Muskoka Bird Board - Archived Reports from January - March 2017
 
Return to the Index of Archived Reports
 
Go to the Muskoka Bird Board

 

 

 

Algonquin Park Birding Report: 30 March
Posted on March 31, 2017 at 08:21:51 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Mar. 30, 2017) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

After two weeks with no new arrivals, several were reported this week: Mourning Dove (March 25); Red-tailed Hawk (March 27); Hooded Merganser (March 28); Northern Saw-whet Owl and Merlin (March 29); and American Black Duck, American Robin and Common Grackle (today). Snow on the ground remains extensive, deep and hard-crusted. All lakes and ponds are completely ice-covered to the shore. Only moving water is open.

BOREAL SPECIALTIES
Spruce Grouse: No reports this week. Displaying males should be easier to detect soon.

Black-backed Woodpecker: One was observed at Spruce Bog Boardwalk (March 23).

Gray Jay: Best places to see them continue to be Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Opeongo Road and at the Logging Museum. Researchers have now found nests of 20 pairs, and at least 16 females are incubating eggs.

Boreal Chickadee: One was seen north of the Trailer Sanitation Station (March 23). There were no reports from Spruce Bog Boardwalk this week. The suet feeder there has now been shut down for the season.

WINTER FINCHES
Pine Grosbeak: No reports. Nearly all have likely moved back north.

Purple Finch: An adult male was at the Visitor Centre feeders today.

Red Crossbill: A few small groups (up to about 12 birds) getting grit and salt along the highway were seen occasionally.

White-winged Crossbill: The only report was of two observed on Opeongo Road (March 25).

Common Redpoll: One or two were noted among the siskins and goldfinches at the Visitor Centre feeders early in the week. There was a flock of 13 at Tea Lake Dam (March 26) and one on Big Pines Trail (March 27).

Pine Siskin: As many as seventy came to the Visitor Centre feeders this week, but the numbers were less than half that most days.

American Goldfinch: Regular at the Visitor Centre feeders; numbers peaked at about 45 birds.

Evening Grosbeak: Early in the week, numbers reached 90 at the Visitor Centre feeders but were about half that by today.


Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).

Good Birding!
Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, ON

DIRECTIONS:
Algonquin Provincial Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400, 11 and 60. Follow the signs which start in Toronto on Highway 400. From Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the park. Kilometre markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from the West Gate (km 0) to near the East Gate (km 56).

The Visitor Centre exhibits, bookstore and restaurant at km 43 are open on weekends from 9 am to 5 pm in winter. The Visitor Centre is also open on weekdays from 9 am to 4 pm with limited facilities, including self-serve hot and cold beverages plus snacks available in the restaurant. The Visitor Centre bird feeders will be shut down for the season on Monday (April 3).

Get your park permit and Information Guide (with a map of birding locations mentioned here) at the East Gate or the West Gate. Locations are also described at: www.algonquinpark.on.ca

 

 

Re(1): Swan
Posted on April 1, 2017 at 10:56:35 AM by Al Sinclair

What was the location of this sighting? In Muskoka at this time of year it could be Trumpeter, Tundra or Mute. The most likely species is Trumpeter now seen frequently here as their numbers continue to increase. Tundra are migrating through now so also a possibility but not seen in Muskoka very often. Non-native Mute can appear anytime anywhere but have been rare here for several years.
Pink around the bill is not a helpful field mark. Body shape on the water, bill shape and colour and neck posture together can make a reliable identification possible. Best thing to do is take photos for later analysis.

 

 

Swan
Posted on March 31, 2017 at 07:21:19 PM by edieov

We have a swan in our bay today. We have only every had a pair come several years ago. It has what looks to be a bit of pink around the beak area. What type of swan is it?

 

 

Chipping Sparrow
Posted on March 31, 2017 at 06:10:23 PM by janice house

I heard the sparrow about 8:35 this morning trilling in the back yard

 

 

more spring arrivals
Posted on March 30, 2017 at 10:44:04 AM by John Challis

Yesterday in Washago, Gayle heard her first meadowlarks singing, on MacArthur Sideroad -- a great haunt for open field birds. After dinner we went back and heard a small gathering of sandhill cranes (one flew past us to meet up with them) and a woodcock in its flight display.

 

 

Bald Eagle
Posted on March 30, 2017 at 09:33:13 AM by Chris

This morning an Adult Bald Eagle on the ice on Lake of Bays. I will assume the same one of several that were here March 15th and 16th .

 

 

Goldeneyes
Posted on March 29, 2017 at 11:07:00 PM by stuartpaul

One male one female goldeneye on muskoka river close to Henry Rd and Beaumont Dr. Also we saw our first robins (in Muskoka) yesterday! Saw many of them weeks ago in Peterborough.

 

 

Turkey vulture, Carolina wren
Posted on March 29, 2017 at 09:24:00 AM by John Challis

Saw my first TV yesterday afternoon while driving home, over 11th Oro Line. Later in the evening Gayle called to say she'd seen a TV just outside Orillia. Must have been the same bird. Keep you eyes peeled in South Muskoka!
Also yesterday morning Gayle watched a Carolina wren, perched on our back deck railing. Ron Reid has had one at his feeder all winter (~4 km south of us), so I think this was his come for a visit. Green River Dr, Washago.

 

 

Gray Jay Live Cam from Alberta!
Posted on March 28, 2017 at 07:06:24 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Watch a Gray Jay nest live from Alberta!
http://www.ustream.tv/channel/ellis-bird-farm-channel-4

 

 

Re(1): ducks
Posted on March 27, 2017 at 09:35:05 PM by John Challis

Or maybe canvasbacks, given that one has been seen in Huntsville?

 

 

ducks
Posted on March 27, 2017 at 09:33:44 PM by John Challis

At Washago this afternoon, top of Lake Couchiching, there were very few waterfowl around, but through the mist with the binoculars I saw four or five ducks with white sides, black down the middle, dark heads. Too distant to get a definitive look. Is the timing right for ring-necked ducks?

 

 

Re(1): Muskoka Beach/Taboo Gravenhurst
Posted on April 1, 2017 at 02:41:59 PM by janice house

just a few minutes ago, 2 trumpeter swans (no tags), 4 common goldeneye, lots of Canada geese, 2 herring gulls and 5 buffleheads (on the river)
 

 

 

Muskoka Beach/Taboo Gravenhurst
Posted on March 26, 2017 at 01:24:11 PM by janice house

A small patch of Lake Muskoka is open, 60+ Canada geese, a male bufflehead, 2 male common goldeneye & 1 female and a kingfisher was calling along the Hoc Roc river

 

 

Beavers Foraging
Posted on March 26, 2017 at 09:29:46 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Yesterday afternoon I watched 4 beavers foraging around open water in the wetland next to Greenslate Rehab Centre between Bala and Glenn Orchard, Hwy 169. They brought sticks and vegetation up onto the ice to eat. I was sure, at first, that they must be otters as I have never seen 4 adult beavers out together before.

 

 

Canvasback in Huntsville
Posted on March 25, 2017 at 03:17:01 PM by LevFrid

Hi Folks,
Amanda Guercio and I found a drake Canvasback with two Common Mergansers in Huntsville. It is visible from the parking area for Avery Beach Park on Yonge St, which just west of downtown off Main St (at the Westside Fish and Chips).   photo

Cheers,
Lev Frid

 

 

Collingwood Harbour, yesterday
Posted on March 24, 2017 at 10:03:52 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

My daughter and I watched a flock of Canada Geese fly in and land in the harbour yesterday afternoon with one accompanying Snow Goose. Also seen was one pair of Red-breated Mergansers along with the usual Common Mergansers. Three Long-tailed Ducks were seen. Dozens, if not hundred of Common Goldeneye along with the other regulars. if there were scoters they were too far out to be seen with binos.

 

 

GBH
Posted on March 24, 2017 at 07:37:17 PM by John Challis

As I was driving home tonight, a pair of great blue herons flew over the Trent Canal bridge at Washago. Welcome back, big birds!

 

 

Snow fleas
Posted on March 24, 2017 at 05:12:37 PM by FrancesGualtieri

I noticed snow fleas out in abundance this afternoon, on the snow in sunny spots around our maple trees.
Frances Gualtieri
Vankoughnet

 

 

Re(1): killdeer
Posted on March 24, 2017 at 03:26:15 PM by janice house

Had 2 killdeer, 50+ starlings, 12 red-winged blackbirds, 2 robins and a Canada goose in the farm field across from the house a lunch time today. I was hoping for horned larks. Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst

 

 

killdeer
Posted on March 24, 2017 at 12:26:16 PM by John Challis

Heard a killdeer in Barrie this morning, flying overhead -- northward. Keep your ears skyward!

 

 

Buffleheads and Brown Creepers
Posted on March 24, 2017 at 10:02:00 AM by John Challis

Yesterday on the Green River the buffleheads had come back. Five to seven of them in separate clusters along the river. While I watched, a brown creeper sang its little heart out in the maples beside me.

 

 

Algonquin Park Birding Report: 23 March
Posted on March 23, 2017 at 11:19:41 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Mar. 23, 2017) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Again this week, no new migrant species were reported arriving in Algonquin Park. There were some days with well-above-freezing temperatures, but also some with strong, cold north winds and much colder than normal temperatures. And extensive deep snow cover, with a hard crust, remains.

Ruffed Grouse were regularly reported at the Visitor Centre feeder area and along the driveway, and the female Wild Turkey there appeared likely to successfully overwinter. Two Northern Goshawks were observed soaring below Cache Lake Dam along Track and Tower Trail on the 18th. A singing Northern Shrike, likely moving northward at this date, was observed at the Old Airfield on the 21st.

BOREAL SPECIALTIES
Spruce Grouse: One was along the trail from Mew Lake Campground to Track and Tower Trail on the 19th, another was in black spruce near northern Opeongo Road on the 20th, and one was along Whiskey Rapids Trail on the 21st.

Black-backed Woodpecker: One was found on Bat Lake Trail (20th).

Gray Jay: Best places to see them continue to be Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Opeongo Road near the locked gate and at the Logging Museum.

Boreal Chickadee: One continues to be seen at the suet feeder on Spruce Bog Boardwalk, although not as regularly as previously. Other locations where this chickadee was reported included Bat Lake Trail and the trail from Mew Lake Campground to Track and Tower Trail.

WINTER FINCHES
There were significant declines in the number of all finch species observed this week, likely in response to the longer days and some warmer temperatures.

Pine Grosbeak: The recurring female at Spruce Bog Boardwalk was present until at least March 20. A few of these grosbeaks were still being seen along the highway edge, but infrequently. Fourteen on the road at the entrance to Spruce Bog on the 19th may have been a flock moving northward.

Red Crossbill: Reports were widespread but typically involved only two or three birds at a time.

White-winged Crossbill: A few were reported on the 16th, but there were no sightings of this species after that.

Pine Siskin: Observations were widespread but involved very small numbers. The peak number counted at the Visitor Centre feeders was 15 this week.

American Goldfinch: The peak number at the Visitor Centre feeders was about 30 at the start of the week, and down to half that by its end.

Evening Grosbeak: The highest number at the Visitor Centre feeders was 50, half of the peak for last week. A few continue to be attracted to bird seed left at Spruce Bog Boardwalk and near the locked gate on Opeongo Road.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).

Good Birding!

Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, ON

 

 

Re(2): Common Grackle
Posted on March 24, 2017 at 10:03:13 AM by John Challis

Gayle saw our first in Washago yesterday as well.

 

 

Re(1): Common Grackle
Posted on March 23, 2017 at 06:51:39 PM by missyinmuskoka

Me too Janice! I had two Grackles and one RW blackbird today

 

 

Common Grackle
Posted on March 23, 2017 at 06:09:55 PM by janice house

First of the season just now in the back yard, Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst

 

 

Re(1): House Sparrows
Posted on March 24, 2017 at 11:43:50 AM by George Bryant

This is a delightful observation. HOSP have been declining in Ontario for decades, I believe they no longer are recorded on Bracebridge / Ghurst Christmas Counts? So these 15 are presumed migrants, not something you think of for HOSP. How many males / females? I hope they stay around.

 

 

Re(1): House Sparrows
Posted on March 23, 2017 at 09:26:35 PM by Doug Smith

That is good news! I had heard some there earlier this week but wasn't sure where or how many. Thank you!

 

 

House Sparrows
Posted on March 23, 2017 at 12:56:40 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there were at least 15 very vocal House Sparrows under the shopping carts in the Food Basics parking lot. They were at the cart shed furthest from the store entrance. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Boreal continues at Spruce Bog Trail
Posted on March 23, 2017 at 06:12:15 PM by janice house

Amazing photos Michael, thank you for sharing

 

 

Boreal continues at Spruce Bog Trail
Posted on March 22, 2017 at 10:49:53 PM by michaelhatton

With the return of colder temperatures, I thought today would be a great time to re-visit Spruce Bog Trail in Algonquin Park and check on the Boreal Chickadees. In the morning I dipped on the bird, but coming back later in the day it showed well. Given the low temperatures, longer day and fewer visitors, I think this is one of the best times of the year to visit the Park.  photo  photo2  photo3

And at the Visitors' Centre, Evening Grosbeaks perform!  photo

 

 

Re(1): Red-bellied Woodpecker
Posted on March 25, 2017 at 02:04:05 PM by Barbara Taylor

He was back again this morning for another short visit at the suet.  photo

 

 

Red-bellied Woodpecker
Posted on March 22, 2017 at 07:46:40 PM by Barbara Taylor

The male Red-bellied Woodpecker made a brief visit to our yard this afternoon. We hadn't seen him here since March 12. (Bracebridge)  photo

 

 

Blue Bird Box
Posted on March 22, 2017 at 08:12:36 AM by janice house

I had the pleasure of watching a downy woodpecker zoom out of one of the nest boxes in our front yard this morning. Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst.

 

 

Snow Buntings
Posted on March 21, 2017 at 01:46:35 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning at the Bracebridge Ponds a large flock of about 150 Snow Buntings swirled around overhead for several minutes, but then headed away to the south-west. A short time later a smaller group of 35 came in from the north and continued on towards the south-west. Do they know something we don't? The Crows seemed to have a different migration plan and were heading north in numbers today.
(all the cells were still iced in)
 

 

 

ravens
Posted on March 20, 2017 at 03:46:34 PM by John Challis

We were hiking on the Orimat Road yesterday -- a cottage access road just on the west side of Sparrow Lake and following the Severn River. Pretty quiet for bird activity, except for a cluster of about eight ravens. An unkindness of ravens, if you really feel compelled to use that judgmental collective.
Anyway they were having a great time, flapping around and bellowing at each other now and then. To me they seemed to be playing, more than anything.

 

 

Redwings
Posted on March 20, 2017 at 09:36:34 AM by Leslie

A number of redwing blackbirds were singing at Henry Marsh this morning. Always a welcome sound right about now!

 

 

Re(1): Greater White Fronted Geese
Posted on March 20, 2017 at 05:09:00 PM by Barbara Taylor

Great sighting! That may be the first record for Muskoka...I don't see the species on my old Muskoka checklist. We looked for the geese along the river this morning but no luck. If anyone sees them again, please let us know.

 

 

Greater White Fronted Geese
Posted on March 19, 2017 at 06:56:36 PM by stuartpaul

We saw 24 Greater White Fronted Geese today on the Muskoka River at Kelvin Grove Park. They flew into the sandy beach, nibbled at some weeds for 10 minutes, and then flew downriver. First time sighting this bird for us! Exciting!

 

 

red-bellied woodpecker
Posted on March 19, 2017 at 01:32:09 PM by John Challis

We were walking the dog this morning, and I was lamenting to Gayle that we haven't seen the red-bellied woodpecker since the pair first appeared two seasons ago. Not five minutes later, we heard a "churr", repeated several times. A few minutes later, its red crown caught the sunlight. He/she spent about 15 minutes in the area. Welcome back!

 

 

Eagles
Posted on March 18, 2017 at 12:19:38 PM by Chris

On Lake of Bays in front of our house we witnessed nature in all it's different cycles. March 15th I spotted a carcass on the ice . Got my binoculars out to determine that the carcass was a smaller deer that would have been killed sometime during the night. Not long after we looked out to see a coyote at the carcass - assuming it was the coyote's kill. It has been many years since we have seen any coyotes or wolves on the ice. The coyote fed for quite a long time. We did not notice which direction the coyote came from or went to when it left.Soon after the coyote left we saw many ravens feeding. Then a much larger bird
arrived- bald eagle- over the next many hours of daylight we watched as Bald and Golden eagles shared the carcass.
At one point I realized I was watching a family of Golden's and Bald's. Two adults each with a juvenile. The pecking order is that the juveniles mostly seemed to be the watch guard. Ravens were chased off in most cases. The next morning the carcass had been moved , still within watching distance. With the cold nights I can only assume that the coyote came back at night and moved it . It would have been frozen to the ice. That next day we watched the eagles again from both families feed. The ravens seem content to feed off the original spot. It was interesting that the eagles would feed with a raven feeding beside them. They did share. Again this feeding went on . I was able to watch the eagles fly in and land and then take off. They are just stunningly gorgeous .The next morning what was left of the carcass was gone. I felt like I was watching a David Suzuki documentary. The deer's death has possibly saved many from winter starvation.

 

 

Algonquin Park Birding Report: 16 March
Posted on March 17, 2017 at 11:49:46 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Mar. 17, 2017) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

The Visitor Centre (km 43) is open daily from 9 am to 5 pm with full services (exhibits, book store and restaurant) during March Break (March 11 to 19).

There were no signs of new migration during this week, likely due in large measure to unusually cold temperatures, gusty winds and persistent deep snow cover.

A Northern Goshawk was observed at Mew Lake Campground on March 11. Bald Eagles were seen at km 11 on Highway 60 (9th) and along Opeongo Road (11th). The female Wild Turkey that has been observed all winter at the Visitor Centre continued to be seen there and across the highway at Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

BOREAL SPECIALTIES

Spruce Grouse: No reports. Keep looking at Spruce Bog Boardwalk and along Opeongo Road north of the locked gate.

Black-backed Woodpecker: A male was photographed at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on the 11th.

Gray Jay: Best places to see them continue to be Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Opeongo Road near the locked gate and at the Logging Museum.

Boreal Chickadee: Three were observed at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, often at the suet feeder. This species was also seen this week along Opeongo Road north of the locked gate and near the south side of the Old Airfield.

WINTER FINCHES

Pine Grosbeak: The long-present female at the entrance to Spruce Bog Boardwalk continued to be seen this week. A few were noted at the Visitor Centre and along the highway, as well.

Red Crossbill: Small groups were reported at several locations along the highway and Opeongo Road.

White-winged Crossbill: This crossbill was seen regularly and at several sites, but numbers were lower than in recent weeks.

Common Redpoll: No reports.

Pine Siskin: The highest number tallied at the Visitor Centre feeders was 50 this week, and continued to include the green morph bird. Smaller numbers of Pine Siskins were encountered at other locations.

American Goldfinch: Maximum number coming to the Visitor Centre feeders was about 50.

Evening Grosbeak: Numbers at the Visitor Centre feeders this week peaked at 100 on the 13.


Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).

Good Birding!
Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, ON

 

 

Red-breasted Nuthatches Posing for iPhone Portraits
Posted on March 16, 2017 at 05:55:35 PM by michaelhatton

Today, on the trail from Henry Marsh to the Lagoons (Chickadee Trail), the Red-breasted Nuthatches were surprisingly aggressive.  photo1  photo2  photo3

 

 

fraudulent starlings
Posted on March 16, 2017 at 05:04:06 PM by John Challis

I'm not sure if they know how good the timing is, but every year around early to mid-March, the starlings outside my office in Barrie start in with the killdeer calls. I yank my head around, looking for something flying in the sky above the parking lot -- and see a cluster of drab speckled shapes gathered on the eaves of the store across the road, chuckling away with each other.

 

 

Bald Eagle
Posted on March 16, 2017 at 12:39:45 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning an adult Bald Eagle soared across the trail east of Henry Marsh, heading into the north-west wind. Two Brown Creepers were singing along the trail. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Red-bellied Woodpecker continues ....
Posted on March 14, 2017 at 08:44:50 PM by michaelhatton

The Red-bellied Woodpecker continues to be seen flitting around the northwest area of Bracebridge. This image captured yesterday as the bird showed off its red belly!  photo

 

 

Ring-necked Ducks
Posted on March 14, 2017 at 12:47:56 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there were two male Ring-necked Ducks and a male Hooded Merganser on the Muskoka River near the entrance to Kerr Park. Out by the river mouth there were about 50 Canada Geese and four Common Goldeneye. A Red-winged Blackbird was singing near Henry Rd. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Common Mergansers
Posted on March 12, 2017 at 01:37:55 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there were eight Common Mergansers (5M,3F) and a female Common Goldeneye on the Muskoka River near Santa's Village. There were three Common Mergansers (2M,1F) on the river along Matthiasville Rd. (Bracebridge)

 

 

A surge of Chickadees?
Posted on March 12, 2017 at 10:27:28 AM by michaelhatton

I'm seeing more and more Chickadees over the past week, often in small groups and seeming to willingly push other birds around.  photo1  photo2

 

 

Roaming Deer
Posted on March 11, 2017 at 12:28:09 PM by Barbara Taylor

Around 11:30 a.m. today there were eleven White-tailed Deer walking along Kevin Cres. near Glendale Rd. We have been seeing three or four in the neighbourhood recently, but looks like they've banded together. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Hooded Merganser
Posted on March 10, 2017 at 01:06:38 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there was a male Hooded Merganser on the Muskoka River near Santa's Village. A Red-tailed Hawk was soaring over the fields by Beaumont Farm Rd. Thirty-six Canada Geese, two Mallards, and three Common Goldeneyes were near the river mouth by the end of Beaumont Farm Rd. (Bracebridge)
 

 

 

Algonquin Park Birding Report: 9 March
Posted on March 10, 2017 at 00:35:29 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Mar. 9, 2017) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

The Visitor Centre (km 43) will be open daily from 9 am to 5 pm with full services (exhibits, book store and restaurant) during March Break (March 11 to 19).
 
There were few signs of new migration during the very cold temperatures that prevailed for most of the week. The first Red-winged Blackbird, a male attracted to seed left in the Spruce Bog Boardwalk parking lot, was photographed yesterday. A Great Gray Owl photographed on March 6 (but not found again) and a Northern Shrike seen March 7, both along Opeongo Road, were likely moving northward.

A Northern Goshawk at Spruce Bog Boardwalk today was likely the sixth observation of the same individual there since January 1. A female Wild Turkey that has frequented the Visitor Centre parking lot feeder all winter now appears to be seeking seed left by birders at nearby Spruce Bog Boardwalk as well.

BOREAL SPECIALTIES
Spruce Grouse: This enigmatic denizen of the spruce was not reported. Displaying males should soon be more easily detected. Keep looking at Spruce Bog Boardwalk and along Opeongo Road north of the locked gate.

Black-backed Woodpecker: Singles were found at Mew Lake Campground, Big Pines Trail and along Opeongo Road. Listen for their distinctive calls and quiet tapping.

Gray Jay: They continue to seek handouts at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Opeongo Road near the locked gate and at the Logging Museum.

Boreal Chickadee: One or two were regularly seen at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, often at the suet feeder or perching on the nearby trail register box where people leave peanut pieces and other food.

WINTER FINCHES
Pine Grosbeak: A female kept coming for seed left at the trail entrance of Spruce Bog Boardwalk this week. A single bird was at the Visitor Centre on March 7 and there were six at km 36 today.

Red Crossbill: There were reports of one to four birds at various locations along the Highway 60 Corridor.

White-winged Crossbill: Totals reported for this species were up to 25 birds, at sites which included: Mew Lake Campground, Opeongo Road, Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Bat Lake Trail.

Common Redpoll: One and sometimes two were seen at the Visitor Centre feeders on most days. From one to three were noted at Opeongo Road, Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Mew Lake Campground and the Logging Museum Trail during the week.

Pine Siskin: As many as 95 continue to come daily to the Visitor Centre feeders. The green morph siskin noted there last week was photographed on March 4. Smaller numbers of Pine Siskins were encountered at other locations.

American Goldfinch: Maximum numbers coming to the Visitor Centre feeders were 50 to 75, with smaller numbers elsewhere along the highway.

Evening Grosbeak: Up to 75 were observed at the Visitor Centre feeders all week. Small numbers continue at Opeongo Road and Spruce Bog Boardwalk as well.
 

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).

Good Birding!
Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, ON

 

 

RedWing at feeder
Posted on March 9, 2017 at 06:13:47 PM by Doug Smith

Had one lone redwing visiting our feeders today -- spring can't be far away!  photo

 

 

Re(1): Snow Buntings
Posted on March 9, 2017 at 08:24:56 AM by Barbara Taylor

Yesterday two Snow Buntings were at the Bracebridge Ponds. (all four cells were still iced in)

 

 

Snow Buntings
Posted on March 9, 2017 at 06:44:50 AM by janice house

A little after 6 this morning I heard several calls above the yard while I was outside with the dogs. Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst.

 

 

Sandhill
Posted on March 8, 2017 at 06:15:58 AM by J. Gardner

Saw my first Sandhill Crane yesterday, flying over Killdeer Crescent, Bracebridge. J. Gardner

 

 

Re(1): Kingfisher and an ermine
Posted on March 8, 2017 at 06:30:31 PM by Jim Griffin

I had a Kingfisher heard and seen in Port Sydney earlier this week.

 

 

Kingfisher and an ermine
Posted on March 7, 2017 at 06:57:33 PM by John Challis

Heard but not seen this morning, the rattled chatter of a kingfisher. I'm just uncertain enough, though, to wonder if there's a woodpecker call close enough to mistake for a kingfisher. It is early...but the river is open.
Over the weekend, we watched an ermine scamper across the snow in the woods down from our house. Unfortunately the dog put the run on it and we were only able to enjoy it for a moment. Gayle found it again on Monday. Maybe it's taking out some of the mice that have been cleaning up below the feeders.

 

 

Re(2): Red-bellied Woodpecker
Posted on March 10, 2017 at 06:10:27 PM by Barbara Taylor

He came in just after 5 p.m. today for some suet...getting ready for a cold night.  photo

 

 

Re(1): Red-bellied Woodpecker
Posted on March 9, 2017 at 10:30:40 AM by Barbara Taylor

He was back again this morning for some suet and a peanut. He took the peanut to his favourite spot high up in our birch tree.  photo

 

 

Red-bellied Woodpecker
Posted on March 6, 2017 at 01:29:08 PM by Barbara Taylor

The male Red-bellied Woodpecker returned to our yard for some lunch today, along with ten Blue Jays. They all quickly grabbed a peanut and then flew off, probably trying to stay one step ahead of the Cooper's Hawk. This is the largest number of Blue Jays we've had all winter. The Red-bellied hadn't been seen here since Feb. 25. (Bracebridge)

 

 

March Mix in Port Sydney
Posted on March 5, 2017 at 10:41:53 AM by Jim Griffin

Mix of weather makes for an interesting observation mix: I was out watching two river otters working the edge of ice in the river while two Canada Geese slept in the sunshine on the ice and common mergansers and golden eyes shared the open water. A Belted Kingfisher arrived seeming to check out what the otters might be stirring up.

 

 

Re(2): Boreal Chickadee & Others - Algonquin Park
Posted on March 5, 2017 at 08:48:08 PM by michaelhatton

Dinny - Thank you for your kind comment. I think I was quite lucky!

 

 

Re(1): Boreal Chickadee & Others - Algonquin Park
Posted on March 4, 2017 at 04:23:22 PM by DinnyNimmo

Your photos are stunning! What a nice collection. Dinny

 

 

Boreal Chickadee & Others - Algonquin Park
Posted on March 4, 2017 at 11:30:12 AM by michaelhatton

A particularly cold and windy Friday seemed to keep birds low and active in Algonquin Park.

The star of the day was a very cooperative (if you were willing to wait) Boreal Chickadee that returned to the Spruce Bog suet area several times over the course of an hour and a half.  photo  photo2  photo3  photo4  photo5

 

And something I've heard about but never seen.  photo

 

Evening Grosbeaks were continuously present at Spruce Bog for more than hour, and especially close to observers. photo1  photo2  photo3

 

Grey Jays were hanging out at along Opeongo Road and Spruce Bog.  photo

 

There were scores of Siskins at Visitors' Centre, especially at the bird feeders in the parking lot. Also seen on Opeongo Road near the locked gate.  photo  photo2

 

On Opeongo Road, the Chickadees were chasing Siskins.  photo  photo2

 

 

Cooper's Hawk
Posted on March 3, 2017 at 06:56:51 PM by Barbara Taylor

There was a lot of activity at our feeders on this cold windy day, which probably attracted the attention of the neighbourhood Cooper's Hawk. It was just about finished plucking a Mourning Dove when I happened to notice it.  photo

Earlier in the day a male Pileated Woodpecker stopped by for some suet, as well as four Downys and three Hairys, but no sign of the Red-bellied.  photo

 

 

Algonquin Park Birding Report: 2 March
Posted on March 2, 2017 at 11:41:33 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Mar. 2, 2017) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Warmer temperatures earlier in the week resulted in record-early spring records for Canada Goose (a pair on February 25), Lesser Scaup (male photographed on open water of the Madawaska River on February 26) and American Tree Sparrow (February 25). Other signs of spring-to-come included a pair of Common Ravens carrying nest material (February 26) and researchers finding a total of five Gray Jay nests under construction by today. A short thunderstorm on the evening of February 24 was an early sign of spring also.

Noteworthy sightings included an adult Golden Eagle photographed over Spruce Bog Boardwalk on February 27 and two adults soaring over Costello Creek along Opeongo Road the next day, and four Bohemian Waxwings at the Visitor Centre on February 26.

BOREAL SPECIALTIES
Spruce Grouse: Up to three males were seen near the register box on Spruce Bog Boardwalk on February 26 and another male was beyond the long boardwalk near Posts 4 and 5 of that trail on February 27.

Black-backed Woodpecker: Single birds were observed along Opeongo Road and on Spruce Bog Boardwalk on February 28.

Gray Jay: They were still regular at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Opeongo Road near the locked gate and at the Logging Museum.

Boreal Chickadee: One or two birds are being seen at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, often at the suet feeder. This chickadee was also found by some in the black spruce sections along Opeongo Road north of the locked gate this week.

WINTER FINCHES
Pine Grosbeak: From one to three individuals were observed at a few locations this week, including: the Visitor Centre, Spruce Bog Boardwalk, and Cache Lake. Numbers have likely started to decline as they move north in response to the warmer temperatures.

Red Crossbill: They continue to be seen in small numbers on the highway as they seek grit and salt, with one observer reporting about 40 in a trip across the Park. Opeongo Road is fairly reliable for this crossbill, too.

White-winged Crossbill: Small numbers continue to be seen regularly.

Common Redpoll: Single birds were observed on Opeongo Road and at the Visitor Centre feeders this week. A flock of 25 at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on February 26 was noteworthy for the number.

Pine Siskin: Numbers appear to be still increasing, with up to 90 birds at the Visitor Centre feeders. A striking “green morph” individual with large patches of yellow on the wings and tail has visited the feeders this week, including today.

American Goldfinch: Up to 75 are coming to the Visitor Centre feeders.

Evening Grosbeak: One hundred or more are at the Visitor Centre feeders daily. Small numbers continue at Opeongo Road and Spruce Bog Boardwalk as well.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).

Good Birding!
Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, ON

 

 

Swan sighting
Posted on March 1, 2017 at 05:21:11 PM by Peter

today in the afternoon we saw two swans, probably Trumpeter, on the frozen Echo Creek,east of Bracebridge. Both had a yellow tag, unfortunately we couldn't see the numbers and one for sure had ring  photo  photo2

 

 

Bluebird
Posted on February 28, 2017 at 05:31:13 PM by missyinmuskoka

A friend reported a male bluebird at her farm property on Southwood Road in Kilworthy today

 

 

Bald Eagle
Posted on February 27, 2017 at 01:16:21 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning we checked the Muskoka River along Beaumont Dr. for early migrants, but only saw 5 Canada Geese. At noon we found an adult Bald Eagle perched in a tree overlooking the river by the end of Beaumont Farm Rd. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Barrow's Goldeneye - female at Bala
Posted on February 26, 2017 at 07:19:06 AM by Al Sinclair

Matthew Tobey found a female Barrow's Goldeneye below Bala Falls on Feb 20, 2017. Also seen by others on Feb 22. Reported on eBird and confirmed by photos. Tempting to speculate it's the same bird that was at Golden Point near Bracebridge in the fall of 2014.

 

 

Red-bellied Woodpecker
Posted on February 25, 2017 at 01:12:29 PM by Barbara Taylor

The male Red-bellied Woodpecker dropped in for lunch today. photo1  photo2  A Cooper's Hawk had kept most of the usual birds away from our yard for a few days. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Bohemian Waxwings
Posted on February 25, 2017 at 12:19:50 PM by Barbara Taylor

At 11:30 a.m. today there were two flocks of Bohemian Waxwings flying around the west end of Meadow Heights Dr. They briefly merged together and perched in a tree by #126...a rough count of 75 birds. There were also a few Pine Siskins in the area. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Red-winged Blackbird
Posted on February 25, 2017 at 04:37:57 PM by janice house

Still here .....hope he gets a good territory if he doesn't freeze to death tonight.

 

 

Red-winged Blackbird
Posted on February 25, 2017 at 07:28:37 AM by janice house

A lone male was in our yard all day yesterday, Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst

 

 

Algonquin Park Birding Report: 23 February
Posted on February 24, 2017 at 07:32:18 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Feb. 23, 2017) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Tomorrow (February 24) will be the final Bird Feeder Friday in Algonquin Park this winter. The Visitor Centre webcams will be aimed at the bird feeders from 8 am to sunset to catch all the action. Watch at: http://www.algonquinpark.on.ca/virtual/webcam/feeder_friday.php


The past week had lots of birders, beautiful mild weather over the long weekend and even a few signs of the coming spring.

The Northern Goshawk was seen again at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on February 19, probably hunting grouse. However, the old banded male Spruce Grouse (likely about ten years of age) was seen that day too, so it continues to survive.

Some eBirders reporting crows here on the weekend were surprised that details were requested. Unlike most of Southern Ontario, the American Crow is rarely present during winter in Algonquin Park and so we can detect the arrival of migrants. The first ones this year were on Saturday, which tied our earliest date in spring. The first European Starling appeared that day as well. Yesterday, Gray Jay researchers found the first nest under construction, right on time for this very early breeder.

BOREAL SPECIALTIES
Spruce Grouse: Several birders observed a male displaying to a female at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on Sunday. Two males (including the banded bird) and two females allowed close-up views along the side trail opposite the register box there the same day.

Black-backed Woodpecker: Single birds were observed along Opeongo Road and on Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

Gray Jay: They were still regular at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Opeongo Road near the locked gate and at the Logging Museum.

Boreal Chickadee: One or two continued to provide great views at Spruce Bog Boardwalk as they fed at the suet feeder and landed on outstretched hands with food for them. Others were seen along Opeongo Road north of the locked gate, and along the trail behind the MOLOKS (refuse containers) in Mew Lake Campground.

WINTER FINCHES
Pine Grosbeak: Small numbers were seen regularly along the highway. The single female continued to come for seed at the entrance of Spruce Bog Boardwalk. Sightings also occurred at: Peck Lake Trail, Mew Lake Campground, Lookout Trail, and the Trailer Sanitation Station.

Red Crossbill: The week was good for seeing small groups getting salt and sand on the highway.

White-winged Crossbill: Groups of up to 30 were regular along the highway, at trails and on Opeongo Road.

Common Redpoll: Reports were of one to seven individuals and locations included: the Visitor Centre feeders, Spruce Bog Boardwalk, and Opeongo Road.

Pine Siskin: Small to medium-sized flocks were regular on the highway.

American Goldfinch: Good numbers are still coming to the Visitor Centre feeders, but some reduction appears to be occurring with the onset of milder temperatures.

Evening Grosbeak: Up to 100 were coming to the Visitor Centre feeders early in the week, but the number appeared to be about 60 by the end of it. Some are still being seen at Spruce Bog Boardwalk and on Opeongo Road near the locked gate.


Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).

Good Birding!
Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, ON

 

 

Re(1): Common Mergansers
Posted on February 27, 2017 at 08:17:33 AM by Jim Griffin

as of this morning; 4 males and 5 females

 

 

Re(1): Common Mergansers
Posted on February 25, 2017 at 11:02:33 AM by Jim Griffin

Three males and four females this morning

 

 

Common Mergansers
Posted on February 24, 2017 at 05:52:11 PM by Jim Griffin

The first males have shown up on the river in Port Sydney, a little earlier than past years I think; 2 males and 2 females today

 

 

White-breasted Nuthatches out in force on "the Chickadee Trail"
Posted on February 24, 2017 at 09:25:29 AM by michaelhatton

photo1  photo2

 

 

Re(1): Hawkwatch sightings
Posted on February 23, 2017 at 04:16:07 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

I see the Ontario Birds photography posts on Facebook and there have been a couple of Red-shouldered Hawk postings.

 

 

Hawkwatch sightings
Posted on February 21, 2017 at 09:09:53 PM by Barbara Taylor

Some of the Hawkwatch sites have begun their migration monitoring. You can find daily reports at hawkcount.org

The Derby Hill Bird Observatory at the south-east end of Lake Ontario has already tallied a few Bald Eagles, Red-tailed Hawks, and Rough-legged Hawks. They often note movements of other species and today they counted 3,648 Crows!

 

 

Re(1): Red-bellied Woodpecker
Posted on February 21, 2017 at 03:27:58 PM by Barbara Taylor

The Cooper's Hawk is back on patrol today. The Red-bellied Woodpecker was here briefly this afternoon but disappeared from view when a Blue Jay called out a warning. A Chipmunk had been collecting spilled seed from under the feeders, but it has taken cover too.

update: The Red-bellied was back at 4:30 p.m. up high in our birch tree.  photo1  photo2

 

 

Red-bellied Woodpecker
Posted on February 20, 2017 at 02:06:35 PM by Barbara Taylor

The male Red-bellied Woodpecker returned to our yard today. We hadn't seen him since Feb. 14 after a Cooper's Hawk showed up. I wondered if the mild weather was letting him search further afield for a mate or if he was just trying to avoid the Hawk...no sign of the Coop today, but apparently no luck finding a mate either. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Barred Owl
Posted on February 20, 2017 at 12:18:32 PM by missyinmuskoka

I have spotted a barred owl on South Kahshe lake road for several weeks in a row

 

 

Blue Jay Day
Posted on February 20, 2017 at 10:08:04 AM by michaelhatton

In the late fall we were seeing 5 Blue Jays several times a day, as a party, looking for a handout of peanuts. However, for the past 6 or 7 weeks, we have seen only a pair arriving at odd times. Our thinking was that a predator of some sort had knocked off three. Today, however, four arrived at one time. Perhaps because it is Family Day?

Photo from an earlier day.

 

 

Brown Creeper singing
Posted on February 19, 2017 at 12:55:53 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there were two Brown Creepers along "the chickadee trail" east of Henry Marsh. One decided to sing his spring song a few times before both flew away. About 20 Pine Siskins had found the feeders along with 8 Goldfinches.

You can listen to a Brown Creeper at: http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/brown_creeper/sounds.

 

 

Re(1): Cooper's Hawk
Posted on March 4, 2017 at 04:45:38 PM by 705Jason

I may have seen the same hawk this week also a very large one probably female. It has eaten at last 3 morning doves on my neighbors lawn this week. I'm still trying to get a pic but the bird is very skittish.

 

 

Cooper's hawk
Posted on February 18, 2017 at 05:02:16 PM by John Challis

Not in our area, but while I was filling up at a gas station in Barrie (Cundles and St. Vincent) yesterday, a Cooper's hawk swooped directly over the gas pumps, scattering pigeons in a wild panic around her (it seemed large for a Cooper's hawk, so assuming female) -- even let out a short chirp as it passed by. It landed in a tree across the road from the station and perched there for a few minutes before tearing off through the trees and over the neighbouring subdivision.

 

 

Algonquin Park Birding Report: 16 February
Posted on February 17, 2017 at 03:34:54 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Feb. 16, 2017) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Winter in the Wild Festival 2017 will take place on Saturday (February 18).
It will have many great activities to choose from, including two Guided
Winter Bird Walks on Spruce Bog Boardwalk (at km 42.5) from 10 am to 11:30
am and 2:30 to 4 pm. Your Park use permit entitles you to free participation
in festival events. For complete Winter in the Wild information see:
http://www.algonquinpark.on.ca/news/winter_in_the_wild.php

Probably the same Northern Goshawk was perched near the suet feeder on
Spruce Bog Boardwalk on the 12th. The Northern Shrike at the Visitor Centre
was mobbed by Black-capped Chickadees in late afternoon on the 11th and seen
flying around the parking lot on the 15th.

BOREAL SPECIALTIES
Spruce Grouse: Still no reports this week. Maybe one will turn up on
Saturday's guided walks at Spruce Bog.

Black-backed Woodpecker: One was observed at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on three
days. Other locations this week included: the Old Railway Bike Trail between
the Old Airfield and Head Creek Marsh; the rail bed near Galeairy Lake; and
near the recycling containers at Mew Lake Campground.

Gray Jay: They were still regular at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Opeongo
Road near the locked gate and at the Logging Museum. The first nest-building
activity can be expected soon.

Boreal Chickadee: One was regular at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, coming to perch
on hands that provided food. There were two at the suet feeder along the
trail on the 11th, one of which was giving the "trilling call" almost
constantly.

WINTER FINCHES
Pine Grosbeak: A female was photographed coming for bird seed at the
entrance of Spruce Bog Boardwalk on the 12th and 13th.

Red Crossbill: Reports involved one to six birds at various locations along
Highway 60.

White-winged Crossbill: This crossbill continues to be the more numerous
species, although most sightings were of 15 or fewer. But on the 10th, there
were 75 in total along the Old Railway Bike Trail between the Old Airfield
and Head Creek Marsh, and another 45 between the West Gate and km 8 on the
highway.

Common Redpoll: Reports again this week were of very small numbers.

Pine Siskin: The increase in numbers noted last week appeared to continue.
Of the 90 tallied along Highway 60 on the 12th, nine had been killed by
vehicles. Slow down and blow your horn when approaching birds on the
highway.

American Goldfinch: Large numbers continue to come to the Visitor Centre
feeders daily, peaking at 150 this week.

Evening Grosbeak: The Visitor Centre feeders are still hosting as many as
130 of these spectacular finches. Lesser numbers come for seed provided by
people at at Spruce Bog Boardwalk and near the locked gate on Opeongo Road.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists
with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).

Good Birding!
Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, ON

 

 

Pine Grosbeaks
Posted on February 16, 2017 at 04:48:05 PM by janice house

I spoke with Tim Mason today who lives on the Luckey Rd in Raymond. He saw 10 pine grosbeaks on Saturday and also sees the occasional northern shrike in his neighbourhood

 

 

Great Backyard Bird Count - Feb. 17-20
Posted on February 15, 2017 at 02:41:47 PM by Barbara Taylor

The annual Great Backyard Bird Count starts on Friday. Details about how to participate can be found at http://gbbc.birdcount.org. Or simply post your yard lists here on the Bird Board to compare notes with other local birdwatchers.

 

 

Re(1): early songs
Posted on February 15, 2017 at 12:54:12 PM by Barbara Taylor

Our resident male Cardinal was serenading his new mate this morning. (Bracebridge)

 

 

early songs
Posted on February 14, 2017 at 09:13:45 PM by John Challis

Chickadees have been giving their best three-note romance songs since the big thaw in January. But white breasted nuthatches have been joining in, off and on, for the last three weeks or so, as weather permitted. And today, the American robin was back with two friends.
All three species were in song up and down our road this morning -- which, given the weather lately, was a warmly welcomed experience.

 

 

Re(1): Great Gray Owl - not today
Posted on February 15, 2017 at 12:16:48 PM by Barbara Taylor

No sign of the Owl this morning and it has probably left the area judging by all the Red Squirrels running around.

Update: as of Feb. 20, still no sign of the owl

 

 

Re(1): Great Gray Owl
Posted on February 14, 2017 at 09:02:43 PM by coreyhkh

Sweet!

 

 

Great Gray Owl
Posted on February 14, 2017 at 01:46:01 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there was a Great Gray Owl perched near "the chickadee trail" east of Henry Marsh. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Cooper's Hawk
Posted on February 13, 2017 at 03:59:23 PM by Barbara Taylor

A Cooper's Hawk just took a run at a Mourning Dove on the platform feeder. I had been watching two male Pileated Woodpeckers having a bit of a tussle when suddenly the Hawk flew into our yard at full speed. It missed the Dove and sent the two Pileateds flying off, clucking loud alarm calls as they went. The Hawk briefly perched in a tree while it took a good look around the feeders and then flew off to the north-west. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Bald Eagles - Huntsville
Posted on February 11, 2017 at 03:42:47 PM by Ontbirds

This report was originally posted by Stephen Derraugh on ONTBIRDS (Feb. 11, 2017) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Beautiful day in Muskoka after days of heavy snow and ice rain. Tough slogging in the bush.
Witnessed two mature Bald Eagles behind the G8 Summit Centre, circling the Lookout hill/trail (Lions Lookout) situated behind the G8 Centre in Huntsville, Ontario. I watched them for a good 15 minutes but did not witness them descend to the ice or seek prey on the Muskoka River. We have 100's of ducks where the water is open on the river. With the deep snow and ice there very well may be a deer carcass that I have not found (or the ravens have alerted me too).

Good birding,
Stephen

 

 

Re(1): In Canada it's OK to call it the grey jay
Posted on February 14, 2017 at 09:14:49 PM by John Challis

Yay! Justification for Canadian spelling!

 

 

In Canada it's OK to call it the grey jay
Posted on February 11, 2017 at 08:27:09 AM by Al Sinclair

This links to a post by the IOC that explains why:
British vs American

 

 

Grey Jay Bracebridge
Posted on February 10, 2017 at 02:16:52 PM by Al Sinclair

Sam Robinson reported a single grey jay stopped briefly in her backyard this morning at 262 Dill St., Bracebridge. It observed the feeder activity for a while but left without coming down.

 

 

Algonquin Park Birding Report: 9 February
Posted on February 9, 2017 at 11:48:16 PM by Ontbirds

This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Feb. 9, 2017) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Tomorrow, February 10, will be the second Bird Feeder Friday this
winter. The Visitor Centre webcams will be aimed at the bird feeders from 8
am to 5 pm. To see large numbers of Evening Grosbeaks at the feeders, an
uncommon occurrence in southern Ontario since the 1970s, watch tomorrow at:
http://www.algonquinpark.on.ca/virtual/webcam/feeder_friday.php

You will also be able to see a review of observations from Bird Feeder
Friday on January 20th.

The most recent observation of a Northern Goshawk at Spruce Bog Boardwalk
was on the 5th. A Northern Shrike was chased by Blue Jays near the Visitor
Centre deck on the 4th and likely the same bird was hunting goldfinches at
the parking lot feeder there the next day.

BOREAL SPECIALTIES
Spruce Grouse: There were no reports this week but the Spruce Bog Boardwalk
birds will likely be found again soon.

Black-backed Woodpecker: One was observed at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on the
5th.

Gray Jay: They were still regular at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Opeongo
Road near the locked gate and at the Logging Museum parking lot.

Boreal Chickadee: At least one continued to be seen regularly near the start
of Spruce Bog Boardwalk and around the suet feeder there. Another individual
was found at Mew Lake Campground.

WINTER FINCHES
Pine Grosbeak: A few were seen along Highway 60 this week. One was at Spruce
Bog Boardwalk on several days.

Purple Finch: Four males were reported with some siskins at km 20 on the
4th.

Red Crossbill: Most sightings were again of only one to three birds, but
were widespread. There were twenty near Lake of Two Rivers on the 6th.

White-winged Crossbill: This crossbill was also usually seen in fairly small
numbers, but sightings were regular. High numbers were about 20.

Common Redpoll: Sightings of very small numbers continued. On the 5th, there
were reports of two on Bat Lake Trail and five on Mizzy Lake Trail.

Pine Siskin: A gradual increase may be occurring. There were 25 at km 10 on
the 3rd and 30 on Mizzy Lake Trail on the 4th. However, most reports
involved small numbers.

American Goldfinch: Up to 120 continued at the Visitor Centre feeders daily.

Evening Grosbeak: The Visitor Centre feeders attracted at least 100 every
day. Small groups are still coming for bird seed left at Spruce Bog
Boardwalk and near the locked gate on Opeongo Road, as well.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists
with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).

Good Birding!
Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, ON

 

 

Golden Eagle
Posted on February 8, 2017 at 02:35:56 PM by tedthevideoman

Just out topping up niger feeders as the Gold finches are eating me out of house and home!, way up was an eagle soaring with wing tips up...he seemed much larger than a Bald...had a good 3 minute look...Golden?...look up is your close...120 Meadow Heights about 2:20 pm

 

 

Common Redpolls
Posted on February 7, 2017 at 01:07:45 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there were about 25 Redpolls feeding in the Alders by the dip in the trail east of Henry Marsh. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Robin
Posted on February 7, 2017 at 10:06:44 AM by John Challis

American robin, calling from a treetop on Green River Drive this morning, around 7:30. It flew off toward the river with an alarm whinny. No mistaking the flight pattern. I'm taking this as a sign it arrived here knowing we're north of the limit of the freezing rain...although I'm not holding out a lot of hope.

 

 

Male Hairy bulking up before the freezing rain arrives
Posted on February 7, 2017 at 09:50:24 AM by michaelhatton

photo

 

 

Re(2): A Woodpecker day
Posted on February 12, 2017 at 01:58:34 PM by Barbara Taylor

The Red-bellied Woodpecker has been back today. Once again he took a peanut up to his favourite spot...but a bit snowier than my last photo on Feb. 10. A pair of Pileateds were hanging around this morning too. (Bracebridge)  photo  (back again at 2:20 p.m. when the snow eased off)  photo2

 

 

Re(1): A Woodpecker day
Posted on February 10, 2017 at 10:37:33 PM by Barbara Taylor

After a couple days absence, the Red-bellied Woodpecker showed up this morning for peanuts along with the Blue Jays. The other Woodpeckers staggered their visits today, so no more lineups at the suet. Red-bellied Woodpecker took the peanut to his favourite spot high in our birch tree:  photo

 

 

A Woodpecker day
Posted on February 5, 2017 at 08:52:41 PM by Barbara Taylor

Today there were lineups at our suet feeders as too many Woodpeckers showed up all at once. There were a few skirmishes as the birds jockeyed for position. We had four Downy Woodpeckers, a pair of Hairy Woodpeckers, a male Pileated, and the male Red-bellied.

Here are a couple photos of the Red-bellied Woodpecker from today (yes, snowing again):   photo1  photo2

 

 

Re(1): Turkeys, Port Sydney.
Posted on February 5, 2017 at 07:38:25 PM by FrancesGualtieri

Our neighbours in Vankoughnet had 22 turkeys in their yard a few days ago.
Frances Gualtieri

 

 

Turkeys, Port Sydney.
Posted on February 5, 2017 at 09:17:16 AM by Jim Griffin

My Turkey drought is officially over, I have been waiting for years to have a rafter in my yard but have had to get by with brief walk through visits by a few at a time; yesterday morning and again this morning my front yard was invaded by 32 wild turkeys which spent some time scratching around my feeder site then this morning they launched out over the river and flew back across to South Mary Lake road area, there is more bush over there.

 

 

Algonquin Park Birding Report: 2 February
Posted on February 3, 2017 at 04:39:53 PM by Ontbirds

This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Feb. 3, 2017) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Great opportunities to see, enjoy and photograph winter birds continued in
the Park this week.

Ruffed Grouse were seen regularly along the Visitor Centre driveway, and the
female Wild Turkey is still coming daily to the parking lot feeder there.

A Northern Shrike, perhaps the bird at Lookout Trail last week, was seen at
the Big Pines Trail parking lot on January 29 and near the Visitor Centre
feeders on February 1.

BOREAL SPECIALTIES
Spruce Grouse: One was observed in the black spruce along northern Opeongo
Road on the 27th. One or two were regularly found near the start of Spruce
Bog Boardwalk until the 29th, before disappearing back into the woodwork in
typical Spruce Grouse fashion later in the week.

Black-backed Woodpecker: A male was heard tapping, seen and photographed
back of the MOLOK refuse containers site in Mew Lake Campground on the 28th
and 29th. Another male was near the locked gate on Opeongo Road on the 30th.

Gray Jay: They continue to be regular at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Opeongo
Road near the locked gate and at the Logging Museum parking lot.

Boreal Chickadee: One provided great views, and a life bird for some, all
this week on Spruce Bog Boardwalk. It was seen at the entrance where people
are leaving bird seed on the railing and along the trail to the area of the
suet feeder at the register box. One of these chickadees was also found at
Mew Lake Campground where it was reported feeding in spruce with
White-winged Crossbills on the 29th.

WINTER FINCHES
Pine Grosbeak: Several were still coming for green ash keys at Lookout Trail
parking lot this week, and were best viewed from the vehicle since they
tended to fly when people got out to look at them. One or two were also
reported from Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Mew Lake on single days.

Purple Finch: Two were reported getting grit on the highway near Lake of Two
Rivers on the 31st. This species continues to be very scarce here this
winter.

Red Crossbill: Reports were of one to three birds at various locations along
Highway 60 and Opeongo Road, the same as last week.

White-winged Crossbill: Most observations were of ten or fewer individuals.
A total of 60 was reported from Opeongo Road on the 28th. They were seen
regularly at Mew Lake Campground and Spruce Bog Boardwalk this week.

Common Redpoll: This finch is present but in low numbers. Up to seven were
noted along Spruce Bog Boardwalk on the 28th and 29th, and five were
reported along the highway between Mew Lake and the Visitor Centre on the
31st.

Pine Siskin: One was observed at the Visitor Centre on the 29th, but the
species has been seen very infrequently this winter. A sighting of 60 with
ten American Goldfinches getting grit on the highway near Lake of Two Rivers
on February 1 was therefore unusual.

American Goldfinch: Numbers at the Visitor Centre feeders ranged from about
70 to 150 each day. They are also being seen on the road across the Park,
and at Spruce Bog Boardwalk and near the Opeongo Road locked gate.

Evening Grosbeak: Up to 140 were reported at the Visitor Centre feeders each
day this week, and small groups are still coming for bird seed left at
Spruce Bog Boardwalk and near the locked gate on Opeongo Road.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists
with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).

Good Birding!
Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, ON

 

 

Re(1): Where are the jays?
Posted on February 4, 2017 at 12:38:46 PM by Dawn Sherman

There are plenty here in Oxtongue Lake! I have about 20 at my feeders on a regular basis and have had up to 35 some days!

 

 

Re(1): Where are the jays?
Posted on February 3, 2017 at 08:27:27 PM by Barbara Taylor

I think the lack of natural food sources convinced many Blue Jays to migrate south last fall. We have 4 Blue Jays coming to our yard regularly (Bracebridge). They are two mated pairs of birds that have overwintered here for several years so perhaps they've learned they can depend on the neighbourhood feeders. Red-breasted Nuthatches seem to be quite scarce this winter too, although our resident pair has remained here. Their early migration was also noted in Ron Pittaway's forecast.

Here is a quote from Ron Pittaway's Winter Finch Forecast:
"BLUE JAY: Expect a much larger than usual flight of jays from mid-September to mid-October along the north shorelines of Lake Ontario and Lake Erie. The acorn, beechnut, hazelnut crops were generally poor but variable in central and southern Ontario. Drought has damaged many seed crops."

 

 

Re(2): Where are the jays?
Posted on February 3, 2017 at 07:06:20 PM by missyinmuskoka

I have 10-15 at my feeders at a time. South Kahshe lake road, Kilworthy

 

 

Re(1): Where are the jays?
Posted on February 3, 2017 at 05:07:46 PM by J. Gardner

Have seen maybe three or four jays since November. My sister, lives outside Lindsay, reports the same thing... no jays. J. Gardner Killdeer Crescent, Bracebridge.

 

 

Where are the jays?
Posted on February 3, 2017 at 04:24:27 PM by FrancesGualtieri

We haven't seen a single blue jay at our feeder this winter, in Vankoughnet. What's up?
Frances Gualtieri

 

 

Siskins Arrive in Blowing Snow
Posted on February 2, 2017 at 01:03:00 PM by michaelhatton

photo1  photo2  photo3

 

 

Re(3): barred owl
Posted on February 3, 2017 at 12:22:36 PM by John Challis

I should also add that the profusion of rabbits -- both snowshoe and cottontail, I think -- in our neighbourhood this winter should provide plenty of dining options for the owl. That, along with the trail of mouse tracks under the bird feeders, could explain why it's been hanging around our yard so much.

 

 

Re(2): barred owl
Posted on February 2, 2017 at 06:47:29 PM by John Challis

I was just assuming it was reducing the amount of light in its eyes - much as Inuit do with their bone or wood "sunglasses". It was being very attentive to all the sounds around it.
But we are making every attempt at reducing the mouse population in our house, so any captures will be served as a snack.

 

 

Re(1): barred owl
Posted on February 2, 2017 at 02:13:06 PM by jim griffin

I recall Janice Enright advising that squinted or closed eyes like that on a barred owl is a sign of stress- find that one a couple of mice!

 

 

barred owl
Posted on February 2, 2017 at 11:38:05 AM by John Challis

Gayle has been watching this owl for quite a while now. It perches on this same branch and naps for hours. I finally got to see it myself today. It did not enjoy the snow; once it let up, the owl shook itself off and groomed itself carefully, looked around at the world through squinted eyes and then nodded back off. I'm not sure how well this composite will show up. I may have tinkered too much and the resolution may have suffered.  photo 

 

 

Wild Turkeys
Posted on February 1, 2017 at 01:30:38 PM by Barbara Taylor

These three Wild Turkeys appeared in our yard today around noon and are still scratching away under the feeders. (Bracebridge)  photo

 

 

Re(1): Pine Siskin
Posted on February 2, 2017 at 02:09:16 PM by jim griffin

one at my feeder in Port Sydney yesterday, 7 today

 

 

Pine Siskin
Posted on February 1, 2017 at 12:20:56 PM by janice house

The first I have seen this year, it was feeding with a small flock of gold finch this morning in the back yard. Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst

 

 

Huntsville Nature Club MEETING
Posted on January 31, 2017 at 10:29:22 AM by CortneyL

Huntsville Nature Club Meeting, Tuesday, January 31, St. Andrews Presbyterian Church Hall on West Street at 7 p.m. Dan Strickland will talk about his trip to Ethiopia. Guests are always welcome. A $3 donation is appreciated.

 

 

Re(3): Red-bellied Woodpecker update
Posted on February 14, 2017 at 07:39:57 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Joyce and Hal Pegg, Torance, have one coming in occasionally to their feeders.

 

 

Re(1): Red-bellied Woodpecker update
Posted on February 1, 2017 at 04:13:23 PM by Barbara Taylor

The Red-bellied Woodpecker wasn't seen the past two days, but showed up this afternoon at the suet at his usual time around 3:30 p.m. (Bracebridge)  photo1  photo2

 

 

Re(2): Red-bellied Woodpecker update
Posted on January 30, 2017 at 10:26:36 AM by dinnynimmo

The Muskoka Bird Board has gone to a new level..matchmaking!! Dinny ( in Barrie for the Winter)

 

 

Re(1): Red-bellied Woodpecker update
Posted on January 29, 2017 at 01:54:03 PM by dinnymccraney

Hi Barbara,
I've had a lone female cardinal living in the cedar hedge since last fall. I saw her yesterday, but do I dare hope she might be the mate your male has found?

 

 

Red-bellied Woodpecker update
Posted on January 29, 2017 at 10:31:00 AM by Barbara Taylor

The male Red-bellied Woodpecker continues to visit our yard. He came in with the Blue Jays this morning for a peanut and then spent some time preening high in our birch tree. Also the resident male Cardinal has finally found a new mate and both came to the feeder this morning. (Bracebridge)  photo  photo2  photo3

 

 

Goldfinch with orange feathers
Posted on January 28, 2017 at 02:01:56 PM by Barbara Taylor

Missy Mandel took this photo of a Goldfinch with some orange coloured feathers in place of the usual yellow colour. There are at least three of these orange-marked birds in the flock of 40. Could it be due to a pigment in some food the birds ate? I've seen orange-tipped tails on Cedar Waxwings, but have never heard of orange-marked Goldfinches.  photo

 

Here are a couple interesting articles:
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/10/birds-change-colors-flickers-honeysuckles

http://www.birdwatchingdaily.com/featured-stories/where-feather-colors-come-from-why-cardinals-are-red-and-grackles-are-shiny/

 

 

Bohemian Waxwings
Posted on January 27, 2017 at 03:58:59 PM by Barbara Taylor

This afternoon at the Bracebridge Ponds there were about 50 Bohemian Waxwings perched high in a tree north of cell 4.

 

 

Algonquin Park Birding Report - 26 January
Posted on January 27, 2017 at 01:06:43 PM by Ontbirds

This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Jan. 26, 2017) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Lots of birders and lots of birds for them to see this week, with more
pleasant temperatures as well.

BOREAL SPECIALTIES
Spruce Grouse: Observers were seeing a total of two (and sometimes three)
from near the parking lot to the suet feeder on Spruce Bog Boardwalk on the
weekend.

Black-backed Woodpecker: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk and the black spruce
sections of Opeongo Road. A female was at the parking lot near the locked
gate on Opeongo Road today.

Gray Jay: They continue to be regular at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Opeongo
Road near the locked gate and at the Logging Museum parking lot.

Boreal Chickadee: One or two were noted at Spruce Bog Boardwalk near the
suet feeder and one was along Opeongo Road north of the locked gate. An
individual at Spruce Bog today was located by its vocalizing.

WINTER FINCHES
Pine Grosbeak: One was observed along Opeongo Road on January 20. About
eight feeding on green ash keys at Lookout Trail entrance were seen by many
on the 22nd and 23rd. A dozen there this afternoon attracted a Northern
Shrike.

Purple Finch: One was at the Visitor Centre on the 21st.

Red Crossbill: Small groups were seen at several locations along the highway
and on Opeongo Road.

White-winged Crossbill: Opeongo Road and Spruce Bog Boardwalk produced small
numbers of this crossbill all week. Some were at Bat Lake Trail as well.

Common Redpoll: One was seen and photographed at the Visitor Centre feeders
all week. A few of these redpolls were along Opeongo Road on the 21st.

Pine Siskin: One to three were observed at the Visitor Centre feeders
regularly.

American Goldfinch: About 40 to 75 were at the Visitor Centre feeders this
week.

Evening Grosbeak: Daily numbers reported at the Visitor Centre feeders
ranged from 65 to 150 this week. A few continue to be attracted to sunflower
seed left by visitors at Spruce Bog Boardwalk and near the Opeongo Road
locked gate also.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists
with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).

Good Birding!
Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, ON
 
DIRECTIONS:
Algonquin Provincial  Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways
400, 11 and 60. Follow the signs which start in Toronto on Highway 400.
From Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the
park. Kilometre markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from the
West Gate (km 0) to near the East Gate (km 56).

The Visitor Centre exhibits, bookstore and restaurant at km 43 are open on
weekends from 9 am to 5 pm in winter. The Visitor Centre is also open on
weekdays from 9 am to 4 pm, with self-serve hot and cold beverages plus
snacks available in the restaurant.

Get your park permit and Information Guide (with a map of birding
locations mentioned here) at the East Gate or the West Gate.
Locations are also described at: www.algonquinpark.on.ca

 

 

coyote tracks
Posted on January 26, 2017 at 01:07:31 PM by John Challis

The tracks I followed across our yard last night were definitely canid, and I'm assuming they were coyote, based on our dog's curiosity about them. But the gait was really intriguing. The footprints were in a pattern almost like a rabbit's. Three feet were clustered together, trailed by the fourth footprint about 20cm behind. On the road, the tracks reverted to the familiar pattern of a dog. But in the woods, they were in the 3-together and 4th behind pattern. They were not a long distance apart, so the animal wasn't in a huge hurry. It wasn't until I saw Nootka sinking belly-deep through the light crust on top that I realized the coyote (if indeed it was) was distributing its weight very carefully over three feet at a time, with the fourth acting a bit like a rudder. The footprints also showed it was leaning back over its dew claws, presumably to increase the surface area. It was a smaller animal than Nootka (German shepherd), but it was still bigger than a fox, and very few footprints actually sank down into the snow.

 

 

Re(1): Chipmunk
Posted on January 24, 2017 at 12:54:58 PM by J. Gardner

OPPORTUNIST! J. Gardner

 

 

Chipmunk
Posted on January 24, 2017 at 11:52:09 AM by Barbara Taylor

This morning a Chipmunk came running across the snow and disappeared under our deck. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Wild Turkeys
Posted on January 20, 2017 at 02:21:26 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there were eight Wild Turkeys by the community mailbox on Henry Rd. They eventually moved off to the east behind the nearby houses on Beaumont Dr. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Algonquin Park Birding Report: 19 January
Posted on January 19, 2017 at 11:55:01 PM by Ontbirds

This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Jan. 19, 2017) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Tomorrow, January 20, will be the first of three Bird Feeder Fridays this
winter. Others will occur on February 10 and 24. The Visitor Centre webcam
will be aimed at the bird feeders from 8 am to sunset.

Watch at: http://www.algonquinpark.on.ca/virtual/webcam/feeder_friday.php

Yesterday, the Sunday Creek Bog moose carcass attracted two wolves near dawn
and later a Bald Eagle (briefly).

The female Wild Turkey continued to come to the Visitor Centre parking lot
feeder.

BOREAL SPECIALTIES
Spruce Grouse: The banded male and another male were photographed in a large
spruce at the first short section of boardwalk on Spruce Bog Boardwalk on
the 15th. This confirmed that the Spruce Grouse taken at the trail by a
Northern Goshawk on January 1 was not the banded individual that is now
likely entering its tenth year.

Black-backed Woodpecker: Two were observed along Spruce Bog Boardwalk on the
14th.

Gray Jay: They continue to be regular at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Opeongo
Road near the locked gate and at the Logging Museum parking lot.

Boreal Chickadee: One posed for photos at point blank range near the
register box and suet feeder of Spruce Bog Boardwalk and a probable second
individual was seen near the trail parking lot on most days this week.

WINTER FINCHES
Pine Grosbeak: A few were noted along Highway 60, including at km 28 and km
36. Pine Grosbeaks had apparently eaten all the green ash seeds at Mew Lake
Campground entrance by the 15th.

Purple Finch: Single birds at km 28.5 on the 13th and photographed at the
Western Uplands Backpacking Trail entrance on the 14th were the first of
this species reported since December 18.

Red Crossbill: Seen in small numbers on the highway. Other locations were
Opeongo Road, Spruce Bog Boardwalk, and in flight at the Visitor Centre.

White-winged Crossbill: Seen in small numbers on the highway. In mostly
small groups, it was also found on Opeongo Road, Spruce Bog Boardwalk and
Bat Lake Trail.

Common Redpoll: Two or three were regular at the Visitor Centre feeders on
most days this week.

Pine Siskin: From one to six were observed at the Visitor Centre feeders all
week. A flock of 24 was seen on the highway near km 43 and 15 were at Spruce
Bog Boardwalk on the 15th.

American Goldfinch: About 50 to 80 were regular at the Visitor Centre
feeders this week. Other flocks were at Opeongo Road, Spruce Bog Boardwalk
and the West Gate.

Evening Grosbeak: Up to 150 are still coming daily, especially in early
morning, to the Visitor Centre feeders. Small numbers continue to be
attracted to sunflower seed left by visitors at Spruce Bog Boardwalk and
near the Opeongo Road locked gate as well.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists
with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).

Good Birding!
Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, ON
 
DIRECTIONS:
Algonquin Provincial  Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways
400, 11 and 60. Follow the signs which start in Toronto on Highway 400.
From Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the
park. Kilometre markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from the
West Gate (km 0) to near the East Gate (km 56).

The Visitor Centre exhibits, bookstore and restaurant at km 43 are open on
weekends from 9 am to 5 pm in winter. The Visitor Centre is also open on
weekdays from 9 am to 4 pm, with self-serve hot and cold beverages plus
snacks available in the restaurant.

Get your park permit and Information Guide (with a map of birding
locations mentioned here) at the East Gate or the West Gate.
Locations are also described at: www.algonquinpark.on.ca

 

 

Re(1): Red-bellied Woodpecker
Posted on January 23, 2017 at 04:18:24 PM by Barbara Taylor

He was here briefly this afternoon. Most of the usual birds had stayed out of sight this morning while a Cooper's Hawk was checking out the neighbourhood.

photo1  photo2  photo3

 

 

Red-bellied Woodpecker
Posted on January 19, 2017 at 04:54:43 PM by Barbara Taylor

The male Red-bellied Woodpecker continues to visit our yard, but less frequently now that conditions are milder. Today he came in a few times with some Blue Jays for peanuts, and enjoyed a nibble of suet shortly before dusk. (Bracebridge)

Here's a photo from a few days ago:  photo

 

 

Northern Shrike
Posted on January 19, 2017 at 02:36:02 PM by Barbara Taylor

Around noon today at Henry Marsh there was an adult Northern Shrike perched in some alders next to the trail. There were two Pileated Woodpeckers along the "Chickadee Trail" as well as the usual friendly bunch of Chickadees and Nuthatches. (Bracebridge)

The trail out to the marsh from Henry Rd. and the trail east of the marsh (the Chickadee Trail) were in good condition, not icy at all. Note that the snowshoe trail through the woods from Kerr Park and a section near the main snowmobile trail may become dangerous as the wet areas are not frozen solid under the trail in several places, and temperatures are forecast to remain above zero for several days.

 

 

Barred Owl
Posted on January 18, 2017 at 07:56:11 PM by VivienVezina

Barred Owl visiting our back yard in Vankoughnet Village all day and here tonight as well still perched in a tree looking for mice. He or she does not seem to be easily spooked by us.

 

 

Barred Owl looking for mice
Posted on January 17, 2017 at 01:26:44 PM by michaelhatton

Hall's Road near Cranberry Marsh. photo

 

 

Algonquin Park Update: 16 January
Posted on January 16, 2017 at 04:30:55 PM by Ontbirds

This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Jan. 16, 2017) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

The road-killed moose placed in the Sunday Creek valley, off the Visitor
Centre viewing deck, has been attracting a variety of birds and mammals.
Sightings have included: wolves (briefly on January 8), fisher (January 14
and 15), American marten (January 14), red fox (most days), Common Ravens
(daily) and Bald Eagle (January 13).

Yesterday, a pack of wolves was heard howling in the valley and a single
wolf was seen on nearby Fork Lake, and two fishers and a fox were frequently
coming to the carcass. Already today, a fisher has been feeding on the
carcass and chasing two ravens away from it.

To view the moose online, go to:
http://www.algonquinpark.on.ca/virtual/webcam/index.php

Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, ON
 
DIRECTIONS:
  Algonquin Provincial  Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways
400, 11 and 60. Follow the signs which start in Toronto on Highway 400.
From Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the
park. Kilometre markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from the
West Gate (km 0) to near the East Gate (km 56).

The Visitor Centre exhibits, bookstore and restaurant at km 43 are open on
weekends from 9 am to 5 pm in winter. The Visitor Centre is also open on
weekdays from 9 am to 4 pm, with self-serve hot and cold beverages plus
snacks available in the restaurant.

Get your park permit and Information Guide (with a map of birding
locations mentioned here) at the East Gate or the West Gate.
Locations are also described at: www.algonquinpark.on.ca

 

 

Re(1): Trumpeter Swan K80 - background information
Posted on January 17, 2017 at 05:35:50 PM by IanP

Thanks Barbara! I love finding out little things like that. It's neat to know how old he is and where he goes. Hopefully we will see him again!
Cheers,
I A N

 

 

Trumpeter Swan K80 - background information
Posted on January 15, 2017 at 10:55:40 PM by Barbara Taylor

Last September IanP reported seeing tagged Trumpeter Swan K80 near Lake of Bays. It has taken quite a while, but I've now received some background information from Kyna Intini who looks after the database. I also received word from Bev Kingdon yesterday that they have approximately 125 Trumpeters at LaSalle Park in Burlington but very few cygnets this year.

Here is Kyna's information about K80:
"Thank you for reporting Trumpeter swan K80, he seemed to be a popular bird this summer because I got a number of reports on him. He was hatched in 2013 to parents 175 & K75 who nested near Washago. He made it down to LaSalle this winter. On Wednesday I banded a lone cygnet at LaSalle and it went and hung out with K80. I suspect it might be a sibling from this years K75 & unbanded mate’s brood. I will watch and see if this cygnet rejoins a family or stays with K80."

 

 

Trumpeter Swans - Washago
Posted on January 15, 2017 at 05:37:08 PM by Barbara Taylor

This afternoon there were 125 Trumpeter Swans visible from the Washago public dock (out Quetton St.). Julie Kee was trying to lure some in to be banded, but they weren't co-operating. Two had been banded earlier in the day, an adult and a cygnet. There were also several Mallards, a Common Merganser, and three Common Goldeneye in view. I was told that about a hundred Trumpeter Swans had been hanging out where there was open water by Fawcett Rd. until recently when the ice cleared out by the town dock.

On the way to Washago we made a brief stop by the Gravenhurst Landfill and saw two Bald Eagles and some Ravens.

 

 

Re(2): weasel at suet (photos)
Posted on January 14, 2017 at 09:03:33 AM by Doug Smith

I think it was too hungry. What was also interesting is that a red squirrel was on the nearby platform feeder, and was not afraid of it. Maybe it knew it was disabled?

 

 

Re(1): weasel at suet (photos)
Posted on January 13, 2017 at 08:44:02 PM by coreyhkh

wow was it not afraid?

 

 

weasel at suet (photos)
Posted on January 13, 2017 at 06:59:43 PM by Doug Smith

A long-tailed (I think) weasel was at our suet feeder around noon today.  photo

When I went to put more food outside I found it on our deck. After watching it for a few minutes I realized it seems to be missing its right front leg.  photo

 

 

Algonquin Park Birding Report: 12 January
Posted on January 12, 2017 at 11:38:30 PM by Ontbirds

This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Jan. 12, 2017) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

A road-killed moose has been placed in the Sunday Creek Bog again this year.
It can be seen from the Visitor Centre viewing deck, especially with the
telescope provided there. The carcass had not attracted the expected birds
and mammals by today, but that may change soon.

The female Wild Turkey continued to be reported irregularly at the Visitor
Centre parking lot feeder.

A juvenile Bald Eagle over Spruce Bog Boardwalk on January 7th and an adult
near the Visitor Centre on the 11th were both photographed. Wolf kills are
an important food source for wintering eagles in Algonquin.

Twelve Bohemian Waxwings were observed at Track and Tower Trail on the 7th.

BOREAL SPECIALTIES
Spruce Grouse: A male was photographed past the long boardwalk near the
kettle bog section of Spruce Bog Boardwalk on the 7th.

Black-backed Woodpecker: Look for this woodpecker on conifers with bark
removed. Listen for the relatively quiet tapping as they scale off bark to
feed on wood-boring beetle larvae. Check black spruce, balsam and tamarack
on Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road north of the locked gate.

Gray Jay: They continue to be regular at Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo
Road near the locked gate.

Boreal Chickadee: No reports this week. Look for them and listen for their
distinctive calls along Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road north of the
locked gate.

WINTER FINCHES
Pine Grosbeak: Some were still being seen feeding on green ash seeds near
Mew Lake Campground entrance this week. Others were noted on the highway at
various locations.

Red Crossbill: Sightings occurred on Peck Lake Trail, Lookout Trail and
Spruce Bog Boardwalk. Small numbers were regularly reported getting sand
and/or salt on the highway also.

White-winged Crossbill: It was reported from Spruce Bog Boardwalk on three
days this week, and others were observed on the highway.

Common Redpoll: Twelve were noted on Bat Lake Trail on the 5th.

Pine Siskin: A single bird was observed regularly with goldfinches at the
Visitor Centre feeders. Watch for them on the highway. A flock of 40 on the
road was photographed near Peck Lake Trail on the 7th.

American Goldfinch: As many as 40 were regular at the Visitor Centre feeders
this week.

Evening Grosbeak: Up to 150 are still coming daily, especially in early
morning, to the Visitor Centre feeders. Small numbers are also being
attracted to sunflower seed left by visitors at Spruce Bog Boardwalk and
near the Opeongo Road locked gate.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists
with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).

Good Birding!
Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, ON
 
DIRECTIONS:
Algonquin Provincial  Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways
400, 11 and 60. Follow the signs which start in Toronto on Highway 400.
From Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the
park. Kilometre markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from the
West Gate (km 0) to near the East Gate (km 56).

The Visitor Centre exhibits, bookstore and restaurant at km 43 are open on
weekends from 9 am to 5 pm in winter. The Visitor Centre is also open on
weekdays from 9 am to 4 pm, with self-serve hot and cold beverages plus
snacks available in the restaurant.

Get your park permit and Information Guide (with a map of birding
locations mentioned here) at the East Gate or the West Gate.
Locations are also described at: www.algonquinpark.on.ca

 

 

Re(1): Evening Grosbeaks
Posted on January 12, 2017 at 01:28:09 PM by Barbara Taylor

I put some sunflower seeds on the snowpack on our deck in the hope that the Evening Grosbeaks would see it if they flew over. No Grosbeaks so far, but about 120 Goldfinches showed up for lunch just ahead of the snow.

 

 

Evening Grosbeaks
Posted on January 12, 2017 at 11:38:25 AM by Barbara Taylor

At 11 a.m. this morning there were about 40 Evening Grosbeaks sitting high in the trees near #104-107 Meadow Heights Dr. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(2): Pileated Woodpeckers...three's a crowd
Posted on January 14, 2017 at 09:50:55 AM by Barbara Taylor

It's a stovepipe with the top opening sealed off tight to the 4x4. Very effective in preventing squirrels, chipmunks, and raccoons from getting to the food by climbing the feeder pole/post. Flying Squirrels, well, that's another problem. During the recent mild spell a raccoon stole all the beef fat from suet cages on the trees, but didn't get to the feeders in the photo thanks to the stovepipe.

 

 

Re(1): Pileated Woodpeckers...three's a crowd
Posted on January 13, 2017 at 11:59:55 PM by John Challis

Looks like you have some kind of squirrel baffle around the post. Sheet metal? Does it work?

 

 

Pileated Woodpeckers...three's a crowd
Posted on January 10, 2017 at 05:02:29 PM by Barbara Taylor

We've had two Pileated Woodpeckers (male and female) making regular visits to our yard the past few days. This afternoon I noticed a male Pileated feeding at the suet cage, but he seemed to have a different technique than usual. Suddenly a second male Pileated flew across the yard right at him and forced him to fly up into a tree. The first male tried to come back to a different feeder but once again was driven away by the other male. Eventually he gave up and flew out of the yard. The aggressive male briefly went over to feed at the suet, and then positioned himself in a nearby pine tree. The female Pileated stayed out of the skirmish.

The male Red-bellied Woodpecker continues to visit our yard. Here's a photo from yesterday when he was resting high in our birch tree. And a photo of one of the male Pileateds at the suet.

 

 

Redpolls arriving with Goldfinches at Leonard Lake
Posted on January 10, 2017 at 02:54:42 PM by michaelhatton

As many as 60 American Goldfinches arrived today, mostly feeding off a 12 foot section of deck railing. By early afternoon, we were seeing a few Redpolls mixed in with the Goldfinches. Visibility is down to 1/4 mile with strong gusts that drive the birds into the trees.  photo1  photo2

 

 

Common Goldeneye at Washago
Posted on January 9, 2017 at 05:28:13 PM by michaelhatton

Centennial Park in Washago is currently hosting Common Goldeneye, Trumpeters and dozens of Mallards in a small patch of open water. On the other side of Highway 11 (seen from Fawcett Drive), the Trent-Severn is brimming with more than 70 Trumpeters, a single Mute Swan, Common Mergansers, Mallards, a pair of Black Ducks, a single Hooded Merganser and a nice variety of feeder birds.  photo  photo2  photo3  photo4

 

 

Re(2): Smith's Longspur worth the drive!
Posted on January 10, 2017 at 02:47:33 PM by michaelhatton

Smith's Longspur photos taken Jan 2nd. There was no snow in that area ... too close to Lake Erie. A few miles north there was lots of snow, but not nearly what we are seeing here.

 

 

Re(1): Smith's Longspur worth the drive!
Posted on January 10, 2017 at 11:52:31 AM by janice house

Great photos Michael! Where is the snow?

 

 

Smith's Longspur worth the drive!
Posted on January 8, 2017 at 02:57:52 PM by michaelhatton

Still being seen north of Long Point Provincial Park.  photo1  photo2

 

 

Cooper's hawk
Posted on January 7, 2017 at 03:22:02 PM by John Challis

Driving into Bracebridge on Entrance Drive, a Cooper's hawk flew across the road in front of us, heading towards the small apartment building.

 

 

Bioblitz this spring in Haliburton County...
Posted on January 7, 2017 at 11:26:22 AM by EdPoropat

Greeting everyone!
I wish you all a wonderful New Year, with piles of awesome, rare species for your 2017 life lists!
J

This year, I am organizing a bioblitz on behalf of the Haliburton Highlands Land Trust. I am reaching out to all of you for assistance in making this the most successful event possible. Although still in the planning stages, here are a few details:

Where: Dahl Forest. A beautiful 400 acre property that straddles the pristine Burnt River, S of Gelert, ON in Haliburton County. Some of you might recognize the site as it is where Common Sanddragon was first discovered in Haliburton County.

When: Saturday, June 24th to Sunday, June 25th

Time: 11:00am to 11:00am.

There will be an area set aside for camping, for those that would prefer to do that. Feel free to come for a few hours or for the entire 24hour period. I would love to collect data on as many taxa as possible, but this will obviously depend on the expertise available. I am hoping to have some short guided hikes for the general public throughout the day, focused on different groups of plants or animals.

Please feel free to contact me and let me know if you might be interested in participating, and what taxa you could assist with. Also, please feel free to share this with friends/acquaintances that might also be keen to assist.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Cheers,
Ed Poropat
Haliburton, ON

 

 

Algonquin Park Birding Report: 5 January
Posted on January 6, 2017 at 09:07:59 PM by Ontbirds

This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Jan. 6, 2017) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

A Northern Goshawk carrying a Spruce Grouse was seen at Spruce Bog Boardwalk
on January 1st. The grouse could have been the banded male that is at least
nine years old. Check any male grouse seen there for a greenish-blue band on
the left leg.

Bohemian Waxwings are still being seen occasionally, including four
photographed at the Visitor Centre on January 2nd.

BOREAL SPECIALTIES
Spruce Grouse: Observed during the week at Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

Black-backed Woodpecker: One was reported on three days this week at Spruce
Bog Boardwalk.

Gray Jay: Continue to be regular at Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road
near the locked gate.

Boreal Chickadee: This species has been difficult to find this week, with
only six reported by the 76 observers on the December 30th CBC. One was
observed along Spruce Bog Boardwalk on January 4th.

WINTER FINCHES
Pine Grosbeak: Check the Green Ash trees near the entrance to Mew Lake
Campground where a few continue to feed on the abundant samaras. Some have
been reported along the highway as well.

Red Crossbill: Small numbers are being observed regularly, often feeding on
the seeds of Black Spruce cones. Also watch for them on the highway seeking
sand and salt.

White-winged Crossbill: This crossbill is being seen daily at various
locations along the highway and on the trails.

Common Redpoll: A few have started to appear in the Park. Watch for them on
the highway. Some were observed in siskin flocks.

Hoary Redpoll: A bird of the "Southern" subspecies was noted in a flock of
45 siskins and two Common Redpolls getting grit off the highway near Lake of
Two Rivers on January 2nd.

Pine Siskin: After just six were reported on the December 30th CBC, flocks
of 30 to 50 birds were being seen along the highway later in the week.

American Goldfinch: Up to 30 came to the Visitor Centre feeders each day.

Evening Grosbeak: As many as 175 were counted at the Visitor Centre feeders,
where they continue to be most numerous in the morning. Sunflower seed put
out by visitors at Spruce Bog Boardwalk and near the Opeongo Road locked
gate attracted small flocks as well.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists
with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).

Good Birding!
Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, ON

 

 

Re(1): Loggerhead Strike
Posted on January 5, 2017 at 07:24:30 PM by Barbara Taylor

Too bad for the chickadee, but what a great chance to see a Shrike in action.  Northern Shrikes are the ones normally expected in Ontario in the winter months.  Loggerhead Shrikes should have already migrated south out of Ontario by October. They look very similar and it can be difficult to tell the two species apart. Hope it comes back so you can get your picture...a very nice looking bird.

There is a good article on the Ontario Field Ornithologists website at: http://ofo.ca/site/page/view/articles.shrikeid
 

 

 

Loggerhead Strike
Posted on January 5, 2017 at 04:33:05 PM by Karen100

JAN 5/16
Loggerhead Strike just killed a chickadee outside my window in Barkway, Gravenhurst! I had a long time to observe the bird because I heard a loud bang as the bird hit my window. At first I thougt it was hurt because it was in the snow and lots of feathers were flying about.Ilooked it up right away on the Internet. I hope I can take a picture if it comes back. What a beautiful looking bird.

 

 

Redpolls on the move
Posted on January 3, 2017 at 01:25:38 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there was a flock of about 40 Common Redpolls feeding in the alders by the dip in the trail east of Henry Marsh. They were slowly moving towards the marsh, following the creek. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Algonquin Park Monday Jan 2
Posted on January 3, 2017 at 06:46:21 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Brian Morin on ONTBIRDS (Jan. 3, 2017) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Here are a few comments about my sightings today. The area in the vicinity
of the visitor centre had the greatest number and variety of birds as noted
in previous reports.

Evening Grosbeaks dominated here but there were flocks of goldfinches,
several Pine Grosbeaks getting grit on the driveway, a flock of about 50
Siskins possibly mixed with redpolls that did not land and a few Bohemian
Waxwings near the visitor centre. Along Hwy 60 I had a flock of about 45
Siskins getting grit near East Beach Picnic area. There were three redpolls
in the flock, one of which was a Southern Hoary that showed a clean white
rump very well.

Gray Jays were present along Arrowhon Rd, at Spruce Bog parking lot and
Opeongo Lake Rd.
I did not locate either Spruce Grouse or Boreal Chickadees and I didn't
meet anyone else who had either.

I was surprised to find Evening Grosbeak flocks in other locations such as
Opeongo Lake Rd and Arrowhon. I also had small flocks of White-winged
Crossbills along Arrowhon, all atop spruces and 8 Reds flying over Hwy #60.

Anyone wanting to drive up Arrowhon Rd should note that the road is not
plowed but vehicles have been making the trip up. Don't try it if you do
not have snow tires and are uncomfortable driving on snowcovered back
roads. You may need to take some of the hills in low gear. All wheel drive
is an asset but not essential. Between km 3 and 4 the road is reduced to a
single track in deep snow. If you encounter a vehcile coming from the
opposite direction between these areas someone will need to back up. It is
not safe to move to the side without risking getting stuck. I do not know
how the coming weather system will affect driving conditions here.

Brian Morin

 

 

Re(1): Red-bellied Woodpecker
Posted on January 5, 2017 at 11:20:17 AM by Barbara Taylor

The male Red-bellied Woodpecker continues to visit our feeders...and our shed this morning. The male Cardinal and male Pileated Woodpecker are also hanging around. (Bracebridge)  photo1  photo2

 

 

Red-bellied Woodpecker and Pileateds
Posted on January 2, 2017 at 04:40:15 PM by Barbara Taylor

This afternoon the Red-bellied Woodpecker spent nearly half an hour preening and sunning high up in our birch tree. Later two Pileated Woodpeckers showed up at the same time...male and female. The male doesn't seem to like the raw beef suet and was content to peck away at the processed variety, while the female has just the opposite preference. (Bracebridge)

Red-bellied Woodpecker male:  photo

Pileated Woodpeckers - male top left (see his red moustache), female bottom right:  photo

 

 

Parks Canada free pass
Posted on January 2, 2017 at 12:59:42 PM by DBurton

Just passing this along. Regards, Dan.

To celebrate Canada's 150th anniversary, Parks Canada is offering its 2017 Discovery Pass free of charge. It would normally cost around $140 per family.
Some practical details:
- You can have the pass shipped to your address for free, or pick one up at a park entrance
- It covers unlimited entry to National Parks, Historic Sites and Marine Conservation areas operated by Parks Canada
-Extras that carry a separate fee, such as camping, tours or parking, are not included
-The pass is valid from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 2017

 

 

43rd Algonquin Park Christmas Bird Count: Friday, 30 December
Posted on January 1, 2017 at 05:08:55 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Jan. 1, 2017) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

The day was mostly cloudy, with occasional light flurries. A wind out of the
northwest with gusts from 20 to 35 kph probably inhibited observer ability
to hear birds such as woodpeckers, creepers and kinglets. Temperatures
ranged from minus 8 degrees C in the pre-dawn to minus 11 degrees in late
afternoon, making it more comfortable than many previous counts. A maximum
of about 30 cm of snow on the ground made the use of snowshoes and skis
helpful.

Total Observers: 76
Total Species: 25 (average is 27)
Total Individuals: 2,743 (average is 4,576)
Birds per Party Hour: 14 (average is 25)

New Species for the Count: none

Count Week Species: Snow Bunting (1 in Visitor Centre parking lot on
December 27), and Red-winged Blackbird (immature male at Visitor Centre
feeder on December 28).

Notable Miss: Barred Owl (not found only once before in 42 previous counts).

Winter Finches:

-Pine Grosbeak: 39
Some were seen feeding on the abundant samaras of Green Ash (introduced) at
Mew Lake Campground entrance and in Whitefish Group Campground.

-Red Crossbill: 214
They were noted getting seeds from Black Spruce and Eastern Hemlock cones.
At least two call types were thought to be present on the count.

-White-winged Crossbill: 466

-Common Redpoll: 59

-Pine Siskin: 6

-American Goldfinch: 73

-Evening Grosbeak: 284
About 175 were at the Visitor Centre feeders.


Complete count results are posted at:
http://www.algonquinpark.on.ca/news/christmas_bird_count_results_2016.php

Thanks to all the participants and those who helped organize and undertake
the count this year.

Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park CBC Compiler
Dwight, ON

 

 

Re(1): Huge flock of Bohemians
Posted on January 3, 2017 at 04:14:04 PM by janice house

there were 100 + at the Goodyear house yesterday

 

 

Re(1): Huge flock of Bohemians
Posted on January 2, 2017 at 02:21:30 PM by Barbara Taylor

There was a flock of about 120 Bohemians near Moreland Crt. around 12:30 p.m. today. Some of the ornamental crabapple trees in the area don't have much fruit left, but others looked untouched...perhaps a bitter variety the birds don't care for unless desperate.

 

 

Re(1): Huge flock of Bohemians -- photo
Posted on January 2, 2017 at 12:14:55 PM by Doug Smith

Went looking late this morning and found a flock of approx 50+ in the pines at 85 Meadow Hgts. There is also a robin in the crabapple tree at the same location.  photo

 

 

Huge flock of Bohemians
Posted on January 1, 2017 at 02:47:47 PM by Barbara Taylor

Around 2:10 p.m. there was a very large flock of Bohemian Waxwings sitting in a tall tree along Meadow Heights Dr. between Brian Rd. and Moreland Crt. There had to be at least 200 birds. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Goldfinches
Posted on January 1, 2017 at 11:13:29 PM by ksmith

I had about the same number of goldfinches visit my feeders for the past 3 days. Hood Road, Port Sydney

 

 

Goldfinches
Posted on January 1, 2017 at 01:17:13 PM by Barbara Taylor

A flock of about thirty American Goldfinches has showed up at our feeder. Until now the most we've had all winter was just four. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Happy New Year!
Posted on January 1, 2017 at 09:50:38 AM by Barbara Taylor

Thanks to everyone for all your reports.
Happy New Year!

A nice start to 2017 here in our yard this morning...a male Northern Cardinal and the male Red-bellied Woodpecker both dropped by for a visit. (Bracebridge)