Muskoka Bird Board - Archived Reports from January - March 2011
 
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Redpoll departure
Posted on March 31, 2011 at 04:31:43 PM by DebbieAdams

Since late December we've had anywhere from 20 to 40 Redpolls as regulars, or 'usual suspects' as I like to call them.
In the past few weeks we've had well over 60 and they've been eating through Niger seed like it was going out of style.
Today around noon they departed with the exception of about 12 who stayed behind.
We've really enjoyed watching them over the course of the winter plus attempting to identify the different varieties.
(Walker's Point)

 

 

Sping arrivals in Port Sydney
Posted on March 31, 2011 at 04:30:39 PM by jim griffin

I am finally seeing some of those new arrivals; Red Wing Black Bird, a couple of Robins and a Belted Kingfisher along the river

 

 

Ermine
Posted on March 31, 2011 at 11:42:52 AM by DebbieAdams

An Ermine, still in winter coat, just killed one of our Chipmunks.
It boldly ran right in front of me while I was standing in our driveway. Then when I tried to get between it and the Chipmunk, yelling and waving my arms, it ignored me and darted after Chippy. The Ermine was certainly fearless!  (Walker's Point)

 

 

Tree Swallow
Posted on March 30, 2011 at 05:28:08 PM by J. Gardner

First Tree Swallow of the season working his way back and forth across the field. Hip Hip Hooray. June Gardner (Hurdville)

 

 

Wild Turkey fly-by
Posted on March 30, 2011 at 05:20:48 PM by Barbara Taylor

This afternoon while out for a stroll, we were surprised to see a Wild Turkey come flying along Meadow Heights Dr. quite low to the ground. It landed on the road and then ran in behind one of the houses on the south side. (Bracebridge)

 

 

bluebird near Orillia
Posted on March 30, 2011 at 02:00:05 PM by GayleCarlyle

I know it isn't Muskoka but I was very thrilled to see a male bluebird sitting on top of a nesting box at a farm near our office at Grant's Woods, near Orillia.
And about 2 dozen robins.

 

 

Red-shouldered and Sharp-shinned Bracebridge
Posted on March 30, 2011 at 12:30:21 PM by Al Sinclair

Our first Red-shouldered Hawk of the year, 11:00 am today, circled in a thermal for about a minute then sailed north-west at high speed. I don't think it was one of the residents here as it disappeared into the distance. Or maybe not, Sarah said she heard it again at around 12:15.

Our first Sharp-shinned Hawk of the year flew into a tree near our feeder at 8:00 am today. There was a Blue Jay in the tree that he may have been after but the Jay deeked left and took off. The Sharpi was about the same size as the Jay.

8 km east of Bracebridge on Hwy 118E.

 

 

Song sparrow and meadowlarks
Posted on March 30, 2011 at 08:52:33 AM by GayleCarlyle

At about 8:20am I heard my first song sparrow on Fairgrounds Rd. outside of Orillia.
And John just called to say he is hearing meadowlarks in a field beside the Baxter community centre in Geo. Bay.

 

 

Turkey Vulture
Posted on March 30, 2011 at 07:01:33 AM by mmcanally

Saw a Turkey Vulture flying over District Road No. 10 near Mary Lake in Port Sydney at 6:15 pm last night. First one of the year for me. Also saw a buteo being harassed by a Raven on Sunday over my back woods here in Huntsville. Couldn't positively id it but looked like a Red Tail.

 

 

Sandhills
Posted on March 29, 2011 at 06:58:10 PM by J. Gardner

The first pair of Sandhill Cranes flew in about twenty minutes ago. They are, at this moment, standing on the glare ice of the frozen creek. So good to hear their rattle as they landed. Hurdville (Manitouwabing). June Gardner

 

 

Cowbirds
Posted on March 29, 2011 at 10:09:02 AM by janice house

two cowbirds on the feeders in our yard this morning, Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst

 

 

Algonquin Park, March 28
Posted on March 29, 2011 at 09:48:24 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Dennis Garratt on ONTBIRDS (Mar. 29, 2011) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

I birded along the highway 60 corridor and adjacent park roads yesterday.
Numerous Redpolls both Common (2 subspecies) and Hoary (2 subspecies) were
observed at the Spruce Bog Boardwalk and along Opeongo Road. The feeders at
the Visitor Centre were very quiet. Three Red Crossbills were observed along
the Arowhon Road (requires four wheel drive due to snow and ice in many
sections) around km 4. Gray Jays and Ruffed Grouse were also observed along
Opeongo Road. A Red-tailed Hawlk was observed being mobbed by ravens near
Lake of Two Rivers. Black-capped Chickadees, Hairy Woodpeckers, American
Crows and Common Ravens were easily found. A single boreal Chickadee was
observed near the suet feeder at the Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

Directions (as per Ron tozer):
Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400,
11 and 60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400.
From Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the park.
Kilometre markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from the West Gate (km 0)
to near the East Gate (km 56). Get your park permit and the park tabloid
(with a map of birding locations mentioned
here) at the gates.

The Visitor Centre at km 43 has recent bird sightings, feeders, and
information. The centre and restaurant are open on weekends from 10 am to 5
pm.

 

 

Hornemann's Redpoll
Posted on March 27, 2011 at 09:01:04 PM by Terry & Marion Whittam

After much consultation (fun!) and studying of literature and material (more fun!) on the 4 subspecies of Redpoll's I'm confident that we have a Hornemann's Redpoll. In addition we've consulted with a number of experts who have come to the same conclusion. This bird was with us from March 12-20 located 10km east of Washago. Substantially whiter than the other 50-75 redpolls and much larger! In addition its behaviour was different in that it did not spoof when the other redpolls did! The size, whiteness, small bill and forehead helped pin it down. In addition the recent posting here on Redpolls by Lev Frid really got us studying this bird. Of course this past weekend with 50+ redpolls and camera ready.... he was a no show! Cheers Hornemann's Redpoll
 

 

 

Re(1): More Redpoll photos
Posted on April 14, 2011 at 04:33:42 PM by Al Sinclair

For the record I now believe the "big" redpoll was a Greater Common Redpoll, C. f. rostrata. See OFO News October 2010 pg 3. Photos of the greater redpoll match the above.

 

 

More Redpoll photos
Posted on March 27, 2011 at 01:00:23 PM by Al Sinclair

It has been a great year for Redpolls. Based on Nyger seed consumption numbers peaked here on a stormy March 21st, probably 150 to 200 birds. This was an interesting bird we noticed yesterday and today. Big like a Hornemann's Hoary but darker in color. Most noticeable features were size and black and white streaks on the back. At first I thought Greater Common Redpoll but they are not that much larger and don't have white streaks on the back, also have more black on the throat. So concluded this must be a dark 1st year Hornemann's Hoary Redpoll. Photos below.  (8km east of Bracebridge on Hwy 118E.)  photo1  photo2

 

 

American Kestrel
Posted on March 27, 2011 at 09:52:31 AM by mmcanally

Saw an American Kestrel sitting on a wire along Hwy 11 near Allensville Road, just south of Huntsville.

 

 

Re(1): Bald Eagle and Wood Duck
Posted on March 28, 2011 at 02:06:58 PM by janice house

last Thursday Geoff saw a lone male wood duck near Santa's Village on Beaumont Rd, he was there today with some Canada geese and two pairs of hooded mergansers

 

 

Bald Eagle and Wood Duck
Posted on March 25, 2011 at 03:54:14 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Along Go Home Bay Rd there were 18 Canada Geese, 2 pairs of Mallards and one male Wood Duck this morning.

Over Healey Lake Rd near the entrance to Massassauga Provincial Park a 2nd prebasic Bald Eagle soared over accompanied for awhile by a raven.

 

 

Algonquin Park birding report: 24 March
Posted on March 25, 2011 at 09:10:08 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Mar. 25, 2011) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

The coming weekend will be the last for bird feeding at the Visitor Centre
and Spruce Bog Boardwalk as both sites will be shut down as of April 1 to
remove potential attractions for bears that will soon emerge from
hibernation. If you have not seen the Boreal Chickadees at the Spruce Bog
Boardwalk suet or looked through the big redpoll flock at the Visitor Centre
in search of two Common Redpoll subspecies and two Hoary Redpoll
subspecies that were present on March 21, this weekend will be your last
chance for this winter.

Cold temperatures at night this week helped to maintain deep snow in the
bush and no open water except for fast-moving sections of rivers such as the
Oxtongue. Snowshoes are still required for travel in the bush, but all the
walking trails are accessible without them.

Red Crossbill: Two were seeking salt and grit on the Visitor Centre driveway
on March 23.

Pine Marten: Individuals were seen and photographed at the Visitor Centre
and Spruce Bog Boardwalk this week.

Spring arrivals included: Red-tailed Hawk, Mourning Dove,
Dark-eyed Junco, and Snow Bunting.

Please report your sightings for our records.

Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, ON

Directions:
Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400,
11 and 60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400.
From Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60
to the park. Kilometre markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from
the West Gate (km 0) to near the East Gate (km 56). Get your park
permit and the park tabloid (with a map of birding locations mentioned
here) at the gates.

The Visitor Centre at km 43 has recent bird sightings, feeders, and
information. The centre and restaurant are open on weekends from
10 am to 5 pm.

 

 

Mink
Posted on March 24, 2011 at 11:07:55 PM by PatWelch

We had a mink in our yard today trying to get at suet hanging on a pole. He ran around and around and jumped at it but never did succeed,so he finally left. Aspdin Rd sw of Huntsville

 

 

Hoody
Posted on March 24, 2011 at 06:00:11 PM by Ted gardner

Hooded Mergansers all over the Muskoka River today. This is one of several I was able to catch with the camera today.  photo  If you would like to see more you can link to my Blog at..
http://t-boneimages.blogspot.com/

 

 

Re(1): Hooded Mergansers
Posted on March 24, 2011 at 03:46:51 PM by Barbara Taylor

This afternoon there were ten Hooded Mergansers (8M,2F) at the "big bend" in the Muskoka River by Santa's Village, Bracebridge. (easily seen from Beaumont Dr.)

 

 

Hooded Mergansers, 2 Locations
Posted on March 23, 2011 at 06:24:13 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

This afternoon about 4:30 pm there was one male Hooded Merganser in Brandy Creek. Later about 5:30 a male and female were in a bit of open water in Sunset Bay, Lake Muskoka, south of Glen Orchard.

 

 

White-throated sparrow
Posted on March 22, 2011 at 04:03:39 PM by PatWelch

On Dec.4th 2010 we had a male white-throated sparrow come to our feeders. I am happy to report that he came to the feeders every day all winter and is still here today. Since I participated in the GBBC for the 4 days, the sparrow was counted. We still have many redpolls around. A barred owl and a male cardinal were back today. Aspdin Rd. sw of Huntsville (where we still have lots if snow in our yard).

 

 

Re(1): Barred owls
Posted on March 23, 2011 at 03:40:24 PM by GayleCarlyle

I heard the barred owls again today around the same location at about 1pm.
Grant's Woods, 1485 Division Rd. W, just outside of Orillia

 

 

Barred owls
Posted on March 22, 2011 at 01:44:07 PM by GayleCarlyle

At about 1:20pm today I heard 2 barred owls hooting at each other here at Grant's Woods, outside of Orillia.

 

 

All Four Redpoll Subspecies in Algonquin P.P.
Posted on March 21, 2011 at 06:15:37 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Lev Frid on ONTBIRDS (Mar. 21, 2011) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Hello Birders,
It's been a while since I've been out, and even today my trip to Algonquin
was not primarily for birding, but I was pleasantly surprised whilst
watching the many redpolls at the feeder off the visitor centre viewing deck
this morning.

There were many COMMON REDPOLLS (flammea), but there was also a good number
of SOUTHERN HOARY REDPOLLS (exilipes) as well. At one point there may have
been eight or more. However, the big surprise was when I was looking at the
ground-feeding redpolls under the feeders and noticed a sight that every
redpoll aficionado relishes - "the big white one".

A HORNEMANN'S HOARY REDPOLL (hornemanni) was feeding with the other
redpolls, told apart by it's markedly larger size and paleness. Later on in
the day I ventured closer to take some pictures and the bird was still
around and posed nicely. It was quite fearless, another characteristic of
this far northern bird which rarely sees humans. It also had the distinctive
"thick necked" look.

The day was made when finally I saw a couple of GREATER COMMON REDPOLLS
(rostrata) later on in the day, which I figured out after looking at my
pictures, thus completing the "Redpoll Challenge".

This was all at the Visitor Centre feeder. I did not venture anywhere else
except for a few minutes at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, which produced a few more
COMMON REDPOLLS.

Pictures of the various Redpolls from today can be seen here -
http://www.flickr.com/photos/levfrid/

Directions as per Ron Tozer:
Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400, 11
and 60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400. From
Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the
park. Kilometre markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from the West
Gate (km 0) to near the East Gate (km 56). Get your park permit and
the park tabloid (with a map of birding locations mentioned here) at
the gates. The Visitor Centre at km 43 has recent bird sightings, feeders, and
information.

Read more about the Redpoll Challenge here:
http://www.jeaniron.ca/2007/Redpolls/redpolltext3.htm

 

 

Re(1): Heron
Posted on March 21, 2011 at 11:51:10 AM by DebbieAdams

I just saw a Blue Heron standing on the ice in Sunset Bay (Lake Muskoka) peering in to a tiny patch of open water.

 

 

Heron
Posted on March 21, 2011 at 09:10:39 AM by GayleCarlyle

I saw and heard my first Great blue Heron yesterday morning, March 20 at about 11:15am.
Wonderful to have one back so early.

 

 

Red-shouldered hawk
Posted on March 20, 2011 at 07:15:14 PM by Doug Smith

Saw a red-shouldered hawk perched on a snag on the south side of the 118 east, (#2458) this afternoon, overlooking the wetlands there.

 

 

Woodchuck
Posted on March 20, 2011 at 02:05:51 PM by Barbara Taylor

Not sure what Wiarton Willie predicted back on Groundhog Day, but spring must be here now...we just had a Woodchuck wander through our yard. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Barred Owl
Posted on March 20, 2011 at 09:41:29 AM by Terry & Marion Whittam

Heard the Barred owl calling this morning at 5:30am....... suspect he saw the Supermoon last night! 10km east of Washago. Also we must have 50+ redpolls eating everything in sight! Cheers Terry

 

 

Re(1): Turkey vultures and Tundra swans near Gravenhurst
Posted on March 22, 2011 at 05:51:36 PM by Doug Smith

Saw a Turkey Vulture earlier this afternoon along the 118 west, near the Ziska Road.

 

 

Turkey vultures and Tundra swans near Gravenhurst
Posted on March 20, 2011 at 09:26:49 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Dave Jolly on ONTBIRDS (Mar. 19, 2011) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Mar. 19, 2011
While traveling north to Gravenhurst today my wife and I spotted several Turkey vultures and two Tundra swans flying over Highway 169 between Beaverton and Gravenhurst. Several more Turkey vultures were seen just north of Huntsville on Hwy 11. It seems the vultures have arrived in the province over the past few days.

Good birding,
Dave Jolly

 

 

Britannia Road Huntsville birds
Posted on March 20, 2011 at 09:20:32 AM by mmcanally

This morning we had 6 Evening Grosbeaks at our feeders (first of the year). Also had 1 Red-winged Blackbird, 1 Grackle, 1 Mourning Dove, 100+ Redpolls (sounded like a jungle when I first went outside this morning) and the regular Blue Jays, Chickadees, and both Nuthatches.
Yesterday we saw 3 Robins on our drive to Rosseau.
Spring is coming slowly.

 

 

Redpolls
Posted on March 19, 2011 at 07:44:34 PM by michaelhatton

Approx 30 Redpolls littering the area this morning (Leonard Lake Rd 2)

 

 

Re(3): Edie's photo... Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch
Posted on March 21, 2011 at 09:14:47 AM by Barbara Taylor

With Edie's permission, I've sent some details to Mark Cranford (OBRC) and he will follow up with them. Mark said "When reviewed it will be the sixteenth record for the province. Most are from Thunder Bay and further west. There are only two records from the South - the long staying Sudbury bird in 2005 and one from the Tip at Long Point in July 1999!!!"

(note: Edie's photo was taken March 16, 2011. The bird has not been seen again after it recovered from striking their window and flew away.)

 

 

Re(2): Edie's photo... Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch
Posted on March 20, 2011 at 06:04:54 PM by Al Sinclair

The photo was taken on March 16, 2011 (from the EXIF data recorded in the file)

 

 

Re(1): Edie's photo... Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch
Posted on March 20, 2011 at 05:00:31 PM by Al Sinclair

This is a very rare bird in Ontario, I dare say a mega-rarity. Photo confirms it. Last sighting in Ontario was in March 2010 near Marathon, before that Sudbury on 2005. The Ontario Bird Records committee list it as reportable in both Southern and Northern Ontario and I'm sure would be interested in obtaining the photo and details of the sighting, date and location especially.
I expect it is also a new species for the Parry Sound District so more documentation would be nice to have for that reason.
http://www.ofo.ca/obrc/reportform.php

The obvious question I have is has it been seen again and how long ago??? There are certainly many who would want to come up and see it.

 

 

Edie's photo... Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch
Posted on March 20, 2011 at 02:23:30 PM by Barbara Taylor

Edie sent this photo of the bird that hit their window and said "the little guy did survive and flew away". They live on Georgian Bay in Carling Township. I seem to recall a sighting of a Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch near Sudbury a couple years ago, so they do pop up unexpectedly sometimes.  photo

 

 

red pole
Posted on March 19, 2011 at 05:00:44 PM by EdieOutramverite

The other day we had a small bird hit our window,
it was with a flock of redpoles but has a gray cap. Our bird book says that Rosy Finches are not in our area just north of Parry sound. Does any one know what is might be

 

 

Muskoka River waterfowl
Posted on March 19, 2011 at 01:53:00 PM by Barbara Taylor

Took a drive this morning along Matthiasville Rd. to check the south branch of the Muskoka River - only 3 Canada Geese, 1 female Common Goldeneye, and 5 Hooded Mergansers. (Matthiasville Rd. is accessed from Hwy. 118E, east of Hwy. 11)

Then checked the Muskoka River along Beaumont Dr. in Bracebridge - several Canada Geese scattered along the river and at the "big bend" by Santa's Village there were 14 Canada Geese, a few Hooded Mergansers, and a male Common Merganser.

At the mouth of the Muskoka River by the end of Beaumont Farm Rd. PVT, there were many Canada Geese, a few Mallards, a couple American Black Ducks, some Hooded Mergansers, at least 20 Common Mergansers, and several displaying Common Goldeneyes.

(here's a YouTube video I found of some goldeneyes displaying:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Fwi9Di-RjU)

 

 

hoodies!
Posted on March 19, 2011 at 08:16:15 AM by John Challis

On the Green River, Washago, this morning, about five male and three female hooded mergansers. My first this season. The males already doing their delightful courtship displays.
I had been drawn to the river by the whining calls of wood ducks, which seems improbably early. Not seen though so I can't confirm. And maybe hoodies have a similar call...will have to check.
also about seven male common mergansers with two or three females and a pair of Canada geese.
Chickadees, white breasted nuthatches, brown creepers, robins, jays, starling and crows all in full voice too. A lovely morning. I don't normally see 6:30 on weekends but a new puppy has forced me into a good habit.

 

 

1st Robin
Posted on March 18, 2011 at 11:28:15 PM by Ted gardner

Home from work today to find my springs 1st Robin in the back yard! Yesss!  (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Red Wing
Posted on March 18, 2011 at 07:18:13 PM by bobhealey

A friend of mine, who has a cottage at Long Point, says the RWBs return on Feb. 28 every year, without fail.

 

 

Red Wing
Posted on March 18, 2011 at 04:36:46 PM by CatMacLean

Finally saw and heard a Red Wing this afternoon in Huntsville, two days later than two years ago but one day earlier than last year.

 

 

Harrier
Posted on March 18, 2011 at 02:59:40 PM by J. Gardner

A male Northern Harrier worked the open areas of our field this morning, in Hurdville. The Canadas have had flyovers, looking for open water.

 

 

Re(1): Port Sydney Merganser update
Posted on March 18, 2011 at 09:54:09 PM by jim griffin

By late this afternoon there were 7 hooded mergansers, 5 males, 2 females

 

 

Re(1): Port Sydney Merganser update
Posted on March 18, 2011 at 12:28:47 PM by jim griffin

as of noon today the common merganser count is 19 males,2 females

 

 

Port Sydney Merganser update
Posted on March 18, 2011 at 09:15:14 AM by jim griffin

As of yesterday the merganser count on the river was 4 male common merg, 2 female common merg and 2 male hooded merg; it seems to fluctuate daily, lots of open water on the river.

 

 

Algonquin Park Birding Report: 17 March
Posted on March 18, 2011 at 01:11:42 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Mar. 18, 2011) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Karl Konze's earlier post is an excellent summary of most of the species
reported here this week. A few additional birds were as follows:

Bald Eagle: On March 15, an adult perched for 20 minutes near the deer
carcass along Sunday Creek below the Visitor Centre deck. The deer was
placed there on March 14 and was completely consumed by ravens and
wolves as of March 16.

Red-winged Blackbird: The first of the spring were one at Clarke Lake
and two at the Visitor Centre on March 16.

Pine Siskin: One was at the Visitor Centre feeders today.

Evening Grosbeak: Up to five were at the Visitor Centre feeders on
March 16 and nine were there today. A flock was in Whitney as well.

Please report your sightings for our records.

Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, ON

Directions:
Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400,
11 and 60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400.
From Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60
to the park. Kilometre markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from
the West Gate (km 0) to near the East Gate (km 56). Get your park
permit and the park tabloid (with a map of birding locations mentioned
here) at the gates.

The Visitor Centre at km 43 has recent bird sightings, feeders, and
information. The centre and restaurant are open daily from 10 am
to 5 pm during March Break (March 12 to 20).

Algonquin Park birding updates and information are available at:
www.algonquinpark.on.ca

 

 

Algonquin P.P. March 15-16
Posted on March 17, 2011 at 01:25:29 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Karl Konze on ONTBIRDS (Mar. 17, 2011) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Hi all,
My wife (Kathy), son (William), and I spent all day March 15th (Tuesday) and the morning of March 16th (Wednesday) birding in Algonquin P.P. If you plan on going off trail, snowshoes are still pretty helpful!

Here is a summary of our observations:

TOWN OF WHITNEY (Just outside the East Gate)
Common Redpoll - Several small flocks were heard flying around.
White-winged Crossbill - A single bird was heard flying past

SPRUCE BOG BOARDWALK (we spent the majority of time here)
Spruce Grouse (male) - One observed on the 15th, about 100 m north of the suet feeder. Another (the same bird?) was observed immediately behind the suet feeder on the 16th. We followed it around a little and observed it do some territorial displays, fanning out its tail feather and strutting around.
Boreal Chickadee - One at the suet feeder on the 15th and 4 (all together) on the 16th.
Gray Jays - Several (3 or 4) were very active on the 15th (sunny). Only one observed on the 16th (cloudy and wet).
Blue Jay - A few seen and heard both days.
Black-backed Woodpecker - A male and female were seen just before the suet feeder on the 16th. The male was quite vocal and chased away a Hairy Woodpecker at one point. Both Black-backed Woodpeckers were even seen on the same snag directly opposite one another briefly.
Hairy Woodpecker - A male and a female observed separately.
Brown Creeper - One observed both days (and singing on the 16th)
Black-capped Chickadee - Lots. Bring sunflower seeds if you want to feed them by hand
Common Redpoll - One observed taking black-oil sunflower seeds; others heard flying overhead
Pine Grosbeak - One possibly heard overhead. I was making too much racket to be sure unfortunately.
Red Crossbill - One possibly heard calling overhead on the 15th
White-winged Crossbill - One or two heard overhead on the 15th
Purple Finch - Heard doing call not overhead on the 15th
Pileated Woodpecker - One heard closer to the highway, later flying in the direction of the V.C. (16th)
Red-breasted Nuthatch - At least two coming to the suet feeder and eating out of you hands
American Robin - One heard chucking from some tree top on the 16th
Horned Lark - One heard heard calling overhead on the 15th
Pine Marten - Not observed by us, but it is apparently fairly regular at the suet feeder

VISITOR CENTRE
Common Redpoll - Lots coming to the feeders there
Hoary Redpoll - Apparently a few have been seen infrequently at the feeders (not by us)
Evening Grosbeak - None
Downy Woodpecker - One
Hairy Woodpecker - One
Common Raven - A few going to the remains of the Moose carcass on the 15th and one by the newly deposited White-tailed Deer carcass on the 16th
Ruffed Grouse - One on the roadway to the Visitor Centre
Red Crossbill - 3 on the road to the Visitor Centre on the 16th, picking grit
Eastern Red Wolf - We did not see any wolves, although it is possible they were there (Sunday Creek Bog) overnight as the deer carcass had been moved a short distance away from the Moose carcass.

OPEONGO ROAD
Common Redpoll - Coming to sunflower seeds placed at the gate (a few km in, which is open) where a snowman had been built
Gray Jay - At least one in the area
Blue Jay - A few
Pine Marten - One observed at the gate. It has been coming fairly regularly.

LEAF LAKE SKI TRAIL
Gray Jay - One drinking from a puddle in the parking lot on the 15th
Ruffed Grouse - One observed running into the forest while skiing along the Jack Rabbit trail (south)

SMOKE CREEK @ HWY 60
Canada Goose - One in the open water.

Cheers,
Karl Konze
Guelph, Ontario

 

 

Saw Whet Owl
Posted on March 17, 2011 at 11:56:31 AM by mmcanally

Heard a Saw Whet Owl calling in Bridgedale Subdivision in Port Sydney last night around 8:30 p.m.

 

 

Redpoll
Posted on March 17, 2011 at 10:44:22 AM by Terry & Marion Whittam

This larger Redpoll seems to stand out amongst the 50+ we still have 10km east of Washago. I just cannot convince myself that it is a Hoary as I don't see quite enough white, especially on the rump. Comments? One thing for sure is he is larger! Cheers Terry
Redpoll

 

 

Grackle
Posted on March 17, 2011 at 09:57:07 AM by Terry & Marion Whittam

A lone grackle arrived this morning ....... first of the season. He disturbed the 50+ redpolls who are beefing up for the trip north! Heard a Barred owl last night.... 10km east of Washago!

 

 

Re(3): Red-winged blackbird
Posted on March 17, 2011 at 09:20:17 AM by janice house

I noticed my first rwb in the basswood tree in our back yard this morning, Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst

 

 

Re(2): Red-winged blackbird
Posted on March 16, 2011 at 11:45:48 AM by bobhealey

The RWB does it for me (signals the beginning of the spring migration).

 

 

Re(1): Red-winged blackbird
Posted on March 16, 2011 at 10:52:33 AM by J. Gardner

First Redwing
here in Hurdville (Manitouwabing Lake)yesterday, three days later than last year, but still in good time.

 

 

Red-winged blackbird
Posted on March 16, 2011 at 10:13:27 AM by GayleCarlyle

Heard and saw my first RWBB yesterday evening behind the Washago Community Centre.
I'm hoping with the milder weather this week that we'll be able to hear them in the wetland behind our house on Green River Drive.

 

 

Re(2): Two Mystery birds
Posted on March 15, 2011 at 01:57:48 PM by LindaActonRiddle

I'm in Bracebridge near the old SSJE on Sadler Dr, above the river, and near hemlock trees. We had WW Crossbills two years ago with their pink plumage, black wings with white bars, and definite crossed bills but these look really washed out in comparison. I couldn't see the crossed bills in these birds.

 

 

Re(1): Two Mystery birds
Posted on March 15, 2011 at 12:50:39 PM by Al Sinclair

WW Crossbills. There has been no sightings of these recently (poor cone crop in Muskoka), where are you located?

 

 

Re(1): I would say they both are...
Posted on March 15, 2011 at 02:33:18 PM by Gardeness

I can see the cross bill in the second photo (even thought it's beak is wide open) - great shots!

 

 

I would say they both are...
Posted on March 15, 2011 at 10:39:03 AM by Alex Mills

...White-winged Crossbills.

 

 

Two Mystery birds
Posted on March 15, 2011 at 10:34:21 AM by LindaActonRiddle

Here are 2 photos of two recent mystery visitors to my backyard. Is the first bird a Pine Siskin? Any help identifying these two would be a help. The yellow-orange one seems to be in winter plumage as the colour is changing. Finch?  photo1  photo2   photoalbum link: http://s1131.photobucket.com/albums/m553/LindaActonRiddle/

 

 

Re(2): Red- tailed Hawk
Posted on March 16, 2011 at 04:35:18 PM by Barbara Taylor

I noticed the Niagara Peninsula Hawkwatch (Beamer) reported a good move of Red-tailed Hawks and Turkey Vultures yesterday. They also had a few Red-shouldered Hawks go through. Here's their
Tuesday report.


Hummingbirds are making progress towards the north too although we will have to patiently wait until May to see them here. Here's a copy of my earlier Spring Migration post with the links:

The following collection of websites will be helpful in following the 2011 Spring Migration. Some of these websites include data from past years which will give you an idea of peak migration times...or just check the recent posts on regional email lists to see what's coming our way.


Hummingbird Migration Map

Purple Martin Migration Map

Chimney Swift Migration Map


Daily reports of Hawks

Recent Posts from ONTBIRDS

Other Regional Email Lists


Tommy Thompson Park Bird Research Station (Toronto's Leslie St. Spit) (active in April)

Long Point Bird Observatory sightings (active in April)

Niagara Peninsula Hawkwatch (Beamer)

Canadian Migration Monitoring Network

Journey North

Migration of Birds

 

 

Re(1): Red- tailed Hawk
Posted on March 16, 2011 at 11:42:01 AM by janice house

spoke to Tim Mason in Raymond today, saw his first red-tailed hawk

 

 

Red- tailed Hawk
Posted on March 14, 2011 at 06:24:05 PM by janice house

Geoff and the dogs were on our back deck today enjoying the sun, hawk landed on the top branch of our basswood tree around 4pm, he stayed for a little while but all our birds had disappeared (Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst)

 

 

Re(1): Robins
Posted on March 17, 2011 at 01:10:56 PM by Barbara Taylor

Heard my first Robin of the year this morning at corner of Glendale Rd. and Daleman Dr. in Bracebridge.

 

 

Re(1): Robins
Posted on March 16, 2011 at 04:55:53 PM by PatWelch

We saw our first robin and red-winged blackbird here today. Aspdin Rd sw of Huntsville.

 

 

Re(1): Robins
Posted on March 16, 2011 at 11:43:26 AM by janice house

while on a doggy walk on Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst Geoff heard a robin on Monday

 

 

Robins
Posted on March 14, 2011 at 10:08:09 AM by GayleCarlyle

We saw and heard our first robins of the year, 2 of them, in a tall cedar beside Ardtrea School on Sat. March 12 at about 10am.

 

 

Brown Creeper
Posted on March 14, 2011 at 08:59:47 AM by CatMacLean

I heard the first Brown Creeper singing this morning in our bush in Huntsville. Still lots of Red-Polls at our feeders with both types of Nuthatches, Blue Jays, Hairy Woodpeckers and Chickadees.

 

 

Re(1): Common Redpoll Feeding Behaviour
Posted on March 20, 2011 at 08:11:07 PM by EdieOutramverite

Hi Eleanor,
We have noticed the same type behaviour from redpolls but in reverse. The first group only ate from the deck floor while the latest group are eating from the feeders.
Very interesting.

 

 

Common Redpoll Feeding Behaviour
Posted on March 13, 2011 at 01:49:33 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Some of the redpolls that have been here for several weeks have departed and some new ones have arrived. I know this by the fact that the new ones aren't feeding on the niger seed from the platform feeder but are eating only sunflower seeds from a silo feeder.  The older bunch don't go to the silo feeder at all.

 

 

BSC News - 2011 Great Backyard Bird Count – A Huge Success!
Posted on March 13, 2011 at 10:25:04 AM by Al Sinclair

The following is from Bird Studies Canada - Latest News. For the full newsletter go to http://www.bsc-eoc.org/organization/bscnews.html

"Canadians submitted a record 7462 checklists and counted 647,402 individuals of 243 species. These numbers are well above those from 2010, when 6653 checklists totalled 228 species. In Canada, the most widespread species this year was once again the Black-capped Chickadee, appearing on 5229 checklists. The American Crow was the most abundant species again, with 66,156 individuals reported. The biggest surprise came from Newfoundland and Labrador, where a Common Snipe (the Eurasian equivalent of the Wilson’s Snipe) was found."

 

 

chipmunk
Posted on March 13, 2011 at 09:50:16 AM by Wayne Bridge

Yesterday morning there was a chipmunk scampering across the snow in, first, the front yard, and then out back. We still have over 2 feet of snow & crust. [Kearney, just north-east of Huntsville.]

 

 

Algonquin Park birding report: 11 March
Posted on March 12, 2011 at 01:26:09 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Mar. 12, 2011) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Winter conditions prevailed this week although milder temperatures
suggested spring will come eventually.

The moose carcass placed in the Sunday Creek bog below the Visitor
Centre viewing deck attracted ravens regularly. Wolves and other
carnivores apparently visited it at night. It is now essentially fully
consumed.

Birds reported this week included:

Ruffed Grouse: one was fairly regular at the Visitor Centre feeders.

Black-backed Woodpecker: one on Opeongo Road (March 4 and 9).

Gray Jay: birds were regular at Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo
Road.

Boreal Chickadee: several still coming to suet and sunflower seeds at
Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

White-winged Crossbill: a few were seen at Spruce Bog Boardwalk
on several days this week.

Common Redpoll: up to 200 continued to come to the Visitor Centre
feeders each day this week. About 30 were at sunflower seed provided
at the Spruce Bog Boardwalk parking lot as well.

Arriving migrants to date are: American Robin (March 1; third earliest
date on record), American Crow (March 4) and Northern Saw-whet Owl
(March 7).

Please let us know your sightings.

Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, ON

Directions:
Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400,
11 and 60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400.
From Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60
to the park. Kilometre markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from
the West Gate (km 0) to near the East Gate (km 56). Get your park
permit and the park tabloid (with a map of birding locations mentioned
here) at the gates.

The Visitor Centre at km 43 has recent bird sightings, feeders, and
information. The centre and restaurant are open daily from 10 am
to 5 pm during March Break (March 12 to 20).

 

 

Canada Geese
Posted on March 12, 2011 at 12:03:19 PM by janice house

Geoff spotted a small flock flying near the Tree Museum Rd and Doe Lake this morning, Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst

 

 

Herring Gulls
Posted on March 12, 2011 at 11:30:52 AM by Terry & Marion Whittam

Our resident Herring gulls returned this morning to the lake, even though there is still 2 feet plus of ice and their nesting spot is snow covered. As I walked out onto the ice they quickly flew overhead squawking and acting territorial! Seems a little early! Spring must be on its way! Cheers Terry

 

 

Seagulls
Posted on March 12, 2011 at 10:46:16 AM by DebbieAdams

Several gulls just showed up on Walker's Point (the actual point) and are the first we've seen this far inland this year.
The lake is still frozen so perhaps they're on their way to open water on the Indian or Muskoka River.
Nice to hear gulls again!

 

 

Evening Grosbeaks
Posted on March 11, 2011 at 06:55:44 PM by J. Gardner

Things are changing in Hurdville. The large flock of Evening Grosbeaks, from 50 to 70 at times, which has been visiting daily since November 20, didn't turn up yesterday or today. I guess they are on their way home. Does this mean Spring???

 

 

Re(1): Port Sydney arrivals
Posted on March 14, 2011 at 07:29:07 AM by jim griffin

as of yesterday afternoon, the male merganser count was up to 6

 

 

Port Sydney arrivals
Posted on March 11, 2011 at 12:50:09 PM by jim griffin

this morning (06:30hrs) I spotted a Sharp shinned hawk casing my neighbors feeders; looking for a red poll for breakfast.
at about 12:45, observed our first male common merganser of the season on the river, just south of the road 10 bridge.

 

 

Sounds of Spring
Posted on March 11, 2011 at 09:38:00 AM by Doug Smith

There has been a red-winged blackbird at our feeder (we are in Uffington) for the last 2 days. He is calling now -- sounds like spring!

 

 

Re(1): Unusual crow
Posted on March 10, 2011 at 00:42:36 AM by StephenDerraugh

Sounds like a "leucistic" or as some say, "partial albino". Here is an interesting link:
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/crows/whitecrows.htm

 

 

Unusual crow
Posted on March 9, 2011 at 09:35:11 AM by GayleCarlyle

We had 4 crows here this morning at the feeders and one of them appears to have some white feathers on its back.
Is this a common thing?

 

 

Crows and barred owl
Posted on March 8, 2011 at 09:03:42 PM by PatWelch

This morning when we heard crows in the trees in front of our house we were surprised to see 4 crows attacking a barred owl. Feathers were flying out of the owl. My husband went out and chased the crows away.
A couple of weeks ago we had a barred owl that swooped around a tree a few times chasing a red squirrel.( We never saw it catch it)
Also this morning we saw a male cardinal that stayed around for awhile. We saw him chase a blue jay away from the feeder area.

We are on the Aspdin Rd. sw of Huntsville.

 

 

Harris's Sparrow update
Posted on March 8, 2011 at 01:41:25 PM by Barbara Taylor

I just received an update from Stephen Sprague that the Harris's Sparrow is still a regular visitor at their feeder on South Monck Dr., Bracebridge.

 

 

Re(2): Signs of spring...Crows on the move
Posted on March 9, 2011 at 07:45:23 AM by DebbieAdams

Crows (and Ravens) galore at the Gravenhurst dump.

 

 

Re(1): Signs of spring...Crows on the move
Posted on March 8, 2011 at 01:28:24 PM by GayleCarlyle

The crows around our home in Washago and here at the office near Orillia have been very noisy the past few days.

 

 

Signs of spring...Crows on the move
Posted on March 8, 2011 at 09:47:21 AM by Al Sinclair

Here near Uffington we don't see or hear crows in the winter. The last two mornings we heard an American Crow calling near the house, first of the spring.

 

 

Brereton Field Naturalists' Club 60th Anniversary
Posted on March 5, 2011 at 08:41:52 PM by BruceWilson

This is being posted with Barbara's permission. In May the Brereton Field Naturalist's Club will be celebrating its 60th Anniversary. We have prepared a week full of trips starting Tuesday May 24 and ending on Sunday May 29. The highlight of the week will be a gala dinner to be held at the Georgian College Dining Room. Well-known nature photographer, film-maker, educator, and natural history author Michael Runtz will be the guest speaker at the dinner. Tickets for the dinner are $45/person and are on sale now. You can order tickets and get more information by clicking on the link below.

I hope many of you can join us for all or some of the events.
Brereton Field Naturalists' Club 60th Anniversary

 

 

Spring Migration 2011
Posted on March 5, 2011 at 09:15:39 AM by Barbara Taylor

With the reports of raccoons roaming about, and today's rainy weather, I decided it was time to dig up my list of migration websites. As usual in early March, Ruby-throated Hummingbirds have been spotted along the Gulf Coast, and Purple Martins are already as far north as Indiana. A few Turkey Vultures and Red-tailed Hawks have already been tallied as they headed north over Beamer Hawkwatch in Grimsby, but expect much larger numbers and more species by the end of the month.

The following collection of websites will be helpful in following the 2011 Spring Migration. Some of these websites include data from past years which will give you an idea of peak migration times...or just check the recent posts on regional email lists to see what's coming our way.

Hummingbird Migration Map

Purple Martin Migration Map

Chimney Swift Migration Map (scroll down to "Spring sightings" link - currently still showing 2010)


Daily reports of Hawks

Recent Posts from ONTBIRDS

Other Regional Email Lists


Tommy Thompson Park Bird Research Station (Toronto's Leslie St. Spit) (active in April)

Long Point Bird Observatory sightings (active in April)

Niagara Peninsula Hawkwatch (Beamer)

Canadian Migration Monitoring Network

Journey North

Migration of Birds

 

 

Re(1): A sure sign of spring!
Posted on March 4, 2011 at 08:50:02 PM by ann hansen

We saw a raccoon run across the road in front of us last night in Bracebridge.

 

 

A sure sign of spring!
Posted on March 4, 2011 at 04:29:34 PM by FrancesGualtieri

We just noticed a raccoon trying to get at our bird feeder, here in Vankoughnet. Seems a bit early, but who am I to question Mother Nature...

 

 

Algonquin Park birding report: 3 March
Posted on March 4, 2011 at 08:12:57 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Mar. 3, 2011) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Still lots of snow here and frequently cold mornings, including minus 32
degrees C. today. No migrants have been reported yet.

A moose carcass was placed in the Sunday Creek bog below the Visitor
Centre on February 25. So far, only one or two Common Ravens have
shown much interest. Wolves may be visiting it at night and have been
heard howling in the morning. There could be good viewing opportunities
from the Visitor Centre deck this weekend.

Birds reported this week included:

Black-backed Woodpecker: one on the Fen Lake Ski Trail along Gateway
Creek at intersection C on February 27.

Northern Shrike: one on Opeongo Road at the Cameron Lake Road on
February 26.

Boreal Chickadee: several continued to visit the suet feeder at Spruce
Bog Boardwalk.

Red Crossbill: two on the Visitor Centre driveway on February 27.

Common Redpoll: about 100 are still at the Visitor Centre feeders.

Hoary Redpoll: one exilipes among the Common Redpolls on February
24 and 26.

Pine Siskin: two at the Visitor Centre feeders.

Please let us know your sightings.

Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, ON

Directions:
Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400,
11 and 60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400.
From Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60
to the park. Kilometre markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from
the West Gate (km 0) to near the East Gate (km 56). Get your park
permit and the park tabloid (with a map of birding locations mentioned
here) at the gates.

The Visitor Centre at km 43 has recent bird sightings, feeders, and
information. The centre and restaurant are open weekends from 10 am
to 4 pm. During the week, birders may be able to enter the centre by
the service entrance (far right as you face the building) to view the
feeders. Contact staff for permission.

 

 

Re(2): Redpoll Quizzie - Bracebridge
Posted on March 3, 2011 at 07:49:13 PM by bobhealey

Thanks for your observations, Al. The Common Redpoll does look a bit under the weather.

Here is a link to an article by Ron Pittaway entitled the "Redpoll Challenge" which I found very interesting.
http://www.jeaniron.ca/2007/Redpolls/redpolltext3.htm

 

 

Re(1): Redpoll Quizzie - Bracebridge
Posted on March 3, 2011 at 11:52:58 AM by Al Sinclair

OK I'll go first:

Second bird from the left first 2 photos is a male Hoary Redpoll exilipes (southern) race. I assume they are the same individual.
-mostly grey, less brown overall
-Mostly white rump
-Fewer less distinct streaks on the side
-less contrast on the face.
-less extensive pink on the breast

Second bird from the left 3rd photo, different bird, is a Common Redpoll that is "fluffed up" possibly indicating that it has salmonellosis. http://www.unbc.ca/nlui/wildlife_diseases_bc/salmonellosis.htm

 

 

Redpoll Quizzie
Posted on March 2, 2011 at 04:49:01 PM by bobhealey

Is this the elusive (lifer for me) Hoary Redpoll in these photos? why/why not?  photo1  photo2  photo3

 

 

snow buntings
Posted on March 2, 2011 at 09:14:35 AM by dinnymccraney

Saw a flock at the Bracebridge hospital helipad yesterday

 

 

Barred Owl calling...Bracebridge
Posted on February 28, 2011 at 02:12:28 PM by Al Sinclair

Last night we heard the Barred Owl calling for the first time this year signaling the start of the their breeding season. He was in his usual location on the hill south east of the house. The nest tree must be nearby but we have never found it. This is much early than in 2010 when the first date was March 22. Why? Less snow, spring-like weather, more deer mice in the woods? It was a good owl calling night, very quiet, far away sounds suppressed by atmospheric conditions.
8 km east of Bracebridge on Hwy 118E.

 

 

Re(1): Carolina Wren
Posted on March 2, 2011 at 01:36:57 PM by Barbara Taylor

I think the term you have in mind is "mantling".

Here is a nice photo of an owl mantling its prey on the ground:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/nigelblake/4400882400/

 

 

Carolina Wren at 7 am - Bracebridge
Posted on February 28, 2011 at 10:38:47 AM by bobhealey

This bird has been seen sporadicly at my feeder early in the morning - 7 am - and again as late as 5:45 pm. In the last photo, taken yesterday, it hopped to the top of the feeder, and covered it with it's wings, like a raptor on prey. I'm certain there is a technical term for this behaviour, but I couldn't find it in Wiki. Sorry for the fuzzy photo, but I was shooting through thermopane glass, F-stop 5/6, 1600 ISO, and 1/15th shutter speed.  photo1  photo2  photo3

 

 

Northern Shrike
Posted on February 28, 2011 at 07:15:37 AM by DebbieAdams

A Northern Shrike was sitting on our deck railing yesterday morning, watching our flock of Redpolls.
I've never seen a Northern Shrike before, so it was exciting to see one for the first time. The Chickadees, Redpolls, Nuthatches and Jays in the surrounding trees were equally excited too! (Walker's Point)

 

 

Barred Owl & Chipmunk
Posted on February 27, 2011 at 02:30:44 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

As I was waiting to photograph the redpolls at my feeders I saw a Barred Owl fly low and land on a lowish branch. As I watched it flew down, sat on the snow for a minute and then up to a high branch. It was carrying a chipmunk. I was able to sneak out for a few photographs but it had its back to me and then flew off into the bush with the chippie.  (Bala)

 

 

Re(1): Cooper's Hawk
Posted on February 28, 2011 at 01:07:37 PM by Barbara Taylor

The hawk came back today for lunch and managed to catch a Mourning Dove. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Cooper's Hawk
Posted on February 27, 2011 at 10:26:18 AM by Barbara Taylor

A few minutes ago noisy Blue Jays got me curious, so I looked out back and there was a "frozen" Pine Siskin and Common Redpoll sitting very still on the birdfeeder. When I went out to take a closer look around, a Cooper's Hawk flushed from its hiding spot in a pine tree. The hawk flew west towards Rockwell Ave. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Bald Eagle
Posted on February 27, 2011 at 09:07:30 AM by mmcanally

Watched an adult Bald Eagle soar over our house for five minutes here at Britannia Road in Huntsville. Beautiful sight. Still have 100+ Redpolls, and yesterday we had a male and female Hairy Woodpecker at the same time. Lots of animal scents in the woods, and the woodpeckers are drumming.

 

 

Carolina Wren
Posted on February 26, 2011 at 05:50:08 PM by bobhealey

It is still appearing daily at my feeder. It just came by while I was typing this post (5:45). Took several photos through the kitchen window yesterday.  (Bracebridge)

 

 

Common Redpolls
Posted on February 26, 2011 at 05:44:31 PM by bobhealey

50 at feeder on Feb. 26th. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Chipmunk
Posted on February 25, 2011 at 02:14:20 PM by GayleCarlyle

I know it isn't a bird but I was pretty excited to see a chipmunk out on the snow outside our office this afternoon.
I'm grasping at any sign of spring. (Grant's Woods, Orillia)

 

 

Re(1): Singing Brown Creeper
Posted on February 25, 2011 at 10:02:33 AM by GayleCarlyle

What a happy coincidence! I heard a brown creeper singing here at our office, Grant's Woods, outside of Orillia. That was at about 9:15am.
I'm taking that as a very welcome sign of spring.

 

 

Singing Brown Creeper
Posted on February 25, 2011 at 09:51:14 AM by diannawolfe

This morning in our woods, our resident Brown Creeper could be heard singing amongst the Chickadee songs. His first song of the year. (Kilworthy)

 

 

Algonquin Park birding report: 24 February
Posted on February 25, 2011 at 09:28:40 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Feb. 25, 2011) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

There were plenty of birders and photographers this week, and the number of
bird observations increased accordingly. Thanks very much to all who kindly
sent in reports of their birds.

The Visitor Centre feeders had a Northern Shrike (February 19) and 2 Evening
Grosbeaks (February 20), and all week there were over 100 Common Redpolls,
1 or 2 Hoary Redpolls, at least 2 Pine Siskins, and 2 American Goldfinches.
An American Marten was frequent.

Reports from Opeongo Road included: 3 Black-backed Woodpeckers (February
24), Gray Jays, and 2 or 3 White-winged Crossbills (February 23 and 24),

Spruce Bog Boardwalk featured a Ruffed Grouse, 1 or 2 Spruce Grouse near
the entrance, Gray Jays, 2 or 3 Boreal Chickadees continuing to come fairly
regularly to the suet feeder, a Brown Creeper at the suet, and 2 Red
Crossbills (February 24). One or two American Martens were often seen as
well.

Wolf Howl Pond reports noted: Ruffed Grouse, 3 Black-backed Woodpeckers
(February 20), and Gray Jays.

A group from Ottawa birding the Barron Canyon Road on the Park's East Side
on February 19 provided an infrequently available indication of the birds
there this winter. Their sightings included: a Spruce Grouse near Lake
Travers, a Black-backed Woodpecker on the Barron Canyon Trail, an adult
male Pine Grosbeak at km 50 on the road, 37 Common Redpolls in three
flocks, and a Hoary Redpoll with Commons at km 55.

East of the Park in Whitney, there was a female Common Goldeneye in the
river near the Highway 60 bridge (February 19) and a small flock of
Evening Grosbeaks at the Ottawa St. & Second Ave. location (February 20).

Good birding this week. Please let us know what you see so we
can enter your sightings in our Visitor Centre records.

Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, ON

Directions:
Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400,
11 and 60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400.
From Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60
to the park. Kilometre markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from
the West Gate (km 0) to near the East Gate (km 56). Get your park
permit and the park tabloid (with a map of birding locations mentioned
here) at the gates.

The Visitor Centre at km 43 has recent bird sightings, feeders, and
information. The centre and restaurant are open weekends from 10 am
to 4 pm. During the week, birders may be able to enter the centre by
the service entrance (far right as you face the building) to view the
feeders. Contact staff for permission.

 

 

Siskins and Redpolls
Posted on February 24, 2011 at 05:11:44 PM by Barbara Taylor

This afternoon there was a large mixed flock of Pine Siskins, Redpolls, and American Goldfinches near the corner of Daleman Dr. and Rockwell Ave. - probably over 60 birds. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Algonquin Feb 24th
Posted on February 24, 2011 at 08:09:46 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Geoff Carpentier on ONTBIRDS (Feb. 24, 2011) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Peter Hogenbirk and I visited Algonquin today the 24th. Somewhat different results from Norm's trip yesterday. Since we left home very early this morning, we didn't know about the Spruce Grouse locale nearer the parking lot where Norm had the birds yesterday, so looked in vain for over 3 hours in other areas. We did find evidence of at least 8 Spruce Grouse further along the Spruce Bog boardwalk, nearer the other suet feeder, along Opeongo Road in the spruce bog and along the spruce bogs on Arrowhon Road, but never actually saw any birds.

We did see three Black-backed Woodpeckers along Opeongo Rd - a male near the gate and a pair near the north end of the spruce bog past the creek where it crosses the road. We also had 3 White-winged Crossbills there and four Gray Jays. It was great to Ian Shanahan and Dan Strickland here monitoring the Gray Jays.

At Spruce Bog Trail we had 2 Boreal Chickadees, 2 Red Crossbills and 2 Gray Jays.
We had two more Gray Jays in the west end of Whitney near the river and two along Arrowhon Road.
Lots of Common Redpolls, one Evening Grosbeak, a few RB Nuthatches, one WB Nuthatch, lots of BC Chickadees, one Brown Creeper, many Blue Jays, Ravens, a Downy and 3 Hairies rounded out the day in the park.

Only mammal of note was a Red Fox mousing near the East Gate.
On the way home, we were fortunate enough to see Shirley Donald's Orillia Pine Warbler on the way - gorgeous bird!

 

 

Algonquin Prov. Park - Spruce Grouse and Boreal Chickadees
Posted on February 24, 2011 at 02:07:25 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Norm Murr on ONTBIRDS (Feb. 24, 2011) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Ian Cannell, Margaret Liubavicius and I were at Algonquin Provincial Park yesterday Feb. 23rd and the Boreal Chickadees and Spruce Grouse are still in the west end of the Spruce Bog area (parking lot and just short of the boardwalk).

There are suet feeders in these areas and the Boreal Chickadees come to the Suet Feeder area near the boardwalk and the Spruce Grouse may be found in the area between the parking lot and the boardwalk.

We saw 2 Spruce Grouse and 2 Boreal Chickadees along with 9 Gray Jays. The Jays were at the Spruce Bog boardwalk parking lot(3)and along Opeongo Road(6) as well as many Common Redpolls and look in these flocks for Hoary Redpolls. Along Lake Street on the south side of Whitney we found 3 Hoary Redpolls in a large flock of Common Redpolls. Whitney is on the east side of the park.

As we were leaving the park in the late afternoon we had great close up views of a large female Moose and her yearling calf at Km 1.5
Norm Murr

Directions per Ron Tozer:Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400,11 and 60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400.From Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the park. Kilometre markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from the West Gate (km 0) to near the East Gate (km 56). Get your park permit and the park tabloid (with a map of birding locations mentioned here) at the gates. The Visitor Centre at km 43 has recent bird sightings, feeders, and information. The centre and restaurant are open weekends from 10 am to 4 pm. During the week, birders may be able to enter the centre by the service entrance (far right as you face the building) to view the feeders. Contact staff for permission. Algonquin Park birding updates and information are available at:www.algonquinpark.on.ca
_______________________________________________
ONTBIRDS is presented by the Ontario Field Ornithologists - the provincial birding organization.
For information about ONTBIRDS visit http://www.ofo.ca/

 

 

Re(1): Redpolls, Bala
Posted on February 26, 2011 at 04:59:16 PM by janice house

we had 3 dozen Friday morning, Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst

 

 

Re(5): Redpolls, Bala
Posted on February 26, 2011 at 09:59:35 AM by Al Sinclair

From 2 last weekend to 20 today. Put up the second nyger feeder.
(8km east of Bracebridge on Hwy 118E.)

 

 

Re(1): Redpolls, Bala
Posted on February 25, 2011 at 11:20:07 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

They have arrived en force! At least 30!

 

 

Re(4): Redpolls, Bala
Posted on February 25, 2011 at 07:34:23 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Jan McDonnell told me they have about 50 gobbling up the neiger at their place off Golden Beach Rd.

 

 

Re(3): Redpolls, Bala
Posted on February 25, 2011 at 07:19:40 AM by J. Gardner

We had only two redpolls until the 14th of February when a large flock arrived, and stayed. Yesterday we had well over 70. Gathering for a northern push?? We are in Hurdville, Lake Manitouwabing.

 

 

Re(2): Redpolls, Bala
Posted on February 25, 2011 at 07:10:43 AM by DebbieAdams

We've had 20+ most of the winter and the past 2 weeks our flock has grown to 30 or more.
(Walker's Point)

 

 

Re(1): Redpolls, Bala
Posted on February 24, 2011 at 09:09:08 AM by GayleCarlyle

Washago: We have had various sized flocks for most of the winter, devouring loads of niger, and this morning there were about 30 of them hovering around me while I filled up the feeder (again).

 

 

Redpolls, Bala
Posted on February 24, 2011 at 07:39:58 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

The little band of Common Redpolls has grown to fifteen today.

 

 

Barred Owl
Posted on February 23, 2011 at 07:12:38 PM by Ted gardner

Our nieghborhood Barred Owl dropped in to see what was on the menu!  photo  (Bracebridge)

 

 

Northern shrike
Posted on February 23, 2011 at 09:06:00 AM by GayleCarlyle

yesterday afternoon at about 3:45, I saw a northern shrike flying from tree to tree at the Hwy. 11 and Soules Rd. overpass.

 

 

Barred Owl Hunting, Bala
Posted on February 23, 2011 at 08:02:01 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

The Barred Owl that visits my feeder area spent several hours flying from tree to tree yesterday. It was looking for red squirrels or chipmunks but I didn't see it catch anything.

 

 

Bald Eagle in Bala
Posted on February 22, 2011 at 06:41:38 PM by Al Sinclair

Kelly Clark reported to me that he saw a Bald Eagle sitting on the ice below Bala Falls this morning at approx. 10:30.

 

 

Chipmunks!
Posted on February 22, 2011 at 02:54:29 PM by DebbieAdams

I thought I saw a Chipmunk last week but wasn't sure. Today I saw 2. Sure sign that spring is on it's way!
(Walker's Point)

 

 

Re(1): Backyard Bird Count results...Bracebridge, Gravenhurst
Posted on February 25, 2011 at 10:14:22 AM by bobhealey

Al, I saw the Carolina Wren several times over the count period. (Bracebridge)

I sent all of my results to Cornell U.  Sorry for not reporting earlier.
Bob

 

 

Backyard Bird Count results...Bracebridge, Gravenhurst
Posted on February 22, 2011 at 12:27:01 PM by Al Sinclair

Results are posted on the GBBC website.http://www.birdsource.org/gbbc
I copied the lists for 2 towns, None were submitted from Huntsville Postal Codes yet. Come on Huntsville.
Looks like checklists from the same location but different days are added together.  (for Bracebridge see here)  (for Gravenhurst see here)

 

 

Backyard Birdcount
Posted on February 22, 2011 at 10:57:57 AM by BobBurton

The count at 1108 Partridge Lane Bracebridge was as follows-
Chickadees-4
Bluejays-5
W.B.Nuthatch-1
R.B.nuthatch-1
Hairy Woodpecker-2
Downey Woodpecker-3
Mourning Dove-8
Redpolls-70+
Turkeys-2
Barred Owl-1
Piliated woodpecker-1
Raven-2 Crow-2

 

 

Back Yard Count - Kearney
Posted on February 22, 2011 at 07:43:29 AM by Wayne Bridge

common repoll (56)
hoary redpoll (1)
black-capped chickadee (7)
blue jay (3)
red-breasted nuthatch (1)
downy woodpecker (2 m&f)
hairy woodpecker (2 m&f)
ring-necked pheasant (1)
common raven (2)
gray jay (2)

and 1 red squirrel
[Kearney is 27 mins. N-E of Huntsville.]

 

 

GBBC for Washago area
Posted on February 21, 2011 at 07:47:06 PM by Terry & Marion Whittam

I had about 5 families counting for the GBBC in the Washago area and east to near Coopers Falls. Everyone had lots of fun counting and reporting in!
Here are our results.

Species [taxonomic] -- Number of Birds -- Number of Checklists
Trumpeter Swan 10 1
Wild Turkey 18 2
Rock Pigeon 20 2
Hairy Woodpecker 8 4
Blue Jay 73 4
American Crow 7 3
Common Raven 5 3
Black-capped Chickadee 196 4
Red-breasted Nuthatch 3 3
White-breasted Nuthatch 16 4
Snow Bunting 105 3
Dark-eyed Junco 1 1
Northern Cardinal 2 2
Common Redpoll 184 4
American Goldfinch 136 4
Total 784

This list included the male Trumpeter tag# E00 nicknamed Mr Wassi! Seems he has a new girlfriend so lets hope he nests somewhere around Washago!

 

 

Breeding Bird Survey Route 052 Port Carling - 40 years of data
Posted on February 21, 2011 at 07:04:00 PM by Al Sinclair

I just finished entering the 2010 data for the Breeding Bird Survey route I run near Port Carling (late as usual). BBS Routes run 24.5 miles along a road with stops every half mile where you listen and observe species present for 3 minutes. The stops are always at the same location year to year and it has to be run during the breeding season from sunrise till 10am. The Port Carling route has been run since 1970 initially by Cliff McFadden then me for the last 10+ years. Route 052 starts at Port Sandfield and goes north through Rosseau to the north end of Skeleton Lake. I have to rise at 3:30am to get to the start point on time, not easy but the data obtained is worth it.

To see what has changed in 40 years I copied the results from the first count and the latest count (see here). The list includes all bird species seen on that route over the 40 years. The species found in 2010 are mostly the same ones as 1970 but the numbers are away down for some and the swallows are gone. The total individuals in 2010 was half what it was in 1970. That's alarming to say the least! Although comparing two years does not give a complete picture the numbers reflect what people are seeing across North America. Despite our mostly natural landscape we are not immune in Muskoka to the continent wide decline in birds.

 

 

Re(1): Back Yard Bird Count Sunday/Monday
Posted on February 21, 2011 at 06:24:28 PM by Al Sinclair

MONDAY
Redpolls up Goldfinches down, otherwise much the same.

Mourning Dove - 3
Downy Woodpecker - 1
Hairy Woodpecker - 2
Blue Jay - 3
Black-capped Chickadee - 6
Red-breasted Nuthatch - 1
White-breasted Nuthatch - 1
Common Redpoll - 12
American Goldfinch - 2
Common Raven - 1

 

 

Back Yard Bird Count Sunday/Monday
Posted on February 21, 2011 at 06:10:45 PM by janice house

Sunday
Mourning Dove 12
Downy Woodpecker 2
Hairy Woodpecker 3
Pileated Woodpecker 1
Blue Jay 12
American Crow 3
Common Raven 1
Black-Capped Chickadee 9
Boreal Chickadee 2
Red-breasted Nuthatch 1
White-breasted Nuthatch 1
European Starling 3
American Tree Sparrow 5
Dark-eyed Junco 7
Northern Cardinal 2
Common Redpoll 12

Monday
Mourning Dove 10
Downy Woodpecker 2
Hairy Woodpecker 2
Blue Jay 8
Common Raven 1
Black-capped Chickadee 11
Boreal Chickadee 2
Red-breasted Nuthatch 1
European Starling 1
American Tree Sparrow 4
Dark-eyed Junco 6
Northern Cardinal 1
Common Redpoll 12

 

 

BY Count Sunday, Bala
Posted on February 21, 2011 at 02:00:16 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Sunday PM
10+ BC Chickadees
2 Downy Woodpeckers, M & F
2 Hairy Woodpeckers, M & F
3 White-breasted Nuthatches
2 Common Redpolls

This was the first day for any redpolls at all and today have 6 feeding on the seeds of the dead Evening Primrose. I usually have Blue Jays but they didn't show up yesterday at all.

 

 

Back yard count
Posted on February 20, 2011 at 01:05:54 PM by Ted gardner

This morning from 10am to 11:30 (Bracebridge)

Bluejays 16
Morning doves 14 ( lower than norm)
Hairy Woodpecker 2
Downey Woodpecker 1
Dark Eyed Juncos 5
Black Capped Chickadees 6
White breasted nuthatch 1
Flying Rats 9 (Pigeons)
Sharpshinned Hawk 1
and the viewing was done!

 

 

BY Bird Count
Posted on February 20, 2011 at 11:42:18 AM by kdyer

Saturday Feb 19 at the feeder on Glendale Rd.
2 white breasted nuthatches
1 red breasted nuthatch
1 blue jay
2 dark eyed juncoes
8 chickadees
3 mourning doves
pair of northern cardinals

 

 

Backyard Bird Feeding Sunday A.M.
Posted on February 20, 2011 at 10:05:57 AM by J. Gardner

Saturday's feeding was very light due to high winds in Hurdville (Manitouwabing). It is more normal today.
Evening Grosbeak 34
Redpoll 52 plus
Blue Jay 25
Hairy 2
Chickadee 8 plus
Dove 1
Starling 1

 

 

Backyard Bird Count
Posted on February 19, 2011 at 07:40:34 PM by michaelhatton

Backyard Count - Leonard Lake

Very Windy - 40 minutes observation from inside
34 Redpolls at one time attacking niger seed
2 Hairy Woodpeckers
1 White Breasted Nuthatch
3 Chickadees

Re(1): Backyard Birdcount Checklist Saturday
Posted on February 20, 2011 at 08:03:37 AM by Goodyear

Saturday's Count (Bracebridge)

Mourning Dove 5
Wild Turkey 1
Blue Jay 6
Black-capped Chickadee 10
White-breasted Nuthatch 2
Red-breasted Nuthatch 1
Song Sparrow 1
Dark-eyed Junco 8
Pine Siskin 2
Common Redpoll 28

 

Re(1): Backyard Birdcount Checklist Saturday
Posted on February 20, 2011 at 07:40:44 AM by janice house

Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst

Mourning Dove - 12
Downy Woodpecker - 3
Hairy Woodpecker - 3
Pileated Woodpecker - 1
Blue Jay - 11
American Crow - 2
Common Raven - 1
Black-capped Chickadee - 8
Boreal Chickadee - 2
Red-breasted Nuthatch - 1
European Starling - 1
American Tree Sparrow - 4
Dark-eyed Junco - 9
Northern Cardinal - 1
Common Redpoll - 6

 

 

Re(1): Backyard Birdcount Checklist Saturday
Posted on February 19, 2011 at 07:45:40 PM by Barbara Taylor

Today's yard count:

18 Mourning Dove
3 Downy Woodpecker
4 Hairy Woodpecker
1 Pileated Woodpecker
3 Blue Jay
2 American Crow
5 Black-capped Chickadee
2 Red-breasted Nuthatch
2 White-breasted Nuthatch
2 American Goldfinch

The pair of crows showed up yesterday when it was still springlike weather. They have a nest tree nearby and over the past few years they've returned to their territory around mid-February, so right on schedule...although with this sudden return to winter I bet they wish they hadn't come back quite so soon. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Backyard Birdcount Checklist Saturday
Posted on February 19, 2011 at 12:04:33 PM by Al Sinclair

Very windy here this morning, Goldfinches were flying backwards at one point. Below is a copy of the email received after entering your checklist.

Record ID: S7638574
Email: sinclair@muskoka.com
Email: P1L 1X1, Bracebridge, ON
Observation Date : FEB 19, 2011
Start Time: 8:30 AM
Total Birding Time: 30 minutes
Party Size: 1
Skill: excellent
Weather: good
Snow Depth: 12 - 14 in (30.5 - 35.6 cm)
Habitat(s):
deciduous woods
Number of Species: 9
All Reported: yes
Checklist:
Mourning Dove - 1
Downy Woodpecker - 1
Hairy Woodpecker - 2
Blue Jay - 2
Black-capped Chickadee - 6
Red-breasted Nuthatch - 1
White-breasted Nuthatch - 1
Common Redpoll - 1
American Goldfinch - 15

 

 

Algonquin Park Birding Report: 17 February
Posted on February 18, 2011 at 09:26:50 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Feb. 17, 2011) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

The Spruce Bog Suet Feeder effect (like the Patagonia Picnic Table effect
before many of you were born!) resulted in more observations this week.

Many people had great looks and photo opportunities as up to 3 or 4 Boreal
Chickadees came fairly regularly to the suet at Spruce Bog Boardwalk. To
see a short video clip of one of these chickadees feeding on a black
sunflower seed visit: http://www.youtube.com/user/FOAPAlgonquinPark

Ruffed Grouse: One was in the Spruce Bog Boardwalk parking lot today.

A male Spruce Grouse was often reported near the suet feeder at Spruce Bog
Boardwalk this week. Two males displayed near two females there today,
likely inspired by the mild temperatures.

There was a Wild Turkey along Highway 60 near Lake of Two Rivers on
February 14, showing once again that turkeys can survive an Algonquin
winter largely un-aided by people in range never occupied by the species
historically.

Those who have experienced enough winter by now may be heartened to
learn that some Gray Jays started building nests this week. People were
seeing Gray Jays regularly at Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road.

Pine Grosbeak: One was flying over near the Old Airfield today.

Red Crossbill: Six were reported at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on February 11
and a single flew over Opeongo Road at Cameron Lake Road on February
12. Two were heard calling north of km 3 on Highway 60 today.

White-winged Crossbill: A small flock was heard over Spruce Bog Boardwalk
today.

Common Redpoll: At least 50 are coming daily to the Visitor Centre feeders
now.

Hoary Redpoll: One (and perhaps two) were briefly at the Visitor Centre
feeders on February 12. A single was with 40 Common Redpolls coming to
seed provided on Opeongo Road north of the bridge today.

American Goldfinch: One was with the Common Redpolls at the Visitor
Centre feeders today. This species has not been seen there recently.

Evening Grosbeak: A flock of 20-30 landed briefly in the trees near the suet
feeder at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on February 13.

American Marten: Two or three have been coming to the suet feeder at Spruce
Bog Boardwalk fairly regularly. One was getting sunflower seed on Opeongo
Road on February 13.

River Otter: One was along Costello Creek on Opeongo Road on February 13.

Good birding this week. Please let us know what you see so we
can enter your sightings in our Visitor Centre records.

Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, ON

Directions:
Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400,
11 and 60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400.
From Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60
to the park. Kilometre markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from
the West Gate (km 0) to near the East Gate (km 56). Get your park
permit and the park tabloid (with a map of birding locations mentioned
here) at the gates.

The Visitor Centre at km 43 has recent bird sightings, feeders, and
information. The centre and restaurant are open weekends from 10 am
to 4 pm. During the week, birders may be able to enter the centre by
the service entrance (far right as you face the building) to view the
feeders. Contact staff for permission.

 

 

Boreal Chickadees & Martens, Algonquin Park
Posted on February 16, 2011 at 08:14:28 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

I made a second attempt to see the Boreal Chickadees and Pine Marten reported by Ron Tozer at the Spruce Bog. One of the naturalists has put up a huge suet feeder near the start of the long boardwalk. The chickadees seem to start feeding there later in the morning and continue, off and on, all afternoon. Also, 2 Gray Jays, a Brown Creeper and a pair of Red-breasted Nuthatches along with a few more common species. A displaying Spruce Grouse put in an appearance as well. There were two Pine Martens yesterday.

 

 

Barred Owl, Bala
Posted on February 16, 2011 at 08:08:06 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

I saw my occasional visitor flying around from tree to tree today then saw it go into a pine tree feet first after a red squirrel. I'm pretty sure it was successful as it landed in a tree out of sight and stopped hunting.

 

 

Re(1): Great Backyard Bird Count Feb. 18-21
Posted on February 19, 2011 at 07:28:49 AM by janice house

Feb 18, 15 mins, Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst
downy woodpecker 1
hairy woodpecker 1
mourning dove 2
blue jay 8
american crow 1
black-capped chickadee 6
european starling 8
american tree sparrow 2
dark-eyed junco 2
american goldfinch 13

 

 

Great Backyard Bird Count Feb. 18-21
Posted on February 14, 2011 at 09:54:42 AM by Barbara Taylor

It's that time of year again...the Great Backyard Bird Count (GBBC). As usual we will have our own informal count here on the Bird Board so we can compare notes with other birders in our area. Post your backyard bird counts for any of the four days.

Information about the GBBC and how to participate: http://www.birdsource.org/gbbc/canada
"The 2011 GBBC will take place Friday, February 18, through Monday, February 21. The Great Backyard Bird Count is an annual four-day event that engages bird watchers of all ages in counting birds to create a real-time snapshot of where the birds are across the continent. Anyone can participate, from beginning bird watchers to experts. It takes as little as 15 minutes on one day, or you can count for as long as you like each day of the event. It’s free, fun, and easy—and it helps the birds."

 

 

Re(1): Goldfinches at Bracebridge
Posted on February 19, 2011 at 07:20:53 AM by janice house

13 yesterday in our yard, off and on there have been 1 to 13ish at our feeders, sometimes they roost in our cedar hedge, Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst

 

 

Re(1): Goldfinches at Bracebridge
Posted on February 14, 2011 at 02:05:30 PM by Barbara Taylor

We've only had five Goldfinches visiting our feeders until this morning when a flock of about 30 showed up. They didn't stay long though. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Goldfinches at Bracebridge
Posted on February 13, 2011 at 05:04:28 PM by Al Sinclair

Just got a message from Doug Smith, the goldfinches have been at his place for a few weeks. Google Earth calculates the distance through the woods to his feeders at 1.09 km. So I suppose they have been scouting the neighborhood and finally located our offerings.

 

 

Goldfinches at Bracebridge
Posted on February 13, 2011 at 01:29:34 PM by Al Sinclair

We had 15 Goldfinches here all morning, not sure where they came from as we have had none this winter until now. Maybe somebody has gone south and their feeder is empty. Still only seeing the odd Redpoll here, just passing through.  (8km east of Bracebridge on Hwy 118E)

We have talked to two people who have no birds at all at their feeder this year but have had them other years. I don't think bird populations are down that much. Their problem seems to be that they waited until there was snow on the ground before putting out food. In one case they waited because they had Wild Turkeys around and didn't want them to stay. Also people are waiting later because they don't want to attract any late hibernating bears.

 

 

Bohemian Waxwings
Posted on February 11, 2011 at 06:05:13 PM by Dawn Sherman

A flock of Bohemian Waxwings (approx. 24) flew over the river at the swing bridge in Huntsville this afternoon.

 

 

Algonquin Park Birding Report: 10 February
Posted on February 11, 2011 at 09:48:58 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Feb. 11, 2011) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

More birders this week resulted in a few more birds being reported.

Black-backed Woodpecker.: female at West Rose Lake on Mizzy Lake
trail on February 5.

Northern Shrike: One was around the Visitor Centre feeders briefly on
February 9.

Gray Jay: reported at Spruce Bog Boardwalk entrance, Visitor
Centre, Opeongo Road and West Rose Lake.

Boreal Chickadee: two or three were at suet and sunflower seeds at
Spruce Bog Boardwalk, providing great photographic opportunities for
those who waited for them to appear. The suet is on a tree on your left
as you approach the trail register box after the first short boardwalk. The
birds are often absent for long periods but have been feeding on the suet
regularly.

Pine Grosbeak: two were on Highway 60 near Leaf Lake Ski Trail
(km 53.9) on February 6. As predicted in Ron Pittaway's Winter Finch
Forecast, this species has been very scarce here this winter.

Common Redpoll: up to 30 were feeding on the sunflower seed at the
entrance to the Spruce Bog Boardwalk and there were about 40
at the Visitor Centre feeders this week.

American Marten: one or two are coming irregularly to the Visitor
Centre feeders.

Moose: one or two were reported along the highway this week,
including a young bull with antlers near Jake Lake on February 9.
Some young bulls will retain their antlers for several more weeks.

Good birding this week. Please let us know what you see so we
can enter your sightings in our Visitor Centre records.

Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, ON

Directions:
Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400,
11 and 60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400.
From Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60
to the park. Kilometre markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from
the West Gate (km 0) to near the East Gate (km 56). Get your park
permit and the park tabloid (with a map of birding locations mentioned
here) at the gates.

The Visitor Centre at km 43 has recent bird sightings, feeders, and
information. The centre and restaurant are open weekends from 10 am
to 4 pm. During the week, birders may be able to enter the centre by
the service entrance (far right as you face the building) to view the
feeders. Contact staff for permission.

Algonquin Park birding updates and information are available at:
www.algonquinpark.on.ca

 

 

pileated woodpeckers
Posted on February 10, 2011 at 10:07:15 AM by John Challis

There were three pileated woodpeckers around the house this morning while I was shovelling -- Green River Drive in Washago. One pair were starting to lark about quite playfully. It seems a bit early for that sort of romancin' but maybe they know Valentine's Day is coming.

 

 

Re(1): Bald Eagle
Posted on February 14, 2011 at 09:26:14 AM by Kip Daynard

I saw a sub-adult Bald Eagle (1st year, I think) flying over the Aspdin Rd. exit just to the east of Hwy 11 on Tuesday, Feb. 8th.

 

 

Re(1): Bald Eagle
Posted on February 13, 2011 at 02:04:13 PM by StephenDerraugh

We have seen a sub-adult two days running - 12/13 Feb, from our house atop the hill on Florence St W, Huntsville looking across towards the lookout circling / being harassed by crows.

 

 

Bald Eagle
Posted on February 7, 2011 at 04:57:20 PM by mmcanally

A Bald Eagle flew across Highway 60 near The Butcher's Daughters in Huntsville today, then soared out over Fairy Lake.

 

 

Goshawk visitor
Posted on February 7, 2011 at 11:42:45 AM by BobBurton

The morning of Feb.04,the flock of Redpolls (50+) were wheeling through the sky but not landing at the niger feeder.On watching for awhile, a mature Goshawk settled in a tree on periphery of garden.Most of the resident birds just went about their business.The hawk flew off into the valley-ravine and after a short time the Redpolls settled in. We live on Partridge Lane. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Northern Goshawk - Huntsville
Posted on February 6, 2011 at 09:42:26 AM by Kip Daynard

This morning at 9:30am an adult Goshawk visited our yard on Hunter's Bay Dr. It hunted for about 10 minutes from various perches before it flew empty-handed southwards across Hunter's Bay.

 

 

Re(1): Gravenhurst Birds
Posted on February 11, 2011 at 04:37:58 PM by dburton

Why weren't they there during the bird count?

 

 

Gravenhurst Birds
Posted on February 5, 2011 at 06:48:00 PM by janice house

I had 2 Boreal chickadees feeding on the suet and peanuts today, (Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst). There are a dozen house sparrows at the YIG's store in Gravenhurst, they were in behind the fencing where the extra grocery carts are kept, 2 dozen starlings were on the tower on top of the Gravenhurst fire station.

 

 

Re(2): Redpolls
Posted on February 7, 2011 at 10:45:09 AM by GayleCarlyle

Yesterday we had about 50 redpolls at our niger feeder in the morning. Up until then we only had about 10 or so. (Washago)

 

 

Re(1): Redpolls
Posted on February 6, 2011 at 12:36:51 PM by janice house

2 dozen flew in to our feeders this morning, Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst

 

 

Redpolls
Posted on February 5, 2011 at 08:39:49 AM by mmcanally

This morning, here on Britannia Road in Huntsville, we had at least 50 Redpolls at our feeders. Up to this point, we had at max of only 6.

 

 

Algonquin Park Birding Update: 3 February
Posted on February 3, 2011 at 09:30:13 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Feb. 3, 2011) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Fresh Pileated Woodpecker excavations in trees near the West Gate
indicate considerable activity recently. This woodpecker is common
in the hardwood forest from there east to Lake of Two Rivers but
not always easy to locate. Searching near the West Gate is likely to
be productive.

Boreal Chickadees continue to be seen with some regularity near
the entrance of Spruce Bog Boardwalk (km 42.5 on Highway 60).
They are feeding on the black sunflower seeds provided in the
parking lot and also coming to the suet on a tree to the left of the
trail just before the register box. We saw a fine photograph of one
splitting open a sunflower seed there this week. Boreal Chickadees
in Algonquin Park are rarely attracted to sunflower seed but the
scarcity of tree seeds this winter may be influencing their behaviour.

Another place to look for Boreal Chickadees is the Visitor Centre.
Some in the black spruce below the viewing deck were heard
calling on February 1.

Indicative of changing numbers of Common Redpolls were the
more than 25 that replaced last week's four individuals at the
Visitor Centre feeders. Redpolls are probably continuing to move
in their search for a better seed crop.

Good birding this week. Please let us know what you see so we
can enter your sightings in our Visitor Centre records.

Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, ON

Directions:
Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400,
11 and 60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400.
From Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60
to the park. Kilometre markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from
the West Gate (km 0) to near the East Gate (km 56). Get your park
permit and the park tabloid (with a map of birding locations mentioned
here) at the gates.

The Visitor Centre at km 43 has recent bird sightings, feeders, and
information. The centre and restaurant are open weekends from 10 am
to 4 pm. During the week, birders may be able to enter the centre by
the service entrance (far right as you face the building) to view the
feeders. Contact staff for permission.

 

 

Re(2): Carolina Wren Photos
Posted on February 5, 2011 at 12:44:47 PM by bobhealey

Al,  You're probably right. It only frequents my place 1-2 times a day for very brief periods. ( He just arrived (!), grabbed a hunk of suet, and left.)

 

 

Re(1): Carolina Wren Photos
Posted on February 5, 2011 at 08:19:06 AM by Al Sinclair

The same bird (likely) was seen at a feeder in the covered bridge subdivision recently. Reported at the Muskoka Field Naturalists meeting.

 

 

Carolina Wren Photos
Posted on February 1, 2011 at 07:15:11 PM by bobhealey

The Carolina Wren has been a regular visitor to our "back deck" feeding station over the past week. (Photos were taken through our bay window.) (Bracebridge)

photo1  photo2

 

 

Re(1): Boreal Chickadee - photo
Posted on February 10, 2011 at 07:26:13 AM by janice house

photo of one of our boreal chickadees taken this week in our yard, Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst, thanks to Barbara for the help in attaching the photo  photo

 

 

Boreal Chickadee - Bracebridge
Posted on January 30, 2011 at 03:53:43 PM by Barbara Taylor

This afternoon there was a Boreal Chickadee a short distance east of Henry Marsh after the trail enters the woods.

directions: from the traffic lights at Wellington St. and Eccelstone Dr., head west along Beaumont Dr. to Henry Rd. and park by the trailhead. Follow the trail straight in to the marsh, and turn left at the "T" in the trail. (note: on busy weekends caution is warranted for a short section of the trail as you approach the marsh since it is also a snowmobile trail in the winter)

 

 

Re(2): Evening Grosbeaks
Posted on February 5, 2011 at 08:13:36 AM by Al Sinclair

A flock of 40 to 50 was reported at the Muskoka Field Naturalists meeting Thursday night. They are coming to Ron Stager's feeders and his neighbours across the road east of Barkway on Merkley Rd. They have been there all winter, nice to have a neighbour who shares the cost of feeding them.

 

 

Re(1): Evening Grosbeaks
Posted on February 3, 2011 at 07:08:51 PM by J. Gardner

It seems that I am the only one with the mobs of Evening Grosbeaks coming to the feeders. And I am the only one with the big bill for sunflower seed too. Between the 30 odd Blue Jays and between 50 and 60 grosbeaks, I am keeping the local supplier afloat. Not that I am really complaining because the grosbeaks have a lovely twittering sound when they are in, reminding one of Spring.  (Hurdville)

 

 

Re(2): Evening Grosbeaks
Posted on January 31, 2011 at 10:39:47 AM by GayleCarlyle

At our feeders in Washago, we have seen no Evening grosbeaks this winter. However, through the week we are at work so they might be stopping by when we're not there. None on the weekends.
We had about 10 of them at the feeders back in early December at our office here at Grant's woods outside of Orillia. None since then.

 

 

Re(1): Evening Grosbeaks
Posted on January 31, 2011 at 08:03:18 AM by Wayne Bridge

I get 4 or 5 every once in a while (three times, I think, in January). Kearney - 27 mins N-E of Huntsville.

 

 

Evening Grosbeaks
Posted on January 30, 2011 at 12:36:14 PM by J. Gardner

I can't compete in the Redpoll stakes, having had only two thus far in January. But I have had as many as 60 Evening Grosbeaks (usual count around 50) daily, and they hang around all day. We are in Hurdville, Lake Manitouwabing. Is anybody else seeing Evening Grosbeaks in any number? Reports from this area would make me believe that we have every one in the district.

 

 

hoary redpoll
Posted on January 30, 2011 at 09:13:16 AM by Wayne Bridge

Finally - because I've been closely watching since the redpolls showed up - I spotted a hoary redpoll yesterday among the two dozen at my nyjer feeder. Interestingly, unlike two years ago when redpolls seemed to be "everywhere", some of my customers report lots of redpolls while others are reporting none at all. [Kearney, 27 mins. N-E of Huntsville.]

 

 

Bald Eagle
Posted on January 29, 2011 at 04:09:12 PM by Goodyear

An adult, circling above South Monck Drive and Partridge Lane this afternoon.(Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Redpolls
Posted on January 30, 2011 at 10:46:24 AM by jim griffin

I have had a flock that varies from 15 to 30 at my nyger seed feeder in port sydney for the past week; the only finch type bird around at the moment

 

 

Redpolls
Posted on January 29, 2011 at 01:02:29 PM by CatMacLean

We presently have three redpolls at our feeders. It is only the second time I have seen them here this winter. (Huntsville)

 

 

Re(1): Carolina Wren
Posted on January 30, 2011 at 10:41:17 AM by jim griffin

I had a Carolina Wren at my feeders in port sydney regularly from mid dec to mid jan. Not seen since jan 15. They do go after suet but mine was partial to "martha's mix", that lard-peanut butter etc. mix.

 

 

Carolina Wren
Posted on January 28, 2011 at 12:41:58 PM by bobhealey

A Carolina Wren made a brief appearance in our back yard at 12:20 pm today. It will not likely stick around as I only have sunflower seeds to offer. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Barred Owl versus Gray Squirrel
Posted on January 28, 2011 at 02:27:21 PM by GayleCarlyle

Great shot Barbara!
About 10 years ago when we live in BB, there was a barred owl hanging around for about 3 weeks at our neighbours feeder presumably picking off mice.
In the spring when we cleaning out our old workshop, we found where the owl had been roosting during that time. There were feathers, a large patch of droppings and the carcass of a black squirrel.
We never saw it go after anything but it must been very quick and strong to get the squirrel.

 

 

Barred Owl versus Gray Squirrel
Posted on January 28, 2011 at 10:31:54 AM by Barbara Taylor

A Barred Owl is back in our yard this morning. A few minutes ago a Gray Squirrel was feeding on some spilled sunflower seeds next to the feeder and didn't seem to be aware of the owl perched high above it. The owl stared intently at the squirrel, waited until the squirrel had its back turned, and then swooped down on it. There was a mighty struggle and the squirrel managed to break free by entangling the owl in a nearby hemlock. I've never seen the owl try for a Gray Squirrel before, only the much smaller Red Squirrels. I guess the Gray Squirrel just got a little too complacent! (Bracebridge)

(Owl ended up posed here, after trying for a Mourning Dove on the roof of this feeder) - photo

 

 

Algonquin Park bird report: 27 January
Posted on January 28, 2011 at 09:52:27 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Jan. 27, 2011) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Little new to report again this week. Beautiful winter conditions but very
few birds in evidence.

Some observers continued to find Boreal Chickadees near the suet feeder just
before the Trail Register box on Spruce Bog Boardwalk this week.

A Spruce Grouse was getting grit along Highway 60 at km 5 on January 24.

About four Common Redpolls are regular at the Visitor Centre feeder. The
apparent increase in redpoll numbers earlier this month has not continued.

We would appreciate receiving your bird observations for our
Visitor Centre records.

Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, ON

Directions:
Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400,
11 and 60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400.
From Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60
to the park. Kilometre markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from
the West Gate (km 0) to near the East Gate (km 56). Get your park
permit and the park tabloid (with a map of birding locations mentioned
here) at the gates.

The Visitor Centre at km 43 has recent bird sightings, feeders, and
information. The centre and restaurant are open weekends from 10 am
to 4 pm.

Algonquin Park birding updates and information are available at:
www.algonquinpark.on.ca
_______________________________________________
ONTBIRDS is presented by the Ontario Field Ornithologists - the provincial birding organization.
Send bird reports to birdalert@ontbirds.ca
For information about ONTBIRDS visit http://www.ofo.ca/

 

 

Bald Eagle
Posted on January 26, 2011 at 06:40:33 AM by mmcanally

While walking through my back woods on Monday, Jim Mavity and I looked up and saw what we believe to be a first year Bald Eagle. Definitely an Eagle, and we had a good, but short, look at it from a pretty close distance. Once we returned to the house and looked at pictures, that is what we came up with. (Huntsville)

 

 

Re(1): How to attract birds to feeders
Posted on January 25, 2011 at 01:28:38 PM by Barbara Taylor

It is usually best to set up your birdfeeders in the fall so the birds will know your yard is a good place to find food during the harsher winter weather. If you just set your feeder out a month ago, that may be why no birds are coming...they already have other favourite feeding spots. Also if there are no shrubs or bushes near your window feeder, the birds might feel too exposed to come down to it. You could try putting some black oil sunflower seeds on the ground or on a deck railing near your feeder and maybe some birds will notice the food as they fly over your yard.

 

 

Re(3): How to attract birds to feeders
Posted on January 25, 2011 at 12:22:06 PM by corky

Hi Again Karen,
Got this recipe from "Birds and Blooms":
1 cup lard, 1 cup crunchy peanut butter, 1/3 cup sugar, 1 cup whole wheat flour, 2 cups cornmeal, 1/2 cup rolled oats, optional:raisins,dried fruit. Melt lard and peanut butter and mix in other ingredients. Let it set then cut into squares and store in freezer. I find this mix to be very popular with most birds that visit.
I took a small block of fire wood (bark attached) and bored several holes 1" diameter and 1" deep into various locations in the block. Drilled smaller holes (3/8" diameter) and inserted small tree branch pieces as perches. Fill the 1" holes with the suet mix and suspend feeder from a hanging post/shepherd's crook close to your pine tree. This is just a suggestion - you may have an alternate way to offer this mix to the birds.

Hope that you get some bird action in your yard.
Here's to good bird watching!
Al

 

 

Re(2): How to attract birds to feeders
Posted on January 25, 2011 at 11:42:59 AM by Karen

Hi there. Okay, it is warmer out today, so I will go move my feeders out from under the tree. My friend has the same feeder on her window, and she has TONS of birds coming to it! Guess I'll have to move that feeder also. Yes, I would be interested in the suet recipe.
thanks so much

 

 

Re(1): How to attract birds to feeders
Posted on January 25, 2011 at 10:34:10 AM by corky

Hi Karen,
It's always great to see lots of birds from a variety of species. I have about 10 different species coming on a daily basis. Set up a seed feeder close to your pine tree but not in the tree and fill it with black oiled sunflower seeds -they are very popular with a lot of species.

 

 

How to attract birds to feeders
Posted on January 24, 2011 at 05:01:03 PM by Karen

We put up a window feeder last month, and have only had one chickadee that we have seen. In front of house in a pine tree, we have a seed bell and a suet cake. No birds. I've always had feeders out other winters, not too far off from where I have the feeders now, with an abundance of birds feeding. Should I move the feeders?

 

 

Re(1): Barred Owl Bracebridge - photo
Posted on January 27, 2011 at 03:23:15 PM by J. Gardner

Neat photo. Not often do you get a chance to have a camera handy when that happens.

 

 

Barred Owl Bracebridge - photo
Posted on January 24, 2011 at 09:28:31 AM by ArtPearse

Barred owl stayed at Bonnell Rd until dark on Saturday. Left 8 impressions in the snow. My son in law was patient enough to photograph one success for the owl.  photo

 

 

Barred owl on Bonnell Rd.
Posted on January 22, 2011 at 09:20:08 AM by ArtPearse

"Our" barred owl has returned to favorite perch atop bird feeder. Has been there for over an hour but have seen only two failed attempts to get breakfast.

 

 

Re(3): Barred owl (not Great Grey)
Posted on January 22, 2011 at 09:57:55 AM by Barbara Taylor

One of the best ways to tell the species apart is to look at the colour of the bird's eyes. Brown=Barred and Yellow=Great Gray

From my past encounters with these owls, I always think a Barred Owl looks like it has a heavy scarf wrapped around its neck whereas the Great Gray doesn't. (you can see the "scarf" in Linda's photo) The Great Gray has distinctive white markings by its chin which most Field Guides refer to as a "bow-tie". The Great Gray also has a very large facial disk, so it appears to have small close-set eyes compared to the more centered big brown eyes of the Barred Owl.

 

 

Re(2): Barred owl (not Great Grey)
Posted on January 21, 2011 at 10:47:52 PM by LindaActonRiddle

Ah, ha! You may be correct, Ted. The Great Grey has longer tail feathers, not as stripped, and the beak is not as prominently yellow. I think the greatest determination is the size. My friend's visitor is not as large as a Great Grey. Thank you for helping with this.

 

 

Re(1): Great grey owl
Posted on January 21, 2011 at 06:24:46 PM by Ted gardner

This may be a Barred Owl.

 

 

Great grey owl
Posted on January 21, 2011 at 06:07:32 PM by LindaActonRiddle

This great grey owl was in a friend's backyard in Bracebridge all day, today. Jan. 21  photo

 

 

Re(1): Bracebridge, Bohemian Waxwings
Posted on January 22, 2011 at 03:09:09 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

The waxwings flew off over Tim's at 11:30 this morning. I couldn't see them in any of the trees at the top of the hill. I waited about 15 minutes but they didn't return.
Not many berries left on the tree so maybe they are looking for a new supply.

 

 

Re(1): Bohemian Waxwings - still there
Posted on January 22, 2011 at 11:28:50 AM by Barbara Taylor

Just got back from Tim Hortons (11:15 a.m.) where about 50 Bohemian Waxwings were taking turns coming down to feed on the Mountain Ash berries. (The tree is by the drive-thru at the north end of Tim Horton's parking lot, corner of Wellington/Hwy 118W and Monck.) Google Map of location

 

 

Bracebridge, Bohemian Waxwings
Posted on January 21, 2011 at 05:58:28 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

For those who like to do their birdwatching in comfort note that a flock of Bohemian Waxwings has found the mountain ash tree at Tim Horton's.
They are very skittish but come back about every 10 minutes or so. They are using the top of a tree right across from Tim's to roost.
They have consumed about half the berries so far so have about two days left.

 

 

Algonquin Park Birding report: 20 January
Posted on January 21, 2011 at 10:01:09 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Jan. 20, 2011) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Of particular interest this week were the one or two Boreal Chickadees that
continue to be seen regularly in the area of the Visitor Register book near
the start of Spruce Bog Boardwalk at km 42.5. They appear to be attracted to
the suet feeder placed there. A Marten was seen in this area as well.

The Opeongo Road produced Gray Jays and another Marten feeding
on bird seed near the bridge. Yet another Marten was near the junction with
the Cameron Lake Road.

The Visitor Centre feeders have Gray Jays regularly and the occasional
Common Redpoll.

We would appreciate receiving your bird observations for our
Visitor Centre records.

Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, ON

 

 

Boreal Chickadee
Posted on January 20, 2011 at 11:49:40 AM by janice house

I thought the chickadee had moved on, last time I heard a call was January 5th, heard a call Sunday 16th and this morning he/she was very vocal while I was topping up our feeders (Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst)

 

 

Robins
Posted on January 19, 2011 at 07:57:12 PM by DebbieAdams

While in Don Mills today, there was a flock of 15 or more Robins that were feeding on berries from a tree. They were roosting in the trees too so perhaps they're regulars? (corner Donway East & Greenland Rd.) They were still there when we left late in the afternoon. It was a treat to hear their familiar chattering during the middle of winter.

 

 

Barred Owl #2
Posted on January 19, 2011 at 10:40:53 AM by Barbara Taylor

When I went out to replenish the birdfeeder this morning a Barred Owl flew back into the pines behind our house. This owl was noticeably larger than our usual Barred Owl visitor and seemed quite concerned by my presence. We haven't seen the other owl since Saturday evening...perhaps this one is his mate. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Brown creeper
Posted on January 17, 2011 at 03:46:50 PM by GayleCarlyle

There was a brown creeper scurrying up a white pine outside our office here at Grant's Woods outside of Orillia.

 

 

Re(1): feeders
Posted on January 19, 2011 at 11:58:32 AM by Barbara Taylor

Finally we had a few Common Redpolls come to our feeder this morning - first ones this winter. Also a Dark-eyed Junco and some American Goldfinch and Pine Siskins. Other more regular visitors are five Hairy Woodpeckers, four Downy Woodpeckers, a female Pileated Woodpecker, a pair of Red-breasted Nuthatches, three White-breasted Nuthatches, about a dozen Mourning Doves, ten Black-capped Chickadees, and four Blue Jays. (Bracebridge)

 

 

feeders
Posted on January 16, 2011 at 04:27:48 PM by MaryWillmott

Today at the feeder at Beaumaris there was one lone Goldfinch plus one Red-breasted Nuthatch , White-breasted Nuthatch, 10 to 15 Chickadees, male Hairy Woodpecker Northern Shrike, Pileated Woodpecker (at the fat every day), two Starlings several Bluejays, Mourning Doves.

 

 

Northern Shrike
Posted on January 15, 2011 at 04:58:18 PM by Goodyear

We went for a late afternoon birding drive out to Falkenburg Rd. The Hawk Owl was at the back of the property at #1819 and there was a Northern Shrike in the thicket to the right of the driveway to #1819.

 

 

Hawk Owl
Posted on January 14, 2011 at 10:46:26 AM by Goodyear

A friend reported seeing the Hawk Owl yesterday afternoon at 2:30, still at the original location on Falkenburg Rd.

 

 

Algonquin Park Birding Update: 13 January
Posted on January 14, 2011 at 08:53:44 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Jan. 14, 2011) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

The birding situation was relatively unchanged this week.
The following reports were received:

Gray Jay: two were at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on
January 12.

Boreal Chickadee: two or three were seen and heard in
the parking lot at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on January 12.

Northern Shrike: one was at km 49 on Highway 60 on
January 11.

Common Redpoll: one or two visited the feeders at the
Visitor Centre irregularly.

We would appreciate receiving your bird observations for our
Visitor Centre records.

Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, ON

Directions:
Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400,
11 and 60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400.
From Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60
to the park. Kilometre markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from
the West Gate (km 0) to near the East Gate (km 56). Get your park
permit and the park tabloid (with a map of birding locations mentioned
here) at the gates.

The Visitor Centre at km 43 has recent bird sightings, feeders, and
information. The centre and restaurant are open weekends from 10 am
to 4 pm.

 

 

Song Sparrow
Posted on January 13, 2011 at 01:10:41 PM by Goodyear

Despite the colder temperatures the Song Sparrow continues to hang around. It feeds on seed that falls off our platform feeder. Our neighbour's sump outlet provides a source of water. We see it flying into and out of a drift of snow that has built up around the remains of some hydrangeas in our garden. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(3): Barred Owl
Posted on January 14, 2011 at 12:35:30 PM by Barbara Taylor

He was back in our yard early this morning and is still here. A Red Squirrel had a close encounter, but managed to evade the owl. (Bracebridge)  photo

 

 

Re(2): Barred Owl
Posted on January 12, 2011 at 07:43:47 PM by Barbara Taylor

Don't know exactly when he arrived...first noticed him on the birdfeeder a little after 8 a.m. and he stayed here all day. He flew east tonight around 5 p.m. after diving into the snow and coming up empty. Could be the same owl if he flew straight over here from your place, but maybe they are mates.

 

 

Re(1): Barred Owl
Posted on January 12, 2011 at 07:24:18 PM by Goodyear

What time was the owl in your yard this morning? We had a Barred Owl in our yard Tuesday evening from 5:30 until at least 10:30 (the last time we looked out the kitchen window for it), and it was still in our yard this morning, perched in the same tree until 8:00, when it flew off.

 

 

Re(1): Barred Owl buzzed by Cooper's Hawk!
Posted on January 12, 2011 at 11:57:24 AM by Barbara Taylor

Unbelievable! A Cooper's Hawk just flew into our yard, saw the Barred Owl, and swooped down on it three times. The owl just ducked and stayed firm on its perch. I went out to try for a photo of the hawk, but it flew off as soon as I opened the door. The Barred Owl is still here and appears to be actively hunting for more shrews or mice.

 

 

Barred Owl
Posted on January 12, 2011 at 11:18:16 AM by Barbara Taylor

This morning our neighbourhood Barred Owl was using our birdfeeder as a convenient perch to hunt for rodents. A couple of Crows came by and chased him high up into the pine trees out of sight, but I knew he was still in the yard since the woodpeckers were very agitated when they came in for suet. A few minutes ago I happened to look out and the owl was on the ground swallowing a very large shrew! (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Northern Hawk Owl - Still there
Posted on January 12, 2011 at 01:41:11 PM by Doug Smith

I looked for the owl this morning around 9am but couldn't find it.

 

 

Northern Hawk Owl - Still there
Posted on January 11, 2011 at 09:21:13 PM by Goodyear

We tried for the Hawk Owl tonight after work and found it sitting at the top of a telephone pole opposite #1819 Falkenburg (where it was first reported). A farm tractor rumbled by and the owl flew to the back of the property that borders Beatrice Line and Falkenburg.

 

 

Harris's Sparrow update
Posted on January 11, 2011 at 09:51:48 AM by Barbara Taylor

This morning I got an update from Stephen Sprague, the property owner at 1150 South Monck Dr., Bracebridge. He said "the sparrow is still enjoying our hospitality and birders are welcome to come and have a look anytime". Please park at his shop and walk in to the feeder at the front of the house. (Thanks Stephen.)

directions:
Head west from Bracebridge on Hwy. 118W, to South Monck Dr. (Note if you also want to try for the Hawk Owl near Bardsville, that you cannot keep going north on South Monck Dr. to Falkenburg Rd. since that section of road isn't plowed in the winter.)
Google Map of area

 

 

Re(1): Bald Eagle
Posted on January 10, 2011 at 11:53:45 AM by Barbara Taylor

On our way out to try and find the Hawk Owl this morning we saw an adult Bald Eagle flying towards us along Hwy. 118W a bit west of #1737, near the old equestrian centre (Kerrydale?).

 

 

Bald Eagle
Posted on January 10, 2011 at 10:50:14 AM by GayleCarlyle

On Sat. 8th, we watched an adult bald eagle soar over the downtown of Orillia at about 2:00pm.

 

 

Re(1): Northern Hawk Owl - still there
Posted on January 10, 2011 at 11:50:48 AM by Barbara Taylor

The Northern Hawk Owl was still in the same area this morning, in the field east of #1819 Falkenburg Rd. At 10:45 a.m. we found it perched in a cedar tree at the south side of Falkenburg Rd. just west of the intersection with Beatrice Townline Rd. We didn't even have to leave our nice warm car to see it! The bird then flew south a short distance and perched in a lone deciduous tree next to the snowmobile trail that cuts through the field.
P.S. - Thanks Ted!

Google map of the area
directions: 1. take Hwy.118W heading west from Bracebridge, turn right on Butter & Egg Rd., turn left at Falkenburg Rd.
OR 2. take Manitoba St. (Hwy.4) heading north from Bracebridge, turn left at Falkenburg Rd.

 

 

The picture
Posted on January 9, 2011 at 09:23:15 PM by Ted gardner

photo

 

 

Northern Hawk Owl
Posted on January 9, 2011 at 03:16:52 PM by Ted gardner

Took a drive today in some open country with the hopes of finding an Owl or two. As luck would have it i spotted someting sitting in the top of a tree off at a distance.
My binoculars told me it may be a Owl but it was back lit and far off. I picked my way through the field on a snow mobile trail and confirmed my thoughts, A Northern Hawk Owl! He sat still while i got the sun behind me to take some pictures. i fired 50 plus shots so hopefully i get a couple half decent which i will post later.
Interesting point is this Owl was in the same spot 3 years ago when my father and I spotted it while following up on a bird board post!! 1819 Falkenburg rd

 

 

more Redpolls
Posted on January 8, 2011 at 03:17:50 PM by bob burton

After a few during the last week.,a flock of 30-40 have settled in our feeders.It is a lovely change in scenery and the trip for Niger is well worth it. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Redpolls are back!
Posted on January 8, 2011 at 01:09:52 PM by Terry & Marion Whittam

Our first redpolls of the season finally arrived 10km east of Washago. About 4-6 arrived with a group of Junco's and Goldfinches. Nice to see them back! Cheers Terry

 

 

redpolls
Posted on January 7, 2011 at 09:28:19 PM by SusanColavecchia

Flock of approximately 30 common redpolls on Thom's Bay Rd. off Stevenson Rd 8, Huntsville feeding in the Tamarack, 2:15 pm Jan 7. 2011

 

 

Bracebridge/Algonquin - January 6
Posted on January 7, 2011 at 09:04:29 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Peeter Musta on ONTBIRDS (Jan. 6, 2011) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Tried for the Harris Sparrow, it did not show from 8-9am this morning. Only black-capped chickadees and 3 common Raven.
Went from there to Algonquin. Nothing special to report, but for those interested in Algonquin reports.

Hike from Arrowhon road & abandoned railway through to west rose lake yielded little bird life. 3 hairy woodpeckers got my hopes up for black-backed, but no such luck. Several black spruce show evidence of work...so perhaps just bad timing or loud snowshoes. One tree looked like Pileated was working on it recently. Trail was in good condition with compacted snow making for pleasant walking.

Once i got back to the road, 7 friendly Gray Jays greeted me along with two ravens who flew over and then perched out of sight.
Over at the Spruce Bog Trail, i picked up 2 more Gray Jays, 2 Blue Jays, 1 red-breasted nuthatch, and abundant black-capped chickadees. No Grouse or Boreal Chickadees. I did not do the full trail.

Visitor Centre was closed, so i did not get to look at the feeders out back...but a solitary Gray Jay greeted me out front. Two more flyover Common Raven.
Opeongo Road was quiet overall. More black-capped chickadees, and a single Ruffed Grouse at high alert in a tree just after the bridge.
Casually checked Utility Poles along the remainder of the Hwy 60 corridor without success.

 

 

Algonquin Park Bird Report: 6 January
Posted on January 6, 2011 at 10:17:15 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Jan. 6, 2011) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

The bird of the week was a Northern Hawk Owl photographed at km 28
on Highway 60 during the morning on January 5. The owl was not seen
again that day or since and has probably moved on. Low small mammal
numbers this winter make it unlikely it will remain in the area.

BOREAL RESIDENTS:
Spruce Grouse: one on Bat Lake Trail and three in black spruce along
Highway 60 opposite the Logging Museum on December 30.

Black-backed Woodpecker: the 14 tallied on the CBC of December 30
showed that normal numbers are present. Check de-barked trees in bog
areas.

Boreal Chickadee: 18 were recorded on December 30. One was at
Spruce Bog Boardwalk on December 31 and January 1.

Gray Jay: regular on Opeongo Road, at the Visitor Centre suet,
Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Mew Lake Campground.

FINCHES:
Pine Grosbeak: numbers remain very low; only six tallied on
December 30.

Red Crossbill: numbers are very low; just 15 noted on December 30.

White-winged Crossbill: more numerous than expected, with 244 on
the December 30 count, but not easily found on any given day.

Common Redpoll: Small flocks continue to be seen. A Greater Common
Redpoll (rostrata) was photographed at bird seed on Opeongo Road
north of the bridge on December 31.

Hoary Redpoll: two were photographed at the Opeongo Road bird seed
on December 31.

OTHER OBSERVATIONS:
Bald Eagle: Single adults near the East Gate and the Visitor Centre on
December 30.

Wild Turkey: three near Lake of Two Rivers and one on Rock Lake Road
on December 30.

Bohemian Waxwing: three were tallied on December 30; a few may still
be around.

We would appreciate receiving your bird observations for our Visitor
Centre records.

Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, ON

Directions:
Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400,
11 and 60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400.
From Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60
to the park. Kilometre markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from
the West Gate (km 0) to near the East Gate (km 56). Get your park
permit and the park tabloid (with a map of birding locations mentioned
here) at the gates.

The Visitor Centre at km 43 has recent bird sightings, feeders, and
information. The centre and restaurant are open weekends from 10 am
to 4 pm.

 

 

Bohemian Waxwings
Posted on January 6, 2011 at 04:27:25 PM by Dawn Sherman

A flock of 37 on the Hunter's Bay Trail this afternoon, across from the train station. Also a male Common Goldeneye in the mouth of the river. (Huntsville)

 

 

Black-backed woodpecker
Posted on January 6, 2011 at 02:45:38 PM by DavidBywater

On January 3rd around dusk, I saw a female black-backed woodpecker on Loch Erne Rd. This road is located near McKellar. Black-backed woodpeckers are usually seen in this area several times per year.

 

 

Re(1): Bohemian Waxwings...Bracebridge
Posted on January 12, 2011 at 09:43:56 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Another report from Gwen that there are 27 Bohemians in the top of the large tree at 9:45.

 

 

Re(1): Bohemian Waxwings...Bracebridge
Posted on January 12, 2011 at 09:34:52 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Gwen De Forest reported to me at 9:30 am today, Jan. 12th, that there were 7 Bohemian Waxwings in the crabapple tree between the band shell and Manitoba Street. They fly off up into the large tree right by the road and back again. They have eaten about half way down the tree so have a few more days of food there.

 

 

Bohemian Waxwings...Bracebridge
Posted on January 6, 2011 at 09:48:56 AM by Al Sinclair

Eleanor Kee Wellman just called on her cell to report a small group (6-8) of Bohemians feeding in fruit trees beside the band shell, downtown Bracebridge, in Memorial Park beside the movie theatre. 9:30AM Thursday

 

 

Big Flock of Blue Jays
Posted on January 5, 2011 at 06:42:03 PM by janice house

Tuesday afternoon Geoff was amazed by the number of jays in our yard, in the trees, on the ground, asked me if we were the only ones with feeders. (Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst)

 

 

Springtails
Posted on January 4, 2011 at 07:27:22 PM by Terry & Marion Whittam

While walking our road this morning (10km east of Washago) I noticed there is a huge number of Springtails or snowfleas everywhere. They seem to be denser at the base of larger maple trees. I'm not sure what significance their large numbers mean to nature? Cheers Terry

 

 

Re(1): Redpolls
Posted on January 4, 2011 at 11:19:37 AM by Al Sinclair

We had a small group just looking yesterday, today they came in and discovered the nyger seed, 6 in total. Lots of bird activity here with fresh snow falling in the last 2 days. 8km east of Bracebridge on 118E.

 

 

Redpolls
Posted on January 4, 2011 at 08:53:59 AM by GayleCarlyle

This morning at about 8:00am I noticed a flock of about 12 redpolls at our niger feeder. First sighting this winter.
Green River Drive, Washago

 

 

Northern Shrike
Posted on January 3, 2011 at 04:33:44 PM by Terry & Marion Whittam

A Shrike came to our feeders today looking for a quick meal! I did not see any Chickadee feathers so I think the shrike left hungry! 10km east of Washago. Cheers Terry

 

 

Algonquin Park - Summer jobs for keen naturalists
Posted on January 3, 2011 at 02:18:05 PM by JustinPeter

Greetings:
Algonquin Park's Natural Heritage Education Program is once again
accepting applications for Seasonal Park Naturalist positions!
Applicants must be at least 17 years of age by June 2011. Find out more
by visiting the following website:
http://algonquinpark.on.ca/visit/park_management/ontario-parks-employment-opportunites.php

Cheers,
Justin Peter

Park Naturalist
Visitor Centre
Algonquin Provincial Park
Ontario, Canada

613-637-2828 x. 223
justin.peter@ontario.ca

(posted with permission of Bird Board administrator)

 

 

Algonquin Park New Year's Eve and Day
Posted on January 2, 2011 at 09:03:34 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ken and Angie Williams on ONTBIRDS (Jan. 2, 2011) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Dec. 31 I hope this may help with count week for the Huntsville count
week in a small way...
1 Boreal Chickadee, 4 Canada Jays, 1 Spruce Grouse at the Spruce Bog.
12 White-winged Crossbills, 2 more Canada Jays

Jan. 1 In spite of the rain, Boreal Chickadee still at Spruce Bog with
the usual suspects but no Grouse but I enjoyed the Red-breasted Nuthatch
pair that ate seeds out of my hand.
11 Common and one Hoary Redpoll at the gate on Opeongo Rd.
1 Ruffed Grouse at the visitor center and very little else happening. No
Black-backed Woodpeckers for us so we'll have to setlle for the Pine
Martin at the Bog and the Mom and 2nd year tot Moose at km 20ish.

There were 7 Wild Turkeys at the feeders of the Algonquin Inn at the
Oxtongue River Bridge.

A nice getaway.
Directions: Go 30 km east of Huntsville on Highway 60 and check in for a
map at the west gate welcome centre of the park.

Happy New Year,
Ken and Angie Williams

_______________________________________________
ONTBIRDS is presented by the Ontario Field Ornithologists - the provincial birding organization.
Send bird reports to birdalert@ontbirds.ca
For information about ONTBIRDS visit http://www.ofo.ca/

 

 

Re(1): Redpolls
Posted on January 2, 2011 at 08:51:17 AM by Wayne Bridge

Kearney: I had 40+ in the yard yesterday. Redpolls have been daily visitors for about 10 days now in ever-increasing numbers.

 

 

Redpolls
Posted on January 2, 2011 at 06:10:17 AM by janice house

we had a flock of close to 30 here yesterday, at least one hoary in the flock, Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst

 

 

Evening Grosbeaks
Posted on January 1, 2011 at 07:29:56 PM by Don Clement

Just thought I'd also report sighting a flock of about six evening grosbeaks at my feeders about a month ago. Got some great shots of jousting behaviour between two males and a female.

 

 

Barred Owl
Posted on January 1, 2011 at 07:24:24 PM by Don Clement

Just spotted a mature barred owl out my window, here near Germania. He tripped my motion sensor light, and I watched him from a window for about a minute in my driveway, 20 feet away, before he swivelled his head in my direction. He seemed curious and gazed at me for another few seconds. I moved slightly, and he was off. Didn't see him feeding on anything. Amazing sight!

 

 

2010 Highlights
Posted on January 1, 2011 at 10:48:40 AM by Barbara Taylor

The year began with the sighting of a Northern Shrike east of Bracebridge. In mid-January a Harris's Sparrow showed up at a Bracebridge feeder and remained until spring, the first record of this species in Muskoka. In February Bald Eagles were seen near Milford Bay and Port Sydney, while a Golden Eagle was seen in Algonquin Park. In March a lone House Finch visited a feeder in Bracebridge and two Trumpeter Swans spent some time at Muskoka Falls. In April a Sandhill Crane was spotted near Washago.

Several good birds turned up in May...a Northern Mockingbird at Bracebridge, a Lark Sparrow east of Gravenhurst, a Sedge Wren at the Bracebridge Ponds, and a Least Bittern near Magnetawan. A dozen White Pelicans were seen flying over Bracebridge and two Blue-winged Warblers were found, one outside Windermere and the other near Magnetawan. A Blue Grosbeak was reported near Emsdale. An Eastern Towhee was seen near North Muldrew Lake and an unusual white Blue Jay was observed in Dwight.

In July a Whimbrel was seen in Algonquin Park. In August an active Purple Martin colony was discovered in Parry Sound. In October the Bracebridge Ponds served up Surf Scoters, Gadwalls, and American Coots to name a few, and in November an American Golden-Plover could briefly be found there. A Red-necked Grebe was seen on Ahmic Lake in November and a very late Northern Parula was photographed at a feeder in Parry Sound.

In December two Boreal Chickadees were east of Gravenhurst, a Northern Hawk Owl was spotted near Burk's Falls, and a Long-tailed Duck was at Port Carling. A Northern Goshawk was seen in Huntsville and another at Walker's Point. Then a bit of déjà vu, although not the same bird...a Harris's Sparrow turned up at a feeder west of Bracebridge. A Snowy Owl was found in Bracebridge, and a Varied Thrush visited a feeder there for a few days. As the year came to a close there were signs of a long-awaited irruption of Redpolls.

Other interesting bird sightings included Yellow-throated Vireos, Carolina Wrens, Clay-colored Sparrows, Red-bellied Woodpeckers, Pied-billed Grebes, Vesper Sparrows, Red Crossbills, Horned Larks, Cliff Swallows, Pectoral Sandpipers, Black-bellied Plovers, Northern Pintails, Bonaparte's Gull, Great Horned Owls, Chimney Swifts, Snow Buntings, Pine Grosbeaks, Evening Grosbeaks, and Bohemian Waxwings.

Other nature sightings included Canada Frostweed and Spotted Coral-root, Blandings Turtle and Northern Map Turtle, Five-lined Skink, Eastern Hog-nosed Snake, Big Sand Tiger Beetle, Cyrano Darner, St. Lawrence Tiger Moth, and butterflies such as Baltimore Checkerspot, Coral Hairstreak, Common Buckeye, and an unusually large number of Red Admirals. There were also reports of the usual assortment of mammals, such as Flying Squirrels, Black Bears, Beavers, and Coyotes, and one memorable moment when you could literally feel the earth move...a magnitude 5.0 earthquake centered near Ottawa in June.

The complete set of reports for 2010 can soon be found in the Archived Reports. Thanks for all your posts.

Happy New Year!