Muskoka Bird Board - Archived Reports from October - December 2012
 
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Redpolls Galore
Posted on December 30, 2012 at 09:21:37 PM by michaelhatton

Redpolls everywhere every day. They seem to fight off the Chickadees.  photo  (Leonard Lake)

 

 

Belted Kingfisher
Posted on December 30, 2012 at 09:12:51 PM by Goodyear

This afternoon there was a male Belted Kingfisher flying up and down the outflow of Henry Marsh. It called several times, and made a couple of dives towards the open creek, but came up "empty beaked". (Bracebridge)

 

 

Barred Owl
Posted on December 30, 2012 at 04:21:17 PM by michaelhatton

Saw this Barred Owl once again today. It has been hanging around the south end of Leonard Lake for a few weeks. I think it likes the chipmunks and squirrels.  photo

 

 

Black-backed Woodpecker
Posted on December 30, 2012 at 01:25:31 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning around 11 a.m. there was a female Black-backed Woodpecker along Henry Trail in Bracebridge. If you are walking towards Henry Marsh from Henry Rd., the bird was in a tree right where the trail leaves the woods and you walk out into the open area. The bird eventually flew east, ending up in a Poplar tree near the spur snowmobile trail which runs east from Henry Trail.

At "the dip" in the hiking trail heading east from the marsh, we had to walk under a Barred Owl perched in a large Yellow Birch tree. There were some Pine Grosbeaks calling just west of the pipeline/main snowmobile trail, but we never saw them. The owl was still on the same branch on our way back. It stared at us as we walked past, perhaps wondering if we had mice in our boots...the cold hard-packed snow was very "squeaky".

Directions: From traffic lights at Wellington St. & Ecclestone Dr. in Bracebridge, take Beaumont Dr. along the Muskoka River and turn left at Henry Rd.
Area Map with trails marked (at upper right of map, click Satellite for terrain, or Map for roads only)

 

 

Re(1): Algonquin Park CBC: December 29
Posted on December 30, 2012 at 03:27:44 PM by coreyhkh

I looked for that hawk owl all week and never found it, glad you guys did.

 

 

Algonquin Park CBC: December 29
Posted on December 30, 2012 at 12:45:48 PM by Ron Tozer

The 39th Algonquin Park Christmas Bird Count was held on Saturday, December 29.

Conditions for observing were excellent: minus 18 to minus 10 degrees C., light cloud and calm all day, and snow depths from 10 to 38 cm. Not needing snowshoes to get around made it easier for participants to cover more areas.

The count was noteworthy for its woodpecker numbers (because they could be heard due to no wind) and rare owls. A poor cone crop limited finch numbers, as expected. Total individual birds on the count were only about half the average.

Total Observers: 79
Total Species: 30 (average is 28; highest ever is 34)
Total Individuals: 2,263 (average is 4,785)
Birds per Party Hour: 10
New Species for the Count: none

-Ruffed Grouse: 19 (low)
-Wild Turkey: 2 (Lake of Two Rivers)
-Bald Eagle: count week
-Northern Goshawk: 1
-Red-tailed Hawk: 1
-Northern Hawk Owl: 1 (Opeongo Road, north of bridge)
-Barred Owl: 3
-Great Gray Owl: 4 (NEW HIGH FOR COUNT)
[Locations were: Eucalia Lake (km 39); Highway 60 at Opeongo Turn (km 46.3); Opeongo Road north of the bridge; and Highway 60 at the East Boundary.]
-Downy Woodpecker: 59
-Hairy Woodpecker: 107 (NEW HIGH FOR COUNT)
-Black-backed Woodpecker: 16
-Pileated Woodpecker: 25
-Unidentified woodpeckers: 10
-Northern Shrike: 1
-Gray Jay: 63
-Blue Jay: 118
-American Crow: 2 (rare in winter)
-Common Raven: 214
-Black-capped Chickadee: 903
-Boreal Chickadee: 25
-Red-breasted Nuthatch: 216
-White-breasted Nuthatch: 12
-Brown Creeper: 25
-Golden-crowned Kinglet: 48
-Dark-eyed Junco: 1
-Pine Grosbeak: 172
-Red Crossbill: 41
-White-winged Crossbill: 70
-Common Redpoll: 61
-Pine Siskin: 1
-American Goldfinch: 24
-Evening Grosbeak: 6
-Unidentified finches: 12

Notable Missed Species:

-Spruce Grouse
-Rock Pigeon (population in MTO sand dome at the East Gate since 1998 disappeared in 2012, returning the Algonquin CBC to its unique status among southern Ontario counts with no Rock Pigeon, European Starling or House Sparrow).

 

 

27 Mourning Doves 8km E of Bracebridge
Posted on December 29, 2012 at 10:19:29 AM by Al Sinclair

Surprised to count 27 Mourning Doves here yesterday at our feeder, a record high out here in the backwoods. Also have 8 Tree Sparrows and 1 Juncoe. Better stock up on mixed seed.

 

 

Re(2): Red-bellied woodpecker
Posted on December 31, 2012 at 10:01:59 AM by CatMacLean

ibird canada 6 on my iphone

 

 

Re(1): Red-bellied woodpecker
Posted on December 30, 2012 at 09:39:30 PM by michaelhatton

What app do you use?

 

 

Red-bellied woodpecker
Posted on December 29, 2012 at 10:14:22 AM by CatMacLean

Just saw my first one in Woodland Heights, Huntsville. Pulled out my handy app for a positive ID. Gotta love technology

 

 

Great Gray Owl just outside Algonquin Park
Posted on December 28, 2012 at 01:52:37 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Dec. 28, 2012) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

A Great Gray Owl was reported this morning in a dead tree in a wetland along
Highway 60 that is 500 metres east of the Algonquin Park East Boundary. This
location is between Whitney and the boundary of the Park.

 

 

Re(1): swans
Posted on December 28, 2012 at 12:55:22 PM by J. Gardner

Drive into the town of Port Severn. Park before the bridge, and you can walk out onto bridge and view the water from there. J. Gardner Hurdville

 

 

swans
Posted on December 28, 2012 at 11:49:19 AM by CliffRummenie

At 11am there were about 70 swans just west of the 400 Highway bridge in the Severn Estuary. Does anyone know a convienient spot to pull off and scope birds in the area?

 

 

Re(1): Pileated Woodpeckers
Posted on December 30, 2012 at 02:36:56 PM by Barbara Taylor

We've only had a female Pileated visiting our suet on a regular basis, but the past couple of days a male Pileated has come in to check out the yard. So far I haven't seen him at the suet though. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Pileated Woodpeckers
Posted on December 28, 2012 at 10:23:01 AM by janice house

Our neighbourhood pair were in feeding on the suet this morning, lovely to watch. Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst

 

 

Peregine Falcon
Posted on December 28, 2012 at 09:33:24 AM by BryanGrant

Wed Dec 26 Red polls were at my feeder by the beaver creek ravine in the Covered Bridge area. While on the walking trails I saw a peregine on the ground eating a kill.  (Bracebridge)

 

 

Redpolls are back!
Posted on December 28, 2012 at 09:05:22 AM by Terry & Marion Whittam

Redpolls arrived at the feeders yesterday and many more this morning! Nice to see them back! 10km east of Washago!

 

 

Re(2): Huntsville Christmas Bird Count
Posted on December 28, 2012 at 01:10:17 PM by Wayne Bridge

Wow! Thanks Ron. Since we're only a half-hour drive N-E of Huntsville (Kearney) your count is useful to birders here. I will post it in the West Algonquin Nature Store.

 

 

Re(1): Huntsville Christmas Bird Count
Posted on December 28, 2012 at 11:21:23 AM by Ron Tozer

Huntsville Christmas Bird Count (started in 1994):
Tuesday, 18 December 2012

All big lakes open: Pen, Fairy, Mary, Vernon and Lake of Bays
Snow: less than 2 cm
Total Species: 46 (second highest; the highest was 54 species in 2006; average is 39)
Total Individuals: 3,491 (average is 3,078)
Total Observers: 18

Trumpeter Swan 1 (banded #586, although wing tags gone now; 10th winter in Huntsville)
American Black Duck 10
Mallard 285
Black x Mallard hybrid 3
Long-tailed Duck 3 (Pen Lake)
Bufflehead 23
Common Goldeneye 118
Hooded Merganser 23
Common Merganser 12
Ruffed Grouse 9
Wild Turkey 95
Common Loon (1 in count week on Pen Lake)
Great Blue Heron 1 (NEW for count; seen in count week three times before)
Bald Eagle 3
Sharp-shinned Hawk (1 in count week on Florence Street)
Red-tailed Hawk 1
Ring-billed Gull 10 (single flock flying over)
Herring Gull 35
Rock Pigeon 131
Mourning Dove 41
Barred Owl 6 (record high)
Belted Kingfisher 1 (creek on Pow Wow road)
Red-bellied Woodpecker 1 (NEW for count; at feeder near Big East River for weeks)
Downy Woodpecker 31
Hairy Woodpecker 48
Pileated Woodpecker 23 (record high; many calling in calm, mild conditions)
woodpecker sp. 1
Northern Shrike 2
Blue Jay 166
American Crow 37
Common Raven 117
Black-capped Chickadee 1,321
Red-breasted Nuthatch 95
White-breasted Nuthatch 83
Brown Creeper 8
Golden-crowned Kinglet 8
European Starling 171
American Tree Sparrow 3
White-throated Sparrow 1
Dark-eyed Junco 1
Snow Bunting 5
Northern Cardinal 9
Rusty Blackbird 1 (second time on count; 1 (photos) at feeder on Bridgedale Road, Port Sydney)
Common Grackle 1 (at feeder on Fairy Street)
Pine Grosbeak 61
Red Crossbill 2
Common Redpoll 408
Hoary Redpoll 2
American Goldfinch 37
Evening Grosbeak 24
finch sp. 13

(Finch numbers are relatively low due to a poor cone crop.)

 

 

Huntsville Christmas Bird Count
Posted on December 28, 2012 at 08:33:43 AM by Wayne Bridge

Would it be possible to list the results (i.e. all of the species and numbers)similar to Bracebridge/Gravenhurst results? That would be helpful. Thanks.

 

 

Algonquin Park Bird Report: 27 December
Posted on December 27, 2012 at 09:04:05 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Dec. 27, 2012) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Great Gray Owls were reported at five locations along Highway 60 this week.
Given the distances between these sites, it is probable that six individuals
were involved. We received no reports on December 26 or today, although some
observers were looking for them.

Locations and Dates:
-one flushed from the highway east of Cache Lake (near km 25): December 23
-one just east of Lake of Two Rivers (km 35.3): December 21
-two near the Centennial Ridges Road turn (km 38): December 23
-one photographed just west of Ring-neck Pond (km 41): December 24
-one at Opeongo Road turn (km 46.3): December 24 and 25

BOREAL SPECIALTIES:
Spruce Grouse: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

Black-backed Woodpecker: A male was photographed near the gate on Opeongo
Road on December 23.

Gray Jay: Regular at Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road. Three are coming
to the Visitor Centre feeders.

Boreal Chickadee: No reports. Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk and the north end of
Opeongo Road where it passes through black spruce bog.

WINTER FINCHES:
Pine Grosbeak: Small groups continue to be seen regularly picking up grit
along Highway 60. A few are coming to seed on the ground below the Visitor
Centre feeders.

Red Crossbill: Occasional small flocks were seen picking up grit and salt on
Highway 60.

Common Redpoll: A few small flocks were noted along Highway 60. About six
were coming to the Visitor Centre feeders today.

CONDITIONS IN ALGONQUIN
Snow cover has reached 20 to 25 cm. See:
http://www.algonquinpark.on.ca/visit/general_park_info/algonquin-park-weathe
r.php#snow

Ice: Both Lake of Two Rivers and Smoke Lake froze over during the night of
December 25-26 and so all lakes along Highway 60 are now ice-covered.

To learn more about Winter in Algonquin Park, see:
http://www.algonquinpark.on.ca/visit/general_park_info/winter-in-algonquin-p
ark.php

DIRECTIONS:
Algonquin Provincial Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways
400, 11 and 60. Follow the signs which start in Toronto on Highway 400.
From Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the
park. Kilometre markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from the
West Gate (km 0) to near the East Gate (km 56).

Get your park permit and the park tabloid (with a map of birding locations
mentioned here) at the gates. Locations are also described at:
www. algonquinpark.on.ca

The Visitor Centre at km 43 will be open 9 am to 5 pm daily from
December 27 to January 6. It has recent bird sightings, feeders and
information. Visitors are welcome to bring a packed lunch and use the
restaurant seating area. Hot and cold beverages, and light snacks are
available to purchase, as well as the use of a microwave.

For more information see Algonquin Park events calendar at:
http://www.algonquinpark.on.ca/involved/calendar/

Good Birding!
Ron Tozer

 

 

Snow fleas
Posted on December 27, 2012 at 12:41:33 PM by CatMacLean

Christmas morning we saw snow fleas on the snow while walking in the bush.  (Huntsville)

 

 

Re(1): Visitor to my feeder
Posted on December 27, 2012 at 09:11:38 PM by dinnymccraney

What a fabulous photo!

 

 

Visitor to my feeder
Posted on December 27, 2012 at 12:36:29 PM by Leslie

http://www.flickr.com/photos/61805247@N03/sets/72157632354090655/

Sorry - I haven't figured out how to get the photo into the message yet!

 

 

Pine Grosbeak (photo)
Posted on December 26, 2012 at 08:55:50 PM by garyschultz

visited Algonquin Park today, and although the Visitors Centre was closed today i could still view the feeders , which was visited by Gray Jays and about 9 Pine Grosbeaks  photo

 

 

Re(1): Tundra Swan on Fairy Lake
Posted on December 28, 2012 at 10:17:41 AM by Barbara Taylor

Is this a different swan than the one seen on the Huntsville Christmas Bird Count? If you see a yellow tag on the wing then it is probably the Trumpeter Swan that regularly over-winters in Huntsville. From the post on Dec. 22 "Noteworthy Species - Trumpeter Swan: male (#586) on Fairy Lake for tenth winter in Huntsville."

edit: - oops, apparently the wing tags are missing on that Trumpeter Swan, but can still be identified since it is banded.

 

 

Tundra Swan on Fairy Lake
Posted on December 26, 2012 at 08:52:41 PM by Graz

I've spotted a single Tundra Swan on Fairy Lake in Huntsville the last few days. The lake is now freezing and it seems to still be hanging around but struggling to walk on the thin ice.

 

 

Re(1): Pine Grosbeaks
Posted on December 25, 2012 at 09:35:20 PM by coreyhkh

Nice I checked it out yesterday and saw nothing.

 

 

Pine Grosbeaks
Posted on December 25, 2012 at 01:21:07 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there were two Pine Grosbeaks near the pipeline end of the Trans Canada Trail between Henry Marsh and the Bracebridge Ponds. The walking trail is in excellent condition from Henry Rd. to the marsh and eastward to the pipeline.

Directions: From traffic lights at Wellington St. & Ecclestone Dr. in Bracebridge, take Beaumont Dr. along the Muskoka River and turn left at Henry Rd.
Area Map with trails marked (at upper right of map, click Satellite for terrain, or Map for roads only)

 

 

barred owl
Posted on December 25, 2012 at 12:12:37 PM by coreyhkh

Hello everyone I spotted a nice looking barred owl this morning. Bushy area located across from Lisa lane in gravenhurst.

 

 

Re(1): Algonquin park- Great grey owl
Posted on December 25, 2012 at 02:43:51 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Kevin Daly on ONTBIRDS (Dec. 25, 2012) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Great grey owl seen aprox 18 km east of east park entrance sitting on power pole near Opeongo store sign. Seen at 11am.
Kevin Daly

 

 

Great Gray Owl(s) in Algonquin Park
Posted on December 25, 2012 at 08:27:36 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Andrew Keaveney on ONTBIRDS (Dec. 24, 2012) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Hey birders. Well, after almost a full year of having the Great Gray Owl as my nemesis Big Year bird I finally nailed it while birding in Algonquin Park this evening. My dad and I came across a bird hunting from small spruces on hwy. 60 directly across the corner from the Opeongo Rd. entrance. It was on our way out of Opeongo Rd. this evening at about 4p.m. that I noticed it while turning west (right). We were able to view the bird for about 20 min. and eventually saw it fly down and pounce on a prey in the snow - wings and tail out, body buried, and head up and looking around as if it didn't know what to do next! I was only in the park from 1:30 p.m. onwards and this was the only owl we saw. If readers are wondering why I never went to see the Essex Co. bird last winter, it is because both I and a few others had suspicions that it may not have been a 'natural occurance'. There was no obvious incursion southward of that species last year, in fact it was a horrible winter for them and I can barely think of another single record south of there breeding grounds. It appears as though there are perhaps as many as 4 birds along the hwy. 60 corridor at the moment, with sightings at ~km. 20 a few days back, a pair at km. 38 yesterday, and our bird at approx. km. 45 (I believe?) this evening. Directions: All birds have been viewed right from the hwy. corridor. ***Please note Visitor Centre is not open on weekdays Other birds noted: Red Crossbill - 3 birds (1 ad. male) feeding on roadside and then flew off towards Bat Lake trail parking lot Pine Grosbeak - 3 birds around km. 36 Ruffed Grouse - 3 birds feeding very high in maples on the north side of hwy. 60 west of Smoke Lake - at least 1 bird was a nice rufus and gray intermediate morph.
_______________________________________________
ONTBIRDS is presented by the Ontario Field Ornithologists - the provincial birding organization.
Send bird reports to birdalert@ontbirds.ca
For information about ONTBIRDS visit http://www.ofo.ca/

 

 

Re(1): Hoary Redpoll
Posted on December 24, 2012 at 04:24:44 PM by Barbara Taylor

This afternoon there was a large pale Redpoll in a flock of smaller Common Redpolls in a birch tree at the north side of Meadow Heights Dr., a short distance west of Kevin Cres. A feeder is hanging from the birch tree next to the driveway at the front of the house.

A possible "Hornemann's" Hoary?! Unfortunately, didn't have binoculars with me. The flock flew to the woods north of the house. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Hoary Redpoll
Posted on December 24, 2012 at 01:58:53 PM by joanpaget

Bob and I have been watching a Pileated Woodpecker decimate our suet. We have also been invaded by a flock of Common Redpolls, including a Hoary Redpoll, which has been here for the past week to ten days. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Great Gray Owl (2 photos)
Posted on December 24, 2012 at 12:16:31 PM by akstinnissen

All I want for Christmas is to see a Great Gray, getting a decent image would be a bonus! You must have been a good boy this year! Thanks for sharing, I hope it is still there later this week!

 

 

Re(1): Great Gray Owl (2 photos)
Posted on December 24, 2012 at 09:19:52 AM by coreyhkh

Hi Gary I should if introduced my self but I was the guy in with the Grey Mazda dressed in camo. Your shot turned out good hopefully mine do also.
Happy birding
Corey

 

 

Great Gray Owl (2 photos)
Posted on December 23, 2012 at 09:04:02 PM by garyschultz

again whilst in the Park today i was able to find this Great Gray Owl along hwy#60 at the 38km marker in fact we saw two birds at this location.it was a treat to finally see them fly to a real perch off the hydro wire  photo1  photo2

 

 

Re(1): Black-Backed Woodpecker (photo)
Posted on December 24, 2012 at 12:14:01 PM by akstinnissen

This is a great image, nice find!

 

 

Black-Backed Woodpecker (photo)
Posted on December 23, 2012 at 08:54:36 PM by garyschultz

whilst visiting Algonquin Park today was able to locate this Black-Backed Woodpecker @ the gate feeding area on Opeongo rd.  photo

 

 

Re(1): Blue Jays
Posted on December 26, 2012 at 05:32:49 PM by Barb Staples

Update. Only the fully-feathered jay has been visiting.

 

 

Blue Jays
Posted on December 23, 2012 at 07:57:09 PM by Barb Staples

Yesterday my resident pair showed up on schedule with one missing all its tail feathers. It appeared otherwise unharmed, robust and able to fly well enough. Today neither came, will see what the next few days bring. Sunny Lake, Gravenhurst.

 

 

Northern Shrike
Posted on December 23, 2012 at 04:21:46 PM by janice house

I just got back from a doggy walk out Silver Lake Rd and spotted an odd bird flying out of our yard. It perched in the tag alder across from the house so I was able to get a good look at it with my binocs, it flew back into the yard heading towards my feeders. I wasn't able to find the shrike again but the chickadees were deeing up a storm. I assume it was the same bird Dan and Marilee found on our CBC. Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst

 

 

Re(1): Evening Grosbeak
Posted on December 25, 2012 at 11:32:34 AM by janice house

Two pairs of grosbeaks were in our yard this morning.

 

 

Evening Grosbeak
Posted on December 23, 2012 at 12:21:58 PM by janice house

Around 9am this morning I heard a grosbeak calling from the top of one of the white pines in our neighbourhood, Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst

 

 

Re(1): Bohemian Waxwings
Posted on December 23, 2012 at 12:20:18 PM by janice house

I just came in from topping up my feeders and heard a flock as they flew over, Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst

 

 

Bohemian Waxwings
Posted on December 23, 2012 at 07:28:57 AM by Dawn Sherman

There were 13 Bohemian Waxwings behind the fire station feeding on a small buckthorn yesterday afternoon. (Huntsville)

 

 

Huntsville Christmas Bird Count: 18 December
Posted on December 22, 2012 at 01:08:43 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Dec. 22, 2012) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

The 19th annual Huntsville Christmas Bird Count was held on
Tuesday, December 18. Temperatures were above freezing all
day, there was very little snow on the ground, and all the big lakes
were open.

Total Species: 46 (second highest; average is 39)
Total Individuals: 3,491 (average is 3,078)
Participants: 18

New Species for the Count:
-Great Blue Heron: 1 (3 times in count week previously)
-Red-bellied Woodpecker: 1 (photos) at Huntsville feeder

Noteworthy Species:
-Trumpeter Swan: male (#586) on Fairy Lake for tenth winter in Huntsville.
-Long-tailed Duck: 3 on Pen Lake
-Common Loon (1 on Pen Lake in count week)
-Ring-billed Gull: 10
-Herring Gull: 35
-Barred Owl: 6 (record high)
-Belted Kingfisher: 1 (second time on count)
-Rusty Blackbird: 1 at feeder in Port Sydney (second time on count)
-Common Grackle: 1 (at Huntsville feeder)

Finches: relatively low numbers due to poor cone crop
-Pine Grosbeak: 61
-Red Crossbill: 2
-Common Redpoll: 408
-Hoary Redpoll: 2
-American Goldfinch: 37
-Evening Grosbeak: 24

Thanks to all participants.

Ron Tozer, Compiler
Dwight, ON

 

 

Algonquin Park Bird Report: 20 December
Posted on December 20, 2012 at 10:40:10 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Dec. 20, 2012) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

NORTHERN HAWK OWL
GREAT GRAY OWL

Snow cover remains very light. See:
http://www.algonquinpark.on.ca/visit/general_park_info/algonquin-park-weather.php#snow

Smoke Lake is almost entirely open, and Canoe Lake and Lake of Two Rivers
have only limited areas covered with ice. All other Highway 60 Corridor
lakes are frozen.

Apparently the same Northern Hawk Owl seen earlier this fall in the Costello
Creek Bog on the east side of Opeongo Road, north of the bridge, was
photographed there this afternoon. Observations of this bird have been
irregular, unfortunately. It could not be relocated later today.

Great Gray Owls were reported at three locations along Highway 60 this week:
at km 19.5 on December 17; between km 22 and 23 on December 15 and today;
and at km 32 today. Try looking for these owls near dawn and dusk. Again,
re-finding them on subsequent days has been difficult.

As in past winters, at least one Marten has started coming to the Visitor
Centre feeders for suet and black sunflower seeds.

BOREAL SPECIALTIES:
Spruce Grouse: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

Black-backed Woodpecker: One was at the Spruce Bog Boardwalk parking lot on
December 19.

Gray Jay: Regular at Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road. Three are coming
to the Visitor Centre feeders.

Boreal Chickadee: One was observed at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on December 13.

WINTER FINCHES:
Pine Grosbeak: Small groups continue to be seen regularly picking up grit
along Highway 60. A few are coming to seed on the ground below the Visitor
Centre feeders.

Red Crossbill: One was reported at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on December 13.

Common Redpoll: A few were noted flying over along Highway 60.

American Goldfinch: One was at the Visitor Centre feeder on December 19.

Evening Grosbeak: Occasionally at the Visitor Centre feeders.

 

 

Re(2): Gravenhurst-Bracebridge Christmas Bird Count Results
Posted on December 20, 2012 at 06:04:39 PM by Al Sinclair

Red-throated Loon was on Lake Muskoka off Muskoka Beach close to one of the islands that has a flagpole, Baldrock Is possibly. Seen by Dan Burton.
I am working on some comments about the numbers, stay tuned.

 

 

Re(1): Gravenhurst-Bracebridge Christmas Bird Count Results
Posted on December 20, 2012 at 03:14:55 PM by coreyhkh

Are those numbers about normal? Also where did was the RED-THROATED LOON seen?

 

 

Gravenhurst-Bracebridge Christmas Bird Count Results
Posted on December 20, 2012 at 02:58:41 PM by Al Sinclair

Count Date December 16, 2012
temperature -2C to +1C freezing rain and rain
snow cover zero to 2 cm, lakes and rivers open
2701 individuals of 36 species counted
New for the count: Red-throated Loon

RED-THROATED LOON 1
CANADA GOOSE 1
MALLARD 52
COMMON GOLDENEYE 88
BUFFLEHEAD 83
COMMON MERGANSER 17
RED-TAILED HAWK 1
BALD EAGLE COUNT WEEK
RUFFED GROUSE 6
WILD TURKEY 84
RING-BILLED GULL 25
HERRING GULL 376
GLAUCOUS GULL 1
ROCK PIGEON 32
MOURNING DOVE 85
BARRED OWL 1
DOWNY WOODPECKER 14
HAIRY WOODPECKER 20
PILEATED WOODPECKER 3
BLUE JAY 39
AMERICAN CROW 64
COMMON RAVEN 30
BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE 485
RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH 20
WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH 27
BROWN CREEPER 6
GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET COUNT WEEK
NORTHERN SHRIKE 1
EUROPEAN STARLING 740
NORTHERN CARDINAL 13
AMERICAN TREE SPARROW 15
DARK-EYED JUNCO 19
SNOW BUNTING 155
COMMON GRACKLE 2
PINE GROSBEAK 31
COMMON REDPOLL 129
AMERICAN GOLDFINCH 25
EVENING GROSBEAK COUNT WEEK
HOUSE SPARROW 10

36 species plus 3 in count week
Species Seen by: Gravenhurst Team 36 - Bracebridge Team 26
Note:the Bracebridge Landfill was closed in 2012.

19 counters
Janice House, Dianna Wolfe, Rob Wilson, Allyn Abbott, Cyril & Marion Fry, Rosemarie Hinzmann, Ron Stager, Dan Burton, Marilee Koenderink, Linda Boon, Donna Millar, Al Sinclair, Bill Dickinson, Stephanie Lehman, Vicki Govan, David, Regan, & Mara Goodyear

 

 

Re(1): Great Gray Owl in Algonquin Park (again!)
Posted on December 21, 2012 at 07:58:30 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Dec. 21, 2012) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

A Great Gray Owl was observed as it perched on a utility wire at km 35.3 on
Highway 60 at dusk today. This location is just east of the eastern end of
Lake of Two Rivers. As I have noted previously, there is no guarantee that
the bird will be present there tomorrow but it would be a good place to
look.

 

 

Great Gray Owl in Algonquin Park
Posted on December 20, 2012 at 02:25:25 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Dec. 20, 2012) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

One was perched on the utility wire that crosses Highway 60 at km 22.3 at
8:30 this morning. (This is where the old railway embankment meets the
highway, for old-time Algonquin people!)

The owl flew into the woods as the observer watched. As with other sightings
of this species here recently, it may not be easy to re-find the bird.
Looking near dawn or dusk may be most productive.

Ron Tozer
Dwight, ON

 

 

Snowy Owl
Posted on December 20, 2012 at 12:22:03 PM by diannawolfe

On Monday evening, a Snowy Owl flushed in our headlights from the side of Kilworthy Road as we drove by it (approximately 750 m west of Hwy 11). It hasn't been relocated since.

Unfortunately, it is outside of the CBC circle...

 

 

Re(2): Usual suspects
Posted on December 20, 2012 at 01:07:15 PM by Debbie Adams

Yes they do! I put fresh seed out for the Pine Grosbeaks then along come the deer and mallards. Turkey often show up too.

 

 

Re(1): Usual suspects
Posted on December 20, 2012 at 10:44:22 AM by coreyhkh

Hi do the Mallards eat the seed?

 

 

Usual suspects
Posted on December 20, 2012 at 10:07:49 AM by Debbie Adams

In, on and around our feeder right now are 3 deer, 10 mallards, a Pileated pecking at the suet cage, 2 female Pine Grosbeaks, 9 Mourning Doves, a number of Jays, Chickadees, Nuthatches and several Downy and Hairy woodpeckers in the trees annoyed that the Pileated is hogging the suet, plus 3 Red Squirrels. All the usual suspects.
(Walker's Point)

 

 

Re(2): Snow buntings
Posted on December 20, 2012 at 07:26:45 PM by Terry & Marion Whittam

Yes John. Just up the hill east of MacArthur side road about 150m. The homeowner has a feeding area he clears south of Coopers Falls Rd. 100s of rock doves and he has had up to 50 Buntings.

 

 

Re(1): Snow buntings
Posted on December 20, 2012 at 02:04:38 PM by John Challis

Just past Macarthur Sideroad?

 

 

Snow buntings
Posted on December 19, 2012 at 03:51:58 PM by Terry & Marion Whittam

30+ Snow buntings at 1835 Coopers Falls Rd today east of Washago. I spoke with the homeowner and he said the Buntings arrived about 2 weeks ago. He has feed them every year now for over 25 years! They just keep coming back!

 

 

Snowdrops
Posted on December 19, 2012 at 11:10:45 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Not in Muskoka but my brother has snowdrops blooming in his garden in Toronto!

 

 

Re(1): Golden-crowned Kinglets Bracebridge
Posted on December 19, 2012 at 02:26:33 PM by coreyhkh

I still see them in the London Area If we don't get much snow they may end up staying all winter.

 

 

Re(1): Golden-crowned Kinglets Bracebridge
Posted on December 18, 2012 at 09:29:33 PM by Alex Mills

Despite hard looking, the 5 parties that covered the Burk's Falls CBC last Friday couldn't find a single Golden-crowned Kinglet. We did find several Bald eagles though.

 

 

Golden-crowned Kinglets Bracebridge
Posted on December 18, 2012 at 06:35:07 PM by Al Sinclair

We had a small group (4?)of GCKIs pass through our yard this morning. We can count them and the eagle on the Christmas Bird Count as count week birds (3 days before or after count day).

 

 

Re(1): Bald Eagle Bracebridge
Posted on December 19, 2012 at 02:30:05 PM by coreyhkh

I have seen a large number of Bald Eagles this year especially down south here. We seem to have a rather large population in the London area. I have seen at least one eagle every time I have gone any where and the norm is 3 to 6 a day. We have one that hangs out at one of the parks near downtown.

Its good to see them coming back.

 

 

Bald Eagle Bracebridge
Posted on December 18, 2012 at 06:28:50 PM by Al Sinclair

Reported by John Purchase.
bald eagle (adult - white head and tail) up over town today at about 3:00 p.m. It appeared to be following down river.

 

 

Gull
Posted on December 18, 2012 at 06:17:14 PM by CatMacLean

Still at least one gull hanging around the Huntsville Place Mall

 

 

Goldfinches
Posted on December 18, 2012 at 12:12:33 PM by Barbara Taylor

Just had a small flock of American Goldfinch come to our feeder. Haven't seen any for several weeks. Perhaps this mild weather is encouraging the birds to wander around more. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Redpolls, Bala
Posted on December 18, 2012 at 12:05:17 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

In my presentation to the MFN I showed pictures of redpolls feeding on seeds in Prairie Meadow plants.

Right now, there are at least 2 dozen redpolls feeding on Evening Primrose seeds 5 ft from my kitchen window! Love it!

 

 

Re(1): Pine Grosbeak
Posted on December 20, 2012 at 00:08:02 AM by DBurton

On Dec 5th there was one on Ann but on the opposite side of Manitoba in a spruce tree. I think you have a very good chance of it still being there.

 

 

Pine Grosbeak
Posted on December 18, 2012 at 09:05:20 AM by janice house

I got to work this morning and was greeted by a pine grosbeak calling from the top of a spruce tree, corner of Ann & Hiram in Bracebridge. Of course my binoculars are at home.

 

 

Common Redpolls
Posted on December 17, 2012 at 07:39:32 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there was a flock of about 30 Redpolls feeding in some birch trees at the NW end of the Meadow Heights Dr. loop. (Bracebridge)

 

 

3 pileated woodpeckers
Posted on December 17, 2012 at 09:19:33 AM by gaylecarlyle

On Friday morning I saw 3 pileated woodpeckers in the bush behind our home in Washago.
One bird was perched in a tree, another flew near it and then one flew over my head towards the other 2.
All 3 took off across the Green River.
We have these magnificent birds visting our area frequently; lots of dead/dying trees.

 

 

Re(1): Great Gray Owl in Algonquin Park
Posted on December 17, 2012 at 08:09:34 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Dec. 17, 2012) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

One was seen perched on the utility line at km 19.5 on the south side of
Highway 60 at dusk today. This location is just west of the Algonquin Art
Centre at Found Lake.

Please note that recent observations of this species here have often been
single-day occurrences.

Ron Tozer
Dwight, ON

 

 

Great Gray Owl - Algonquin Park
Posted on December 15, 2012 at 02:14:35 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Justin Peter on ONTBIRDS (Dec. 15, 2012, 1:31 p.m.) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Hi Everyone,
We just got a report of a Great Gray Owl that flew across Highway 60 between km 22 and km 23. This may be one of the birds that were in that very area several weeks ago.
Good birding!
Justin

 

 

Tues Dec11 Barred Owl
Posted on December 14, 2012 at 04:47:57 PM by BryanGrant

Spotted a Barred Owl on the power lines at about noon while driving Vankoughnet rd just off 118hwy.

 

 

Re(1): Northern Shrike - Henry Marsh
Posted on December 15, 2012 at 12:10:30 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there was an immature Northern Shrike perched in an alder close to the trail as you enter the woods heading east from the marsh. There were 17 Common Redpolls feeding in a larch near the pipeline, and two Common Ravens were "playing" in the skies above. A Pileated Woodpecker was calling from the woods west of Henry Marsh.

 

 

Barred Owl - Henry Rd.
Posted on December 14, 2012 at 12:48:43 PM by Barbara Taylor

At noon today there was a Barred Owl perched in a tree at the west side of the Henry Rd. parking area. Several Black-capped Chickadees, Red-breasted and White-breasted Nuthatches, and a couple Brown Creepers were "mobbing" it. Earlier, a Red-tailed Hawk was perched in a dead tree near the "T" in the trail at Henry Marsh. A Pileated Woodpecker flew past the hawk at close range, "clucking" loudly as it went by, and then perched in a snag near the back of the marsh. No sign of the Boreal Chickadee along the trail between the marsh and the Bracebridge Ponds. A few Ruffed Grouse tracks criss-crossed the trail in places, but didn't see one. There was a set of Mink tracks in the snow going down into the NW corner of cell 4 and along the north side where there are a few Muskrat huts...guess that will put a dent in the muskrat population.

Directions: From traffic lights at Wellington St. & Ecclestone Dr. in Bracebridge, take Beaumont Dr. along the Muskoka River and turn left at Henry Rd.
Area Map with trails marked (at upper right of map, click Satellite for terrain, or Map for roads only)

 

 

Re(2): Swimming Deer
Posted on December 15, 2012 at 02:29:11 PM by Debbie Adams

I couldn't see if they made it to Eileen Gowan Island due to the trees in the way, but that's where they seem to be headed. It was odd that they didn't simply go straight across to Browning Is., it was closer. The deer were in the frigid water for such a long time that I was wondering about hypothermia. Despite having a thick layer of fat for winter, surely it must affect them?

 

 

Re(1): Swimming Deer
Posted on December 15, 2012 at 01:10:49 PM by Barbara Taylor

Wow, that is a long swim! Did they finally make a landing on Eilean Gowan?

 

 

Swimming Deer
Posted on December 14, 2012 at 11:45:31 AM by Debbie Adams

For the past half hour, I've been watching 2 deer do a marathon swim in Lake Muskoka from near Montcalm Pt. past Browning Island and heading towards Eileen Gowan. Amazing!
(Walker's Point)

 

 

More info on Christmas Bird Counts
Posted on December 14, 2012 at 12:09:35 PM by Al Sinclair

http://www.bsc-eoc.org/volunteer/cbc/index.jsp?targetpg=cbcparticpate&lang=EN

 

 

Gravenhurst-Bracebridge Christmas Bird Count Sunday
Posted on December 14, 2012 at 10:05:00 AM by Al Sinclair

Gravenhurst-Bracebridge Christmas Bird Count is this Sunday Dec 16. Come out and join a group to count all the birds in a 24 km (15 mile) diameter circle. A fun day that collects data on bird populations and distribution. Potluck to follow. Everyone welcome. Send me an email for more information.

 

 

Algonquin Park Bird Report: 13 December
Posted on December 14, 2012 at 08:57:56 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Dec. 13, 2012) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.


There is now about 6 cm of snow on the ground, and all lakes along Highway
60 except Canoe, Smoke and Two Rivers are ice-covered.

A Great Gray Owl was seen from about km 36 to 37 along Highway 60 on
December 11 and 12 , but was not reported today.

Observers have been unable to relocate the Northern Hawk Owl that was last
seen along Opeongo Road on December 3.

BOREAL SPECIALTIES:
Spruce Grouse: Try Opeongo Road and Wolf Howl Pond/West Rose Lake.

Black-backed Woodpecker: One was 300 metres north of the bridge on Opeongo
Road on December 7.

Gray Jay: Regular at Wolf Howl Pond/West Rose Lake, Spruce Bog Boardwalk,
and Opeongo Road. Two are coming to the Visitor Centre feeders.

Boreal Chickadee: Try Opeongo Road and Wolf Howl Pond/West Rose Lake.

WINTER FINCHES:
Pine Grosbeak: They are being seen regularly along Highway 60, such as a
total of 46 at nine locations between the West Gate and the Visitor Centre
on December 9. A few are coming to seed on the ground below the Visitor
Centre feeders daily.

Red Crossbill: Two were heard calling in flight over the Visitor Centre on
December 4.

White-winged Crossbill: Two were observed on Opeongo Road on December 7.

Common Redpoll: A few were reported along Highway 60.

American Goldfinch: Two came to the Visitor Centre feeder on December 7 but
did not return, probably indicative of the continued movement of finches.

Evening Grosbeak: Two were irregularly at the Visitor Centre feeders this
week.

 

 

Re(1): Pine Grosbeaks
Posted on December 13, 2012 at 06:06:24 PM by Debbie Adams

We've had 2 females for the past month. We've never had Pine Grosbeaks before. Here's hoping these two will stay around all winter.
(Walker's Point)

 

 

Pine Grosbeaks
Posted on December 13, 2012 at 04:22:39 PM by ArtPearse

3 pine grosbeaks on Bonnell Rd for last 2 weeks. Now snow on ground they seem to arrive under feeder between 3 and 4 PM and don't stay long.
Haven't been seeing any grosbeaks all summer & Fall

 

 

Re(1): Common Redpoll
Posted on December 14, 2012 at 08:07:21 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

For the past couple of weeks I saw a single redpoll once a day. My theory was that there was a flock feeding in the area and they sent out a scout to see if it could find greener pastures. They decided my place wasn't it.

Then on Wednesday there were 4, Thursday 10 and this morning more than 20. It would be nice if they stayed!

 

 

Re(1): Common Redpoll
Posted on December 13, 2012 at 09:53:57 PM by dinnymccraney

Beautiful pictures! But have had the same lack of birds here.(Bracebridge) I emptied, cleaned and refilled all the feeders yesterday and still didn't see much today. Perhaps they are all at Barbara's!

 

 

Common Redpoll
Posted on December 13, 2012 at 03:01:36 PM by tedthevideoman

Had a brief visit from 20 plus Redpolls yesterday...a pleasant sight as its been very quiet at our feeders the last 3 weeks. Even our resident Blue Jays have not been in!...very strange?
photo  There are 4 more shots on my blog www.t-boneimages.blogspot.com

 

 

Common Grackle
Posted on December 13, 2012 at 09:59:20 AM by janice house

I spotted the bird in my white birch tree this morning about 8am, Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst

 

 

Re(2): Great Gray Owl in Algonquin Park: Update
Posted on December 13, 2012 at 03:59:47 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

I did not find the owl between 8:30 am & 1 pm today.

3 Pine Grosbeaks seen on Hwy 60 at KM 9.5 this morning on the way to try for the Great Gray Owl.

Five Gray Jays at the bridge on Opeongo Rd. Also, BC Chickadees.

One mink along Costello Creek, 1 doe with 1 fawn, 1 Red Fox on the road up to the Visitor Centre.

 

 

Re(1): Great Gray Owl in Algonquin Park: Update
Posted on December 12, 2012 at 01:08:14 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Dec. 12, 2012, 12:06 p.m.) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

The Great Gray Owl is now being observed at km 37 on Highway 60.

Ron Tozer
Dwight, Ontario

 

 

Great Gray Owl in Algonquin Park
Posted on December 12, 2012 at 01:04:20 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Dec. 12, 2012) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

A Great Gray Owl was seen at dusk yesterday (December 11) on the north side
of Highway 60 near km 36, just west of the parking lot.

Heavy snow squalls are frequent here today.

DIRECTIONS:
Algonquin Provincial Park (fee) is three hours north of Toronto, via
Highways 400, 11 and 60. Follow the signs which start in Toronto on Highway
400. From Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the
park. Kilometre markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from the
West Gate (km 0) to near the East Gate (km 56).

Ron Tozer
Dwight, Ontario

 

 

Bohemian Waxwings, Huntsville
Posted on December 11, 2012 at 11:53:21 AM by StephenDerraugh

13 Bohemian Waxwings feasting on my now, I am sure, well fermented Prunus serotina berries. Wondering if there will be a Sharpie lurking somewhere, awaiting a meal, too!?!?

I wish they'd leave so I could get some work done as I am on deadline :) Gorgeous birds and fun to watch!

From atop 'Mount Florence'(St W), Huntsville.

 

 

Great blue heron
Posted on December 10, 2012 at 10:55:42 AM by GayleCarlyle

We were surprised to see a GBH fly over our house on Saturday morning.
Hopefully it either survives the winter or manages to head south in time. (Washago)

 

 

Red-tailed Hawk
Posted on December 9, 2012 at 02:01:47 PM by Barbara Taylor

At the Bracebridge Ponds around 12:30 p.m. today there was a Red-tailed Hawk perched in a birch tree on the hill behind the new treatment plant. (all the cells are completely frozen over except for a very small area in cell 3 near the treatment plant - no ducks)

 

 

Re(1): Boreal Chickadee - still there
Posted on December 11, 2012 at 12:26:14 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning around 11 a.m. we found the Boreal Chickadee foraging on the ground at the north side of the trail about half way between Henry Marsh and "the dip" in the trail heading east from the marsh. There is a square green trail marker on a tree at the south side of the trail in the general vicinity. The Boreal Chickadee was very active, but didn't make a sound. It looked for food around the base of each tree and tried to pull up matted frozen leaves to check for anything edible underneath. There weren't any other birds with it, but as we were walking out to the marsh from Henry Rd., we had heard some Black-capped Chickadees calling from the woods east of Henry Trail.

Directions: see Area Map

 

 

Boreal Chickadee
Posted on December 9, 2012 at 12:13:29 PM by Goodyear

This morning around 11:30 we saw a Boreal Chickadee in "The Dip", along the trail from the Bracebridge Lagoons to Henry Marsh. It was foraging close to the trail on top of a fallen tree. It called a couple of times, and then flew farther back into the woods on the north side of the trail. It appeared to be associating with a small flock of Black-capped Chickadees.

 

 

5 species of gulls, Haliburton
Posted on December 8, 2012 at 03:04:28 PM by EdPoropat

Only 7 days to the Minden Christmas Bird Count and there are still plenty of birds and open water around. Although not in the circle, the following gulls are still lingering in Haliburton, mostly at the dump:

Iceland Gull - 2 first winter birds (dump)
Glaucous Gull - 1 darker first winter individual (Grass Lake)
Great Black-backed Gull - 1 first winter bird (dump)
Ring-billed Gull - still 2 adults (Head Lake)
Herring Gull - 200+ birds of various ages

Good birding!
Ed Poropat
Haliburton, ON

 

 

Robin
Posted on December 7, 2012 at 02:57:33 PM by janice house

Geoff saw a robin around noon today in our back yard, Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst

 

 

Algonquin Park Bird Report: 6 December
Posted on December 6, 2012 at 10:14:50 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Dec. 6, 2012) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

NORTHERN HAWK OWL
Relatively few birders reported this week. Unusual for the date, all the
snow has melted. The larger lakes are wide open.

A Northern Hawk Owl was observed in the Costello Creek Bog on the east side
of Opeongo Road, north of the bridge, from at least December 1 to 3. It may
still be in the area.

BOREAL SPECIALTIES:
Spruce Grouse: One was along the railway embankment between the chain gate
and Wolf Howl Pond, accessed via Arowhon Road on December 1.

Black-backed Woodpecker: No reports. Try Opeongo Road.

Gray Jay: Regular at Wolf Howl Pond/West Rose Lake, Spruce Bog Boardwalk,
and Opeongo Road. Two are coming to the Visitor Centre feeders.

Boreal Chickadee: No reports. Try Opeongo Road and Wolf Howl Pond/West Rose
Lake.

WINTER FINCHES:
Pine Grosbeak: A few are being seen regularly along Highway 60. Six or seven
are coming to seed on the ground below the Visitor Centre feeders daily.

Red Crossbill: Two were heard calling in flight over the Visitor Centre on
December 4.

Common Redpoll: A few were reported along Highway 60.

Evening Grosbeak: Two were fairly regular at the Visitor
Centre feeders again this week.

DIRECTIONS:

Algonquin Provincial Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways
400, 11 and 60. Follow the signs which start in Toronto on Highway 400.
From Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the
park. Kilometre markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from the
West Gate (km 0) to near the East Gate (km 56).

Get your park permit and the park tabloid (with a map of birding locations
mentioned here) at the gates.

Locations are also described at: www. algonquinpark.on.ca

The Visitor Centre at km 43 has recent bird sightings, feeders and
information. The Visitor Centre restaurant is not open in winter but
visitors are welcome to bring a packed lunch and use the seating area.
Hot and cold beverages, and light snacks are available to purchase, as well
as the use of a microwave.

The Visitor Centre is open on weekends from 9 am to 5 pm. Birders visiting
during the week are usually able to enter the Visitor Centre to view the
feeders and exhibits. Check in with staff to find out what birds are being
seen.

For more information see Algonquin Park events calendar at:
http://www.algonquinpark.on.ca/involved/calendar/

Good Birding!
Ron Tozer
Dwight, Ontario

_____________________________________________
ONTBIRDS is presented by the Ontario Field Ornithologists - the provincial birding organization.
Send bird reports to birdalert@ontbirds.ca
For information about ONTBIRDS visit http://www.ofo.ca/

 

 

Re(3): Redpolls
Posted on December 7, 2012 at 08:17:46 PM by dinnymccraney

My solitary one was here again today...guess he got lost!

 

 

Re(2): Redpolls
Posted on December 7, 2012 at 02:45:28 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there was a flock of about 25 Common Redpolls feeding in some birch trees at the north side of Meadow Heights Dr., a short distance west of Kevin Cres. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Red Polls
Posted on December 6, 2012 at 09:37:03 PM by dinnymccraney

Had one lonely little one here today (Bracebridge)

 

 

Red Polls
Posted on December 5, 2012 at 10:16:43 AM by BryanGrant

About 15 small birds moving as a group were at the backyard feeder late morning. They moved short distances from one area of cover to an other and stayed as a group. They appear to be red polls. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Georgian Bay Turtle Hospital -- semi-final voting has begun
Posted on December 4, 2012 at 03:27:33 PM by diannawolfe

This is a follow-up to the original post on October 29 and has been approved by the administrator.

The Georgian Bay Turtle Hospital made it through to the semi-finals of the Aviva Community Funding competition, but needs your continued support until December 12th to obtain funding.

Every summer, hundreds if not thousands of turtles are critically injured and die on the roads of Parry Sound-Muskoka. Road mortality is the leading cause of turtle population declines, with all but one of our local turtle species considered to be species at risk. The Georgian Bay Turtle Hospital is a not-for-profit concept to reduce road-related turtle mortality, put forward by Jeff Hathaway, owner/operator of Scales Nature Park in Orillia, with input from the Kawartha Turtle Trauma Centre. Jeff has local veterinary support, experienced and qualified personnel, and sufficient facilities, but he needs substantial funding for site modifications and equipment to get the turtle hospital off the ground. As such, he entered into a funding competition through Aviva Insurance and after preliminary voting in Oct-November, has made it to the semi-finals. The public can vote daily online until December 12, with the top 10 projects in each budget category receiving funding. The Georgian Bay Turtle Hospital is currently 15th out of the 31 projects in its budget level.

Please consider supporting this worthy conservation effort by taking a few minutes to register at the website below and voting every day until noon on December 12.

Please note that if you choose to support the turtle hospital project by submitting a vote, you will be required to register on a commercial website. The Muskoka Bird Board does not endorse or recommend any commercial entities. Product or services advertisements are not permitted on the board without prior approval by the administrator.

Link to vote for the Georgian Bay Turtle Hospital

 

 

cardinals
Posted on December 4, 2012 at 01:45:09 PM by plainjane

Saw our first cardinal ever outside the village of Vankoughnet. i know they are at feeders in Bracebridge and Gravenhurst, but had never seen one this far out of "town". We also have a flock of about 20 pine grosbeaks.

 

 

Great Grey Owl
Posted on December 4, 2012 at 11:47:19 AM by Cliff1

Yesterday, my wife & I spotted a Great Grey Owl on the north portion of the OFSC trail (snowmobile) paralleling the Twelve Mile Bay Road.
Cliff Rummenie

 

 

Spring peepers
Posted on December 4, 2012 at 08:48:11 AM by GayleCarlyle

Can't believe it's Dec. 4th!
We heard at least 4 spring peepers this morning peeping in our wetland at about 6:50am.
Poor mixed up little critters.

 

 

Re(1): Female Pileated
Posted on December 4, 2012 at 11:50:21 AM by janice house

We have had both the male and female coming to our suet feeder almost everyday for 3 weeks. They also like the peanut feeder. Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst

 

 

Female Pileated
Posted on December 3, 2012 at 07:23:36 PM by dinnymccraney

A female Pileated woodpecker was at the suet log this morning. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Snow Buntings
Posted on December 4, 2012 at 11:52:48 AM by janice house

I have seen and heard a few birds in the farm field across from our house in the last few weeks. Yesterday morning a single bird was calling and circling over head as I walked the dogs. Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst

 

 

Snow Buntings
Posted on December 3, 2012 at 02:12:11 PM by Barbara Taylor

Don Bailey reports there were about 50 Snow Buntings feeding in the weedy field between Home Depot and Walmart this morning. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Muskrats
Posted on December 3, 2012 at 01:57:22 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning at the Bracebridge Ponds there were seven Muskrats in cell 4. They were diving down in the open patches of water to retrieve clumps of vegetation (looked like algae), and then they would climb up on the ice to consume it. That's all we saw at the Ponds except for six Mallards flying north towards the Muskoka River and one Ring-billed Gull flying south. All the cells were frozen over except parts of cell 4 and a small area in cell 3 near the treatment plant.

 

 

Re(1): Belted Kingfisher
Posted on December 6, 2012 at 11:53:33 AM by jim griffin

Kingfisher seen again this morning in front of my place on the river.

 

 

Belted Kingfisher
Posted on December 3, 2012 at 07:46:17 AM by jim griffin

I heard and saw a Kingfisher at noon Nov.30 on the river at Port Sydney

 

 

Haliburton birds...
Posted on December 2, 2012 at 07:24:29 PM by EdPoropat

There are a fair number of good birds in or near the village of Haliburton.

Today, I had the following gulls at the Haliburton Dump:

Iceland Gull - all first winter birds, at least 3 and possibly 4 individuals

Glaucous Gull - 2 first winter birds present. One very pale, the other more tawny. There was also a tawny first winter bird at the Minden Dump.

Great Black-backed Gull - 1 first winter bird. Thom Lambert had 3 adults on Grass Lake (about 0.5 km S of the dump) earlier in the week.

Many (100+) Herrings still loafing, and at least 3 adult Ring-billed Gulls on Head Lake in town.

Bald Eagle - 1 adult at Head Lake, Haliburton.

Golden Eagle - 1 observed by Thom Lambert at the outflow dam on Twelve Mile Lake, N of Minden.

Pine Grosbeaks and Bohemian Waxwings are still being seen regularly around town. Common Redpolls appear to be increasing in numbers.

Cheers,

Ed Poropat
Haliburton, ON
 

 

 

N. Hawk Owl, Algonquin
Posted on December 1, 2012 at 04:23:33 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Keith Linton on ONTBIRDS (Dec. 1, 2012) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

1:20pm - Hawk Owl spotted hunting from several tree tops in marshland east of Opeongo Road just north of the narrow bridge.
Opeongo Road is near km48 of HWY 60 in Algonquin Prov Park, about 3hrs north of Toronto.
Keith and Bethany Linton
_______________________________________________
ONTBIRDS is presented by the Ontario Field Ornithologists - the provincial birding organization.
Send bird reports to birdalert@ontbirds.ca
For information about ONTBIRDS visit http://www.ofo.ca/

 

 

Re(4): Bird Board...text size adjustment
Posted on December 3, 2012 at 06:43:28 AM by Debbie Adams

Yes! Great job. Thank you Barbara.

 

 

Re(3): Bird Board...text size adjustment
Posted on December 2, 2012 at 09:27:56 PM by dinnymccraney

I agree wholeheartedly...great job, Barbara. Your efforts are very much appreciated

 

 

Re(2): Bird Board...text size adjustment
Posted on December 2, 2012 at 01:24:15 PM by J. Gardner

While you are at your "work" desk, Barbara... Thanks for putting in your time and talent so that we can share our sightings and interests with those in the area who share the "passion". J. Gardner Hurdville

 

 

Re(1): Bird Board...text size adjustment
Posted on December 2, 2012 at 09:58:32 AM by Barbara Taylor

Because the Archived Reports webpages have been moved to the MFN webspace (i.e., a different web address), you may have to adjust your browser's "view-zoom" setting so the text size becomes larger. Once adjusted to your liking, your browser will remember the setting so you shouldn't have to change it again.

Or you can quickly enlarge the text size by holding down the Ctrl key on your keyboard while tapping the + key. (while holding down the Ctrl key, tapping the - key will make the text smaller, and tapping the zero key will return the text size to the default.)

Or if you have a mouse with a scroll wheel, hold down the Ctrl key on your keyboard and scroll the wheel up or down to adjust the text size.

(note: these methods work with any webpage in a browser on a PC - not sure about Macs)

 

 

Bird Board Update...
Posted on December 1, 2012 at 03:22:17 PM by Barbara Taylor

Bird Board Update

Archived Reports
I was running out of storage space for the Archived Reports, but the Muskoka Field Naturalists have come to the rescue. You won't notice any difference in how you access the Archives, but they are now stored on the MFN webspace (up in their "cloud" so to speak). Thanks to the MFN, you will continue to be able to view any of the historical reports online, or you can download the complete set of archived reports to your computer. Visit the "Archived Reports" link near the top of the Bird Board.

New to the Bird Board?
Check out the "Posting Guidelines" link near the top of the Bird Board. I've included several handy tips about using the board. And if you want to do a test post or learn how to post a photo in your message, go to the Nature Photos Board and give it try. You don't need to register before posting on that board.

Thanks to everyone for all your posts.

Barbara Taylor
email: muskoka_birder@hotmail.com

 

 

Muskoka Field Naturalists - next meeting December 6
Posted on November 30, 2012 at 02:24:44 PM by Barbara Taylor

MFN meeting Thursday, December 6, at 7:30 p.m., in Bracebridge

Presentation - Drinking Buddies & Bathing Beauties by nature photographer Eleanor Kee Wellman
It’s about birds, really! This is a program of images taken by Eleanor of birding activities at a small water feature.

Silent Auction - Members donate items that will inspire the shrewd bidder to spend BIG bucks! The proceeds support the activities of the club.

Baked Goodies - The ladies renew their Christmas baking skills and share the goodies and non-alcoholic/non-caffeinated refreshments with the members.

Meetings from September through January are held in Bracebridge at the Church of the Latter Day Saints at the corner of Taylor Road and Cedar Lane - entrance on Cedar Lane south of the traffic circle. Unless otherwise indicated, all meetings commence at 7:30 p.m. Visitors welcome to attend.
(source: MFN website - http://www.muskokafieldnaturalists.com)

 

 

Algonquin Park Bird Report: 29 November
Posted on November 29, 2012 at 10:22:20 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Nov. 29, 2012) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

BALD EAGLE
GOLDEN EAGLE
HORNED LARK

There has been up to 8 cm of snow on the ground since Saturday, and smaller
lakes and ponds are now ice-covered.

An adult Bald Eagle was tearing apart prey on the small rocky island in Lake
of Two Rivers on November 25, and one was reported on Arowhon Road the
same day.

A juvenile Golden Eagle low over the north end of Opeongo Road provided
a great view for one observer on November 25.

A Horned Lark on the lawn of the Smoke Lake Hangar on November 27 was
six days later than our previous latest date for this species.

BOREAL SPECIALTIES:
Spruce Grouse: One was along Opeongo Road in the black spruce section on
November 22.

Black-backed Woodpecker: Two males were along Opeongo Road north of
the bridge on November 27.

Gray Jay: Best places continue to be Wolf Howl Pond/West Rose Lake,
Spruce Bog Boardwalk, and Opeongo Road.

Boreal Chickadee: Two were noted 300 metres beyond the chain gate along
the railway to Wolf Howl Pond on November 22. The northern black spruce
section of Opeongo Road produced four, and one was at Spruce Bog
Boardwalk, on November 27.

WINTER FINCHES: Numbers are relatively low, with few being attracted
to the highway even after fresh sanding and salting.

Pine Grosbeak: Two birders noted a total of 18 on the Arowhon and Opeongo
Roads on November 27. One or two are fairly regular now feeding on seed on
the ground below the Visitor Centre feeders.

Red Crossbill: Noted at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on November 27.

White-winged Crossbill: Observed at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on November 27.

Common Redpoll: Reported at West Rose Lake on November 27, and one
small flock was on Highway 60 today.

Evening Grosbeak: From one to three were fairly regular at the Visitor
Centre feeders this week.

DIRECTIONS:
Algonquin Provincial Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways
400, 11 and 60.

Follow the signs which start in Toronto on Highway 400.
From Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the
park. Kilometre markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from the
West Gate (km 0) to near the East Gate (km 56).

Get your park permit and the park tabloid (with a map of birding locations
mentioned here) at the gates.

Locations are also described at:
www. algonquinpark.on.ca

The Visitor Centre at km 43 has recent bird sightings, feeders and
information. The Visitor Centre restaurant is not open in winter but
visitors are welcome to bring a packed lunch and use the seating area.
Hot and cold beverages, and light snacks are available to purchase, as well
as the use of a microwave.

The Visitor Centre is open on weekends from 9 am to 5 pm. Birders visiting
during the week are usually able to enter the Visitor Centre to view the
feeders and exhibits. Check in with staff to find out what birds are being
seen.

For more information see Algonquin Park events calendar at:
http://www.algonquinpark.on.ca/involved/calendar/

Good Birding!
Ron Tozer
Dwight, Ontario

 

 

Red-bellied Woodpecker
Posted on November 29, 2012 at 09:32:57 PM by Goodyear

The Red-bellied Woodpecker that George Moroz has coming to his feeder in Bracebridge was indeed there around noon again today. As he stated in his response to a November 13 sighting elsewhere(see Nov 13 posts below)he has had a Red-bellied visiting daily around noon for about three weeks. Thanks for the post, George!

 

 

American Robin in Dwight
Posted on November 29, 2012 at 11:39:18 AM by Rick Stronks

We had a robin at our feeders this morning for about 10 minutes. Not a common sight in our area at this time of year.

 

 

Re(1): Price of sunflower seeds
Posted on November 29, 2012 at 07:58:16 AM by Wayne Bridge

In fact, the price of black oil sunflower has dropped dramatically over the last couple of months. I sell a 40lb. bag (The West Algonquin Nature Store, Kearney)for $29.95. COSTCO is, apparently, selling the same size for less than my wholesale cost. When oil sunflower prices peaked late last winter, I could buy it cheaper from WalMart in Huntsville than I could from my supplier. However, it's anybody's guess how old WalMart's stock was. I am a small, out-of-the-way store (affecting consumer traffic and shipping charges) so I would hope that you can get a 40 lb. bag in the Bracebridge area for less than $29.95. Hope this helps.

 

 

Price of sunflower seeds
Posted on November 29, 2012 at 07:18:38 AM by FrancesGualtieri

I remember someone mentioned earlier that the price of sunflower seed has risen sharply. Where are members buying, to get the best price?

 

 

Re(1): Barred Owl
Posted on November 28, 2012 at 09:38:55 AM by GayleCarlyle

We had one perched in a tree near our feeders a few weeks ago in the evening.
I'm hoping it was picking off mice or squirrels looking for a late night snack.
(Washago)

 

 

Barred Owl
Posted on November 28, 2012 at 09:21:40 AM by Barbara Taylor

Several Blue Jays were making a ruckus behind our shed this morning. I went out to check, and the Barred Owl was back, perched above our brush pile, probably hoping for a careless Red Squirrel to make an appearance. There were lots of little squirrel tracks in the freshly fallen snow. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Black-backed Woodpeckers, Pine Grosbeaks, etc. - Algonquin Prov. Park
Posted on November 28, 2012 at 09:02:44 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Norm Murr on ONTBIRDS (Nov. 28, 2012) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.


Yesterday, Tuesday Nov. 27th Ian Cannell and I went up to Algonquin on a beautiful late fall day. Weather was great, wind quite calm, sunny and only about 2 to 3 inches on the ground with most roads clear and following are some of the birds we found.

- Ruffed Grouse – 3 high in trees in the early morning at the West Gate
- Hairy Woodpecker – 5
- Black-backed Woodpecker – 2 adult males within a few feet of us along Opeongo Rd north of the Hermit Creek bridge
- Horned Lark – 1 along Hwy 60 – across from the start of Arowhon Rd in the grassy area where the float plane usually parks (Smoke Lake)
- Pine Grosbeak – 18 – Arowhon and Opeongo Roads
- Gray Jay – 10 – West Rose Lake, Spruce Bog parking area, and Opeongo Rd
- Red-breasted Nuthatch – 11 – all of above areas as well as the Visitor Centre feeders
- White-winged Crossbill – Spruce Bog – at east end of the boardwalk
- Red Crossbills – seen by others – same area as White-wings
- Evening Grosbeak – 3 at Visitor Centre feeders
- Boreal Chickadee – 4 – along Opeongo Rd north of the Hermit Creek bridge – another one was found by others in the same area as the Red Crossbills noted above
- Common Redpolls – West Rose Lake

Directions:- ALGONQUIN PROVINCIAL PARK - PER RON TOZER

Algonquin Provincial Park (fee) is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400,11 and 60.

Follow the signs which start in Toronto on Highway 400.From Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the park. Kilometre markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from the West Gate (km 0) to near the East Gate (km 56). Get your park permit and the park tabloid (with a map of birding locations mentioned here) at the gates.

Locations are also described at:www.algonquin park.on.ca The Visitor Centre at km 43 has recent bird sightings, feeders and in formation. The Visitor Centre restaurant is not open this winter but visitors are welcome to bring a packed lunch and use the seating area. Hot and cold beverages, and light snacks are available to purchase,as well as the use of a microwave.

The Visitor Centre is open on weekends from 9 am to 5 pm.Birders visiting during the week may be able to enter the Visitor Centre to view the feeders and exhibits. Check in with staff to find out what birds are being seen.For more information see Algonquin Park events calendar at
http://www.algonquinpark.on.ca/involved/calendar/


_______________________________________________
ONTBIRDS is presented by the Ontario Field Ornithologists - the provincial birding organization.
Send bird reports to birdalert@ontbirds.ca
For information about ONTBIRDS visit http://www.ofo.ca/

 

 

Re(2): Wild Turkeys
Posted on November 28, 2012 at 08:06:55 AM by BryanGrant

At the feeder black sunflower seeds and cracked corn

This morning across the road at 127 Covered Bridge what ever berries that remain in the tree they were roosting in
- 3 birds

 

 

Re(1): Wild Turkeys
Posted on November 27, 2012 at 09:48:15 PM by coreyhkh

col what are they eating?

 

 

Wild Turkeys
Posted on November 27, 2012 at 05:30:22 PM by BryanGrant

16 wild turkeys at my backyard feeder. Morning tracks in the snow told that the birds came and went from the beaver creek ravine. The birds were seen today returning several times throughout the day. I saw more tracks in the snow through many back yards along the trail. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Huntsville Nature Club meeting November 27
Posted on November 26, 2012 at 10:08:24 PM by BevEaston

The next meeting of the Huntsville Nature Club will be held on Tuesday, November 27, at St. Andrews Presbyterian Church Hall, on West Street, Huntsville. Guests are always welcome. A $3 donation is appreciated.

This meeting’s theme is Members Night. Ken Morrison will give an illustrated talk about the Birds of Newfoundland. Ron Tozer will present a Nature Quiz that will involve identifying plants, animals and birds, in photographs, and then answering questions about their behaviour and ecology. In addition, the club’s annual silent auction and fundraiser of nature-related books and items will take place.

For more information regarding the Huntsville Nature Club, contact Ken Morrison (705) 789-1407.

 

 

Re(3): Algonquin Park bird feeders?
Posted on November 26, 2012 at 07:45:15 PM by Ron Tozer

There were three Evening Grosbeaks and six Pine Grosbeaks at the Visitor Centre feeders today.

 

 

Re(1): Algonquin Park bird feeders?
Posted on November 26, 2012 at 08:38:48 AM by RonTozer

The Algonquin Visitor Centre feeders (km 43 on Highway 60) are currently providing seed only. Regular species at the feeders now include Blue Jays (20+), Red-breasted Nuthatch, White-breasted Nuthatch, and Black-capped Chickadee. The only winter finch species visiting the feeders involves the occasional Pine Grosbeak picking up seed on the ground.

Photographic opportunities at the Visitor Centre feeders are good, either from the Viewing Deck or on the ground near the feeders.

 

 

Algonquin Park bird feeders?
Posted on November 25, 2012 at 05:52:19 PM by coreyhkh

Hello everyone I was wondering if any of you guys have been up there in the winter and seen them, if so what type of birds do they usually get and are they in a good location to take pictures?
thanks

 

 

Golden Eagle, Algonquin
Posted on November 25, 2012 at 04:47:07 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Keith Linton on ONTBIRDS (Nov. 25, 2012) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

1:10pm - While searching for the Hawk Owl on Opeongo Road, I was surprised by a juvenile Golden Eagle flying south through the tunnel of trees over the road, 250m south of the store towards the sharp corner at the base of the lake. It continued lazily flying low, south through the valley.

I could not turn around on that narrow road fast enough to give chase, however I got a fantastic eye level view at 40 meters distance in perfect sunlight!
Opeongo Road is on the east end of Algoquin Park, off HWY 60 at around the Km48 marker.

 

 

Great Blue Heron
Posted on November 25, 2012 at 04:40:16 PM by Barb Staples

At 4:10 p.m. yesterday, a GBH flew over the southern end of Sunny Lake, Gravenhurst, heading SSE.

 

 

Bufflehead ducks
Posted on November 25, 2012 at 04:26:50 PM by BryanGrant

On Nov 23rd I saw bufflehead ducks at the ponds - pond#2 . The group of 8 had 3 males.
Also over 30 mallards were present thoughout the 4 ponds. A group of 40 Canadian geese were present Fri afternoon but not Saturday the 25th (Bracebridge Ponds)

 

 

White-winged Scoters
Posted on November 25, 2012 at 02:41:50 PM by Goodyear

There are currently 4 White-winged Scoters visible from the old Bangor Lodge property on Lake Muskoka. The birds are out near what is locally called One Tree Island. They are all young female types. Distinct face patches, light bellies, and white secondaries. Although they are well out, the area they are diving in is only about 10 -15 feet deep. Several Buffleheads, 2 winter plumaged Common Loons, and about 20 Common Goldeneye were also seen.

 

 

Iceland and Glaucous Gulls, Haliburton
Posted on November 25, 2012 at 12:32:52 PM by EdPoropat

Greetings everyone,
There is a first winter Glaucous Gull and a first winter Iceland Gull at the Haliburton Dump among 100+ Herrings and some lingering Ring-billed Gulls.
Also Pine Grosbeaks and Bohemian Waxwings are still being seen regularly on the front yard of the High School. Common Redpolls seem to be increasing.

 

 

Re(1): bird feeder poles
Posted on November 25, 2012 at 05:46:49 PM by coreyhkh

Hey I put up a bird feeder in the spring and I got a pole system at Canadian tire I would not recommend this it was too short and the and not stable.
I did a lot of research and I ended up buying the Advanced Pole System from wild birds unlimited its extremely while made and you can expand it.
Maybe call local bird shops and see if they carry it.
hope it helps
bird feeder pole system

 

 

bird feeder poles
Posted on November 25, 2012 at 09:54:34 AM by Dennis Wilks

Although I can make one myself by buying steel pipe or?, Is there anywhere locally ( Muskoka ) where these can be purchased. Would prefer a 2 piece, one pointed on the ground end and the other fitting over it and adjustable?
Thanks

 

 

bird feed
Posted on November 25, 2012 at 09:46:09 AM by Dennis Wilks

I can't recall who was asking, but I picked up an 18kg ( 40 lb ) bag of sunflower seeds from Costco this week for $20.00.

 

 

Re(2): Pine Grosbeak
Posted on November 28, 2012 at 12:34:15 PM by gerald

We have had a flock of 40 Pine Grosbeaks in Covered Bridge (Keall Cres)for the past few days. There are no more berries on any of the trees.

 

 

Re(1): Pine Grosbeak
Posted on November 25, 2012 at 09:51:15 AM by Dennis Wilks

As I reported earlier, I had a female, feeding on the ground below the feeder, earlier this week. Then a couple of days ago 2 males showed up, feeding on the ground below the feeder but did land on the feeder for a short period of time. Haven't seen them today. (South Portage Road - between Huntsville and Baysville)

 

 

Re(1): Pine Grosbeak
Posted on November 24, 2012 at 02:01:09 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there were four Pine Grosbeaks at the NE corner of Tamarack Trail and Ball's Dr. They were on the ground under the crabapple tree, trying to find leftovers as the tree has been picked clean. Didn't see any Bohemian Waxwings in the neighbourhood. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Pine Grosbeak, Bala
Posted on November 24, 2012 at 09:26:31 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

There is s single male Pine Grosbeak eating, what looks to be, tree buds in the trees by my house right now.

 

 

Sharp-shinned Hawk
Posted on November 23, 2012 at 01:21:15 PM by Barbara Taylor

Don Bailey reports there was a Sharp-shinned Hawk checking out their birdfeeder this morning, but it didn't appear to catch anything. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Northern Hawk Owl: Algonquin Provincial Park
Posted on November 23, 2012 at 12:44:49 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Bruce Kirkland on ONTBIRDS (Nov. 23, 2012) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Greetings Birders,
The Northern Hawk Owl, found by others, remained in Algonquin Provincial Park on Thursday, Nov. 22. While spending four hours birding along Opeongo Road from Highway 60 to the lake, I distinctly heard (but did not see) the owl.

At 2 pm Thursday, for about one minute, the owl loudly and repeatedly sounded its "trilling call" as it moved north in the forest on the west side of the road. This was approximately 400 to 500 metres south of the sharp left turn in the road as it approaches the end of Lake Opeongo.

Throughout the rest of the time I spent close at hand, which was half of those four hours in the general area, the bird never again called. Nor did I ever see it perched or flying.

Other interesting birds seen in the area, including on the lake: gray jay, common loon, plus flocks of both hooded and common mergansers and both ring-billed and herring gulls. At the south end of the lake, five Northern River Otter fished, cavorted, loudly snuffled and played close to Opeongo Road.

DIRECTIONS: Opeongo Road runs north from Highway 60 just 0.3 km east of milepost 46 km inside Algonquin Provincial Park. The road runs 6.2 km to its terminus at the Opeongo Store on the lake. Previous sightings of the Northern Hawk Owl have been in the vicinity of that sharp left turn in the road before it gets to the lake.

Good birding, Bruce Kirkland

 

 

Algonquin Park Bird Report: 22 November
Posted on November 22, 2012 at 09:42:05 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Nov. 22, 2012) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

TUNDRA SWAN
GOLDEN EAGLE
NORTHERN HAWK OWL
GREAT GRAY OWL
NORTHERN SHRIKE
AMERICAN PIPIT
BOHEMIAN WAXWING
NORTHERN CARDINAL

A Tundra Swan was photographed on Galeairy Lake on November 20.
It flew into Mud Bay of that lake at one point and was then in the Park.
This is only the fourth fall record of this swan for Algonquin. See:
www.algonquinpark.on.ca/news/algonquin_park_birding_report.php

A Golden Eagle was seen high over the Lake Opeongo Access Point
on November 21.

Ring-billed Gulls still lingering at the Opeongo Access Point dock
numbered 17 on November 19 and 13 on November 21.

A Northern Hawk Owl was seen in the Costello Creek Bog bordering
Opeongo Road from at least November 17 to 19. The owl was observed
just beyond the bridge and farther north a little before the road reaches
Lake Opeongo. Searchers reporting on November 20 and 21 did not
observe this owl.

A Great Gray Owl was reported at West Rose Lake during the morning
of November 18. It was not found subsequently.

Single Northern Shrikes were at the Old Airfield on November 18, and
at West Rose Lake and near the West Gate on November 21.

An American Pipit calling in flight over the Old Airfield on November 18
was record late for Algonquin Park by 11 days, probably reflecting the
very mild conditions this week.

A Bohemian Waxwing was noted along Opeongo Road on November 19.

A female Northern Cardinal was at the East Gate on November 17.

Northern Specialties:
Spruce Grouse: Noted at 2.7 km up Arowhon Road, Wolf Howl Pond,
Spruce Bog Boardwalk, and Opeongo Road.

Black-backed Woodpecker: Seen at West Rose Lake, along the black
spruce section of Opeongo Road and at Opeongo Access Point.

Gray Jay: Regular at Wolf Howl Pond/West Rose Lake, Spruce Bog
Boardwalk, and Opeongo Road.

Boreal Chickadee: Observed along Opeongo Road in the black spruce
section and about 100 m south of the Opeongo Access Point, and in the
border of the Old Airfield.

Winter Finches:
Pine Grosbeak: Reported on Arowhon Road, at Spruce Bog Boardwalk
and along Opeongo Road. Occasional flyovers and on road all along
Highway 60.

Red Crossbill: Observed along Opeongo Road on November 18 and at
Spruce Bog Boardwalk on November 21.

White-winged Crossbill: Noted flying over fairly regularly at various
locations, including Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road.

Common Redpoll: A few reports, including along Opeongo Road on
November 18.

Evening Grosbeak: Fewer than earlier in the month. Two were at the
Visitor Centre feeders on November 22.

Mammals:
Otter: As many as 8 together were fairly regular this week at Opeongo
Access Point or along Costello Creek on the east side of the north end
of Opeongo Road.

Beaver: For those who stay in their vehicle, there is a great opportunity
to see and photograph beavers up close as they work on their food pile
at the east end of small Eos Lake (km 43.8 on Highway 60).

The Visitor Centre at km 43 on Highway 60 is officially open only on
weekends and holidays for the winter (9 am to 5 pm). However, access
to viewbirds and the exhibits is usually possible on weekdays. At the
Visitor Centre you can find recent bird sightings, information, and
helpful Park Staff to assist your birding efforts.

Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400, 11
And 60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400. From
Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the park.
Kilometre markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from the West Gate
(km 0) to near the East Gate (km 56). Get your park permit and the park
tabloid (with a map of birding locations mentioned here) at the gates.

Please send us your bird sightings in the Park, as we continue to monitor
the autumn migration.

You can also get directions to the locations, as well as updates and info
about other park events at: www.algonquinpark.on.ca

Good Birding!
Ron Tozer
Dwight, Ontario

 

 

Re(2): Red-tailed Hawk
Posted on November 22, 2012 at 09:29:05 PM by Barbara Taylor

Didn't see any Redpolls today and didn't look for Bohemians. Maybe if we get a bit of snow this weekend some Redpolls will show up at birdfeeders.

 

 

Re(1): Red-tailed Hawk
Posted on November 22, 2012 at 08:53:54 PM by coreyhkh

Nice shot, have you seen any Redpolls lately? I am come home this weekend and was hoping I would run into a few and also maybe a few bohemian waxwings.

 

 

Red-tailed Hawk
Posted on November 22, 2012 at 06:37:20 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning at the Bracebridge Ponds there wasn't much of note...still several Buffleheads and Mallards, and this Red-tailed Hawk hunting west of cell 4.  photo

 

 

Pine Grosbeaks
Posted on November 20, 2012 at 04:45:42 PM by tedthevideoman

About 6 female Grosbeaks are still feeding on the ornamental crab apples at 117 meadow heights today...got some really nice shots!...I'll share 1 here and the rest @ www.t-boneimages.blogspot.com  photo

 

 

Re(2): ...chickadee behaviour
Posted on November 21, 2012 at 02:18:12 PM by Barbara Taylor

If the chickadees find an owl or other predator, they will become very agitated, and even dive-bomb the predator. You can usually hear the calls of the birds before you come upon them, and then you can zero in on the predator by looking for the spot that the little birds seem to be focused on. The chickadees give a very rapid series of dee-dee-dee-dee, quite unlike their normal call. Their calls attract other birds to the area and together they "attack" or scold the predator. This is called "mobbing" behaviour. There are various theories why birds engage in this behaviour - perhaps to try and convince the predator to leave, or to alert other birds that there is a predator in the area, or to teach young birds what a predator is. Even if the predator stays put, the "mob" usually breaks up after 10 minutes or so.

We have seen hawks on several occasions only because crows or jays were noisily harrassing them and drew our attention. The crows also tell us when a fox is in our yard. It is usually very difficult to find an owl, especially a smaller species that is roosting quietly in a tree. We once found a Northern Saw-whet Owl in a fir tree behind our house after hearing a mob of chickadees and nuthatches. In early October I saw a Weasel pop up from the middle of our brush pile after the crows and chickadees alerted me to it.


Bryan, if you saw a fast bird take a chickadee in the afternoon, it was most likely a Sharp-shinned Hawk, or possibly a Northern Shrike or Merlin.

 

 

Re(1): 200+ Bohemian Waxwings - Bracebridge
Posted on November 21, 2012 at 10:48:50 AM by BryanGrant

How would the chickadees' behaviour tip me off regarding the screech owl?
I am at 124 Covered Bridge, my backyard is on the beaver creek ravine side of the road. I saw a small, fast bird take a chickadee in the afternoon last week - now I'm not so sure the predator was a hawk.

 

 

200+ Bohemian Waxwings - Bracebridge
Posted on November 20, 2012 at 03:07:40 PM by Barbara Taylor

Shortly after 2 p.m. today we came upon a very large flock of over 200 Bohemians at #105 Ball's Dr. (near Zellers). They were taking turns coming down to the ground under a juniper(?) tree at the back end of the driveway, presumably to feed on some fallen berries. Several of the birds flew down to the hiking trail along Beaver Creek and perched in some trees next to the footbridge. Many others ended up in trees next to #65 Covered Bridge Trail. There must be some crabapple trees in the area. (Bracebridge)

(we hoped some chickadees might show us where the Screech Owl was hiding, but no luck along the trail all the way over to Moreland Ct.)

Directions - see Google Map: http://goo.gl/maps/SP4wf

 

 

Re(2): Screech Owl??????
Posted on November 21, 2012 at 01:15:41 PM by Goodyear

The call was unmistakable. We did try playing a tape, but we did not get a response. It took us a few minutes to find our stuff at 2:30 in the morning, and it had stopped calling by then. We tried again last night, but no luck. Unfortunately we could not see it when we turned on our backyard floodlights. It sounded very close to the house. Perhaps it was hunting mice around our feeders? We are going to walk around the neighbourhood tonight and have a listen.

 

 

Re(1): Screech Owl??????
Posted on November 20, 2012 at 10:11:34 AM by Al Sinclair

The Beaver Creek valley is typical habitat for them, the time (2:34 am) suggests it's not somebody playing a tape, and they would likely play other owl calls as well. Birds disperse in the fall turning up in unexpected locations and Screech Owls are widespread in Simcoe County so I think you have one, first report of this species in Muskoka for many years. We had one near Sparrow Lake on an owl prowl about 25 years ago. You should try playing a tape yourself tonight.

 

 

Re(1): Screech Owl??????
Posted on November 20, 2012 at 09:41:25 AM by Barbara Taylor

Although listed as "very rare" in Muskoka, the Eastern Screech-Owl does have a call that seems to fit your description of a "horse-like descending whinny".
You can listen to variations of its calls at: http://allaboutbirds.org/guide/Eastern_Screech-Owl/sounds.

(P.S.- ha-ha...don't have a tape, and wouldn't be in the ravine at night when one of the bears might still be on the prowl !)

 

 

Screech Owl??????
Posted on November 20, 2012 at 08:33:08 AM by Goodyear

Very early this morning, 2:34 a.m., my wife was awakened by a repeated, horse-like, descending whinny call of an owl. She was trying to make it fit a Barred Owl, but realized that it was unlike a Barred Owl's call. She then woke me. I went through the same thought process, but also thought Screech Owl. The calls were about 3 seconds apart. It repeated the whinnies about 9 times in total. We turned on our backyard floodlights, but we didn't see anything and it didn't call again. The entire call was higher pitched than the "you all" part of a Barred Owls call. Any thoughts? Barb, were you wandering around Beaver Creek last night playing tapes????!!  (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Northern Hawk Owl (Algonquin Park): Clarification on directions
Posted on November 19, 2012 at 06:22:08 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Nov. 19, 2012) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Near dusk, the owl was flying from tree to tree on the edge of the open
Costello Creek bog on the east side of Opeongo Road, just south of the sharp
left hand curve as the road first reaches Lake Opeongo,

 

Great Gray Owl and Northern Hawk Owl (Algonquin Park)
Posted on November 19, 2012 at 03:34:00 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Nov. 19, 2012 at 2:43 p.m.) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

A Great Gray Owl was reported yesterday (November 18) morning at West Rose
Lake, on the railway section of Mizzy Lake Trail. We have not received any
subsequent reports, but it is not known whether anybody has gone searching
for the bird.

A Northern Hawk Owl is currently being viewed by Michael Runtz and others
north of the bridge on Opeongo Road. Presumably the same owl was reported
there late yesterday afternoon, but could not be relocated later.

Good birding.
Ron Tozer
Dwight, ON

Directions:
West Rose Lake is most easily accessed by driving 4.8 km north on Arowhon
Road (at km 15.4 on Highway 60) to the intersection with the abandoned rail
bed; then turn right on the rail bed and drive east 0.6 km to a chain gate.
Park near the gate (without blocking it) and walk 2.5 km on the rail bed to
West Rose Lake.

Opeongo Road runs north from km 46.3 on Highway 60. The bridge is about half
way up the road, which goes to Opeongo Lake

Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400, 11 and
60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400. From Ottawa,
take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the park. Kilometre
markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from the West Gate (km 0) to near
the East Gate (km 56). Get your park permit and the park tabloid (with a
map of birding locations mentioned here) at the gates.

 

 

Moose
Posted on November 19, 2012 at 01:23:54 PM by gaylecarlyle

I was thrilled to see a moose ambling through the woods near Washago at the Turnbull Tract, a Simcoe County forest.
I'm always impressed by the size of these animals.

 

 

Sharp-shinned Hawks Nov13
Posted on November 19, 2012 at 09:23:29 AM by BryanGrant

Covered Bridge Trail, Bracebridge, on the trails' side of the rd
Chickadees at the backyard feeder became the feed for a Sharp-shinned hawk. The Hawk swooped in from the side and above the path to the feeder that the chickadees had been making .

 

 

Jack Rabbit
Posted on November 19, 2012 at 09:02:23 AM by BryanGrant

Nov 18th at 4pm Wood Lake off Foxpoint rd I disturbed a jack rabbit

 

 

American Woodcock
Posted on November 19, 2012 at 08:55:44 AM by BryanGrant

Nov 18th At wood Lake off foxpoint rd. near Vankoughnet I saw what looked to be an American Woodcock.

 

 

Re(1): Bohemian Waxwings
Posted on November 19, 2012 at 03:17:47 PM by Barbara Taylor

Just before 3 p.m. today there were about 20 Bohemians in the crabapple tree at 117 Meadow Heights Dr., another 25 flew overhead from behind the houses at the north-west end of Meadow Heights, and another 12 were perched in a tree next to 42 Meadow Heights Dr. The large flock must be breaking up as they search a wider area for food...not much fruit left on the trees. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Pine Grosbeaks and Bohemian Waxwings
Posted on November 19, 2012 at 08:30:51 AM by Goodyear

There are still some crabapples left on our ornamental crabtree, but the daily visits from a flock of approx 50 Bohemian Waxwings and 6-10 Pine Grosbeaks means they are quickly disappearing.(117 Meadow Heights Drive Bracebridge)

 

 

Pine Grosbeak
Posted on November 18, 2012 at 07:52:08 PM by Judy

Nov.18,2012 Pine Grosbeak on trail at Langman Sanctuary ( Bass Lake area)

 

 

Loon, Doe Lake Gravenhurst
Posted on November 18, 2012 at 01:31:30 PM by janice house

A loon was swimming along the south-east shore at noon today. There was a large flock of buffleheads on the lake this morning.

 

 

Re(1): Pine Grosbeak
Posted on November 19, 2012 at 12:52:04 PM by janice house

I heard one this morning while on my doggy walk, about 5 minutes into the walk another flew overhead calling heading in the direction of the first bird (Doe Lake Rd., Gravenhurst)

 

 

Pine Grosbeak
Posted on November 17, 2012 at 10:58:09 PM by DBurton

I heard a Pine Grosbeak in Gravenhurst today. There were 2 last weekend. So far no close looks.

 

 

Deer: sick or old? (photo)
Posted on November 17, 2012 at 05:52:48 PM by Debbie Adams

This doe is a regular in our neighbourhood. In the spring she had 2 fawns but even then, she looked like the attached photo. Her ribs are showing, stomach seems bloated and she has a sway back. Is she sick or just old?  photo
The rest of the deer in the neighbourhood appear to be in good health.
(Walker's Point)

 

 

White-winged Crossbills and Bald Eagles
Posted on November 17, 2012 at 02:34:34 PM by Goodyear

Just after noon today, we saw 3 White-winged Crossbills just west of cell 4 (Bracebridge Lagoons) along the Trans-Canada Trail. A few minutes later we looked up to see 2 Bald Eagles. One was a full adult, the other a sub-adult. They circled together off to the southeast. Lots of Buffleheads and Mallards at the Lagoons, along with 2 Hooded Mergansers in cell 4.

 

 

Re(1): Fox Sparrow
Posted on November 19, 2012 at 12:46:04 PM by janice house

the fox sparrow was still in our yard on Sunday

 

 

Fox Sparrow
Posted on November 17, 2012 at 11:14:50 AM by janice house

Spotted the bird under a spruce tree this morning, Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst

 

 

Red Breasted Nuthatch Pic
Posted on November 17, 2012 at 06:44:47 AM by tedthevideoman

So rarely do these little fellows sit still!...but I caught a nice image recently, I thought I'd share... photo
www.t-boneimages.blogspot.com for more.

 

 

Cardinal and Goshawk - Port Sydney
Posted on November 16, 2012 at 06:33:32 PM by jim griffin

a continuation of previous reports:
the nov.13 male cardinal which I thought was a one day wonder, showed up at 3 and 5 pm again today; same times, same habits, same bird?

my pigeon feeder visits are way down since I reported the young Goshawk hanging around and dining; I saw it again today on a quick fly by up river, maybe heading for the bridge where some pigeons go to roost.

 

 

Algonquin Park Bird Report: 15 November
Posted on November 15, 2012 at 10:03:06 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Nov. 15, 2012) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

SNOW GOOSE
GOLDEN EAGLE
BOHEMIAN WAXWING
NORTHERN CARDINAL

There was a flock of about 100 Snow Geese (80 blue and 20 white) over
Scorch Lake in the southern panhandle on November 5.

An immature Golden Eagle was observed at Lostwater Lake (also in the
panhandle) on November 6.

There were six adult Ring-billed Gulls still lingering at the Opeongo Access
Point dock on November 15, a remnant of up to 100 regularly there this fall.
This gull does not breed in Algonquin Park but significant numbers come to
Lake Opeongo every fall.

Best sites to look for Algonquin's boreal specialties are the Wolf Howl
Pond/West Rose Lake area of Mizzy Lake Trail, Spruce Bog Boardwalk and
Opeongo Road. A male Black-backed Woodpecker was at the entrance of
Tea Lake Campground on November 13. A Boreal Chickadee was observed
along Arowhon Road on November 11.

A Northern Shrike was noted at Whitefish Lake on November 11.

There were 25 Bohemian Waxwings at the Visitor Centre on November 9, and
some were heard there on November 15.

A female Northern Cardinal was at the Visitor Centre from November 11 to 14,
and a male joined it there on November 13, as the record-high number of
sightings in Algonquin this fall continues to rise. Dispersing cardinals
tend to linger here only briefly, even when they find rare well-stocked
feeders in a vast expanse of unsuitable Canadian Shield habitat.

Pine Grosbeaks have become regular and increasingly numerous since their
widespread arrival here last week. Common Redpoll, Pine Siskin and American
Goldfinch were also reported. Few Evening Grosbeak sightings this week may
suggest that most have moved through this area.


The Visitor Centre at km 43 on Highway 60 is officially open only on
weekends and holidays for the winter (9 am to 5 pm). However, access to view
birds and the exhibits is usually possible on weekdays. At the centre
you can find recent bird sightings, information, and helpful Park Staff to
assist your birding efforts.

Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400, 11 and
60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400. From Ottawa,
take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the park. Kilometre
markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from the West Gate (km 0) to near
the East Gate (km 56). Get your park permit and the park tabloid (with a
map of birding locations mentioned here) at the gates.

Please send us your bird sightings in the Park, as we continue to monitor
the autumn migration.

You can also get directions to the locations, as well as updates and info
about other park events at: www.algonquinpark.on.ca

Good Birding!
Ron Tozer
Dwight, Ontario

 

 

pine grosbeak
Posted on November 15, 2012 at 03:22:39 PM by Dennis Wilks

First time I have seen one of these at my place--female Pine Grosbeak--feeding on the ground (South Portage Road - between Huntsville and Baysville)

 

 

Barred Owl
Posted on November 14, 2012 at 02:48:41 PM by Barbara Taylor

A few minutes ago the Jays in our back yard starting screaming about something, so I went out to check what was up. A Red Squirrel was giving an alarm call from under our shed, and a Barred Owl was perched in a nearby pine tree. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Bohemian Waxwings, Pine Grosbeaks
Posted on November 14, 2012 at 02:36:50 PM by Barbara Taylor

Around 2 p.m. today there were over 50 Bohemian Waxwings taking turns feeding in the crabapple tree in front of 117 Meadow Heights Dr. and 3 Pine Grosbeaks were in the crabapple tree by 85 Meadow Heights Dr. (Bracebridge)

 

 

snowy owl
Posted on November 13, 2012 at 04:10:09 PM by GeorgeMoroz

A Snowy Owl was observed in Bracebridge on Friday 9th/12 on top of the steeple tower of the Anglican church about 3.00pm.
A photo was taken by someone at the church and is posted on the bulletin board at the church. Will try to get a copy for posting.

 

 

The Birds of Georgian Bay Book Launch
Posted on November 13, 2012 at 09:49:10 AM by PamelaHiggins

Saturday November 17th, 2012
1:00 - 4:00 p.m. at Midland Cultural Centre

Share the joy of birding with Award-winning Biologist Bob Whittam at the launch of his new book The Birds of Georgian Bay at the Midland Cultural Centre.
Learn how to find and photograph local birds with bird photographer Homer Caliwag
View spectacular bird photography
Meet the Wye Marsh Wildlife Centre's Tawny Owl Alice
Hear a reading from the book
Take a chance on winning a birding basket and a copy of the book
Signed copies will be available for purchase.

Free and open to the public.
Cafe Roxy will have refreshments and food for sale.

The event and proceeds from the book will support the Wye Marsh Wildlife Centre.
*(this post has been approved by the administrator - The Muskoka Bird Board does not endorse or recommend any commercial entities. Product or services advertisements are not permitted on the board without prior approval by the administrator.)
The Birds of Georgian Bay Facebook Page

 

 

Re(1): Redbellied
Posted on November 28, 2012 at 04:45:48 PM by GeorgeMoroz

We have had this woodpecker at our front feeder daily, at around noon, for the last three weeks and it still returns. Quite a sight. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Redbellied
Posted on November 13, 2012 at 04:54:33 PM by tedthevideoman

my Pop's pic of the Red Bellied Woodpecker.  photo

 

 

Redbellied
Posted on November 13, 2012 at 09:11:53 AM by J. Gardner

Had a visit from a Redbellied Woodpecker this morning. A beautiful adult male. He stayed until the photographer in the family got too familiar. With luck, he will return. J. Gardner Hurdville, Lake Manitouwabing

 

 

Re(1): Cardinal - Port Sydney
Posted on November 14, 2012 at 09:05:35 AM by Dennis Wilks

I too just had a male cardinal at my feeder this morning--the only time I can remember seeing one, other than a female for a brief visit in the spring. (South Portage Road - between Huntsville and Baysville)

 

 

Re(1): Cardinal - Port Sydney
Posted on November 13, 2012 at 05:00:00 PM by jim griffin

he made 3 more appearances today, mid-morning, mid-afternoon and the typical 5:00 pm or dusk feed.Only feeding on the ground

 

 

Cardinal - Port Sydney
Posted on November 13, 2012 at 09:11:20 AM by jim griffin

just in case someone is tracking travelling cardinals, a male stopped by my feeder site briefly this morning. Probably have to wait til this evening to see if he is hanging around.

 

 

Black-backed Woodpecker and others, Haliburton Co.
Posted on November 12, 2012 at 05:13:39 PM by EdPoropat

Good day all,
Got out for a walk yesterday in the beautiful warm weather along the rail trail S of Gelert (S of the former Dutch Line). It was surprisingly productive.

A few highlights of the day:
Black-backed Woodpecker - 1 female heard and observed in large wetland just S of 24km marker.
Bohemian Waxwing - flock of about 10 birds also near above location. A second flock of 30+ birds was feeding on the crab apple trees along the edge of Head Lake in Haliburton in the morning.
Pine Grosbeak - 1 observed just N of 25 km marker in tamarack swamp
Common Redpoll - 5 at above location
White-winged Crossbill - 1 calling and observed overhead, again near the 25 km mark
Otter - 1 pair observed in large beaver pond S of 26 km marker. Not avian but a nice bonus!

 

 

Re(3): bluejay info
Posted on November 13, 2012 at 09:48:41 PM by dinnymccraney

I have seen them "swallow" a peanut in the shell then fly off with one in their beak

 

 

Re(3): bluejay info
Posted on November 13, 2012 at 06:06:37 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

I videod one Blue Jay take 67 seeds at one time!

 

 

Re(2): bluejay info
Posted on November 12, 2012 at 07:31:57 PM by Barbara Taylor

Another good way to ration out the sunflower seeds is to get a feeder with weight adjustable perches. You can set it so only the smaller weight birds will be able to have access to the seed. The Nuthatches and Chickadees will still carry away a lot of seed to cache for winter, but at least they can't take as much per visit as a Blue Jay.

Dennis, you're right, the Jays will eventually crack open the shell and just eat the sunflower seed inside. Some birds will eat the whole thing though...we have a "herd" of Mourning Doves here that gulp down shell and all.

 

 

Re(1): bluejay info
Posted on November 12, 2012 at 05:56:10 PM by Al Sinclair

They are caching them to eat later. We have around 8 Jays here that clean out the feeders in a couple of hours. We ration our birds to 1 lrg coffee can in the morning plus a couple of cups late in afternoon.
Sunflower seeds are up in price this year, $30 for 40 pounds at home hardware. Anyone seen a better price? I suppose we can blame our governments for pushing more ethanol in fuel. Farmers are switching to corn to produce it.

Below I copied info on Jay food caching from this site:
http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Blue_Jay/lifehistory
Blue Jays carry food in their throat and upper esophagus—an area often called a “gular pouch.” They may store 2-3 acorns in the pouch, another one in their mouth, and one more in the tip of the bill. In this way they can carry off 5 acorns at a time to store for later feeding. Six birds with radio transmitters each cached 3,000-5,000 acorns one autumn.

 

 

bluejay info
Posted on November 12, 2012 at 04:35:25 PM by Dennis Wilks

I recently set up my bird feeder and use black oiled sunflower seeds. I watched, while a Bluejay ( pigbird ) appeared to put 50+ seeds into his gullet. I am presuming they must spit them out at some stage, remove the outer shell and then eat the seeds, rather than swallowing the seed with shell and all. Am I correct? Obviously I cannot afford this.

 

 

Evening Grosbeak
Posted on November 12, 2012 at 11:48:59 AM by harrisac

Just saw the first evening grosbeak in over a year. Just one male at the feeder in bracebridge.

 

 

Bay-Breasted Warbler
Posted on November 11, 2012 at 01:59:44 PM by DBurton

There is a Bay-Breasted Warbler hanging around my yard today. It took some suet from a feeder. It has a streaked back and hint of bay on the flanks. (Gravenhurst)

 

 

Bohemians and Pine Grosbeaks
Posted on November 11, 2012 at 12:51:03 PM by Barbara Taylor

At about 12:15 p.m. the large flock of 55 Bohemian Waxwings and a few Pine Grosbeaks were still taking turns feeding in the crabapple tree at the NE corner of Tamarack Trail and Ball's Dr., across the street from the LCBO in Bracebridge. Here are a couple photos of the Waxwings awaiting their turn in a nearby tree on the pipeline/snowmobile trail:  photo1  photo2

 

 

Re(2): Snowy gone?
Posted on November 12, 2012 at 11:59:13 AM by Barbara Taylor

Couldn't find the Snowy Owl this morning. At the Bracebridge Ponds, the female Pintail was still in cell 2 with the Mallards and a Black Duck. A Common Goldeneye was in cell 3 along with many Buffleheads. A Common Merganser and three Scaup were in cell 4. Several Common Redpolls and a male Red-winged Blackbird were feeding in the weeds at the north side of cell 3. A Ruffed Grouse flew up from the ditch near the Lagoon Lane gate and ended up in the woods behind the treatment plant.

 

 

Re(1): Snowy gone?
Posted on November 11, 2012 at 12:35:40 PM by Barbara Taylor

The Snowy Owl was still behind the UAP Auto Parts building as of 10:45 a.m., but we couldn't find it anywhere in the area when we left around noon. The female Northern Pintail was at the south end of cell 2 with some Mallards. Several Common Redpolls were feeding in the weeds east of cell 3 and also north of cell 4.

A few photos from this morning: snowyowl1  snowyowl2  femalepintail

 

 

Snowy Owl, Northern Pintail, Bohemian Waxwings
Posted on November 11, 2012 at 10:31:52 AM by Goodyear

This morning around 9:50 the Snowy Owl was sitting on the roof of a small garage behind the Union Gas building at the corner of Robert Dollar Drive and Ecclestone Drive, Bracebridge. We viewed it from the UAP Auto Parts driveway on Robert Dollar Drive. There was a female Northern Pintail in cell 2 at the Bracebridge Ponds. When we got home Barb Taylor phoned to say she and Bob had seen 50+ Bohemian Waxwings in the fruit trees behind the LCBO store in Bracebridge.

 

 

red bellied woodpecker
Posted on November 11, 2012 at 10:28:53 AM by edieov

We have had a red bellied woodpecker visting our feeding all morning. He is very timid but we have managed a few photos. We are in Carling Township on Georgian Bay.  photo

 

 

Haliburton gulls
Posted on November 10, 2012 at 01:36:18 PM by EdPoropat

Greetings,
White-winged gulls are beginning to show up in the Haliburton area....right on time. Observed a first-winter Iceland Gull at the Haliburton dump today around 12:30pm. Dan Busby had a Glaucous Gull there yesterday. Still lots of Herrings and Ring-billed around.

Pine Grosbeaks are increasing in numbers.

Cheers,
Ed Poropat
Haliburton, ON

 

 

Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on November 10, 2012 at 12:32:38 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning all the cells at the Bracebridge Ponds were free of ice. About 100 Buffleheads and some Mallards were in cell 3. A Green-winged Teal was in cell 4. An adult Red-tailed Hawk was flying low along the west side of cell 4 (possibly the same bird we've seen a few times now in that area). A juvenile Red-tailed Hawk was perched in a small tree to the east of cell 3. About 15 Snow Buntings were near the dumping ponds by the SW end of cell 3. Over 50 Common Redpolls were feeding in the weeds east of cell 3 along with a single American Tree Sparrow.

 

 

Re(3): Snowy Owl
Posted on November 11, 2012 at 08:05:52 AM by Doug Smith

Saw the snowy on top of the T&A Tire building on E.P. Lee Drive at about 7pm last night. It seemed quite alert.

 

 

Re(2): Snowy Owl
Posted on November 10, 2012 at 09:11:32 PM by tedthevideoman

The best species shot I got of the Snowy Owl yesterday.   photo
Have several more that include crows bombing and a few what I would call artistic on the church bell tower if your interested. Ted ...some will be posted on my blog www.T-boneimages.blogspot.com

 

 

Re(1): Snowy Owl update
Posted on November 10, 2012 at 02:33:18 PM by Barbara Taylor

Janice House just called to report the Owl has moved, but is still in the same area. At about 2:15 p.m., it was on the roof of the building out behind Muskoka Window and Door Centre on Robert Dollar Dr.

(note: this is the same area where both a Northern Hawk Owl and a Snowy Owl were being seen regularly in early January, 2005, as well as a couple Great Gray Owls nearby at the TransCanada compressor station on Beaumont Dr. -- the Snowy had arrived about mid-Dec. 2004)

Directions - see Google Map: http://goo.gl/maps/3ddsg
From Hwy. 11 take Hwy. 118W/Ecclestone Dr. exit into Bracebridge. Turn west onto Robert Dollar Dr. at Leons Furniture.

 

 

Snowy Owl relocated...photo
Posted on November 10, 2012 at 11:39:41 AM by Barbara Taylor

This morning we found the Snowy Owl atop the Bracebridge Examiner building on E.P. Lee Drive. It was at the NE end of the roof near the Sublime Graphics sign. You could see the bird from Robert Dollar Dr. looking to the south across the field. Or, drive out behind the building and have a closer look. The owl was still there as of 11:25 a.m.   photo

Directions - see Google Map : http://goo.gl/maps/QNeQg

(note: Google's "street view" is out of date - shows Nautilus North sign instead of Sublime Graphics at the north end of the building)

 

 

Pine Grosbeaks
Posted on November 9, 2012 at 04:20:18 PM by janice house

the last two mornings I have heard several of the grosbeaks on my morning walks, loop around Laycox Rd and Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst

 

 

Re(4): Snowy Owl Bracebridge...1st photo
Posted on November 9, 2012 at 07:21:43 PM by Barbara Taylor

Dave Wright sent this shot taken with his phone. Interesting choice of a perch...is that about the highest point in town?  photo

 

 

Re(3): Snowy Owl Bracebridge...1st photo
Posted on November 9, 2012 at 06:43:56 PM by Al Sinclair

First photo from Earle Robinson:  photo

 

 

Re(2): Snowy Owl Bracebridge
Posted on November 9, 2012 at 05:50:21 PM by tedthevideoman

I was happy to be there with my camera for about 45 minutes
he flew across behind the theatre I got about 150 images...very low light but should have some good ones to show soon!

 

 

Re(1): Snowy Owl Bracebridge
Posted on November 9, 2012 at 04:17:10 PM by Barbara Taylor

It had already left by the time we got over there just before 4 p.m. A few people in the area had seen it on the spire of the church, and apparently some Crows were pestering the owl, so perhaps that's why it left. We drove around trying to find it but no luck.

 

 

Snowy Owl Bracebridge
Posted on November 9, 2012 at 03:23:29 PM by Al Sinclair

3:25PM Dave Wright reports that a Snowy Owl is currently sitting on the peak of the Anglican Church roof in downtown Bracebridge.

 

 

Red Bellied Woodpecker
Posted on November 9, 2012 at 03:13:29 PM by carolwagg

A first-ever sighting here at our place on Doe Lake Road, and only for a few minutes at the suet feeder, a red-bellied woodpecker. You know the one - with a red head and nape, but invisible red on its belly. (east of Gravenhurst)

 

 

Algonquin Park Bird Report: 8 November
Posted on November 8, 2012 at 10:38:01 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Nov. 8, 2012) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

RED-NECKED GREBE
GOLDEN EAGLE
NORTHERN HAWK OWL
GREAT GRAY OWL
BOHEMIAN WAXWING
NORTHERN CARDINAL

A bizarre owl incident and the first Pine Grosbeaks of the fall were
noteworthy in the Park this week. Seed feeders are now operating at the
Visitor Centre.

A Red-necked Grebe was off the Lake of Two Rivers Campground beach on
November 4.

The carcass of a road-killed Eastern Wolf just east of Brewer Lake attracted
a Bald Eagle and a Golden Eagle, plus several Common Ravens that mobbed
the eagles, on November 4.

A Northern Hawk Owl was seen just outside the west boundary of the Park
along the South River on November 7. The location is on Ottawa Avenue about
10 km past the Kawawaymog Access Point. This owl and the one reported in
Ottawa may suggest the start of an irruption to southern Ontario.

Last week's post mentioned one Great Gray Owl, but there were actually
three reported from the Wolf Howl Pond/West Rose Lake area along Mizzy
Lake Trail on October 31. These were likely members of the family group
first recorded there in late September. At 3 pm on November 1, one of these
owls was seen to fly to the surface of Wolf Howl Pond, where it eventually
died after about 30 minutes of struggling. This unusual occurrence was
observed by distraught birders unable to reach the owl to intervene. Perhaps
it was one of the inexperienced young birds that made a fatal mistake.

A Bohemian Waxwing was seen at the Visitor Centre on November 5, as the
flight continued.

A male Northern Cardinal was at the Visitor Centre on November 2 and 3 but
then disappeared. Occasional brief appearances by dispersing individuals
from late October to late November are typical for this rarity here. The
movement this year has already had the highest number on record.

Scattered sightings of small numbers of winter finch species, mainly heard
flying over, continued this week. The first Pine Grosbeaks of the fall were
reported from several locations on November 4 and some have been seen most
days since then. Other finches observed this week included: Red Crossbill,
White-winged Crossbill, Common Redpoll, Pine Siskin and Evening Grosbeak.
A few of the latter have been at the Visitor Centre on most days.

A Spruce Grouse was in the Wolf Howl Pond/West Rose Lake area on November 4.
A female Black-backed Woodpecker was on a utility pole at km 53 on November
4. One Boreal Chickadee on November 1 and two on November 4 were reported
along the railway near Wolf Howl Pond.

The Visitor Centre at km 43 on Highway 60 is officially open on weekends
and holidays only for the winter (9 am to 5 pm). Access to view birds and
the exhibits is often possible on weekdays, however. At the centre
you can find recent bird sightings, information, and helpful Park Staff to
assist your birding efforts.

Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400, 11 and
60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400. From Ottawa,
take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the park. Kilometre
markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from the West Gate (km 0) to near
the East Gate (km 56). Get your park permit and the park tabloid (with a
map of birding locations mentioned here) at the gates.


Please send us any bird sightings you¹ve had in the park, even of common
birds, as we continue to monitor the autumn migration.

You can also get directions to the locations, as well as updates and info
about other park events at: www.algonquinpark.on.ca

Good Birding!
Ron Tozer
Dwight, Ontario

 

 

Re(1): Bruce Spanworm moths?
Posted on November 8, 2012 at 05:30:28 PM by Al Sinclair

Correct. Bruce Spanworm, the last moth to emerge in the fall. Slow fluttering day flyers, they would be easy prey for birds except now most insect eaters have gone south. We also had some here east of Bracebridge. Their plant food is tree leaves including maples so they are very common moth here.

 

 

Bruce Spanworm moths?
Posted on November 8, 2012 at 05:13:57 PM by Barbara Taylor

Yesterday I noticed a few small moths flying around the neighbourhood. This afternoon's warm sunshine seemed to bring out even more. Several were flying out behind our house and were gathering in one spot on the ground amongst the pine needles. I was able to catch one very easily with my bare hands and it stayed still long enough for a quick photo before flying away. (Bracebridge)

Would they be Bruce Spanworm Moths?
Here's the one I caught today: photo

 

 

Goshawk
Posted on November 7, 2012 at 08:08:59 PM by jim griffin

I observed a juvenile Goshawk in front of my place in Port Sydney this morning, the Blue Jays were not happy. I came back from town this afternoon and the Blue Jays were at it again so I checked it out and found only a fresh patch of plucked pigeon plumage: one less pigeon - go goshawk!

 

 

Bohemian Waxwings - Huntsville
Posted on November 7, 2012 at 01:36:50 PM by Goodyear

This morning there was a flock of approx. 50 - 60 Bohemian Waxwings calling from the tosp of the trees that are around La Dolce Vita restaurant on West Street. Some flew down to a low juniper and looked to be eating the berries.

 

 

Redpolls / Siskins and Barred Owl
Posted on November 7, 2012 at 01:16:53 PM by StephenDerraugh

We lost our flocks of American Goldfinch (~85+) during the stormy weather last week, along with my gaggle of immature Grosbeaks (sad to see them go as we had them from fledge, on) and our last few mishmash of sparrows. We now have ~ 40 Com Redpolls (No Hoary that I have seen, yet), mixed with Siskins, Juncos... We are still only feeding nyjer seed as 'the bear' has been around finishing off the last of the feral farm treats before his long winters rest. He, for some reason never bothers with the seed bags - too much work as he is a rippling chubby Ursus americanus at this point. we kindly refer to him, in our infrequent sightings as 'Jabba the Hutt.'

We have had an active and vocal Barred Owl(s) in our back lot / yard the last 2-nights. We are thinking there must be two, as we do know for a fact we have a resident BAOW. We tried to coax them this past eve; inspire all to regale a fall lament, to know avail. These are defiantly free thinking Jazz owls, not open to our poorly crafted "Who cooks for you?."

From atop 'Mount Florence'(St W), Huntsville.

 

 

Barred Owl
Posted on November 7, 2012 at 12:07:04 PM by GayleCarlyle

Washago:
We got home last night at about 10pm and saw a barred owl swoop up from the ground into a small tree in our front yard.
It hung around for a while, allowing us to take a quick closer look with a flashlight.
Hopefully he/she is snacking on mice and squirrels around our feeders.

 

 

Re(1): Pine Grosbeaks
Posted on November 8, 2012 at 11:55:17 AM by Barbara Taylor

Around 10:30 a.m. this morning there were 4 Pine Grosbeaks feeding in the crabapple tree at the NE corner of Tamarack Trail and Ball's Dr. (across from the LCBO - Bracebridge).

 

 

Pine Grosbeaks
Posted on November 6, 2012 at 01:51:04 PM by Goodyear

This morning the 6 female and first winter male Pine Grosbeaks were joined by 2 beautiful red adult males. A pair of Cardinals was feeding on the ground below our Miniature Crab tree. We were enjoying watching a pair of Hairy Woodpeckers on our platform feeder when a male Pileated Woodpecker joined them. Boy, they're big! (117 Meadow Heights Bracebridge)

 

 

Bracebridge Ponds - Great Blue Heron
Posted on November 6, 2012 at 11:46:57 AM by Barbara Taylor

This morning cells 1 and 2 were frozen over. About sixty Mallards and a couple American Black Ducks were in an area of open water at the south side of cell 3. A Great Blue Heron and three Red-winged Blackbirds flushed from the SE corner of cell 3 as I walked by. Cell 4 had a large area of open water, but only a few Mallards and about 300 Buffleheads. Didn't see the Gadwalls.

 

 

3 Swans at Port Carling
Posted on November 6, 2012 at 09:26:15 AM by Al Sinclair

Had a phone call this morning from Ken Pray. 3 swans are feeding near IGA on the river in Port Carling. Probably Trumpeter but could be Tundra or Mute.

 

 

Re(2): Bohemian Waxwings
Posted on November 5, 2012 at 04:32:09 PM by janice house

2 dozen flew over my home on Sunday, heading west towards town (Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst)

 

 

Re(1): Bohemian Waxwings
Posted on November 5, 2012 at 11:21:45 AM by Barbara Taylor

Took a look around 11 a.m. but no Bohemians. Five Pine Grosbeaks were feeding on the crabapples and while we watched, a sixth one flew in from the east near Moreland Cres. and joined them. (117 Meadow Heights, Bracebridge)

 

 

Bohemian Waxwings
Posted on November 5, 2012 at 08:48:07 AM by Goodyear

This morning there was a flock of 14 Bohemian Waxwings visiting our miniature crabapple tree (117 Meadow Heights Bracebridge) There were also 6 Pine Grosbeaks visiting at the same time.

 

 

cardinal
Posted on November 5, 2012 at 07:43:47 AM by Wayne Bridge

I had been feeling it was just a matter of time and yesterday I had my first ever cardinal (14 years) in Kearney (30 mins N-E of Huntsville). Female. Also had one redpoll and a pair of evening grosbeaks plus the regulars.

 

 

Re(1): Pine Grosbeaks and Common Redpolls
Posted on November 4, 2012 at 10:23:40 AM by StuartImmonen

I also had three Pine Grosbeaks briefly atop a dead White Pine in my yard East of Novar.

 

 

Pine Grosbeaks and Common Redpolls
Posted on November 4, 2012 at 09:25:57 AM by Goodyear

Yesterday afternoon there was a flock of approx. 40 Common Redpolls at the Bracebridge Lagoons. This morning there is a flock of 5 Pine Grosbeaks feeding in our miniature crabapple tree (117 Meadow Heights Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Bear.
Posted on November 2, 2012 at 09:23:04 PM by dinnymccraney

oh dear! I feel your pain..had the same thing happen here in broad daylight.

 

 

Bear.
Posted on November 2, 2012 at 08:31:43 PM by DebbieAdams

A bear came around our place last night trashing 4 bird feeders along with a suet cage. It even bent a double metal pole!
I was sure bears had headed for more secluded locations preparing for hibernation. I thought wrong.
(Walker's Point)

 

 

Re(2): Brown Creeper
Posted on November 2, 2012 at 09:27:16 PM by dinnymccraney

Hope I am not tempting the bears..once this summer was enough! I have had my suet out for several weeks and the nuthatches and woodpeckers make short work of it. Also have several bluejays who like to pick at it.  (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Brown Creeper
Posted on November 2, 2012 at 03:52:32 PM by Barbara Taylor

Ok, now a Brown Creeper is checking out the empty suet cage...guess they're trying to tell me something.

 

 

Pileated Woodpecker
Posted on November 2, 2012 at 12:55:04 PM by Barbara Taylor

A female Pileated Woodpecker was just here checking out our old suet cage which we have hanging on a tree...sorry, not time for suet yet. She was very vocal, perhaps telling her mate there's nothing here. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Algonquin Park Bird Report: 1 November
Posted on November 2, 2012 at 09:51:17 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Nov. 1, 2012) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

GREAT GRAY OWL
NORTHERN SHRIKE
BOHEMIAN WAXWING
NORTHERN CARDINAL

Algonquin Park experienced lots of rain and a power outage this week. Not
surprisingly, no apparent hurricane-related birds have been noted to date.

A Great Gray Owl was reported from the Wolf Howl Pond/West Rose Lake
area along Mizzy Lake Trail on the 31st. This location had a pair feeding
young earlier in the fall.

Single Northern Shrikes were at Radiant Lake in the Park Interior on the
26th, and in the Wolf Howl Pond/West Rose Lake area on the 31st.

A Boreal Chickadee in a flock of Black-caps on the High Falls Trail near
Achray on the 26th was very rare for the East Side and likely a dispersing
bird. Other Boreals with Black-capped Chickadee flocks in atypical habitat
have been noted in Algonquin this fall.

There were about a dozen Bohemian Waxwings in Highbush Cranberry
bushes at the East Gate on the 31st, as the previously reported flight
continued here. Highbush Cranberry is not favoured by waxwings as a food
source, but very few other berries exist in the Park at this date.

The Northern Cardinal is very rare and irregular in Algonquin and so a
number of dispersing individuals were noteworthy this week, including:
singles on the East Side near Radiant Lake, at Travers Creek and at the High
Falls Trail parking lot on the 26th; two at Achray on the 30th; and a male
at km 41 along Highway 60 on the 31st.

Scattered sightings of small numbers of winter finch species suggesting they
were on the move included: Red Crossbill, White-winged Crossbill, Common
Redpoll, Pine Siskin, American Goldfinch and Evening Grosbeak.

Look for Spruce Grouse, Black-backed Woodpecker, Gray Jay and Boreal
Chickadee along the old railway near Wolf Howl Pond/West Rose Lake, on
Spruce Bog Boardwalk and along Opeongo Road.

The Visitor Centre at km 43 on Highway 60 is officially open on weekends
and holidays only for the winter (9 am to 5 pm). Access to view birds and
the exhibits is often possible on weekdays, however. At the centre
you can find recent bird sightings, information, and helpful Park Staff to
assist your birding efforts.

Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400, 11 and
60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400. From Ottawa,
take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the park. Kilometre
markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from the West Gate (km 0) to near
the East Gate (km 56). Get your park permit and the park tabloid (with a
map of birding locations mentioned here) at the gates.

Please send us any bird sightings you¹ve had in the park, even of common
birds, as we continue to monitor the autumn migration.

You can also get directions to the locations, as well as updates and info
about other park events at: www.algonquinpark.on.ca

Good Birding!
Ron Tozer
Dwight, Ontario

_______________________________________________
ONTBIRDS is presented by the Ontario Field Ornithologists - the provincial birding organization.
Send bird reports to birdalert@ontbirds.ca
For information about ONTBIRDS visit http://www.ofo.ca/

 

 

Re(1): Northern Shrike
Posted on November 4, 2012 at 09:24:30 PM by PatWelch

Saw a Northern Shrike in our yard late this afternoon. All the birds at the feeders quickly disappeared while it was there. Aspdin Rd Huntsville

 

 

Northern Shrike
Posted on November 2, 2012 at 08:53:37 AM by tedthevideoman

Went out this AM to fill the feeders that 30 plus Evening Grosbeaks and 15 Blue Jays have been emptying lately, when I flushed a Northern shrike who was under a bush enjoying his breakfast of a Dark eyed Junco. 120 Meadow Heights Bracebridge

 

 

Re(2): white-winged crossbills
Posted on November 5, 2012 at 04:54:56 PM by janice house

I have heard small groups flying over and heading north for over a week (Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst)

 

 

Re(1): white-winged crossbills
Posted on November 3, 2012 at 01:18:50 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there were a few White-winged Crossbills along the Trans Canada Trail just a short walk west of the Bracebridge Ponds.
Directions to Bracebridge Ponds/Henry Marsh: see Area trails map (click "Satellite" button at upper right to view terrain or "Map" for just roads)

 

 

white-winged crossbills (photos)
Posted on November 1, 2012 at 04:16:34 PM by LindaActonRiddle

They are back after three years! Small flocks feed in the hemlock trees behind the homes on Sadler Drive in Bracebridge. Lovely colour in the trees!  photo1  photo2  photo3

 

 

Barred Owl
Posted on October 31, 2012 at 08:38:59 PM by dinnymccraney

have seen a barred owl twice this week in the trees between our house and our neighbours.What a gorgeous bird! Hope he(she?) stays around and keeps the mice under control. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Gadwalls still there
Posted on November 3, 2012 at 01:25:28 PM by Barbara Taylor

The pair of Gadwalls were still in cell 4 this morning at the Bracebridge Ponds. About 70 Canada Geese were there too...they had flown in from the Muskoka River after a boat flushed them from their usual hangout by Annie Williams Park.

 

 

Greater Yellowlegs, Gadwalls
Posted on October 31, 2012 at 01:04:02 PM by Barbara Taylor

Around noon today at the Bracebridge Ponds a Greater Yellowlegs flew in from the north-east, calling as it went past. It flew low over cell 4 heading towards the west, but we couldn't see if it landed. The large raft of Ring-necked Ducks was still in cell 4, along with the pair of Gadwalls, and a few Mallards and Buffleheads. In cell 3 there were fifteen Scaup and many Buffleheads. Five American Black Ducks were at the north end of cell 1. A few American Tree Sparrows and Song Sparrows were in the weedy area SE of cell 1.

 

 

Re(1): Northern Shrike
Posted on November 1, 2012 at 01:46:58 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there was a Northern Shrike at the Bracebridge Ponds (north of cell 4). While we were there, over 200 of the Ring-necked Ducks flew up, circled around, and then headed off to the south-west. What a spectacular sight! The pair of Gadwalls were still in cell 4 at the west edge.

P.S. - The trail heading west from the Bracebridge Ponds is now flooded just past the snowmobile trail due to recent rains. Henry Trail is badly flooded at the "T" as you approach Henry Marsh from Henry Rd. due to high beaver dam and rain.

 

 

Red Tailed Hawk & Northern Shrike
Posted on October 31, 2012 at 11:18:28 AM by DebbieAdams

Yesterday a Red Tailed Hawk came to visit. It hopped from branch to branch and eventually settled on a utility line while I tried unsuccessfully to get a good photo.
Today a Northern Shrike arrived and I spotted it sitting on the fence staring at the Jays on the feeder. Then it began harassing the Mourning Doves on the driveway. I've never seen a Northern Shrike here before.  (Walker's Point)

 

 

Muskoka Field Naturalists - next meeting November 1
Posted on October 30, 2012 at 01:41:03 PM by Barbara Taylor

MFN meeting Thursday, November 1, at 7:30 p.m., in Bracebridge

BIRDS OF ALGONQUIN PARK by Ron Tozer
Ron is a retired Algonquin Park Superintendent. His subject will be his recently published book ‘Birds of Algonquin Park’.Subjects discussed will include: changes in migration timing; declines in aerial insectivores; changes in species and numbers over time; major changes in Park habitats; possible effects of climate warming; effects of Algonquin’s contiguous forest cover (e.g. Brown-headed Cowbird nest parasitism is unrecorded during the last 30 years); recent new species for the Park; effects on birds over a 40 year period (1890’s to at least the 1930’s) resulting from poison baits used in wolf control; introduction of exotic species by Superintendent George Bartlett (1898 to 1922); records of rarities in Algonquin; finding northern specialties; winter finches and how the book was researched and written.


Meetings from September through January are held in BRACEBRIDGE at the Church of the Latter Day Saints at the corner of Taylor Road and Cedar Lane - entrance on Cedar Lane south of the traffic circle. Unless otherwise indicated, all meetings commence at 7:30 p.m. Visitors welcome to attend.
(source: MFN website - http://www.muskokafieldnaturalists.com)

 

 

Re(1): Georgian Bay Turtle Hospital
Posted on October 29, 2012 at 05:03:39 PM by coreyhkh

Great Idea, I saved 9 or 10 turtles this spring from the road, unfortunately I was often too late.

 

 

Georgian Bay Turtle Hospital
Posted on October 29, 2012 at 04:54:41 PM by diannawolfe

This post has been approved by the administrator.

Every summer, hundreds if not thousands of turtles are critically injured and die on the roads of Parry Sound-Muskoka. Road mortality is the leading cause of turtle population declines, with all but one of our local turtle species considered to be species at risk. The Georgian Bay Turtle Hospital is a not-for-profit concept to reduce road-related turtle mortality, put forward by Jeff Hathaway, owner/operator of Scales Nature Park in Orillia, with input from the Kawartha Turtle Trauma Centre. Jeff has local veterinary support, experienced and qualified personnel, and sufficient facilities, but he needs substantial funding for site modifications and equipment to get the turtle hospital off the ground. As such, he has entered into a funding competition through Aviva Insurance. The public can vote daily online until November 5, with the top projects advancing to the next round of the competition. The Georgian Bay Turtle Hospital is currently 13th out of 345 projects in its size class, but needs to be in the top 10 to advance.

Please consider supporting this worthy conservation effort by taking a few minutes to register at the website below and voting every day until November 5th.

Please note that if you choose to support the turtle hospital project by submitting a vote, you will be required to register on a commercial website. The Muskoka Bird Board does not endorse or recommend any commercial entities. Product or services advertisements are not permitted on the board without prior approval by the administrator.

Link to vote for the Georgian Bay Turtle Hospital

 

 

Cardinal
Posted on October 29, 2012 at 01:18:33 PM by J. Gardner

Had a very nice female Northern Cardinal under my feeder this morning. A good healthy speciman. A very rare occurence out here near Lake Manitouwabing. She stayed only a short time. J. Gardner

 

 

Re(1): Do Evening Grosbeaks stay all winter?
Posted on October 29, 2012 at 10:59:33 AM by Barbara Taylor

Natural food is scarce this year, so most "Winter Finches" will probably continue on. Some Evening Grosbeaks and Purple Finches may spend the winter here if they've learned your birdfeeding station is dependable from past years. See Ron Pittaway's annual Winter Finch Forecast which was posted earlier on Ontbirds.
You can read the post here: http://ontbirds.ca/pipermail/birdalert_ontbirds.ca/Week-of-Mon-20120917/031284.html

There is a theory that Northern Cardinals have been able to expand their distribution northward as winter birdfeeding has become more popular. They are not migratory birds. It isn't so much the cold temperatures, but the lack of food which is a problem for Cardinals in the winter. That would explain why they've become more common in Muskoka towns where there are many backyard feeders, but not out in the rural areas where it is more difficult for them to find feeders.

 

 

Do Evening Grosbeaks stay all winter?
Posted on October 28, 2012 at 10:11:05 PM by coreyhkh

Hello everyone I was just wondering if these birds stay for the winter or if they are just passing through.

Also of note because of the bad weather I ended up staying inside for a large part of the day Saturday watching the feeders at my Dads in Gravenhurst. The two most common birds where goldfinches and black caps, but we also had a visit from a Male cardinal and a single Male Purple finch.

Are they seen much around Muskoka?

I was hoping for Grosbeaks or even pine siskin, but they where a no go.

 

 

"Dark" Red-tailed Hawk
Posted on October 28, 2012 at 12:51:31 PM by Goodyear

Around 11:30 this morning we saw a Dark adult Red-tailed Hawk. The underwing showed the distinct light/dark contrast between the flight feathers and the underwing coverts and body. The underwing coverts, upperwing, head and body were uniformly very dark brown. The flight feathers were white, with a dark border/trailing edge. At first glance it resembled a Turkey Vulture, but with a solid red tail! It came in from the northeast,circled slowly over cells 1 and 3 and then continued southeast. We counted 320 Ring-necked Ducks in cell 4. The Gadwall pair are still around and were at the back end of cell 4. (Bracebridge Lagoons)

 

 

Red-tails, Siskins, Snow Buntings
Posted on October 28, 2012 at 11:47:43 AM by Barbara Taylor

This morning at the Bracebridge Ponds there were three Red-tailed Hawks circling overhead. Four Common Ravens flew in and started harrassing the hawks. Two hawks continued south while one actually turned on the Ravens, putting on a great show. It eventually came down and perched in a tree south of cell 4. The large raft of Ring-necked Ducks was still in cell 4, along with a few Scaup, Buffleheads, Mallards, Canada Geese, and a Hooded Merganser. Four American Black Ducks were in cell 1. A few Snow Buntings were at the south side of cell 1.

On our way home we saw two more Red-tailed Hawks heading south. A bunch of Pine Siskins were at a feeder near Bowyers Beach and another bunch were at a feeder by #1134 South Monck Dr. (Bracebridge)

 

 

rufous-sided towhee
Posted on October 27, 2012 at 10:00:34 PM by PatWelch

Yesterday and today a male Rufous-sided towhee was seen eating seeds on the gound by our feeder, plus yesterday a male cardinal and a ruffed grouse were here too.(SW of Huntsville)

 

 

Re(1): Female Cardinal
Posted on October 28, 2012 at 02:00:48 PM by dinnymccraney

She was here throughout the day yesterday and back again this morning. Wish the male would show up. The goldfinches have been replaced by masses of pine siskins!

 

 

Re(1): Female Cardinal
Posted on October 28, 2012 at 09:18:52 AM by Wayne Bridge

A female cardinal has been feeding in the downtown Kearney area (half-hour N-E of Huntsville)lately. That's rare for here.

 

 

Re(1): Female Cardinal
Posted on October 27, 2012 at 05:12:40 PM by janice house

I finally spotted a fox sparrow today, a male pileated woodpecker has been at the peanut feeders every day since Wednesday, and the male and female cardinal were feeding in the open instead of chipping from the cedar hedge, Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst

 

 

Female Cardinal
Posted on October 27, 2012 at 03:08:51 PM by dinnymccraney

A female Northern Cardinal was at the feeder at noon today along with too many goldfinches to count.(Bracebridge)

 

 

Birds, Avery Beach Park to Orchard Park, Huntsville
Posted on October 26, 2012 at 04:02:38 PM by StuartImmonen

Between 10:30 and 11:00AM today, I walked part of the Trans Canada Trail on the south shore of Hunter's Bay, Huntsville. It drizzled a bit, but there were some good birds out.

At Orchard Park at the west end of the trail, there were 15 Bohemian Waxwings huddled high in a tree overlooking HWY 11. East of this, along the railway tracks, I picked out 5 Evening Grosbeaks among 50 or so noisy Starlings. Also loosely associated with the starlings were four (late?) Red-winged Blackbirds.

Lots of American Tree Sparrows in the goldenrod, too.

There are plantings of Mountain Ash with plenty of berries along this part of the trail; it would be a good place to find waxwings as winter approaches.

 

 

Algonquin Park (Bohemian Waxwing and Common Redpoll)
Posted on October 26, 2012 at 10:11:18 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Oct. 26, 2012) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

As predicted in Ron Pittaway's winter finch forecast, a flight of Bohemian
Waxwings has started. Five were at Cache Lake on the 24th and about 75
were observed near Radiant Lake in the Park Interior on the 25th.

Also predicted to move southward this winter, small numbers of Common
Redpolls are now being observed. One or two calling in flight were noted at
several locations near Radiant Lake and Lake Travers on the 25th.

Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400, 11 and
60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400. From Ottawa,
take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the park. Kilometre
markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from the West Gate (km 0) to near
the East Gate (km 56). Get your park permit and the park tabloid (with a
map of birding locations mentioned here) at the gates.

The Visitor Centre at km 43 on Highway 60 is open daily until October 28,
and then weekends and holidays for the winter (9 am to 5 pm). At the centre
you can find recent bird sightings, information, and helpful Park Staff to
assist your birding efforts.

Please send us any bird sightings you¹ve had in the park, even of common
birds, as we continue to monitor the autumn migration.

You can also get directions to the locations, as well as updates and info
about other park events at: www.algonquinpark.on.ca

Good Birding!
Ron Tozer
Dwight, Ontario
_______________________________________________
ONTBIRDS is presented by the Ontario Field Ornithologists - the provincial birding organization.
Send bird reports to birdalert@ontbirds.ca
For information about ONTBIRDS visit http://www.ofo.ca/

 

 

Huntsville Nature Club
Posted on October 26, 2012 at 09:35:45 AM by beveaston

The Huntsville Nature Club will meet on Tuesday, October 30, at St. Andrews Presbyterian Church Hall, on West Street South, Huntsville, starting at 7 pm.

Dan Strickland will present, “Birding in New Guinea”, based on his recent travels. New Guinea is famous for its fabulous Bowerbirds and Birds of Paradise. Guests are always welcome to attend. A $3 voluntary donation is appreciated. For more information regarding the Huntsville Nature Club, contact Ken Morrison (705) 789-1407

 

 

Birds at Algonquin Park this week
Posted on October 25, 2012 at 07:43:31 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ian Shanahan on ONTBIRDS (Oct. 25, 2012) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Hello Birders:
Great Gray Owl sightings have ceased, a small flock of Sandhill Cranes paid
a brief visit, Evening Grosbeak and waterfowl sightings are up and Snow
Buntings have arrived: such has been the past 7 days at Algonquin Park.
With recent warmer-than-usual temperatures (20* Celsius at present) surely
keeping Black Bears active, the Visitor Centre feeders have not yet been
filled, but will be once the ground freezes.

A flock of 18 Sandhill Cranes at Wolf Howl Pond on the 21st was the
highlight of the week.

Waterfowl numbers are up as expected. Specific sightings are below:
Ring-necked Duck - 1-2 birds in Mew Lake most days this week
A. Black Duck - 4 at Mew Lake on the 22nd, 2 at Ringneck Pond on the 22nd
and 5 on Opeongo Road near the bridge on the 24th
Common Merganser - 7 females on Brewer Lake on the 20th
Hooded Merganser - 3 at Ringneck Pond and 4 on Costello Creek on the 19th,
6 at Eucalia Lake on the 21st and 2 at Found Lake on the 22nd.

11 Common Loons were on Lake Opeongo yesterday.

An immature Bald Eagle over Hermit Creek on the 19th was a treat.

Several Red-tailed Hawks have been seen along Highway 60, including a
light-morph abieticola subspecies individual at Km 28 on the 23rd.

Snow Buntings have arrived, though snow is the farthest thing from our
minds on this warm, insect-filled Thursday afternoon. A flock of 8-10 was
seen at Km 47 and 6 were seen at Park (Long) Lake (just west of the West
Gate, but still in the Park) yesterday.

Other passerines of note:
Horned Lark - 10 birds at Lake Opeongo and 1 bird at the Visitor Centre on
the 21st; 2 birds at the Visitor Centre on the 23rd.
American Robin - 1 at the Visitor Centre on the 21st
Red-winged Blackbird - 1 at the Visitor Centre on the 21st
Common Grackle - single birds at the Visitor Centre on each of the 20th and
22nd

Specialty Birds are as follows:
Great Gray Owl - The presumed resident first-year bird that had been
frequenting the roadside between Km 21 and 23 has not been seen this week,
nor have any others.

Spruce Grouse - A pair was seen on the 23rd at Wolf Howl Pond. Spruce Bog
Boardwalk and Opeongo Road are traditionally good places to find this
species.

Boreal Chickadee - 2 birds were seen at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on the 22nd;
also that day, 1 bird was seen near Post 2 on Bat Lake Trail. Look for
more Boreal Chickadees in the small flocks of Black-cappeds that have been
moving through the Park this week.

Gray Jay - Easy to see as they seek people out for food at this time of year.
Reported daily from the north end of the Mizzy Lake Trail, the Algonquin
Logging Museum and Opeongo Road. An unbanded bird (not for long) was seen
this morning taking food from visitors who are stopped at Km 53 to view a
massive and close-range bull Moose.

Black-backed Woodpecker - 1 at Spruce Bog on the 19th and sightings from 3
locations on the 22nd: 1 male at Km 21, a male and female at Mew Lake and a
single bird at Km 53.

Winter Finches:
Evening Grosbeak - Small flocks have been seen a various locations through
the week, with early morning at the Visitor Centre being a particularly
productive time and place this week. Specific sightings are as follows: 3
at Wolf Howl Pond on the 21st, 10 at the Visitor Centre parking lot on the
22nd, 10 across from the Bat Lake Trail lookout on the 22nd and 6 at the
Visitor Centre parking lot on the 24th.

White-winged Crossbill - 7 at Wolf Howl Pond on the 21st

Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400, 11 and
60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400. From Ottawa,
take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the park. Kilometre
markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from the West Gate (km 0) to near
the East Gate (km 56). Get your park permit and the park tabloid (with a
map of birding locations mentioned here) at the gates.

The Visitor Centre at km 43 of Highway 60 is open daily until October 28,
2012, and then weekends and holidays for the winter (see the Events
Calendar for more details). At the centre you can find recent bird
sightings, information, and helpful Park Staff to assist your birding
efforts.

Please send us any bird sightings you’ve had in the park, even of common
birds, as we continue to monitor the autumn migration.

You can also get directions to the locations, as well as updates and info
about other park events at *www.algonquinpark.on.ca*

Best wishes,
Ian Shanahan
Algonquin Park, Ontario
_______________________________________________
ONTBIRDS is presented by the Ontario Field Ornithologists - the provincial birding organization.
Send bird reports to birdalert@ontbirds.ca
For information about ONTBIRDS visit http://www.ofo.ca/

 

 

Re(1): Ducks Gravenhurst
Posted on October 26, 2012 at 03:54:24 PM by StuartImmonen

After meeting Janice and her companion at the Bracebridge Lagoons today, I took Muskoka Beach Road south to the park near Taboo to scan for ducks.
I counted as many as 29 Common Goldeneye, only five of which were female. Nothing that looked remotely Barrows-ish, sorry to report.
Much further out, 8 Bufflehead.
stuart

 

 

Ducks Gravenhurst
Posted on October 25, 2012 at 05:19:44 PM by janice house

9 common goldeneye and 60ish bufflehead in front of Taboo resort today at noon, went back at 4:30 and they are still there

 

 

Pied-billed Grebes
Posted on October 25, 2012 at 12:39:19 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there were two Pied-billed Grebes and a couple Wood Ducks at Henry Marsh and that was it. Several Golden-crowned Kinglets were near the dip in the trail as we walked over to the Bracebridge Ponds. A large raft of over 200 ducks was in cell 4 - mostly Ring-necked Ducks, but also a few Scaup, and the usual bunch of Buffleheads and Mallards. No Goldeneyes.

(note: Henry Trail is badly flooded near the "T" in the trail if approaching the marsh from Henry Rd., but the trail between the Bracebridge Ponds and Henry Marsh is in great condition.)
Directions to Bracebridge Ponds/Henry Marsh: see Area trails map (click "Satellite" button at upper right to view terrain or "Map" for just roads)

 

 

Re(1): Cardinal is back
Posted on October 27, 2012 at 04:15:57 PM by Al Sinclair

Our Cardinal is gone, stayed for 3 days.

 

 

Cardinal is back
Posted on October 25, 2012 at 10:14:28 AM by DebbieAdams

After a few days without a sighting, the lone male Cardinal is back at our feeder. (Walker's Point)

 

 

Re(1): Barrow's Goldeneyes? - photos
Posted on October 27, 2012 at 02:25:45 PM by DBurton

The female has the right head shape and beak size. The males do not seem to share this feature.

 

 

Re(1): Barrow's Goldeneyes? - photos
Posted on October 25, 2012 at 10:31:12 AM by StuartImmonen

I agree that structurally, they both look good for Barrow's, but the cheek patch on the male hampers a definitive ID. Sub-adult, anyway. Nice find! I hope they decide to return.

 

 

Barrow's Goldeneyes? - photos
Posted on October 25, 2012 at 09:26:44 AM by Barbara Taylor

Late yesterday afternoon there were three Goldeneyes in cell 4 at the Bracebridge Ponds. There was a male Common Goldeneye and I think a pair of Barrow's Goldeneye. Unfortunately they spooked and flew south after workers by the dumping ponds caused some very loud bangs. I stuck around for fifteen minutes, hoping the birds might come back, but no sign of them.

I'd appreciate any feedback on an identification.
Here are some heavily cropped photos - the overcast day sure didn't help. You can see the female bird has a very steep forehead, and a short, stubby bill which is mostly yellow. The bird I think may be a male Barrow's has a somewhat steep forehead, and the dark bar separating the white breast from white sides appears to be there, but still quite faint in this plumage. Also, there is not a full white crescent on the face...so perhaps an eclipse male or an immature male?

(in this photo, from left...male Common, male and female Barrow's?) : photo

photo1  photo2  photo3  photo4

(male Common at left) : photo5  photo6

 

 

David Beadle Book Signing
Posted on October 23, 2012 at 04:53:07 PM by KristenMartyn

Hi Everyone,
I thought some people might be interested in a free event that is coming up. I'm one of the owners of Wild Birds Unlimited in Barrie and on November 4th (11 am-4 pm) David Beadle, author of the new "Peterson Field Guide to the Moths of Northeastern North America", will be at our store in Barrie doing a meet and greet and book signing. This event is free, so if you have a copy of this book it would be a great opportunity to meet Dave, ask any burning moth questions and get your book signed. I have attached a link below to our website which has some details about this event.

Thanks!
Kristen Martyn, Wild Birds Unlimited of Barrie
WBU Barrie Website

 

 

Re(4): Evening Grosbeaks...photo
Posted on October 25, 2012 at 12:37:58 PM by DebbieAdams

Four Evening Grosbeaks showed up here this morning.We've never had more than 1 or 2 passing through in the past.
(Walker's Point)

 

 

Re(3): Evening Grosbeaks...photo
Posted on October 24, 2012 at 06:46:14 PM by Al Sinclair

23 here today, most we've seen in years.  photo

 

 

Re(2): Evening Grosbeaks
Posted on October 24, 2012 at 01:57:53 PM by janice house

15 in our yard this morning, they were still there at noon, Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst

 

 

Re(1): Evening Grosbeaks
Posted on October 24, 2012 at 01:38:09 PM by Barbara Taylor

Just a few minutes ago a flock of about thirty Evening Grosbeaks were resting in a tree across the street from us. It was their loud constant chatter that drew my attention to them. Unfortunately they didn't find our feeder out back, and eventually flew to the south. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Evening Grosbeaks
Posted on October 23, 2012 at 01:34:12 PM by GayleCarlyle

We just had a flock of about 8 male and female evening grosbeaks descend on the feeders outside our office here at Grant's Woods, near Orillia.
Haven't seen any of these colourful guys since last year and that was only one day!

 

 

Re(3): Pine Siskins - Huntsville
Posted on October 24, 2012 at 01:56:00 PM by janice house

Have had a dozen to 3 dozen since the weekend, Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst

 

 

Re(2): Pine Siskins - Huntsville
Posted on October 23, 2012 at 11:43:05 AM by wilf Yusek

Had 20 + Pine Siskins at my feeders this morning (Prospect Lake)

 

 

Re(1): Pine Siskins - Huntsville
Posted on October 22, 2012 at 07:19:34 PM by J. Gardner

Flocks of Pine Siskins going through our area on Lake Manitowabing and using nyger feeder heavily. Sister outside of Lindsay says large numbers of siskins there, bouncing off windows. J. Gardner Hurdville

 

 

Pine Siskins - Huntsville
Posted on October 22, 2012 at 03:58:06 PM by Goodyear

This morning there was a flock of approx. 30 Pine Siskins by the public dock in downtown Huntsville.

 

 

Bracebridge Ponds - Gadwalls
Posted on October 21, 2012 at 12:23:44 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there was a pair of Gadwalls at the north end of cell 1 along with a Wood Duck, a Green-winged Teal, and a couple American Black Ducks. Still a few Ring-necked Ducks in cell 4 along with some Lesser Scaup and Buffleheads. Savannah Sparrows were along the roadway between cells 1 and 2. Many American Tree Sparrows and a few Song Sparrows were in the weedy patches west of cell 3.

 

 

Wild Turkeys
Posted on October 20, 2012 at 02:26:14 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there were 14 Wild Turkeys foraging in the field west of South Monck Dr. just south of McCrank's farm. This one was strolling along the edge of the road so I was able to grab a quick shot before it ducked back into the field. (Bracebridge)  photo1  photo2

 

 

millipedes
Posted on October 20, 2012 at 11:53:22 AM by John Challis

Dozens of millipedes were out on our road last night (Green River Dr., WAshago). Many 2-cm thin greasy spots attested to more that have been run over by vehicles. Most of them were heading west, more or less, for some reason. Is it a hatch time for them? Are they moving to better leaf duff to overwinter? They weren't just in one place; this was over several hundred metres of the road.
Wonderful that such little puzzles can present themselves even by staring at the pavement while the dog's out for her evening constitutional.

 

 

Re(1): Nature versus Noise
Posted on October 19, 2012 at 11:11:24 PM by coreyhkh

what the heck, that's all we need. All the atvs do is tear up the trails and leave them a muddy mess.

 

 

Nature versus Noise
Posted on October 19, 2012 at 06:53:33 AM by FrancesGualtieri

If, like me, you like to nature-walk along our country roads, you will be appalled to learn that Bracebridge is considering legalizing the use of ATVs on municipal roads. This is to allow ATV clubs to use our roads as trails. This issue surfaced last year, and I had thought that the protests generated had killed it. But no. If you object, contact your local councillor, and e-mail the head of Public Works, walter Schmid, at wschmid@bracebridge.ca. I personally moved to the country to enjoy nature in a quiet setting, not to listen to the roar of ATV clubs.

 

 

Birds in Algonquin Park this Week
Posted on October 18, 2012 at 05:05:39 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Lev Frid on ONTBIRDS (Oct. 18, 2012) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Hello Birders,
If there was a birding highlight this week besides the semi-regular Great
Gray Owl, it would be the large diversity and numbers of emberizid sparrows
moving through the Park right now.

The most common sparrows in the Park right now seem to be American Tree and
White-crowned Sparrows, while numbers of Fox Sparrows continue to grow.
Lincoln's, Savannah, Song, Chipping, White-throated, Swamp and Le Conte's
Sparrows (the one on the 15th at Travers Marsh) were also reported.

Horned Larks and American Pipits are still common in open areas, and this
is a good time to look for Lapland Longspurs amongst them - two were seen
at Beaverpond Trail on the 15th. It is not long before Snow Buntings arrive
to join them.

This is also a good time to start looking for waterfowl in the Park. A Surf
Scoter was seen at Mud Bay in Lake Galeairy on the 14th. A Red-necked
Grebe was seen on Lake of Two Rivers on the 15th along with two Bufflehead,
and a Common Goldeneye there on the 16th. Lake Travers, on the East Side of
the Park, had a small flock of White-winged Scoters and two Red-necked
Grebes on the 15th.

Finches are starting to arrive or become more apparent in the Park - A
flock of White-winged Crossbills was seen flying over Opeongo Road on the
16th, six Red Crossbills near Argue Lake on the East Side and a solitary
Common Redpoll at Basin Depot on that date as well. Evening Grosbeaks
continue to be a daily feature in the Visitor Centre Parking Lot in the
early morning, with a flock of 13 birds there on the 16th. Two Evening
Grosbeaks were also at Tea Lake Dam this morning (18th).

Individual Bald Eagles were seen over the Visitor Centre on the 15th and
one today (18th) at West Rose Lake. We are starting to get into the time to
keep your eyes on the skies for migrating Golden Eagles and Rough-legged
Hawks.

Specialty Birds are as follows:
Great Gray Owl - The bird at km 21-23 has been moving around between
several wetlands in that general area, but continues to be seen almost
daily. Yesterday, in what could be the first time in the Park's history,
and entire bus of overseas tourists got to see a Great Gray Owl - hunting
in the open at km 21.5. Take care to drive slowly and pull off far enough
from the road so as not to impede traffic.

Spruce Grouse - One on the 13th at Spruce Bog, another on the 14th at
Opeongo Road, one at Wolf Howl Pond on the Mizzy Lake Trail on the 16th and
one on the 17th on Opeongo Road south of the gate.

Boreal Chickadee - One was at West Rose Lake on the 11th, another was near
there on the 17th, and a group of fifty-six(!) students from Bracebridge
Public School observed one this morning (18th) in that locale as well. One
was also at Radiant Lake on the East Side on the 15th and one at Tea Lake
today - both atypical spots and perhaps hinting that the birds may be on
the move.

Gray Jay - Easy to see as they seek people out for food at this time of
year. Reported daily from the north end of the Mizzy Lake Trail, the
Algonquin Logging Museum and Opeongo Road.

Black-backed Woodpecker - One was at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on the 13th, and
individual birds were seen north of the gate on Opeongo Road on the 15th
and 16th.

Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400, 11 and
60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400. From Ottawa,
take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the park. Kilometre
markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from the West Gate (km 0) to near
the East Gate (km 56). Get your park permit and the park tabloid (with a
map of birding locations mentioned here) at the gates.

The Visitor Centre at km 43 of Highway 60 is open daily until October 28,
2012, and then weekends and holidays for the winter (see the Events
Calendar for more details). At the centre you can find recent bird
sightings, information, and helpful Park Staff to assist your birding
efforts.

Please send us any bird sightings you’ve had in the park, even of common
birds, as we continue to monitor the autumn migration.

You can also get directions to the locations, as well as updates and info
about other park events at *www.algonquinpark.on.ca*

Good Birding!
Lev Frid
Algonquin Park, Ontario
thespruceblog.blogspot.com
_______________________________________________
ONTBIRDS is presented by the Ontario Field Ornithologists - the provincial birding organization.
Send bird reports to birdalert@ontbirds.ca
For information about ONTBIRDS visit http://www.ofo.ca/

 

 

Re(1): Evening Grosbeaks
Posted on October 19, 2012 at 11:16:52 PM by coreyhkh

Sweet, they are very sharp looking birds

 

 

Evening Grosbeaks
Posted on October 18, 2012 at 04:38:32 PM by Wilf Yusek

Had these guys in my yard this afternoon, there were 10 of them, like to see them again. (Prospect Lake)  photo

 

 

Re(1): Cardinal
Posted on October 22, 2012 at 06:26:47 PM by Al Sinclair

Believe it or not we had a female Cardinal at our feeders for the last 2 days, 8km east of Bracebridge. New species for our yard list.

 

 

Re(4): Cardinal
Posted on October 22, 2012 at 07:49:29 PM by DebbieAdams

Our male has gone. He hasn't been around for 2 days now. He must have gone back to Gravenhurst or perhaps the Barred Owl that's be hanging around has something to do his disappearance!

 

 

Re(3): Cardinal
Posted on October 19, 2012 at 09:19:17 AM by Al Sinclair

A few Cardinals can be found year-round in all the larger towns in Muskoka and farther north also. But they are rarely seen in rural areas like Walkers Point. Most rural sightings are in the spring and fall when birds are moving around. Normally they don't stay long, let us know if it does.

 

 

Re(2): Cardinal
Posted on October 19, 2012 at 08:46:10 AM by DebbieAdams

There are Cardinals in Gravenhurst but not sure how common they are further north in Muskoka.

 

 

Re(1): Cardinal
Posted on October 18, 2012 at 04:12:44 PM by coreyhkh

Are cardinal not common in muskoka area?

 

 

Cardinal
Posted on October 18, 2012 at 09:16:20 AM by DebbieAdams

A male Cardinal just showed up at our feeder. For just a few days each year, one will blow in from, I presume, Gravenhurst. Maybe this fellow might think there is good pickin's here and stick around for the winter. Fingers crossed. (Walker's Point)

 

 

Rose Breasted Grosbeak
Posted on October 17, 2012 at 12:10:24 PM by janice house

A lone female was feeding at noon in our yard yesterday, Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst

 

 

Algonquin Park - Le Conte's Sparrow, Great Gray Owl
Posted on October 16, 2012 at 08:25:37 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Lev Frid on ONTBIRDS (Oct. 16, 2012) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Hello Birders,
Just a quick update, as promised - yesterday a single LE CONTE'S SPARROW
was observed by some of the staff at Lake Travers Marsh on the East Side of
the Park. The sparrow in a wetland midway along the south shore, where a
small creek empties into the lake. This is a reliable site for this bird
along with Nelson's Sparrow earlier in the year.

Rubber boots are a necessity if you're going to be looking for it. Also
present was a small flock of WHITE-WINGED SCOTER and two RED-NECKED GREBES.
Keep in mind this is not on HW 60 and is quite a distance away from the
Visitor Centre.

The GREAT GRAY OWL along HW 60 is still showing very irregularly but almost
daily from km 21-23. It was at km 22 yesterday.

There are pictures of the sparrow, owl and some other birds here:
http://thespruceblog.blogspot.ca/.

Watch for the more detailed report on Algonquin's avian goings-on this
Thursday.

To get to Lake Travers, Turn south off Highway 17 onto Doran Road (Rd 26).
Then take an immediate right onto Barron Canyon/Achray Road. Follow for 77
km to Lake Travers.

The Visitor Centre at km 43 of Highway 60 is open daily until October 28,
2012, and then weekends and holidays for the winter (see the Events
Calendar for more details). At the centre you can find recent bird
sightings, information, and helpful Park Staff to assist your birding
efforts.

Please send us any bird sightings you’ve had in the park, even of common
birds, as we continue to monitor the autumn migration.

You can also get directions to the locations, as well as updates and info
about other park events at *www.algonquinpark.on.ca*

Good Birding,
Lev Frid

 

 

Fox Sparrow
Posted on October 16, 2012 at 12:46:24 PM by Barbara Taylor

Just had a Fox Sparrow show up under our birdfeeder - first one this season. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(3): Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on October 18, 2012 at 04:14:22 PM by coreyhkh

seems like the action is picking up.

 

 

Re(2): Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on October 18, 2012 at 03:29:06 PM by Barbara Taylor

Don Bailey reports there was also a Pied-billed Grebe in cell 4 this afternoon, and a Northern Shrike was west of cell 4 and two Field Sparrows were west of cell 3.

 

 

Re(1): Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on October 18, 2012 at 12:44:58 PM by Barbara Taylor

The large raft of Ring-necked Ducks was still in cell 4 this morning. Only new species seen was a female Common Merganser. Several American Tree Sparrows in the weeds south of cell 2 and some by the dumping ponds.

 

 

Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on October 16, 2012 at 12:42:16 PM by Barbara Taylor

Late this morning at the Bracebridge Ponds it was quite busy with trucks driving around the main three cells - so only saw a few Mallards, four Black Ducks, and one Wood Duck there. But much better luck at cell 4 where we found about 220 Ring-necked Ducks, 40 Buffleheads, 20 Mallards, 1 Black Duck, a dozen Scaup, 3 Common Goldeneyes, 2 Hooded Mergansers, and 2 Canada Geese.

A Northern Shrike was west of cell 4. A Sharp-shinned Hawk appeared out of nowhere and perched for a while in the "merlin tree" north of cell 4. Two Yellow-rumped Warblers were foraging on the ground by the NE corner of cell 4 along with a couple Song Sparrows. About twenty Pine Siskins were feeding in some alders north of cell 4. A few Golden-crowned Kinglets were near the Lagoon Lane gate.

 

 

late-flying darners
Posted on October 16, 2012 at 08:27:33 AM by Alex Mills

I think it is likely to be either a Shadow Darner or a Green Darner. I have seen both of these flying in early October at Magnetawan.

 

 

Re(1): Late Dragonfly - species?
Posted on October 15, 2012 at 08:58:37 PM by John Challis

I have no idea, but Gayle and I saw one yesterday, too. We were hiking on the rail trail south of Orillia at the time. Plenty of tiny insects hovering around were the obvious food supply.

 

 

Late Dragonfly - species?
Posted on October 14, 2012 at 04:03:59 PM by Barbara Taylor

While the rain stopped briefly this afternoon, I stepped out to get a better look at two Yellow-rumped Warblers foraging in our birch tree, and noticed a few small insects flying around. Then suddenly a large Dragonfly swept past. Unfortunately it left before I got a good look, but it appeared to be a Darner and had light coloured markings along its dark abdomen. What species might still be flying in Bracebridge this late? Perhaps a Canada Darner or Shadow Darner?

 

 

Northern Shrike
Posted on October 13, 2012 at 01:14:26 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there was an adult Northern Shrike perched in a tree next to Ziska Rd. overlooking the open fields just south of Baldwin Rd. (NW of Bracebridge)
Directions: see Google map


*addendum: A Northern Shrike was also reported Oct. 13 at the Bracebridge Ponds west of cell 4...so they must have just started to move south.

 

 

Juvenile Swan - Bracebridge Lagoons
Posted on October 13, 2012 at 08:05:27 AM by Goodyear

Last night just before 7, a juvenile swan flew into cell 4 at the Lagoons. It didn't vocalize and we saw it just as it was landing on the water. Judging by its smaller size, somewhat humped back appearance, and very pale base to its mostly pinkish bill, it looks like a first winter Tundra Swan. We didn't see any tags on it. We also heard what sounded like a Horned Owl, with distincts hoots coming from somewhere west of cell 4.

 

 

Re(1): Bluebirds
Posted on October 15, 2012 at 03:35:19 PM by janice house

The bluebirds were in our neighbourhood all weekend, on Saturday they were feeding with a group of juncos and chickadees.

 

 

Bluebirds
Posted on October 12, 2012 at 07:25:20 PM by janice house

Three bluebirds were feeding from the hydro wires tonight when I got home about 5:30, Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst

 

 

100 Ring-necked Ducks
Posted on October 12, 2012 at 03:03:55 PM by Barbara Taylor

Just got back from the Bracebridge Ponds...about 100 Ring-necked Ducks are in cell 4 along with a dozen Bufflehead, a Common Goldeneye, and a male Hooded Merganser. A Pied-billed Grebe, three Green-winged Teal, three Scaup, Wood Ducks, Mallards, and a couple Black Ducks in cell 2. A male Gadwall still in cell 1. Two Blue-winged Teal in cell 3. Savannah Sparrows were along the roadway between cells 1 and 2, and several White-crowned Sparrows in the weeds at the south end of cell 2.

 

 

Birds in Algonquin Park this Week
Posted on October 11, 2012 at 04:21:18 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Lev Frid on ONTBIRDS (Oct. 11, 2012) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Hello Birders,
The continuing birding highlight in Algonquin is Great Gray Owls. Many have
come from far and wide to have a try at these huge northern owls, and many
were not disappointed.

On October 7th there were three birds in three different locations – one at
the Pinetree Lake Portage at km 50, the continuing bird at km 22-23, and
one in the interior at Otterslide Creek. The last day that a bird was
reported was on Oct. 8th at km 23. I haven’t heard of any more reports, but
that bird, and others, may still be around.

Sparrows are still moving through rather strongly, but nobody has reported
any Nelson’s or Le Conte’s Sparrows this week.

A Peregrine was winging its way over HW60 on the 6th.

Blackbirds are flocking up and Rusty Blackbird has been seen in a few spots
this week, such as the Old Airfield and the North End of the Mizzy Lake
Trail. Yesterday (Oct 10th), a small flock of three Brown-headed Cowbirds
was at Lake of Two Rivers.

Warblers are now reduced almost entirely to Yellow-rumpeds but a late
Blackpoll Warbler was at km 50 on the 7th.

Pied-billed Grebes continue on March Hare Lake, visible from Arowhon Road,
with two birds there on the 9th.

A flock of Snow Geese, very uncommon migrants through the Park, was heard
going over Mizzy Lake Trail on the 7th.

Specialty birds are as follows:

Spruce Grouse: Two birds were seen at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on the 5th, and
a single bird there on the 8th. Two birds were seen on the 6th at the
North end of the Mizzy Lake Trail.

Gray Jay: These birds are easier to see at this time of year and readily
seek people out for food. They have been reported daily from a variety of
locations – the most reliable being the North end of Mizzy Lake Trail,
Opeongo Road past the gate and the Algonquin Logging Museum.

Boreal Chickadee: Three birds were seen on the 8th at the North end of
Mizzy Lake Trail. Also try along Opeongo Road past the bridge.

Black-backed Woodpecker: A pair was at Bat Lake on the 3rd and a single on
Spruce Bog, also on the 3rd. Two were at the North end of the Mizzy Lake
Trail on the 7th.

Finches: Small numbers of Evening Grosbeaks have been in the Visitor Centre
Parking lot almost every day. Pine Siskins are increasingly heard as
flyover birds. A small flock of White-winged Crossbills flew over km 23 on
the 6th, and a single Red Crossbill was there on the 7th.


Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400, 11 and
60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400. From Ottawa,
take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the park. Kilometre
markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from the West Gate (km 0) to near
the East Gate (km 56). Get your park permit and the park tabloid (with a
map of birding locations mentioned here) at the gates.

The Visitor Centre at km 43 of Highway 60 is open daily until October 28,
2012, and then weekends and holidays for the winter (see the Events
Calendar for more details). At the centre you can find recent bird
sightings, information, and helpful Park Staff to assist your birding
efforts.

Please send us any bird sightings you’ve had in the park, even of common
birds, as we continue to monitor the autumn migration.

You can also get directions to the locations, as well as updates and info
about other park events at *www.algonquinpark.on.ca*

Good Birding!
Lev Frid

 

 

Lapland Longspur
Posted on October 9, 2012 at 06:31:00 PM by Goodyear

At the Bracebridge Lagoons around 6:00 this evening we saw 1 female Lapland Longspur feeding in the weeds along the edge of the road that runs between Cells 1 and 2, close to the south end.

 

 

A few Magnetawan birds
Posted on October 8, 2012 at 03:11:56 PM by Alex Mills

I enjoyed a walk in a sunny October landscape near Magnetawan yesterday (Oct 7). White-crowned Sparrows were everywhere along with a scattering of other sparrow species including one Chipping Sparrow. I couldn't find any of the more difficult sparrows to spot, however (Lincoln's, Nelson's, LeConte's). I saw a Phoebe in bright fall colouring. The best bird was an Orange-crowned Warbler feeding busily in a tamarack at the edge of a beaver pond.

 

 

Bracebridge Ponds - Gadwall
Posted on October 7, 2012 at 01:15:26 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning at the Bracebridge Ponds there was a pair of Gadwall at the north end of cell 1, but no Ruddy Ducks. A few Green-winged Teal in cell 2 and a couple Blue-winged Teal in cell 3. In cell 4 there were two Scaup, two Hooded Mergansers, a Bufflehead, a Common Goldeneye, and a Pied-billed Grebe. The usual Mallards, Wood Ducks, and American Black Duck in cell 2. A flock of American Pipits flew over on their way south. A few Palm Warblers were north of cell 4 and a couple more were at the south side. Several Song Sparrows and White-crowned Sparrows were feeding in the smartweed at the south end of cell 2.

 

 

Birds in Algonquin Park this Week
Posted on October 4, 2012 at 03:25:42 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Lev Frid on ONTBIRDS (Oct. 4, 2012) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Greetings Birders,
If the amazing show of fall colour isn't enough for you to come to
Algonquin Park, then perhaps the chance of seeing one of Canada's most
spectacular birds of prey will be.

Starting late last week and continuing through this week, we have had
multiple reports of Great Gray Owls from three or four locations in the
Park, likely involving different birds. Some have been one-day wonders in
Algonquin's backcountry observed by Park Staff. However, one first-year
bird has been observed most of this week along Highway 60 from km 21 to km
23. This bird has been enjoyed by many people, including this morning
(October 4). It is usually seen in the early morning and again in the
evening, and usually when it's overcast.

All of these owls may be residents, rather than the start of an irruption,
since this species is know to breed in Algonquin. Only time will tell.

See an image of this Great Gray Owl at:
http://www.algonquinpark.on.ca/news/algonquin_park_birding_report.php

If you are going to try and see or photograph this owl, please keep in mind
that Highway 60 is a provincial highway. Pull completely off the traveled
portion of the highway and be mindful of heavy traffic volumes. This bird
is also located within a Provincial Park so special regulations about the
harassment of wildlife do exist and can be enforced by Park Wardens and/or
Conservation Officers. Individuals witnessing illegal or questionable
behaviour in this regard are encouraged to notify Park Staff immediately.

This week is also best to locate Nelson's and LeConte's Sparrows, both
detected annually in the Park. The weather hasn't been ideal for
observations, but watch for these species at the Old Airfield (LeConte's)
and in the Airfield Marsh (Nelson's), both accessible via Mew Lake
Campground Road. Other long grass areas and marshes may have these sparrows
also.

Orange-crowned Warbler: A single bird was seen on September 28 at West Rose
Lake along the Mizzy Lake Trail.

Pied-billed Grebe: Two at March Hare Lake seen from the Arowhon Road on
October 2.

Finches: Evening Grosbeaks have been at the Visitor Centre Parking Lot
every day this week, and Pine Siskins continue to increase in the Park. No
crossbills were reported.

Specialty Bird Species:

Spruce Grouse: A male was displaying to a female at Wolf Howl Pond along
the Mizzy Lake Trail on the September 28, and also on Opeongo Road near the
Lake Opeongo Access Point on October 2.

Gray Jay: Birds were observed at the Algonquin Logging Museum, the Mizzy
Lake Trail, Spruce Bog Boardwalk, and at the Opeongo Road. At this time of
year, this species is increasingly easy to locate.

Boreal Chickadee: Four birds were at Wolf Howl Pond along the Mizzy Lake
Trail on September 28. A pair was seen with Black-capped Chickadees at the
kettle bog on Spruce Bog Boardwalk on the September 30. Also try the
Opeongo Road.

Black-backed Woodpecker: The fact that there were no birds reported last
week was an apparent "call to arms", as we have been flooded with reports!
There were four birds in the dead spruces at West Rose Lake on the
September 29, Spruce Bog hosted a female bird on October 1, a single bird
was at the Algonquin Art Centre on October 2, a single bird on the Opeongo
Road on October 2, and there were a pair at Bat Lake Trail on October 3.

Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400, 11 and
60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400. From Ottawa,
take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the park. Kilometre
markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from the West Gate (km 0) to near
the East Gate (km 56). Get your park permit and the park tabloid (with a
map of birding locations mentioned here) at the gates.

The Visitor Centre at km 43 of Highway 60 is open daily until October 28,
2012, and then weekends and holidays for the winter (see the Events
Calendar for more details). At the centre you can find recent bird
sightings, information, and helpful Park Staff to assist your birding
efforts.

You can also get directions to the locations, as well as updates and info
about other park events at *www.algonquinpark.on.ca*.

Good Birding!
Lev Frid

 

 

Re(2): Ruddy Ducks - photos
Posted on October 5, 2012 at 04:56:55 PM by Barbara Taylor

Just for the record as they were too distant for a good shot...these are photos of the six in cell 1 (5M,1F). The one in cell 3 was a male.
Ruddy Ducks in foreground, half-submerged Mallards "tipping" in background: photo  photo 2

Female Ruddy Duck at far right: photo

 

 

Re(1): Bracebridge Ponds - 7 Ruddy Ducks
Posted on October 5, 2012 at 03:13:33 PM by Barbara Taylor

Just got back from the Ponds...six Ruddy Ducks in cell 1 at the north end and one Ruddy Duck in cell 3 at the south side.

 

 

Bracebridge Ponds - Goldeneye, Coot
Posted on October 4, 2012 at 12:55:37 PM by Barbara Taylor

At noon today there was an American Coot at the south shore of cell 2. A male Common Goldeneye was in cell 4, along with three Pied-billed Grebes. Also two female Lesser Scaup and a few Green-winged Teal in cell 2.

 

 

Muskoka Field Naturalists - next meeting October 4
Posted on October 2, 2012 at 04:20:39 PM by Barbara Taylor

MFN meeting Thursday, October 4, at 7:30 p.m., in BRACEBRIDGE at the Church of the Latter Day Saints

BONNIE & CLYDE
Come and hear the amazing story of ‘Bonnie & Clyde’ as told by Janice Enright, founder of A Wing and A Prayer bird rehabilitation centre. Bonnie & Clyde are eagles rescued by Janice from the Kapuskasing area. The eagles are so named for the thieving skills they developed in order to obtain food to survive without parental guidance. Janice will tell this story with a video presentation of the unusual community and provincial connections resulting in one success story out of hundreds.

MFN website: http://www.muskokafieldnaturalists.com
Meetings from September through January are held in BRACEBRIDGE at the Church of the Latter Day Saints at the corner of Taylor Road and Cedar Lane - entrance on Cedar Lane south of the traffic circle. Unless otherwise indicated, all meetings commence at 7:30 p.m. Visitors welcome to attend.

 

 

Orange-crowned Warblers
Posted on October 2, 2012 at 12:18:47 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning at the Bracebridge Ponds we found four Orange-crowned Warblers feeding low in the shrubbery around cell 4 at the north and west sides. A single Palm Warbler was feeding near the top of the mountain of earth north of cell 4. Several White-crowned Sparrows and some Song Sparrows were singing brief versions of their spring songs as they foraged in the weedy margins along the roadways. A Swamp Sparrow was singing west of cell 4. A few Savannah Sparrows were along the roadway north of cell 2. A Pileated Woodpecker was calling west of cell 3.

In cell 2 there were four Green-winged Teal, two female Lesser Scaup, a couple American Black Ducks, and several Mallards, plus Wood Ducks. In cell 1 there were a few Blue-winged Teal. At least two Pied-billed Grebes were still in cell 4.

 

 

Large Flock of Wood Ducks
Posted on October 2, 2012 at 12:06:26 PM by lauragilmour

There was a flock of 17 Wood Ducks on our pond last night near Seebreeze Road in Dwight. Quite a sight!

 

 

Broken antlers (photo)
Posted on October 2, 2012 at 09:48:10 AM by DebbieAdams

This young buck that wandered into our yard this morning has clearly been in a fight.
The deer are quite active right now and here on Walker's Point they literally jump out from nowhere onto the road.  photo

 

 

Unwelcome visitor at the fish pond
Posted on October 1, 2012 at 09:46:36 PM by Al Sinclair

Seen at our pond today and Saturday. It spent about 15 minutes each day diving into the pond repeatedly but we only saw it catch one small goldfish. Saturday it was here at 7am but today it was seen at noon.  American Mink (Neovison vison) - Bracebridge ON Oct. 1, 2012: photo

 

 

Spotted Cucumber Beetle
Posted on October 1, 2012 at 04:59:05 PM by Tedthevideoman

This is a shot of a Spotted Cucumber Beetle..not sure if they are common as I cannot say I've see one before!  photo

 

 

Northern Harrier
Posted on October 1, 2012 at 04:11:23 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning at the Bracebridge Ponds there wasn't much in the way of any hawk migration until we met up with two visitors from England - (nice meeting you). They must have brought lady luck with them...a Northern Harrier came in low along the west edge of cell 4, hovered briefly, and then landed not very far from us on the roadway! A short time later, a Red-tailed Hawk soared low overhead, giving us excellent views, then followed the ridge to the south. Three Pied-billed Grebes were still in cell 4, but no Green Herons. A few Golden-crowned Kinglets were near the Lagoon Lane gate.

This American Lady butterfly was at the south end of cell 4, but wouldn't let me get close enough for a decent photo - at least you can see the white dot in the orange patch on each forewing.

American Lady - Vanessa virginiensis : photo

Directions to Bracebridge Ponds/Henry Marsh: see Area trails map (click "Satellite" button at upper right to view terrain or "Map" for just roads)