Muskoka Bird Board - Archived Reports from April – June 2009
 
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Bank Swallows - Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on June 30, 2009 at 12:23:11 PM by Barbara Taylor

Just before the heavy rain moved through this morning there were close to fifty Bank Swallows flying over cells 1 and 2 at the Bracebridge Ponds. There were several young with the group and it was interesting to watch them being fed in flight. A male Green-winged Teal was in cell 3, but no shorebirds other than the usual Spotted Sandpipers and Killdeer. Many turtle egg nests have been dug up around cell 4...hope the predators missed some. A few White Admiral butterflies were out but didn't see any Monarchs. (cell 3 is completely drained except for a couple large "puddles", so good mudflats for the shorebirds on their southbound migration which begins around this time of year)

 

 

Golden-Winged Warbler (GWWA)
Posted on June 28, 2009 at 12:38:20 PM by Terry & Marion Whittam

 

I took this shot while working on the Couchiching Conservatory GWWA survey in the "land between". photo

This was one of a number of GWWAs banded off Coopers Falls road east of Washago Ontario. In total we have seen 20 GWWAs within the 6 Ontario base maps we were given again all east of Washago Ontario. One area encompassing McArthur sideroad, M&N sideroad and Brooks sideroad was especially abundant with GWWAs. This transition area on the edge of the Shield is quite rich in terms of species and especially GWWAs.
Cheers Terry

 

 

Wounded Bear - Bracebridge
Posted on June 27, 2009 at 06:31:04 PM by Barbara Taylor

I just learned about this today, but in case the bear is still out there, take care hiking along Beaver Creek or the snowmobile trail in the Meadow Heights and Covered Bridge areas of Bracebridge.

Copy of media release from http://www.crimealerts.net/bracebridge.htm:

FROM: BRACEBRIDGE OPP
DATE: JUNE 25, 2009
(BRACEBRIDGE, ON) – Bracebridge OPP is advising the public of the possibility of a wounded bear in the area of Monsignor Michael O’Leary School.

On Monday June 22 2009 Bracebridge OPP shot and wounded a black bear near Glendale Dr. in the interest of public safety after the bear failed to leave the area adjacent to the school property on its own. The black bear retreated to a near-by wooded area where a search by police and the MNR failed to locate it.

Community alert broadcasts were made on local radio station MOOSE FM and many near-by residents in the area were notified directly by Police who continued to stay in the area ensuring there was not immediate danger to the public.

Every year the OPP and MNR receive calls from the Meadow Heights/McCrank area. In all cases these bears are being attracted initially by bird feeders and garbage. They stay and return because they find food. Some area residents are ignoring the MNR’s message to stop feeding birds during bear season.

There is no such thing as a feeder that only attracts birds.

The last sighting of what is believed to be an injured bear was Tuesday evening with nothing else reported since that time.

 

 

Gray Catbird - photo
Posted on June 27, 2009 at 02:32:39 PM by J. Gardner

This fellow sure was difficult to catch with the camera. He finally made the mistake of staying in one spot for more than two seconds. (Hurdville) photo
June Gardner

 

 

Chimney Swift Blitz
Posted on June 27, 2009 at 08:43:54 AM by janice house

Bird Studies Canada is inviting Ontario residents to look for chimney swifts this weekend. Choose a single night and watch a chimney that may have swifts. More information at the BSC website or http://birdcanada.wordpress.com/2009/06/18/ontario-swift-watch/

 

 

Nighthawks
Posted on June 25, 2009 at 11:57:12 AM by Terry & Marion Whittam

Finally last night at dusk we heard 3-4 Nighthawks calling as they flew feeding around the lake. So nice to hear their call! Location about 8km east of Washago.

 

 

Re(1): upland sandpipers
Posted on June 25, 2009 at 05:47:11 PM by Terry & Marion Whittam

Excellent John! We have not heard them yet on McArthur sideroad this year. Lots of Snipe but no Upland sandpipers. We did get a Blue-winged on M&N sideroad nearby towards the Black River. Check it out if you get a chance. Terry

 

 

upland sandpipers
Posted on June 25, 2009 at 09:50:37 AM by John Challis

On McArthur Sideroad, east of Washago, there has always been an upland sandpiper that takes up residence on a big erratic in the middle of a farm field -- what Terry Whittham calls the "elephant rock". This year we hadn't seen the sandpiper at all in our trips along the road. But last night at dusk there were four of them flitting over the fields. And further south on the road there were more, twittering in the sky and wolf-whistling on the ground.

 

 

Blandings Turtle
Posted on June 24, 2009 at 06:54:18 PM by janice house

I just took the dog for a swim to Sunny Lake via the Tomingas Rd (2+ klm from hwy 11 off Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst) and in a sandy spot beside a swamp spotted the turtle. She was still there when we left, when I stopped to have a good look she pulled her head in and there was definite signs of digging.

 

 

Algonquin - Warblers, Boreal Chickadees
Posted on June 24, 2009 at 06:51:57 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Patrick Blake on ONTBIRDS (June 24, 2009) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Hi ONTBirders:
I spent the day at Algonquin, concentrating on the Arowhon Road areas. At the end of Arowhon Road, on the Orange Trail at Arowhon Pines, I located 10 species of warbler, including 4 NORTHERN PARULAS, 4 MAGNOLIA WARBLERS, 2 BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLERS, and 1 CANADA WARBLER. Two WINTER WRENS could be heard singing in the forest, as well as a WOOD THRUSH and a VEERY. As I was leaving, I heard three YELLOW-THROATED VIREOS singing near the restaurant and tennis court area.

I spent the remainder of the morning and early afternoon along the Old Railway, where I observed 11 warbler species, including 4 NASHVILLE WARBLERS, 2 CAPE MAY WARBLERS, 2 BLACKBURNIAN WARBLERS, and singles of BLACK-THROATED BLUE, BLACK-AND-WHITE, MAGNOLIA, and MOURNING WARBLERS. Five BOREAL CHICKADEES were singing and actively foraging, as well as 5 GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLETS. A family of three BROAD-WINGED HAWKS flew lazy circles above the trail, frequently calling out.

Good birding!
Pat

 

 

Another Nice Moth ...Rosy Maple Moth
Posted on June 24, 2009 at 04:40:55 PM by Al Sinclair

Another Nice Moth: 7715 Dryocampa rubicunda Rosy Maple Moth
Had 9 at the light last night, more than usual. Food plant maples and oaks. Most individuals here have yellow wings, no pink. Only one of the 9 had pink on the wings. photo

 

 

robin in a hanging planter
Posted on June 24, 2009 at 04:14:18 PM by John Challis

 

The hanging planter on our porch is a little more crowded since the young hatched last weekend. I believe all four eggs hatched but between visits all I can really see is pink and spikes of down. Will post a shot of the chicks if I can manage one without disturbing Mom and Pop R. (Washago)  photo

 

 

Laurel Sphinx Moth life cycle continues...
Posted on June 23, 2009 at 03:01:28 PM by Barbara Taylor

Some of you may remember my posts last year about the life cycle of the Laurel Sphinx Moth...from moth to eggs to caterpillar instars to pupa. I overwintered two of the pupa in a container in our cold cellar, and about two months ago I moved them into our unheated garage so they would remain safe from predators, but they would be exposed to the natural swings in outdoor temperature and humidity. I checked the container this afternoon and finally the life cycle has come full circle. A new moth has crawled out of its pupa case and is now hanging from the lid of the container so it can inflate its wings. If my camera co-operates, I may add a photo later. (update: nope, camera has completely died)

Here are my posts from last year with links to all the photos, starting with the moth which arrived at our porch light on June 21, 2008:

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Sphinx Moth - photos
Posted on June 22, 2008 at 12:10:01 PM by Barbara Taylor

This large moth came to our porch light between rain storms last night. I kept her in a plastic container until this morning so I could take pictures, and it appears that she laid a few eggs! See the last photo. Apparently the larvae feed on lilac, so now I know where to place the caterpillars if they hatch out in a few days. (Bracebridge)
Laurel Sphinx, Sphinx kalmiae, Hodges #7809 (also known as the Fawn Sphinx in Wagner's guide) photo1 photo2 photo3

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Laurel Sphinx Moth caterpillars - photos
Posted on July 16, 2008 at 12:37:07 PM by Barbara Taylor

Update on previous post about the Laurel Sphinx Moth...
All five of the eggs laid by the moth hatched and the caterpillars are growing rapidly as they munch through lilac leaves. The first two photos were taken this morning - 16 days old now. The third photo is of a one day old caterpillar which you can hardly see against the mid-vein of the lilac leaf...except for its "horn" at the tail-end which was solid black in the early days. photo1 photo2 photo3

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Laurel Sphinx caterpillar update - photos
Posted on August 1, 2008 at 10:45:56 PM by Barbara Taylor

In my last update on the Laurel Sphinx caterpillars they were at the 4th instar stage. On July 18 they stopped eating and by July 20 they had become 5th instars. The new black and blue tail is very distinctive.

On July 25 the caterpillars stopped eating again. They began alternating a rest period with a wandering period when they became very restless and just wouldn't stop moving about. On July 27 they became quite sluggish and eventually crawled under some layers of paper towel I had placed in the bottom of their container. (I had learned this would make a good substitute for soil, which is where they would normally go to pupate.) I'll post more photos once the pupa stage is reached.
Early 5th Instar - photo
Day before pupation begins...approx. 4 inches long when "stretched" as it wanders about - photo
An eating machine...click on the image below to watch a short video – video clip

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Laurel Sphinx update - pupa photos
Posted on August 9, 2008 at 09:48:02 PM by Barbara Taylor

In my last update, the fully grown caterpillars had crawled beneath some paper towels I placed in their container to simulate soil, where they would normally pupate. Within 24 hours they had already begun to shrink from their original 4 inches down to about 2 1/4 inches. After three days the prepupa had shrunk down to only 1 1/2 inches in length and its colour took on a noticeable brownish-yellow tinge. The day after this colour change, the old skin was shed and then the pupa began to darken up and take on its final form.

(July 28 - only 2 1/4 inches long; head end is at left side) photo1
(July 31 - prepupa now only 1 1/2 inches long and brownish tinge) photo2
(Aug. 1 - the head end is at the right side in the following photos and the pupa is lying on its back as it would normally do under the soil. The shed skin is to the left. The green colour is already disappearing as the pupa changes into its final form.) photo3
(Aug. 3 - the now dark black pupa has distinctive red markings. The pupa is about the same size as the prepupa, around 1 1/2 inches in length.) photo4
(The now visible "hook" at the head end is characteristic of Sphinx species pupae. It is the case for the developing proboscis, the long strawlike mouthparts of the moth.) photo5

 

 

Re(1): Pink-barred Pseudeustrotia moth (photo)
Posted on June 23, 2009 at 01:29:31 PM by Al Sinclair

Had one here 8km east of Bracebridge 2 nights ago, first this year. Usually get a few every year. Food plants - dock, goldenrod, smartweed.

 

 

Pink-barred Pseudeustrotia moth (photo)
Posted on June 23, 2009 at 12:05:22 PM by Barbara Taylor

Unfortunately my camera's sensor seems to be failing, but I tried my best to get a shot of this interesting moth at our porch light last night. I don't recall seeing this one before. (Bracebridge)
Pseudeustrotia carneola - Pink-barred Pseudeustrotia (formerly Pink-barred Lithacodia) - Hodges#9053  photo

 

 

Green Herons hatched...Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on June 22, 2009 at 08:29:15 PM by Al Sinclair

Wilf Yusek took this photo today. Green Heron is rare in Muskoka, please do not do anything that might disturb them. This image was cropped from a photo taken with a long lens. photo

 

 

Luna Moth - Actias luna
Posted on June 22, 2009 at 04:44:34 PM by Terry & Marion Whittam

 

Our neighbors called us over this morning to see one of 2 Luna moths they had flying around their woodpile. This one was looking a little tired and a little ragged on one wing.
Beautiful moth and quite tame. Location was Clearwater Lake 8km east of Washago.  photo

 

 

Five-Lined Skink - Ontario lizard!
Posted on June 22, 2009 at 04:34:32 PM by Terry & Marion Whittam

 

Here is a nice shot of a Five-lined skink (Eumeces fasciatus) we spotted today sunning itself in the heat of the day. Location was Clearwater Lake 8km east of Washago. First one this year!  photo

 

 

bluebirds
Posted on June 20, 2009 at 10:56:53 AM by NancyTapley

 

one of two nesting pairs of bluebirds at Bondi Village, next door to the chickadees and tree swallows  photo

 

 

Bracebridge Moose Calf update
Posted on June 18, 2009 at 03:47:06 PM by Al Sinclair

Called Aspen Valley today. The moose calf rescued here on June 4 is doing OK now. He was not good at first and they thought they might loose him but he is improving, more stable now on his feet and soon to be transferred to the outdoor pen to be with the two twins.

 

 

Nice Moth...Bracebridge
Posted on June 18, 2009 at 03:41:21 PM by Al Sinclair

At the light last night:
9050 Maliattha concinnimacula Red-spotted Lithacodia
Usually see 1 or 2 every year, nice colors on this one, small moth less than an inch long.  photo

 

 

Injured Snapping Turtle
Posted on June 17, 2009 at 11:13:13 AM by janice house

Janet Fraser found a turtle with a bad leg and a badly split shell on Monday night by her home in Bala. She took the turtle to Centennial Animal Hospital and it has since had a successful operation and is going to the Kawartha's for turtle rehab.

 

 

Algonquin Park June 15th - Birds and Moose
Posted on June 17, 2009 at 09:50:59 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Norm Murr on ONTBIRDS (June 17, 2009) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Good Day Eh !
Yesterday Ian and I birded the Opeongo and Arowhon Roads ( to and at Wolf Howl Pond and West Rose Lake ) with a couple of stops in between and along with us was a 14 year old son of a friend of Ian and his wife Carol. The teenager wanted to see animals and we hopefully made that wish came true for him.

On the way along Hwy 60 east of Huntsville was a juvenile Bald Eagle flying past just east of Hidden Valley.

Here are some of the birds we did find in Algonquin - Common Loons, Ring-necked Ducks, Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, Pileated Woodpecker ( Visitor Centre ), Olive-sided Flycatcher, Alder Flycatcher, Gray Jay, Common Raven, Boreal Chickadee, Winter Wren, Hermit Thrush, Philadelphia Vireo, many Red-eyed Vireos, 16 Warbler species including Chestnut-sided, Blackburnian, Pine, Blackpoll ( male at West Rose Lake ), Wilson's and Canada, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Marsh and White-throated Sparrows ( many ) Pine Siskin ( Visitor Centre ), and Purple Finch plus lots of the usual birds.

This was a great day ( not only the perfect weather ) but for Mammal and Herp sightings. WE got to see 5 moose ( 2 bulls, 2 cows and a calf ), 2 Bears, 3 Deer, Beavers, Painted and Snapping Turtles, Bull, Green and Mink Frogs.

Ian decided to head for home going south along Hwy 35 and on the way down just north of Minden we spotted a Black-backed Woodpecker A nice sighting as we missed it in Algonquin.

 

 

Re(1): Black-bellied Plover ... Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on June 16, 2009 at 09:08:40 PM by Barbara Taylor

The Plover was still in cell 3 at 8:30 p.m. tonight and the male Redhead was still in cell 2.

Huge mats of thick green algae are growing in cell 4 - we've never seen it like that before. When we walked around the pond, three families of Wood Ducks had great difficulty trying to hide amongst the cattails as they kept getting caught in the thick algae

 

 

Re(1): Black-bellied Plover ... Bracebridge Ponds - photo
Posted on June 16, 2009 at 03:29:54 PM by Al Sinclair

Photo by Wilf Yusek

 

 

Black-bellied Plover ... Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on June 16, 2009 at 02:51:53 PM by Al Sinclair

Wilf Yusek found a Black-bellied Plover on the mud island in cell 3 today, nonbreeding plumage, still present at 1pm. Redhead still in cell 2.

 

 

Redhead
Posted on June 15, 2009 at 02:31:54 PM by wilf yusek

There is a male Redhead in cell 2 seen at 1.50 pm.today (Bracebridge Lagoons)

 

 

Chimney Swifts
Posted on June 15, 2009 at 12:28:09 PM by janice house

Friday night Janet Fraser and I went to Huntsville to watch the birds roost, we saw about 60 birds. Twice on the weekend I saw 2 swifts flying above the Independent Grocery store parking lot in Gravenhurst

 

 

Scarlet Tanager
Posted on June 15, 2009 at 12:25:43 PM by janice house

Laura my boss's wife was on the Butter & Egg Rd Friday night about 5:30 when she spotted the tanager pecking the ground on the side of the road, it did not appear to be having a dust bath.

 

 

Sedge Wren
Posted on June 14, 2009 at 08:54:26 PM by Alex Mills

I stopped at a wet field west of Burk's Falls about 1 am saturday morning (June 13) and heard a Sedge Wren singing in the moonlight.

 

 

Re(1): Identification
Posted on June 14, 2009 at 07:47:54 PM by Terry & Marion Whittam

I'd also definitely say Phoebe! Watch if the bird flicks its tail a lot usually when it calls, more like a little beep! Phoebe's also like to be around cottages. The nests are often very buggy even to the point of being lousy! Be careful.

Cheers Terry

 

 

Re(1): Identification
Posted on June 14, 2009 at 07:18:34 PM by CatMacLean

Maybe a Phoebe? Nesting material is right. Our Phoebe is nesting in our outhouse at the cottage and the floor is littered with moss and mud etc.

 

 

Identification
Posted on June 14, 2009 at 06:57:22 PM by HilaryCurrer

I have been trying to identify this bird for the past couple of years. My first guess was a Least Flycatcher however I read that the nesting site for a Least is in the fork of a tree, also noted that the wingbar markings and white around the eyes is not as prominent as on a Least Flycatcher. The nest has been built against the logs of our cottage on Lake of Bays.  I am sure that there are many experts who will be able to assist me with this identification. Thanks Hilary  photo

 

 

Pepper and Salt Skipper ...Bracebridge
Posted on June 13, 2009 at 04:01:15 PM by Al Sinclair

We had a Pepper and Salt here yesterday in the flower beds, photo below. They fly the same time as the chives bloom often nectaring in the chive flowers. This skipper is rarely seen, a small and easily missed woodland species. Also could be uncommon and local in Muskoka, have heard of no other locations for this species in the district. We usually see a few every year in our yard and once in a blow-down opening about 100 metres back in the woods. Last year we saw none so were glad to find one here again.  photo

 

 

Yellow-throated Vireo
Posted on June 13, 2009 at 12:24:48 PM by Goodyear

This morning we had a Yellow-throated Vireo west of Gravenhurst. It was 1.2km west of Snider's Bay Road on Muriel Crescent.

 

 

Re(1): Nesting Bird ?
Posted on June 13, 2009 at 10:25:17 AM by Barbara Taylor

Could it be an Ovenbird nest? They nest on the ground amongst the leaf litter, a dome-shaped nest with a side entrance. I think Winter Wrens prefer to place their nest partly sheltered by an exposed tree root and would have moss/lichens covering it.

 

 

Nesting Bird ?
Posted on June 13, 2009 at 07:59:50 AM by CatMacLean

I have had two encounters recently with small brown birds shooting out from under my feet while I was walking through the bush. The first time I looked down and found a nest covered with leaf litter and fashioned with bits of grass. There were three young un-fledged birds in it. The second time when the bird flew at ground level, I looked for the nest and found the same stucture but with small beige eggs.  Can anyone tell me what this bird is? I am thinking Winter Wren.

 

 

Re(1): Monarch Butterflies
Posted on June 22, 2009 at 08:24:52 PM by Dawn Sherman

I finally saw a Monarch yesterday here on the Hunter's Bay Trail in Huntsville.

 

 

Monarch Butterflies
Posted on June 11, 2009 at 12:53:41 PM by Barbara Taylor

Finally saw a couple Monarch butterflies this morning at the Bracebridge Ponds. This is a bit late compared to the past few years but I suppose the weather hasn't been co-operating this spring. Has anyone else seen Monarchs yet?

Journey North - Monarch Butterfly Migration:
http://www.learner.org/jnorth/monarch/index.html

 

 

Re(4): Swallows
Posted on June 28, 2009 at 12:00:09 PM by RobertMacIntosh

Thank you Barbara. I should add that we had one tree swallow looking for a nestilng site, but I think he was driven away by our pesky red squirrels.

 

 

Re(3): Swallows
Posted on June 28, 2009 at 09:03:21 AM by Barbara Taylor

This does seem to be a poor year for swallows generally. Once nestlings have fledged it will be interesting to see if sightings pick up.

 

 

Re(2): Swallows
Posted on June 27, 2009 at 08:32:37 AM by RobertMacIntosh

For thirty years, we have always had at least two pairs of barn swllows nesting in our boathouse, and usually four offspring in each nest. This year there are no barn swallows. We are on an island in central Lake Muskoka.
The month of May and early June were very cold, windy and wet, and there were no insects to speak of.Has there been a widespread absence of barn swallows this year?

 

 

Re(1): Swallows
Posted on June 11, 2009 at 08:56:02 AM by ron tozer

My annual survey of nesting Barn Swallows in the Highway 60 Corridor of Algonquin Park to date indicates that this once common breeding species has been reduced to a total of about 15 birds this year. At the current rate of decline, this swallow may be virtually extirpated along Highway 60 during the next five years. As with other dramatically declining aerial insectivores, reasons for the population collapse are uncertain. However, reductions in the insect food supply, and disruption of insect availability due to weather events linked to climate change, have been suggested as important factors.

 

 

Re(1): Swallows
Posted on June 11, 2009 at 07:00:05 AM by J. Gardner

We have only two Cliff Swallow nests on our garage this year. Grackles got into two more on the rear of the building. We are near Manitouwabing Lake.

 

 

Swallows
Posted on June 10, 2009 at 10:21:51 PM by Alex Mills

I spent most of the morning birding in central Parry Sound District doing the Sand Lake Breeding Bird Survey. The only swallow on the survey was a single Tree Swallow, but after the survey near Burk's Falls in late morning I watched a flock of about 20 swallows feeding over a low field. There were about 15 Barns, 4 Trees, and 1 Bank. I know there are still lots of Barn and Tree Swallow sightings, but I wonder if anyone else is finding Purple Martins, Bank, Rough-winged, or Cliff Swallows in "cottage country."

 

 

Late Blackpoll Warbler
Posted on June 10, 2009 at 07:11:45 PM by Alex Mills

This morning (June 10) I heard and saw a male Blackpoll Warbler singing near Burk's Falls. This is my latest spring date ever for this species, although Murray Speirs saw one at Sundridge on June 11, 1933.

 

 

Re(1): Woodcocks
Posted on June 10, 2009 at 00:17:51 AM by Marilyn Kisser

looks like one stopped for a rest! neat shots!

 

 

Woodcocks
Posted on June 9, 2009 at 09:59:19 PM by LawrenceFrench

I saw this woodcock getting her young ones across Brackenrig Rd on May 25  photo1  photo2  photo3  photo4

 

 

robin nest
Posted on June 7, 2009 at 10:06:56 PM by John Challis

We have a robin with a bent for interior design. Last week a male spent several days battering itself on our kitchen window. Meanwhile the female was ignoring him and busying herself with searching for a nest site. Gayle had just hung a hanging pot full of bacopa and red something-or-others from the eave of our front porch. Yesterday I startled the robin from the pot. It's roosting in the pot again today. I'll try to get a photo of her to share on the board. (Washago)

 

 

Bardsville area...
Posted on June 6, 2009 at 01:22:01 PM by Barbara Taylor

We didn't find any Brewer's Blackbirds this morning in their usual spot near the intersection of Beatrice Townline Rd. and Falkenburg Rd. Has anyone seen them this year?

Just south of #1690 Beatrice Townline Rd. there were two Black-billed Cuckoos in the shrubbery next to the road. Lots of Bobolinks in the area, Gray Catbird, Alder Flycatcher, Eastern Kingbirds, and a singing Mourning Warbler. Along Falkenburg Rd. several warblers including Yellow, Common Yellowthroat, American Redstart, Chestnut-sided, Blackburnian, Black-throated Green, and Black-and-white. Along Butter & Egg Rd. there was a Ruffed Grouse taking a dust bath and three young Common Ravens which didn't want to yield to the car. This area offers varied habitat of field, forest, and wetland which makes for a good birding tour...best to go in the morning when the birdsong will help you locate the birds.

 

 

Re(1): Looking for birding spots in Muskoka
Posted on June 5, 2009 at 01:44:57 PM by Al Sinclair

Hotspots? We don't have many, lots of habitat here so birds are spread out over the whole district. If you have some target species perhaps we could suggest where to find them. In the Rosseau area I would drive up towards Hekkla and stop at all the wetlands. Drive up Bear Cave Rd and listen for the bird songs to find them. If you want to get more serious get topo maps and compass or GPS with topos and head into the backwoods, look for wetlands again as that's where the action is. The best hotspot in Muskoka is the Bracebridge Sewage Ponds followed by Henry Marsh, check previous posts for directions. Good Luck and let us know your good finds.

 

 

Looking for birding spots in Muskoka
Posted on June 4, 2009 at 08:30:25 PM by DavidFCreed

Hi,
I'm looking for some help finding birding hotspots in Muskoka, specifically the Lake Rousseau area.
Thanks in advance for your help.
David

 

 

Re(1): any idea?
Posted on June 7, 2009 at 10:39:26 AM by Barbara Taylor

Could be a first spring male Purple Finch since they take two years to attain adult colour, or an older female which can also have yellowish colour according to this website: http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek060301.html

And excerpt from http://www.birdsource.org/ibs/IBSspecies/purfin/index.html:
"First-summer males are similar to females but with head and rump washed in olive-yellow and deep yellow on chin and throat. Males in this plumage may sing and hold territory before molting into adult plumage in their second fall."

 

 

Re(2): any idea?
Posted on June 4, 2009 at 07:58:21 PM by DBurton

Yellow aberration of a Purple Finch. We can call it a Yurple Finch... sounds better than Purpellow Finch. Maybe it likes eating golden rod and canary foods?

 

 

Re(1): any idea?
Posted on June 4, 2009 at 06:12:53 PM by Alex Mills

I'd certainly say it is a purple finch (by the size, pattern of brown and white, and positioning of the "colour"), but I'm not sure what the explanation of the colouring and the pattern of that colouring is. Young bird exhibiting an unusual moult pattern? Genetic colour aberration?

 

 

any idea?
Posted on June 4, 2009 at 03:28:59 PM by Marilyn Kisser

this finch was at the nyger feeder this moring ..definate yellowish crown and rump ... looked larger than a purple finch ...Rosseau  photo1  photo2

 

 

Re(1): Moose calf...update
Posted on June 4, 2009 at 03:19:06 PM by Marilyn Kisser

what a great story! I live beside the sanctuary ...will have to try to get a look at Hermie and his other friends!

 

 

Moose calf...update
Posted on June 4, 2009 at 02:10:37 PM by Al Sinclair

Hermie the moose is now on his way to a new home at Aspen Valley Wildlife Sanctuary. We found him last night around 10pm still alone and calling for his mom. Using lights we were able to catch him and carry him into the house where he spent the night in our laundry room. At 9:00 this morning Ben from the sanctuary arrived and picked him up.

We called the Aspen Valley emergency number at 10:30pm last night and Ben recommended keeping him indoors in a dark room as it was going to be a cold night. He settled fairly quickly and seemed to know we meant him no harm, but didn't like to be locked up. During the night we heard him a few times trying to push his way out.

This morning he was still fine and was more relaxed. Ben had no trouble loading him in a crate for the ride to his new home. There are already 3 other moose calves there and another one coming soon from Sudbury for a total of 5 when Hermie arrives. Two of the others came from Ullswater, 1 from New Liskeard. Ben thinks our little moose was about 2 weeks old, may have been one of a set of twins that wandered off(the mothers can't count). It will be bottle fed for a while and is already ready to eat normal moose browse. MNR reserves the right to pick the Moose release site this fall, currently they like the northern Parry Sound District. We think that the young adult moose we saw here a couple of weeks ago was the one the leaving the fresh tracks recently, not the calves mother.  photo1  photo2  photo3

 

 

Re(1): Tennesse Warbler
Posted on June 27, 2009 at 08:41:12 AM by RobertMacIntosh

We had a pair of Philadelphia vireos in a cedar tree about three feet from my eyes this week. A first sighting ever
for me, and probably unusual for Lake Muskoka.The female was small, a beautiful grayish colour, no wing bars; the male nearby had a pale yellow shading on the sides of the belly.

 

 

Tennesse Warbler
Posted on June 4, 2009 at 09:10:29 AM by CatMacLean

Had a Tennesse Warbler singing near the house in Huntsville this am. Hermit thrush, Veery and Scarlet Tanager singing in the bush along with both red-eyed and blue headed vireo.

 

 

Henry Marsh - Green Heron
Posted on June 3, 2009 at 07:10:11 PM by Barbara Taylor

Good news! The beavers have reconstructed their dam under the little bridge at Henry Marsh and the water level is nice and high. The beaver baffles don't seem to be carrying much water out of the marsh, if any. A Green Heron and an American Bittern were at the west side of the marsh this afternoon.

directions to Henry Marsh:
From traffic lights at Eccelstone Dr./Wellington St. in Bracebridge, take Beaumont Dr. along the Muskoka River to Henry Rd. There is a parking area at the end of Henry Rd. by the trailhead. When you reach the "T" in the trail, turn right (west) to check out the beaver dam.

 

 

Re(1): Moose calf on the loose...east of Bracebridge
Posted on June 3, 2009 at 08:20:51 PM by Terry & Marion Whittam

Very nice shots Al. Watch your back as mum cannot be far off..... lets hope so as this little guy must still need mother. Cheers Terry

 

 

Re(1): Moose calf on the loose...east of Bracebridge
Posted on June 4, 2009 at 10:37:44 AM by BarryPeyton

Nice shot Al. Yes, Terry is right, watch your back on this one. Thanks for leading our group on the Wings over Muskoka event, your knowledge of birds shone.

 

 

Moose calf on the loose...east of Bracebridge
Posted on June 3, 2009 at 06:27:22 PM by Al Sinclair

We have a moose calf out here that seems to be wandering around alone. It was beside Hwy 118E (8km east of Hwy 11) yesterday for a few hours and Aspen Wildlife Sanctuary was called to help. By the time they arrived it had disappeared but they found tracks of an adult in the woods nearby and thought it might not be an orphan.

Today we heard something bleating in the woods behind our house, investigated and found the moose calf still alone, it stopped and stood still when it saw me. I took a photo (see below) and got Joan to watch it while I went to get a blanket to put over its head so we could catch it. But by the time I got back it had taken off again. We also found tracks of an adult in the woods where it disappeared so it may not be alone. We had an adult moose in our backyard two weeks ago, it may have been her.  photo1  photo2

 

 

Black-billed Cuckoo
Posted on June 3, 2009 at 11:41:19 AM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there was a Black-billed Cuckoo along the snowmobile trail north of Ball's Dr. near Patricia Parkway, Bracebridge. map: http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&q=patricia+parkway+bracebridge+ontario&um=1&ie=UTF-8&split=0&gl=ca&ei=9JcmSqyqOYPCM8P2hYkF&sa=X&oi=geocode_result&ct=title&resnum=1

 

 

Mourning Warbler, shorebirds
Posted on June 2, 2009 at 11:31:23 AM by Barbara Taylor

This morning at the Bracebridge Ponds I finally had my first Mourning Warbler of the year and three Indigo Buntings which had previously been eluding me. The Mourning Warbler was singing at its usual spot near the SW corner of cell 4.

In cell 3 there were only a few shorebirds scattered along the west shore:
Least Sandpiper
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Semipalmated Plover
Solitary Sandpiper
Spotted Sandpiper
Killdeer

 

 

N. Muldrew Lake - Whip-poor-will, Warblers, Sparrows
Posted on June 2, 2009 at 09:31:44 AM by Kip Daynard

The Whip-poor-will appears to have set up residence here for the summer and continues to call most evenings.

This morning a few minutes listening before leaving for work revealed some nice warblers including Canada, Cape May, Pine, Redstart, Chestnut-sided, Yellow-rumped and Ovenbird.

We've enjoyed watching the progress of a brood of Chipping Sparrows in a small spruce just 15 feet or so from our front steps. The nest is less than 4 feet off the ground, low enough that our 3 and 5-year old girls can peek into the nest, something they make sure to do twice daily. Four speckled, light-blue eggs hatched about a week ago and the birds have gone from pitiful, blind, pink and featherless creatures to bright-eyed, downy chicks. Their bright yellow gapes really jump out at you. What a great first-hand view onto the early development stages of one of our common birds. It's amazing how fast these little guys grow! I'll try to post some pictures before they fledge, which judging from the rapid progress is only a couple of weeks away.

North Muldrew Lake is 3kms SW of Gravenhurst wharf reachable by North Muldrew Lake Rd.

 

 

Re(1): 100s of Chimney Swifts
Posted on June 3, 2009 at 10:31:47 PM by Jim Griffin

Thank you Mr. Goodyear and students of Huntsville Public school for your posting. I have never seen swifts going to roost in a chimney so based on your report I came to Huntsville this evening to see if I could observe it. I determined that the chimney was the big yellow brick one at the back of the old Empire Hotel. We arrived at about 8:20, saw a few swifts flying around so decided to wait. At 9:00 they started to gather, flying quite low and in what seemed like circles gradually decreasing in diameter. A few dropped into the chimney, then as if someone had turned on a vacuum, the rest of the flock just dropped en mass into the chimney; it was all over by 9:10. I estimate about 100 birds in this case.

 

 

Re(1): 100s of Chimney Swifts
Posted on June 1, 2009 at 04:17:33 PM by Alex Mills

One coolish morning in September of 2007, I saw more than a hundred Chimney Swifts entering a chimney at an Anglican Church in Windsor. I had always associated the entering of chimneys by these birds with evening, since they roost communally overnight. I wonder what makes them go to roost in the morning. Perhaps, when conditions are poor, it's more energetically efficient to roost than to continue hunting with poor success?

 

 

100s of Chimney Swifts
Posted on June 1, 2009 at 09:15:14 AM by Goodyear

This morning as I collected my students from the playground at Huntsville Public School we watched in amazement as 100s of Chimney Swifts flew in from all directions and circled in a large wheeling mass around one of the downtown buildings at the NE corner of Main St. and Centre St. They flew down into one of the chimneys on the building in groups of 2 - 5 at a time. The kids said there were many more when they first noticed them, but I would estimate the number I saw to be around 350 - 400.

 

 

Re(1): Wings over Muskoka
Posted on June 3, 2009 at 06:12:45 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Hi Barry,
Nicely done! I had blurring in the wing-spread images, as well. Not enough light for enough shutter speed for the wing flaps. Fun, though!
Thanks for posting!

 

 

Wings over Muskoka
Posted on June 1, 2009 at 09:02:07 AM by BarryPeyton

If you missed this event, you missed a good one. Cynthia and i spent the weekend at Red Leaves, an area about 13 km east of Port Carling, enjoying the programs put on by Bob Bowles ( Kids for Turles) and Robin Tapley, senior naturalist. All funds raised were to support the Kids for Turtles program. This even was set up to make people aware of the decline of Muskoka's migrant songbirds, wetland and grassland birds and other wildlife. We saw and heard birds such as the scarlet tanager, indigo bunting, nighhawk etc. as many as 50 species. The pontoon boat ride on Lake Rosseau provided an excellant opportunity to photograph Loons with Eleanor Kee Wellmann a well known wildlife photographer. Several local wildlife artists put on displays and examples of their work and the guest speakers and guides were of a very high caliber. Congratulations to the organisers and thank you. This was the first annual event for Wings over Muskoka so if you get a chance to go next year it will likely be even better, if this is possible. We highly recommend this experience and learning opportunity.  photo1  photo2

 

 

Flycatcher
Posted on May 30, 2009 at 12:41:49 PM by CatMacLean

Heard my first Olive-sided Flycatcher of the year yesterday along the Hunter's Bay trail in Huntsville.

 

 

Re(1): Lagoons
Posted on May 29, 2009 at 03:52:30 PM by Barbara Taylor

We arrived at the Lagoons around 1:30 p.m. today. All the shorebirds Wilf reported plus a Semipalmated Plover were still in cell 3. There were several Swallows swooping back and forth over cell 3 including two Cliff Swallows, Barn, Bank, Tree, and Northern Rough-winged. As we were leaving, a Merlin was flying low over cell 3, and no shorebirds were in sight. After waiting several minutes only some Least Sandpipers reappeared...hopefully the rest of them were just hiding.

There was a Common Loon in cell 4 (I'm not kidding!), but it eventually flew off to the north-east. Some of the highlights west of cell 4 were a Black-billed Cuckoo, Green Heron, Belted Kingfisher, Canada Warbler, Magnolia Warbler, American Redstart, Chestnut-sided Warbler, Yellow Warbler, Alder Flycatcher, Gray Catbird, and Baltimore Oriole. Two male Buffleheads were in cell 4.

Bracebridge Ponds Map (north approx. at top, west at left):

http://s5.photobucket.com/albums/y175/naturepics/birdboard/pondsmap.jpg

 

 

Lagoons
Posted on May 29, 2009 at 12:43:08 PM by Wilf Yusek

Hi Stopped at the lagoons about 11.00 am saw 2 Dunlin, 4 Semipalmated Sandpipers and 7 Least Sandpipers in cell 3 west side. Did not see any Loons but did see 1 Green Heron fly over cell 4 heading east toward cell 3.

 

 

Red-throated Loon?
Posted on May 29, 2009 at 08:58:17 AM by Barbara Taylor

Yesterday afternoon I checked for shorebirds at the Bracebridge Ponds and found only one Least Sandpiper along with the usual Spotted Sandpipers and Killdeer. As I approached cell 4 I noticed a bird had just taken flight and quickly got my binoculars on it. As the bird rose I realized it had the shape of a loon but was much smaller than a Common Loon. The top of the wings and back appeared brown and the underside of the wings and body appeared white. The wings were pointy like a loon and the head shape was right, but I didn't see any red on the neck. I've checked all my field guides and nothing seems to match what I saw except for a first spring Red-throated Loon. If only I'd been a few minutes earlier when it was still on the water!

Has a Red-throated Loon ever been seen at the Ponds? I've observed a Common Loon in cell 4 a few times in the past, usually during spring migration.

 

 

Muskoka Field Naturalists - next meeting June 4
Posted on May 29, 2009 at 08:32:43 AM by Barbara Taylor

MFN meeting Thursday, June 4 at 7:30 p.m., Gravenhurst
From the Wakerobin, newsletter of the Muskoka Field Naturalists:

BUTTERFLIES with Bob Bowles
Well known naturalist and MFN founding member, Bob will share his knowledge of butterflies and provide information about the upcoming Butterfly Festival in Orillia on Saturday, June 27. This will set the stage for the MFN Butterfly Count on July 5.

February through June meetings will be held at the Calvary Baptish Church located at the corner of First and Brock Streets in Gravenhurst across from the Giant Tiger store. Visitors welcome to attend.
Muskoka Field Naturalists website: http://www.muskokafieldnaturalists.com

 

 

pine siskin albino (photo)
Posted on May 28, 2009 at 07:17:53 PM by garyschultz

had a strange bird visiting the feeders for the last two days, for which we could could not place after reviewing our field guides so we asked Ron Tozer to id, and he has advised that it is in fact a partial albino rather than a full albino Pine Siskin, note the dark eye not a red one.  the location is algonquin inn on hwy # 60  photo

 

 

Pewee
Posted on May 28, 2009 at 08:39:25 AM by Goodyear

This morning we heard our first Eastern Wood-Pewee of the year singing from the woods behind our house (Meadow Heights, Bracebridge).

 

 

Yellow-throated Vireo at the Torrance Barrens
Posted on May 27, 2009 at 01:43:32 PM by Al Sinclair

On May 24 our Baillie Birdathon group found a Yellow-throated Vireo at the Torrance Barrens. It was singing in trees beside a pond a short hike south-west across the road from the main parking lot. Wilf Yusek got a photo.

 

 

Re(1): Little Gull
Posted on May 31, 2009 at 01:04:35 AM by Bob Healey

There has been no further confirmation of this reported sighting. It would have been a new bird for this area.

 

 

Little Gull
Posted on May 26, 2009 at 02:34:19 PM by Bob Healey

My brother-in-law reported seeing a Little Gull around Monck P.S. at 12 noon today. He is an experienced birder from the Hamilton area, and has seen this bird many times before, in Niagara Falls and Florida.

 

 

Cedar Waxwings
Posted on May 26, 2009 at 08:37:51 AM by Goodyear

Yesterday afternoon and again this morning I saw 3 Cedar Waxwings in and around a small wetland at the intersection of Lone Pine Drive and Stephenson Road 4 - the first of the year. I also had a Wilson's Warbler in the same area.

 

 

Common Terns
Posted on May 24, 2009 at 09:19:52 PM by SylviaPurdonJimMaguire

Possible colony on Severn River near Island 32 (our little island) situated between the railway bridge and The Swift, maybe in Muskoka, maybe in Matchedash on a large 'whale rock' just past Island 32. The line goes right through there somewhere.

8 Common Terns Adults appear to be sitting on territory all over this whale shaped rock .

 

 

Re(1): and a Black-billed Cuckoo...
Posted on May 24, 2009 at 11:36:50 AM by Barbara Taylor

Don and Bev Bailey report seeing a Black-billed Cuckoo, a Tennessee Warbler, and a Green Heron west of cell 4 this morning.

 

 

Wilson's Phalarope - Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on May 24, 2009 at 09:58:22 AM by Barbara Taylor

A male Wilson's Phalarope was found this morning during the Baillie Birdathon. It was in cell 3 mid-way along the north shoreline and then moved to the east end. Also a few Semipalmated Plovers and Least Sandpipers present.

 

 

Re(1): Fox
Posted on May 24, 2009 at 10:04:36 AM by Barbara Taylor

We have seen both a female and male fox pass through our yard on a fairly regular basis each evening, usually heading west..which is towards Rockwell Ave. from here. The male is a bit larger with a bushier coat, and the female shows that she has been suckling young. We've also had a female Raccoon nosing around the birdfeeder some evenings and she met face to face with the female Fox one night. It was interesting to watch the interaction...the fox is the one who backed off. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Fox
Posted on May 23, 2009 at 10:49:50 PM by Ted Gardner

Had a male fox wander through the back yard this evening mousing and or chipmunking...this would be the 1st in our yard since they had a den at the end of Rockwell before they built houses.(figure it was a male as his coat was perfect) 120 Meadow Heights dr. BB

 

 

Golden-winged Warblers - Henry Marsh
Posted on May 23, 2009 at 08:55:11 PM by Bob Healey

I sighted a pair of Golden-winged Warblers late this afternoon - at the usual nesting site - where the Henry Rd. trail opens to the marsh.  photo1  photo2

 

 

Re(1): Bracebridge Lagoons
Posted on May 23, 2009 at 12:40:39 PM by Barbara Taylor

Around 11 a.m. this morning there was a female Lapland Longspur in the NW corner of cell 3 along with a few Semipalmated Plovers, Least Sandpipers, a Semipalmated Sandpiper, and the usual Spotted Sandpipers and Killdeer. Tennessee and Blackpoll Warblers were still singing near the NW corner of cell 4. A Broad-winged Hawk circled overhead for a while.

 

 

Bracebridge Lagoons - Blackpolls and Tennesees, Lincoln's Sparrow
Posted on May 23, 2009 at 10:16:35 AM by Goodyear

I birded the Lagoons this morning between 6:30 and 9:00 and found some new birds for the year - 65 species for the morning. Highlights include:
Lincoln's Sparrow - 1 in the woods at the NW corner of Cell 2
Tennesee Warbler - male (singing) and female NW corner of Cell 4
Blackpoll Warbler - male (singing)and female NW corner of Cell 4
Wilson's Warbler - 1 male W side of Cell 2
Black-billed Cuckoo - W side of Cell 4

While I was watching the Cuckoo I saw a Green Heron sitting on what appears to be its nest. It was a platform of small sticks/twigs, about 5 - 6 feet above the ground, located on the west side of Cell 4 about halfway down.

Last night I also saw a Common Nighthawk flying over Cell 1 and there were approx. 12 Chimney Swifts over downtown Bracebridge.

 

 

Re(2): Whip-poor-will at Muldrew Lake
Posted on May 27, 2009 at 06:13:14 PM by Alex Mills

I spent two summers studying Whip-poor-wills many years ago, and I have caught and banded many individuals since then, mostly near Barrie.

Whip-poor-wills seem less affected by tree species (which ecologists often call "composition") than by forest structure (which ecologists call "structure"). They don't like deep forests with a closed canopy or with a dense understory, whether conifer or hardwood. Instead, they like open forests, such as those found in barrens, or fragmented stands of poplars following burns, etc.

Incidentally, the Whip-poor-will is the latest bird addition to Canada's threatened species list, having been so designated by COSEWIC on May 4th, 2009

 

 

Re(1): Whip-poor-will at Muldrew Lake
Posted on May 27, 2009 at 10:54:53 AM by Jim Griffin

Hi Kip, I have never heard a whip-poor-will in the Port Sydney area (land of big pines) in my 11 years here. I did have one virtually on my campsite on the French River,west of Hwy 69 some years ago. I've always had the impression it was more west muskoka where they hang out.

 

 

Whip-poor-will at Muldrew Lake
Posted on May 22, 2009 at 02:58:32 PM by Kip Daynard

Just as Al predicted I'm hearing a Whip-poor-will at my new place on Muldrew Lake Rd. about 4kms SW of Gravenhurst. It sang on and off all night long last night starting around 9:30pm. What a marvellous sound - first time I've ever heard them in Muskoka and the first time anywhere in over 7 years ago!

I had always thought their habitat was primarily deciduous. Its fairly mixed here, lots of oaks but with a pretty high number of Pines as it was in the Pinery P.P. where I heard them last. I've seen a few reports in Muskoka but most appear to be in southern Muskoka which to my mind has more Pines than northern Muskoka. Perhaps a quick survey is in order... what sort of habitat are people encountering Whip-poor-wills in these days?

 

 

Black-billed Cuckoo, Wilson's Warblers
Posted on May 22, 2009 at 09:43:03 AM by Goodyear

Last night at the Bracebridge Lagoons we saw a Black-billed Cuckoo sitting in a shrub in the wet area on the west side of Cell 4. As well, we had 2 Wilson's Warblers in the same area.

 

 

Lagoons
Posted on May 21, 2009 at 04:45:24 PM by Wilf Yusek

There were 5 Semipalmated Plovers in cell 3 this morning 11.20 am.

 

 

Lapland Longspur - Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on May 20, 2009 at 08:29:12 PM by Barbara Taylor

Tonight at the Bracebridge Ponds there was a male Lapland Longspur on the little island in cell 3. The female Redhead was still with the Mallards in cell 3. About 17 Least Sandpipers and 2 Lesser Yellowlegs in cell 3.

 

 

Re(1): Veery, Canada Warbler
Posted on May 19, 2009 at 01:53:50 PM by John Challis

We had a veery singing in our back yard, Green River Drive, last night as well.  (Washago)

 

 

Veery, Canada Warbler
Posted on May 19, 2009 at 11:56:17 AM by Barbara Taylor

Don Bailey reports there was a Veery and a Canada Warbler this morning in the undeveloped area behind Gagnon's grocery store in Bracebridge. Other birds included:
Nashville Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Gray Catbird
Brown Thrasher

Don also reports that yesterday morning there was an Eastern Wood-Pewee along the Henry Rd. Trail.

 

 

Wilson's Warbler - Henry Marsh
Posted on May 19, 2009 at 10:33:18 AM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there was a male Wilson's Warbler in the shrubbery where the Trans Canada Trail enters the woods at the east side of Henry Marsh. As I watched the Wilson's, I thought I had my first Scarlet Tanager of the year when I saw a flash of red. But to my surprise it was a male Northern Cardinal...the female soon joined her mate and they began singing a lovely duet. I can't remember ever seeing cardinals at the marsh...has anyone?

Alder Flycatchers are back at the marsh now. They were at the west side where the Rose-breasted Grosbeak is often singing.

 

 

Bonaparte's Gulls - Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on May 19, 2009 at 10:20:53 AM by Barbara Taylor

Around 9:45 a.m. this morning there were two Bonaparte's Gulls (adult breeding plumage) in cell 1 picking insects off the surface of the water. The female Redhead was still in cell 3 hanging out with some Mallards. There were a few Least Sandpipers, Semipalmated Plovers, both Yellowlegs, American Pipits, Spotted Sandpipers, and many Killdeer in cell 3. The quarreling Killdeer kept stirring up the shorebirds causing them to move around a lot.

 

 

Bracebridge Lagoons to Henry Marsh - Redhead, Orange-crowned Warbler, etc.
Posted on May 18, 2009 at 10:05:20 PM by dbritton

I spent a very pleasant couple of hours early this morning birding from the Bracebridge Lagoons to the Henry Road Marsh and back. Despite the cool weather there was a lot of bird activity, including some nice migrants.

The best bird of the morning was one of the first ones I saw: a female REDHEAD consorting with a few Mallards in Cell 3.

Most of the other ducks were in Cells 2 and 4, including Wood Ducks, Lesser Scaup , Bufflehead, Blue-winged Teal and a single Ring-necked Duck in cell.

Despite the excellent habitat the shorebirds were a little thin - 2 Lesser Yellowlegs and 2 Least Sandpipers were along the southern shore of Cell 3 and there were a few Killdeer and Spotted Sandpipers in the area.

In the woods at the southwest corner of Cell 4 were Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Scarlet Tanager and several Baltimore Orioles. In the wetland and the northwest corner of Cell 4 a Sora called.

I walked the Trans-Canada Trail to Henry Marsh and back and the warbler activity was outstanding. In the poplars just west of cell 4 at the pipeline were two foraging ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLERS. A little further along was a singing Tennessee Warbler. In the scrubby area near the T-intersection with the Henry Road Trail were the previously reported two singing GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLERS. Other warblers seen or heard on the trail included Nashville, Yellow, Chestnut-sided, Magnolia, Black-throated Blue, Black-throated Green, Black-and-white, American Redstart, Ovenbird, Northern Waterthrush and Common Yellowthroat. Other birds of note here included Golden-crowned Kinglet, Blue-headed Vireo, Pine Siskin and Purple Finch.

On the way back to my car on Lagoon Lane a few Northern Rough-winged Swallows skimmed over Cell 4, a Red-eyed Vireo sang in the woods behind the construction site and an Evening Grosbeak called in flight overhead.

All in all, an excellent morning of birding!

 

 

Algonquin Park & Surrounding Area - 17 Warbler Species & More
Posted on May 18, 2009 at 10:01:14 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Lev Frid on ONTBIRDS (May 18, 2009) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.


Hi All,
I had a great birding-oriented weekend in Algonquin Park and nearby small
tracts of woodland along the Oxtongue River.

Highlights:

17 Warbler species - incl. numerous Bay-breasteds and Cape Mays in full song
at West Rose Lake & Wolf Howl pond
Two bands of Gray Jays, now carting around scraggly dark juvenile birds.
First-year male Spruce Grouse at Wolf Howl Pond
Three separate pairs of Boreal Chickadees - Point-blank, in-the-open views.
Ruby-throated Hummers, Evening & Rose-breasted Grosbeaks at Algonquin
Lakeside Inn Feeders.

I tallied about 75 or so species over the 15th, 16th and 17th.

Other highlights included a sow Black bear with three cubs, a grand total of
13 Moose including two cows with calves, a Pine Marten at Wolf Howl Pond,
five foxes and numerous beavers.

Photos are available here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/levfrid/

DIRECTIONS:
Courtesy of Ron Tozer

Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways
400, 11 and 60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on
Highway 400. From Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then
follow Highway 60 to the park. Kilometre markers along Highway
60 in the Park go from the West Gate (km 0) to the East Gate
(km 56). Get your park permit and the park tabloid (with a map
of birding locations mentioned here) at the gates.
_______________________________________________
ONTBIRDS is presented by the Ontario Field Ornithologists - the provincial birding organization.
For information about ONTBIRDS visit http://www.ofo.ca/

 

 

Indigo Bunting
Posted on May 18, 2009 at 07:21:22 PM by dinnymccraney

We had a beautiful male indigo at the feeder this morning...backing on South Muskoka Golf course.

 

 

Bracebridge Lagoons
Posted on May 18, 2009 at 07:19:00 PM by Ted Gardner

My Father and I visited the lagoons today and ran up a nice list of birds as well as Birders...nice to meet you all!
Common Yellow throat
Yellow Warbler
Chesnut sided Warbler
Baltimore Oriole
Song Sparrow
Northern Rough winged Swallow
Killdeer
Red Winged Backbird
Lesser Yellowlegs
Blue winged Teal
Mallard
Wood Duck
Green Heron
Broad winged Hawk
Ring Billed Gull
and this guy...........Bobolink photo

 

 

Birds this weekend
Posted on May 18, 2009 at 05:22:56 PM by CatMacLean

Yesterday in Huntsville we had the Baltimore Orieole back, two female Rose Breasted and one male at our feeeders as well as the usual hummers, chickadees, sisikins, and grackles.
Today we were at the cottage on the NW corner of Algonquin Park and I saw the spotted sandpiper, a kingfisher as well as Blackburnian and Magnolia Warblers.

 

 

Baltimore Oriole
Posted on May 18, 2009 at 10:25:26 AM by garyschultz

we had our first pair of Baltimore Oriole's today around our feeders,
location Algonquin Inn on hwy # 60 just before west gate to Algonquin Park.

 

 

Broad Winged Hawk Nest
Posted on May 18, 2009 at 08:56:15 AM by janice house

I stopped by the cottage yesterday at Skeleton Lake Rd 3 and when I got out of the car Dad asked me who was making the call. The hawk was in the maple tree right beside the parking lot. Hopefully people coming and going will not disturb the nest and we can watch the nestlings.

 

 

Re(2): full birding report Algonquin Park
Posted on May 18, 2009 at 09:11:58 PM by garyschultz

the nest is well bulit now,great to see him when he sticks his head out and you get that yellow top...

 

 

Re(1): full birding report Algonquin Park
Posted on May 18, 2009 at 12:25:05 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman


Thanks for sharing the list, Gary! I sat waiting for that Black-backed Woodpecker for more than 4 hours one day. Glad to hear it is still around and I'll give it another try.

 

 

full birding report Algonquin Park
Posted on May 18, 2009 at 08:03:23 AM by garyschultz

this weekend we had a birding group in from eagle eye tours staying at the Algonquin Inn,the tour leader was Blake Maybank,

Blake was good enough to go over his sighting for the Algonquin Park trip ,here is the listings broken down by main areas.

 

 

Wild Turkey
Posted on May 17, 2009 at 04:08:25 PM by Ted Gardner

Just had 2 female Turkey in the yard under the feeders. We have not see them since early December. Sorry to say at this point we have not seen Woodrow the Red Headed Woodpecker since Friday. (Bracebridge)

 

 

...and a Semipalmated Sandpiper
Posted on May 17, 2009 at 05:45:33 PM by Goodyear

Thanks for the post, Barbara. The Dunlin was still there at 4:30. A single Semipalmated Sandpiper has now joined the group. At one point I had 6 species of shorebird in one binocular view - Dunlin, Semipalmated Plover, Semipalmated Sandpiper, Least Sandpiper, Spotted Sandpiper, and a Lesser Yellowlegs!

 

 

Re(1): Semipalmated Plover...and a Dunlin
Posted on May 17, 2009 at 12:49:58 PM by Barbara Taylor

Just got back from a bone chilling walk around the Bracebridge Ponds...but it was worth it to see our first Dunlin of the year along with the Semipalmated Plover. They were with several Least Sandpipers along the west shoreline of cell 3. Two Eastern Kingbirds, a Bank Swallow, and two Barn Swallows were flying low over the semi-sheltered grassy area west of cell 3, but didn't seem to be having much luck finding something to eat. The lack of sun and very windy cold conditions kept most birds quiet and hunkered down out of sight. A Sora called briefly from the marshy area west of cell 4 at the north end. A Killdeer was sitting on her nest in the middle of the large gravel filled area north of cell 4...unfortunately the bird is not aware that this area will soon be used to store construction equipment once the new plant gets started.

 

 

Semipalmated Plover
Posted on May 16, 2009 at 03:13:42 PM by Goodyear

A single Semipalmated Plover was with the large flock of Least Sandpipers on the south side of Cell 3 at the Bracebridge Lagoons around 1:30, just as it began raining again.

 

 

scarlet tanager (photo)
Posted on May 16, 2009 at 07:50:45 AM by garyschultz

we have two tanager's in the back yard today at the algonquin inn on hwy # 60 just before the west gate gate to algonquin park.  photo

 

 

Re(1): Marsh Wren and Least Sandpipers
Posted on May 16, 2009 at 01:55:36 PM by Barbara Taylor

The fifty or so Least Sandpipers were still there after the rain stopped this morning, but we couldn't find the Marsh Wren. Over a hundred Swallows were swooping low over cells 1 and 3. There were at least three Cliff Swallows (first we've seen this year) amongst the many Tree, Barn, Bank, and Northern Rough-winged Swallows.

 

 

Marsh Wren and Least Sandpipers
Posted on May 15, 2009 at 09:42:51 PM by Goodyear

Just after 8:00 this evening we heard a Marsh Wren singing from the cattails in the southwest corner of Cell 4 at the Bracebridge Lagoons. We tracked it down and were able to get brief glimpses of it. The number of Least Sandpipers is now up to 53. They were scattered along the south and north sides of Cell 3.

 

 

red-bellied woodpecker
Posted on May 15, 2009 at 05:17:42 PM by Gerry Lannan

About 3pm I saw a red-bellied woodpecker & a pr of rose breasted grosbeaks;about 2km NE of Kearney.

 

 

American Redstart, Golden-winged Warblers
Posted on May 15, 2009 at 03:00:08 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning at Henry Marsh there were two male Golden-winged Warblers having a singing duel across the open area at the east/left side of Henry Trail. A male American Redstart was along the Trans Canada Trail a short distance east of Henry Marsh. Further east near the gas pipeline there was a Magnolia Warbler singing from a Tamarack.

Other birds today included:
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Purple Finch
Yellow Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Nashville Warbler
Black-and-white Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Cape May Warbler (probable - heard only)
Ovenbird
Baltimore Oriole
Pine Siskin
White-throated Sparrow

directions to Henry Marsh:
From traffic lights at Eccelstone Dr./Wellington St. in Bracebridge, take Beaumont Dr. along the Muskoka River to Henry Rd. There is a parking area at the end of Henry Rd. by the trailhead.

 

 

Least Sandpipers
Posted on May 15, 2009 at 10:13:08 AM by Goodyear

I apologize for the late post, but last night I went to check out the Bracebridge Lagoons after the storms had passed through and found a flock of 34 Least Sandpipers on the newly exposed mud flats in Cell 3. There is now an "island" in the middle of Cell 3 and much enlarged mud flats around the sides. There were also 2 Lesser Yellowlegs, and several Spotted Sandpipers and Killdeer. There wasn't much songbird activity owing to the strong winds.

 

 

Scarlet Tanager
Posted on May 15, 2009 at 09:23:54 AM by CatMacLean

 

Not a great pic of a tanager but he was quite vocal and competing with a Rose Breasted Grosbeak for attention. Two new birds today; the Red Eyed Vireo and a Northen Parula Warbler.  photo

 

 

Re(2): Pine Siskins on the Move?
Posted on May 15, 2009 at 11:34:04 AM by janice house

I had at least 3 dozen this morning ( Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst)

 

 

Re(1): Pine Siskins on the Move?
Posted on May 15, 2009 at 10:47:14 AM by Marilyn Kisser

I must have 5 dozen siskins here too! strange ... just outside of Rosseau

 

 

Pine Siskins on the Move?
Posted on May 15, 2009 at 08:03:35 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

On May 7, before I left for Point Pelee, I had about 10 Pine Siskins still visiting my feeders. When I returned yesterday I had a least 5 dozen. At least some must be on the move North.

I visited with a bander in Tilbury and he banded 6 Pine Siskins in 1 hour along with the same number of White-crowned Sparrows.

I had a nice male Bay-breasted Warbler here this morning along with yellow-rumps, Palm and Ovenbird.

No Whip-poor-will yet. I checked and this is late for arrival at my place in Bala.

 

 

Red Headed Woodpecker
Posted on May 14, 2009 at 06:43:31 PM by Ted Gardner

Well it seems "Woodrow" the red headed woodpecker may stay for a while??...in and out several times today. The Hairy pair dont much care for him and have put the run on him a few times, but he likes those peanuts. Finally have a half decent picture!!  Thank God for digital!!  photo

 

 

Re(1): Indigo Bunting
Posted on May 15, 2009 at 02:34:45 PM by Barbara Taylor

Don Bailey reports there was an Indigo Bunting by the snowmobile bridge out behind the Sleep Inn in Bracebridge this morning. Also several Chestnut-sided Warblers, Yellow Warblers, an Eastern Phoebe, and a Brown Thrasher. Oh, and lots of blackflies!

 

 

Re(2): Indigo Bunting
Posted on May 14, 2009 at 04:26:46 PM by CatMacLean

I just have mixed seed, peanuts, niger seed and humming bird food. The bunting is usually on the mixed seed or the nectar. He usually moves out to our field soon and sings from the pin cherries.

 

 

Re(1): Indigo Bunting
Posted on May 14, 2009 at 12:08:40 PM by MikeWeiss

Im on Penetang bay,, saw 2 male (blue) Indigo Buntings this am,,, Is there a preferred food they like,,.. thanks in advance... ( would mealworms be worth try

 

 

Indigo Bunting
Posted on May 14, 2009 at 10:20:11 AM by CatMacLean

 

This guy has been at mt feeder for the past two days. Not singing yet but I have heard the Scarlet Tanager singing in the bush. Huntsville.  photo

 

 

Baltimore Oriole
Posted on May 13, 2009 at 10:37:10 PM by MikeWeiss

Seen my first (of the year) Baltimore Oriole today,,,,Im on Penetang Bay...Heres a tip,,,for my fellow Birders... He was eating Welches Grap Jelly exclusivley,,,never touched the oranges or the nectar...

 

 

Posting photos...helpful hint
Posted on May 13, 2009 at 12:46:47 PM by Barbara Taylor

When you use Tinypic to upload your photo, paste their IMG code line right into your typed message on the Bird Board wherever you want the photo to appear. You can even include more than one photo that way.

(Note: the Image URL box below the Message Box is only used when you are pasting in the photo's url by itself, without those square bracket IMG tags around the url.)

Go to the Nature Photos Board for instructions How to Post Photos and to do a test post if you'd like.

 

 

Re(1): Red Headed Woodpecker
Posted on May 14, 2009 at 11:33:49 AM by Ted Gardner

He is here again today, The wind and rain dont seem to bother him.

 

 

Re(3): Red Headed Woodpecker - previous sightings
Posted on May 18, 2009 at 10:14:45 AM by MikeWeiss

Wow, great list of all the previous sightings,,, one dated back to 1995,,, that is something,,,,,,This year I saw the Red Headed Woodpecker only once so far on my peanut feeder,about a week ago...(They have been here for the last 2 seasons frequently feeding) im on Penetang Bay,,any ideas why he has not come back...

 

 

Re(3): Red Headed Woodpecker - previous sightings
Posted on May 15, 2009 at 08:44:10 AM by dbritton

Thanks for that helpful summary Barbara. The only Red-headed Woodpecker that I've seen in Muskoka was in the Cedar Springs campground on Beausoleil Island, Georgian Bay Islands National Park in early-mid May 1995

 

 

Re(4): Red Headed Woodpecker - previous sightings
Posted on May 18, 2009 at 10:22:18 AM by MikeWeiss

The baby (Immature) red headed woodpeckers have brown-blackish heads, the young will come with the red headed parents alot to feed at the peanut feeder (this I witnessed the past 2 seasons)

 

 

Re(3): Red Headed Woodpecker - previous sightings
Posted on May 14, 2009 at 06:07:42 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

That is quite a list of sightings, Barbara!
I had an immature male one winter before I changed over to a digital camera in 2003 while I was still living on Lake Joseph.

 

 

Re(3): Red Headed Woodpecker - previous sightings
Posted on May 14, 2009 at 02:52:21 PM by J. Gardner

Thanks for the history of the Red Headed Woodpecker Barbara. What a wonderful record to be able to draw on. Saves a few arguments.

 

 

Re(2): Red Headed Woodpecker - previous sightings
Posted on May 14, 2009 at 10:28:59 AM by Barbara Taylor

I searched the Bird Board Archived Reports and here's a copy of all the previous reports of Red-headed Woodpeckers going back in time:


-------------------------------
Red-headed Woodpecker
Posted on May 13, 2008 at 09:04:56 AM by Alex Mills

I have been birding at Magnetawan since 1973, and have just once seen a Red-headed Woodpecker there (actually closer to Burk's Falls), probably about 1992.

Yesterday (May 12), I found a Red-headed Woodpecker at Ahmic Lake. It was in a cluster of poplars beside a marsh with standing dead trees. I certainly hope it sticks around.
--------------------------------

red headed woodpecker, Tudhope Park
Posted on August 7, 2007 at 10:00:34 PM by John Challis

I was in Tudhope Park, Orillia with my parents last Sunday and came across a red-headed woodpecker; first I've seen since I painted a plastic model of one at the age of nine or 10. It's not the greatest of photos; it was busy and in a hurry to get back to a hungry, and noisy, juvenile in a nearby maple. I'm assuming it was still feeding the juvenile, because there was a great racket when this individual flew back to the tree. Bob Allison wrote about this celebrity in his nature column; it was mentioned in Orillia Today, anyway, on Aug. 3. Don't know if that part of the column made it into the Muskoka Weekender. photo
---------------------------------

Red-headed Woodpecker near Glen Orchard
Posted on July 6, 2007 at 03:39:47 PM by BillCrins

On 2 July, I was driving northwest on Hwy. 69 just west of Glen Orchard (about 0.2 km east of Bass Lake Rd. and Berners Rd. turnoffs), when a male Red-headed Woodpecker looped over the highway and back to a dead snag. There were numerous snags along the highway and in a small wetland adjacent to the highway, on the south or east side of the highway at that location.

On 4 July, I checked there again on my return from Timmins, but with no success.
---------------------------------

Red-headed Woodpecker
Posted on June 5, 2006 at 08:54:44 PM by Bob Healey

While riding at Buckwollow MTB this afternoon, I saw a red-headed woodpecker flying down the trail away from me. I thought it hadn't gone to far, but didn't get a second look. This is the first of this species for me this year, anywhere.
---------------------------------

Red-headed Woodpecker in Bracebridge
Posted on June 3, 2006 at 08:51:08 PM by Ron Tozer

At 6 p.m. this evening, I saw a Red-headed Woodpecker flying north from near the South Branch of the Muskoka River, over Milton Street in Bracebridge. I am not certain of the current Muskoka status of this woodpecker, but it was the first one I have seen here.
---------------------------------

Red-headed Woodpecker...pair at Pine Lake near Gravenhurst
Posted on June 13, 2005 at 09:31:53 PM by Al Sinclair

Dan Burton reported finding a Red-headed Woodpecker yesterday on a private road off Snider's Bay Rd west of Gravenhurst at Pine Lake. Today Dan, Allan Aubin and myself returned to the site and found a pair. This raises their breeding status for the breeding bird atlas to Probable. This could be the only breeding pair in the Muskoka region. I took this photo through a scope for confirmation.
---------------------------------

Red-Headed Woodpecker
Posted on October 9, 2004 at 02:20:17 PM by Janice House

We have an immature red-headed woodpecker on the clothesline pole in our back yard. Geoff managed to get 3 or 4 pictures.
------------------------------------

Red Headed Woodpecker
Posted on May 31, 2004 at 09:28:10 AM by Terry Whittam

A Red Headed Woodpecker was seen on May 19, 2004 at Clearwater Lake 10k east of Washago by Ruth Flood a permanent resident at the lake. The Red Headed stayed for about 3 hours leasurely eating at Ruth's feeders. The bird has not returned but Ruth assures me she will call if it returns.
-------------------------------------

Red-headed Woodpecker in Algonquin Park
Posted on May 26, 2004 at 07:26:18 PM by Rick Stronks

*This report originated on ONTBIRDS (May 26, 2004) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

A Red-headed Woodpecker was seen today at the Lake of Two Rivers Picnic
Ground in Algonquin Provincial Park. It was first discovered by Chris
Boettger and seen by many of the naturalist staff.

Algonquin Park is located east of Huntsville on Highway 60. The Lake of Two
Rivers Picnic Ground is located on Highway 60 at kilometer 33.8 (the West
Gate is kilometer 0 while the East Gate is kilometer 56).

Good birding,
Rick Stronks
Algonquin Provincial Park
----------------------------------------

(no subject)
Posted on May 22, 2004 at 08:00:28 PM by Sam Robinson

May 21 - 6-6:30 p.m.
red-headed woodpecker
rose breasted grosbeak
baltimore oriole
(all seen by 3 others)
all seen at Dill St., backing on Beaver Creek, Bracebridge
------------------------

Red-headed Woodpecker
Posted on May 20, 2004 at 08:53:08 PM by CAROL CASCANETTE

There was a Red-headed Woodpecker at a feeder on Loon Bay in Carling Twsp and it stayed for most of the day off and on. Video of it is very good.`
--------------------------

Red-headed Woodpecker near Huntsville
Posted on May 20, 2004 at 04:46:35 PM by Al Sinclair

Another Red-headed Woodpecker was reported May 19 from 5 to 6 pm in the yard of Chris MacCormack in the Deer Lake Trailor Park, Hutcheson Beach Rd, Huntsville (north side of Lake Vernon). It was not around next day.
---------------------------

Red-headed Woodpecker...same bird???
Posted on May 12, 2004 at 04:54:08 PM by Al Sinclair

A Red-headed Woodpecker was seen by Stewart Boyd yesterday afternoon at his feeders on McNabb St in Bracebridge. It was not there this morning but a Red-headed was seen this morning by Heather Harris at her suet feeder on Wapaska Cr. in Gravenhurst. Same bird as the one on Juddhaven Rd last week or 3 different birds??? If it's the same bird it is slowly heading back south where it should be.
---------------------------------

No Red-Headed Woodpecker
Posted on May 10, 2004 at 03:59:47 PM by Carolyn Moore

The red-headed woodpecker that was visiting the feeder in Minett has not been seen since Saturday. Hoping it will return.
---------------------------------------

Photo...Red-headed Woodpecker Juddhaven Rd May 3
Posted on May 5, 2004 at 10:21:55 PM by Al Sinclair

Carolyn Moore sent this photo of a Red-headed Woodpecker at her feeder on May 3(previously reported on the Bird Board). The bird was seen again on May 4, 2004. Juddhaven Rd is north of Minett on the west side of Lake Rosseau.
-------------------------------------------

nesting red headed woodpeckers
Posted on April 21, 2004 at 09:27:48 AM by Leslee Tassie

A woman I work with, Mary Jane Ewens and her husband live out in Port Carling, down Todholm road which is just off Foreman Road. She reported to me that they have had a pair of red headed woodpeckers nesting in their yard which have had two young. She confirmed the sighting with her birding guide, and is certain they are red headed woodpeckers.
-----------------------

Red-headed Woodpecker near Baysville May 23
Posted on May 31, 2003 at 10:31:56 AM by Al Sinclair

I recently received a report from Jim Derbyshire of a Red-headed Woodpecker that was eating sunflower seeds at his feeder most of the day on May 23. It has not returned since. I can't help thinking that it might be the same bird seen earlier this year near Bracebridge. Derbyshires live on South Portage Rd just off Brunel Rd. north of Baysville.
-------------------------------

Red-headed Woodpecker near Bracebridge
Posted on May 5, 2003 at 10:07:06 PM by Al Sinclair

Stew Boyd reports that at supper time today, May 5, they had a Red-headed Woodpecker in their yard in the McNabb subdivision north of Bracebridge. It stayed for about 5 minutes. He will report back if it returns.
-----------------------------------

Red-headed Woodpecker: Pecking Order
Posted on November 15, 2002 at 11:43:01 AM by Ron Stager

We have had an immature Red-headed Woodpecker around the feeder for most of the morning (East of Barkway in former Ryde Township now Gravenhurst). It got along well with the Blue Jays but the female Hairy Woodpecker was not impressed. The Hairy did much posturing, spreading of wings and pecked the Red-headed on the head a few times. The Red-headed was nonchalant about this.

Later the Hairy Woodpecker would leave the feeder when the Red-headed Woodpecker returned.
------------------------------

Red-headed Woodpecker
by Rick Snider 9:29 pm thursday july 18, 2002

At our recent McKechinie Lake cottagers meeting I found out that
a Red-headed Woodpecker was coming to a feeder on our lake for a
two week period around the end of May-beginning of June. Saw a
nice photo of it.
McKechnie Lake is a small lake east of highway 69 near the top
of Lake Joseph.
This is another of the several reports for this spring invasion
of Muskoka-Parry Sound.
--------------------------------

red-headed woodpecker
by Dave Hawke 9:40 pm tuesday june 18, 2002

A male red-headed woodpecker was seen at the new Taboo Golf
Course on June 11 (Muskoka Sands Resort, Gravenhurst). There are
reports from greens workers that they are regularily seen, but I
need to determine if those sightings are male yellow-bellied
sapsuckers.
------------------------

Red-headed Woodpecker
by Brian Pfrimmer 3:43 pm saturday june 8, 2002

A call from a neighbour last evening had me viewing a mature Red-
headed Woodpecker. The bird had been coming to his feeder all
day eating black sunflower seeds. The colors are quite sharp.
The bird was sited at the North East corner of Fox Lake , Con
11, in Stisted Twp. This is all private property and
unfortunately the owner does not want visitors.

Last Sept 22nd, 01, I had a juv. bird spend the day in my yard,
so perhaps they are breeding in the area.
Ravenscliffe Rd, west of Huntsville
---------------------

Red-headed Woodpecker in Parry Sound
by Stan. Fairchild 8:04 pm thursday may 30, 2002

I have had a Red-headed Woodpecker coming to my feeder at the
back of my house since May 25.I think there is only the one but
it is here most of the time .It even comes down to the lawn
sometimes . I recently saw them in Pelee but this is my first in
Parry Sound.
----------------------

Red-headed WP Gravenhurst..update
by Al Sinclair 8:14 pm thursday may 23, 2002

The Red-headed Woodpecker was still at the west end of Lorne
street in Gravenhurst yesterday May 22. Check along the new
street under construction through the Gateway Estates.
--------------------------

Red-headed Woodpecker Gravenhurst
by Al Sinclair 1:58 pm saturday may 18, 2002

Dan Burton just reported a Red-headed Woodpecker he found this
morning May 18 at the west end of Lorne Street at the lake. From
the north end of the main street in Gravenhurst go west on
Winewood to Austin, then right to Lorne, then left to the
Gateway Estates Park at the Lake.
---------------------------

Red-headed Woodpecker
by George Bryant 11:51 am thursday june 28, 2001

A calling Red-headed Woodpecker was observed June 23 at Snider's
Bay Swamp. As the location is not ideal for this species, it
was presumed to be an unmated adult. The swamp does provide a
nice diversity of breeding birds including Ravens feeding young
(this year and last year) and nesting Pileated Woodpeckers and
Hooded Mergansers (both last year).

The swamp can be accessed by taking Hwy. 169 out of Gravenhurst
toward Bala app. 4 kms. to Snider's Bay Road on the left
(south). Go app. 2 kms. to a major fork, take the right and the
road parallels the swamp for app. 1/3 km. allowing good views.
------------------------

Note: Bird Board reports earlier than October, 2000 were not saved.

 

 

Re(1): Red Headed Woodpecker
Posted on May 13, 2009 at 10:28:52 PM by MikeWeiss

Hello Im on Penetang Bay and seen my first red Headed Woodpecker 2 years ago,,,(I hope this year will be the third),,,,I have been up in the Penetang area for 36 years so my first sighting I was as excited as you are now... So I ask the Board,,, has anyone seen these Red Headed Woodpeckers prior to the spring of 2007.

 

 

Re(2): Still present
Posted on May 14, 2009 at 03:41:33 PM by Marilyn Kisser

I had a red-headed woodpecker at my feeder the first spring I moved here - so that goes back to 2002 .. I saw him for a couple of days and have never seen one since ... just outside Rosseau

 

 

Re(1): Still present
Posted on May 13, 2009 at 05:29:14 PM by Barbara Taylor

And thanks to Ted and David I saw the bird just after 5 p.m. on the peanut feeder...a life bird for me!

 

 

Still present
Posted on May 13, 2009 at 04:58:31 PM by Goodyear

Thanks for the posting, Ted. We zipped home from work tonight and were able to see the Red-headed Woodpecker on your peanut feeder - a new bird for our Muskoka list! Still present at 4:50 p.m.

 

 

Red Headed Woodpecker
Posted on May 13, 2009 at 12:27:46 PM by Ted Gardner

just a while ago i was watching the Rose Breasted Grosbeak
when a wood pecker landed on the peanut feeder on the other hook. It just happened to be a Red Headed Woodpecker a 1st for my yard!! got a picture after some scrambling around! not great but you can tell what it is! 120 Meadow Heights BB  photo

 

 

Bracebridge Ponds...Least Sandpipers
Posted on May 13, 2009 at 11:05:42 AM by Barbara Taylor

This morning we found eight Least Sandpipers along the shoreline at the north side of cell 3. They have started to drain cell 3 and cell 4, but unfortunately the draining must be stopped midnight on Thursday due to mandated environmental regulations. So we may not get large mudflats, but conditions for viewing the migrating shorebirds should be greatly improved. It appears that construction of the new plant will probably not start until after the end of the month...and hopefully we will still have access.

Other highlights of the morning included:
Rose-breasted Grosbeaks (near NW corner cell 4)
Green Heron (in dead tree W of cell 4)
Sora (W of cell 4 near south end)
Broad-winged Hawk (on hydro pole W of cell 3)
Least Flycatchers (W of cell 2)
Northern Waterthrush (W of cell 2)
Baltimore Orioles
Warbling Vireos
Yellow Warblers
Common Yellowthroats
Chestnut-sided Warblers
Black-throated Green Warblers

Bracebridge Ponds map (north approx. at top, west at left)

 

 

Re(2): Coyotes
Posted on May 14, 2009 at 11:50:51 AM by Ted Gardner

Coyotes also travel in family groups.

 

 

Re(1): Coyotes
Posted on May 13, 2009 at 10:22:24 PM by MikeWeiss

Hello I thought Coyotes were alone and Wolves were in packs...Anyone,,, is this correct or am I wrong...just my 2 cents....

 

 

Coyotes
Posted on May 13, 2009 at 00:20:53 AM by Ted Gardner

Just now in the back yard for a breath of fresh air i listened to a pack of coyotes yipping and calling in the distance north west of here. 1st i can say ive hear this close! 120 meadow heights BB.

 

 

White headed European Starling
Posted on May 12, 2009 at 08:36:30 PM by janice house

I was just watching the starlings feeding in our front yard, one bird has lots of white on his head and the back of neck. Several weeks ago in Bent River Dad and I saw a raven that was heavily splotched with white. My first thought was an immature bald eagle. I know we have reports of grackles and blue jays with lots of white, any ideas what is causing this in our birds?

 

 

Re(2): female hummer...
Posted on May 16, 2009 at 09:29:05 AM by Barbara Taylor

The adult male Ruby-throated Hummingbird has the red throat and your "white throated" hummer would be the female at this time of year. Later in the summer when you start seeing some of the young birds, they will all resemble the female even if they are male.

Here are two online field guides which you might find helpful in identifying bird species:
http://sibley.enature.com
http://www.whatbird.com/

 

 

Re(1): female hummer...
Posted on May 15, 2009 at 11:24:36 PM by MikeWeiss

Hello, not sure how to tell the male or female hummers,,,however I have seen a ruby throated hummer amd a white throated hummer this year at the feeder....im on penetang bay

 

 

female hummer...
Posted on May 12, 2009 at 11:24:02 AM by Barbara Taylor

A female Ruby-throated Hummingbird is a new arrival in our yard today. She was perched on the usual hanger for the nectar feeder trying to give me a not so subtle hint it was time to put out the feeder. This is the first hummingbird we've seen this year. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Eastern Kingbirds
Posted on May 14, 2009 at 09:11:51 AM by Wayne Bridge

We have 2 eastern kingbirds in Kearney near the boardwalk beside Sucker Creek/Perry Lake.

 

 

Re(1): Eastern Kingbirds
Posted on May 12, 2009 at 11:14:35 AM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there was a pair of Eastern Kingbirds just past the snowmobile bridge across Beaver Creek along the trail behind the Sleep Inn in Bracebridge. Many White-throated Sparrows, Chestnut-sided Warblers, and Nashville Warblers were in full song, and we heard our first Gray Catbird of the year. A Red-tailed Hawk was hunting over the field past the bridge, spooking a Wild Turkey which ran towards the woods for cover.

 

 

Eastern Kingbirds
Posted on May 11, 2009 at 08:44:11 PM by Bob Burt

This evening there were two Eastern Kingbirds next to the dumping ponds east of cell 4 at the Bracebridge Ponds. Several Tree, Barn, and Bank Swallows were in the same area.

 

 

Least Flycatcher, Bobolinks, Yellowlegs - Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on May 11, 2009 at 12:55:00 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning at the Bracebridge Ponds there was a Least Flycatcher calling from west of cell 2. A few Bobolinks were in the grass along the east side of cell 1 and two Lesser Yellowlegs were in the SE corner of cell 1. Don Bailey reports there was a Green Heron at the little pond at Kerr Park.

 

 

Re(1): Nectar Mixes
Posted on May 11, 2009 at 05:09:09 PM by Barbara Taylor

I'm sure the orioles won't mind if you use the same mix as for hummers at 1 part sugar and 4 parts water. Here's an interesting article about nectar concentration: http://www.hummingbirds.net/hainsworth.html

excerpt from article:
"A hummingbird Is more likely to stay at a feeder when it first arrives if the feeder contains a relatively rich sugar solution...Once hummingbirds have been attracted with a rich sugar solution for two or three weeks, a lower concentration will increase their feeding activity and still provide sufficient energy. To promote high rates of feeding activity, mix one part sugar with four parts water (1:4 ratio). This 10-calorie solution is similar to lower sugar concentrations in nectar produced by some plants...It will seem like there are many more hummingbirds visiting your feeders because each bird will feed 10 to 12 times an hour in comparison to two or three times an hour with richer food."

 

 

Nectar Mixes
Posted on May 11, 2009 at 10:38:30 AM by MikeWeiss

Hello All,,I enjoy this board very much,,,When I was at my local bird products store,,, they informed me that the nectar for orioles should be 1 part sugar to 6 parts water,, and for hummers its 1 part sugar to 4 parts water,,..hope this is useful for all you birders,, if incorrect please post a reply,, thank you...(Im on Penetang Bay),, I have a hummer or 2, still havent seen an oriole or a red headed woodpecker yet.

 

 

Rose Breasted Grosbeak
Posted on May 10, 2009 at 09:14:57 PM by Ted Gardner

For the 5th year now a pair of Rose Breasted Grosbeaks are at our feeders,usually spring only. 120 Meadow Heights BB

 

 

Bobolink
Posted on May 10, 2009 at 07:14:35 PM by J. Gardner

The first bobolink of the season was warbling here this afternoon. (Hurdville)

 

 

This weekend
Posted on May 10, 2009 at 05:58:28 PM by CatMacLean

This weekend was spent at the cottage near the NW corner of Algonquin Park.
This morning I spent an hour in the woods and heard the yellow-rumped, black-throated green and blue,Black and White, Nashville, a purple finch, Evening Grosbeaks, Blue headed vireo, Robins and Jays.
But the best sighting was yesterday, a Red-Necked Grebe off the end of our dock. Heard a strange call and there he was! Also our loons are back but not sitting on the nest yet.

 

 

Magnolia Warbler - Henry Marsh
Posted on May 10, 2009 at 11:21:15 AM by Barbara Taylor

A colourful selection of birds at Henry Marsh this morning:
Magnolia Warbler
Golden-winged Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Nashville Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Black-and-white Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Ovenbird
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Baltimore Oriole
American Goldfinch
Ruby-crowned Kinglet


directions to Henry Marsh:
From traffic lights at Eccelstone Dr./Wellington St. in Bracebridge, take Beaumont Dr. along the Muskoka River to Henry Rd.  There is a parking area at the end of Henry Rd. by the trailhead. The Golden-winged Warbler was just east (left) of the "T" in the trail, while the Magnolia Warbler was to the west (right) where the trail leaves the marsh.

 

 

American Bittern et al. in Arrowhead
Posted on May 9, 2009 at 10:27:02 PM by Burke Korol

I too squeezed in a bit of early morning birding before today's (9 May) rain. Lots of interesting birds and new arrivals in Arrowhead including an AMERICAN BITTERN calling from the north end of Arrowhead Lake.

I found spring arrivals like CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER, BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK, SCARLET TANAGER, BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER, MAGNOLIA WARBLER, EASTERN KINGBIRD and SOLITARY SANDPIPER (rare in the park).

Had a NORTHERN GOSHAWK fly over and flushed a WILSON'S SNIPE from suitable breeding habitat.

Yesterday the first well-documented SAVANNAH SPARROW was found in Arrowhead.

 

 

Golden-winged Warblers
Posted on May 9, 2009 at 06:43:15 PM by Goodyear

Early this morning 6:30 - 8:30 before the heavy rain came I made a visit to Henry Marsh and the Bracebridge Lagoons. 3 Golden-winged Warblers could be heard singing (saw 2 of them) in the area of the "T" junction. Several Ovenbirds, Common Yellowthroats, Nashville, Chestnut-sided, Black and White, and Yellow Warblers were also seen/heard. 5 Bobolinks were in the trees next to the bird blind at Kerr Park. Despite the fine drizzle/mist there was lots of activity and I tallied 58 species.

 

 

Shorebirds - Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on May 9, 2009 at 10:40:11 AM by Barbara Taylor

The Ponds have not been drained so no mudflats for the migrating shorebirds, but some are moving through now. Last night a Greater Yellowlegs was calling as it came in and briefly touched down in cell 3. Six Lesser Yellowlegs were flushed by a Merlin flying low over cell 2, and eventually flew northward. A Solitary Sandpiper was in the flooded area by the pipeline/snowmobile trail near the SW corner of cell 4. Baltimore Orioles and a Warbling Vireo are the latest new arrivals.  Bracebridge Ponds Map (north approx. at top of map, west approx. at left)

 

 

Re(2): Ebony Boghaunter
Posted on May 9, 2009 at 06:04:23 PM by Ron Stager

It was in the middle of road (Lewisham) near wet mixed forest.
Saw it fly but it seemed less erratic in flight and very calm on the ground compared to other dragonflies. A "relaxed" dragonfly.

 

 

Re(1): Ebony Boghaunter
Posted on May 9, 2009 at 10:21:34 AM by Al Sinclair

Ebony Boghaunter is a good find. Could be the first record for Muskoka, not listed for our area in Catling and Brownell, "Damselflies and Dragonflies of Ontario". Can you tell us what type of habitat it was in and what it was doing (behavior). They are described as secretive, no doubt there are populations in Muskoka that have not been found yet.

 

 

Ebony Boghaunter
Posted on May 8, 2009 at 05:42:29 PM by Ron Stager

Lots of dragonflies out at noon today (Merkley Rd. east of Barkway). Ebony Boghaunter is a very small and dark dragonfly. Also saw American Emeralds, Hudsonian Whitefaces, a damselfly species and two other types of dragonflies. I am enjoying Colin Jones' guidebook for dragonflies (Friends of Algonquin will mail it out).  Lots of Spring Azure butterflies out.

 

 

More warblers
Posted on May 8, 2009 at 12:32:38 PM by CatMacLean

This morning in Huntsville I heard the Black-Throated Blue, the Chestnut Sided and had a good look at the Nashville warbler. The winter wrens were in fine form and a Rose Breasted grosbeak was singing.
A pair of mallards were on the pond and a couple of deer were eyeing up my hostas. At the feeder we had a pair of Evening grosbeaks, the usual siskins and grackles.

 

 

Loon Nest Cam, Minnesota
Posted on May 8, 2009 at 09:08:40 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

I was sent a link to a Loon Nest Cam on a lake in Minnesota. After some problems this morning there is now lovely live video of a loon on the nest. For the most part it will be like watching grass grow with short, fast bits of action. http://www.mnbound.com/live-loon-cam/

The eggs were laid April 30 so the chicks should hatch around the 26-29 of May. They only stay on the nest for about 24 hours so not much time to watch the chicks but fun! If you hunt around on the sight, mostly hunting and fishing, you will find a video of the eggs being laid!

 

 

Least Sandpiper
Posted on May 8, 2009 at 08:52:00 AM by Goodyear

Last night we saw a single Least Sandpiper on the east side of Cell 1 at the Bracebridge Lagoons.

 

 

Re(3): Hummers???
Posted on May 8, 2009 at 10:48:26 PM by Ted Gardner

Male Hummer showed this morning!
(Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(2): Hummers???
Posted on May 8, 2009 at 09:08:15 PM by Marilyn Kisser

I'll trade you one male hummer for that beauty:-)

 

 

Re(1): Hummers???
Posted on May 8, 2009 at 07:18:34 AM by Al Sinclair

Very nice photo. Looks like he pulled off the bee guard to get access to the sugar water, probably learned how to do that down south.

 

 

Hummers???
Posted on May 7, 2009 at 10:56:48 PM by Ted Gardner

With all the talk of Hummers i quickley cleaned and filled our feeder..then waited and looked for any movement close to the feeder!!! After 3 days i got bored...then this morning just before departing for work i got a flash of colour!!...but it was orange?, well as the pic will show it was a Northern or Baltimore Oriole ( The latter is also a really bad baseball team).This bird waited while i changed lenses on my camera and then gave me a nice profile! So the end to the story is that i was all excited to show my wife the picture when I was home!...when she saw me appraoch with my camera she asked " Did you get pics of the Oriole?"...Aah poo! was my comment!...anyway he has been in 4 times today and he likes his picture taken! 120 Meadow Heights B.B  photo

 

 

Blackfly Prey? Photo
Posted on May 7, 2009 at 01:17:29 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

I know that loons have a blackfly species that preys only on them. Does anyone know if Canada Geese have one too? Yesterday I was out in a blind watching a goose on her nest and it was surrounded by blackflies. The bird constantly snapped at the flies and swallowed them. The blackflies were not biting me and, normally, I am plagued.  photo (Those spots are not dirt!)

 

 

Re(1): Bird Query
Posted on May 9, 2009 at 10:30:36 AM by Al Sinclair

Hooded Warbler would be a new species for the Muskoka list (if confirmed), a more southern species that has not reached Muskoka yet, but due to climate change it may soon. I believe there has been a few records from Simcoe County. If you see this bird again let us know.

 

 

Bird Query
Posted on May 7, 2009 at 10:39:17 AM by CatMacLean

Busy couple of days with the birds. Hummers were back in Huntsville yesterday. Today I heard the winter wren, a thrush, ovenbird, black and white warbler, black-throated green, white-crowned sparrow, great crested flycatcher, Nashville warbler and blue-headed vireo.
Yesterday while in the woods near Dwight I saw a small warbler that had a black bib and head and yellow under belly and back. I was thinking Black-throated green to begin with but the song was wrong. Could it possibly be a Hooded warbler? I don't know if they have been seen in the area before.

 

 

Redhead at Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on May 6, 2009 at 07:58:02 PM by Bob Burt

This evening at 7 p.m. there was a male Redhead in cell 4. The Ruddy Duck was not seen.

 

 

Hudsonian Whiteface
Posted on May 6, 2009 at 04:53:25 PM by Ron Stager

Bugs are back and many newly emerged dragonflies out today at Hopkins Road (off Merkley Road east of Barkway).

 

 

Re(1): Hummer
Posted on May 6, 2009 at 10:27:09 PM by Marilyn Kisser

had the first male arrive at the feeder at approximately 1800 this evening ... yahooo! just outside of Rosseau!

 

 

Hummer
Posted on May 6, 2009 at 03:09:43 PM by Wilf Yusek

Had my FOS male Ruby-throated Hummingbird today here at Prospect Lake.

 

 

Blackburnian Warbler
Posted on May 6, 2009 at 09:38:00 AM by Barbara Taylor

One of my favourite warblers, a Blackburnian, was singing at the foot of our driveway this morning. First one this spring for me. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Muskoka Field Naturalists - next meeting May 7
Posted on May 5, 2009 at 10:08:50 PM by Barbara Taylor

MFN meeting Thursday, May 7 at 7:30 p.m., Gravenhurst
From the Wakerobin, newsletter of the Muskoka Field Naturalists:

ALGONQUIN PARK ROAD ECOLOGY
Brad Steinberg, a Management Biologist for Algonquin Park, will be the presenter.
He will be discussing the complexities of planning a park layout including consideration of the impact of roads and infrastructure on the natural environment and the species in the park.

February through June meetings will be held at the Calvary Baptish Church located at the corner of First and Brock Streets in Gravenhurst across from the Giant Tiger store. Visitors welcome to attend.
Muskoka Field Naturalists website: http://www.muskokafieldnaturalists.com

 

 

Bracebridge Ponds this morning
Posted on May 5, 2009 at 09:27:32 PM by Al Sinclair

Quiet day, 36 species, nothing new.
Had a good look at a river otter swimming in cell 4. Swam along the south side, saw me and went farther out and disappeared, maybe hiding in the old cattails on the west side. I saw a family of 3 there 3 or 4 years ago, hunting frogs?

 

 

Bracebridge Ponds Trumpeter Swans...background info
Posted on May 5, 2009 at 01:53:03 PM by Barbara Taylor

I have just received the following background information from Harry Lumsden about the two tagged Trumpeters seen April 28 at the Bracebridge Ponds. (see Bob Healey's photos)

E49 is a male, hatched in 2008 in the Gloucester Pool by 100 and 888. He was banded in Dec 2008 at LaSalle Park Burlington.

H18 is a male, hatched in 2008. He was banded at LaSalle Park in Apr 2009. He was last seen at Lambs Bay on the Severn River on 23 Apr 2009.

 

 

Whip-poor-will
Posted on May 5, 2009 at 09:52:31 AM by Ron Stager

Bugs are out and a Whip-poor-will was calling last night (May 4) at our house (East of Barkway on Merkley Road). Lots of Brown Thrashers along the road.

 

 

Indigo Bunting at our feeder
Posted on May 4, 2009 at 09:45:01 PM by Al Sinclair

Indigo Bunting at our feeder tonight. Grabbed a quick shot, not that great, low light through a window with a 60mm macro lens at asa 1600. May 4, 2009, 6:28 pm 8km east of Bracebridge.  photo

 

 

Snapping Turtle
Posted on May 4, 2009 at 07:52:36 PM by terry & marion whittam

We had to steer around this big lady who was crossing our driveway recently! Did not mind having its photo taken! Nice to see them this big!  photo

 

 

Greater Yellowlegs
Posted on May 4, 2009 at 03:46:19 PM by Barbara Taylor

Three Greater Yellowlegs were at Henry Marsh this afternoon. No ducks though. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Great-crested flycatcher, ovenbird, hawks
Posted on May 4, 2009 at 07:18:25 PM by CatMacLean

I have also heard the Great-Crested Flycatcher today in Huntsville. Hummingbird feeders are up but no sign of them yet. Tent caterpillars are building their tents.

 

 

Great-crested flycatcher, ovenbird, hawks
Posted on May 4, 2009 at 10:20:11 AM by GayleCarlyle

Green River drive, Washago.
May is here and so are the birds.
Our first hummingbird on May 3 (3 days early), and a great-crested flycatcher, and a pair of broad-winged hawks.
Sharp-shinned hawks too.

 

 

Falkenburg/Beatrice Townline/Windermere
Posted on May 3, 2009 at 07:39:07 PM by janice house

Moira and I headed to Windermere Garden Ctr today via the scenic route. We stopped at the bend where Falkenburg and Beatrice townline meet. Near 1710 Falconburg Rd we saw a bluebird pair, a redtailed hawk, barn swallows, a juvenile tree swallow that was being harassed by adults as he tried to claim a nesting box, a male northern harrier cruising the low spot that floods, a killdeer running the road and an eastern kingbird close to Beatrice townline and Raymond road. Moira spotted a three toed woodpecker on a tree near the Windermere fire station. On the North Shore road near the garden centre we spotted a black and white warbler.

 

 

Hummertime
Posted on May 3, 2009 at 05:01:46 PM by J. Gardner

Saw on the Board that Janice in Gravenhurst had a hummer on April 29, so I got the feeder ready. Sure enough, a lovely male turned up at the feeder today, breaking the record of May 5. Now, I will keep my eyes peeled for orioles as Janice has hers. Hurdville, near Lake Manitouwabing.

 

 

Re(1): Bracebridge Lagoons and Henry Marsh
Posted on May 3, 2009 at 12:35:25 PM by Barbara Taylor

Don and Bev Bailey report hearing a Sora and a Virginia Rail calling this morning from well back to the west of cell 4 - the beavers may have caused the water level to rise too high for the birds at their usual spot near the roadway. A Yellow Warbler was singing near the Lagoon Lane gate.

I took a quick check of Henry Marsh this morning...water level is quite high...no ducks or herons, and just one Belted Kingfisher. Perhaps most of the normally abundant food died off when the marsh was drained last year. A Cooper's Hawk flew out of the woods, circled high in a thermal, and then disappeared to the north. A Nashville Warbler, a Black-and-white Warbler, and a Blue-headed Vireo were singing along the Henry Trail. Blackflies were already out at the marsh.  Saw my first of the year Spring Azure butterfly and also a Mourning Cloak near the "T" in the trail.

 

 

Bracebridge Lagoons
Posted on May 3, 2009 at 10:54:34 AM by Goodyear

The Ruddy Duck was still present in Cell 1 this morning. There were 3 American Pipits and a single Horned Lark on the dirt mound on the north side of Cell 3. A House Wren was exploring one of the nest boxes on the west side of Kerr Park and an Osprey flew high over Cell 4.

 

 

Baltimore Orioles
Posted on May 3, 2009 at 08:57:55 AM by janice house

Two males were in my neighbours yard just now (Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst)

 

 

White Crowned Sparrow
Posted on May 3, 2009 at 06:48:11 AM by janice house

A white crowned sparrow popped out of our cedar hedge last night, every time he got close to the seed the white throated sparrow charged and sent him packing.  (Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst)

 

 

Hummingbird progress
Posted on May 2, 2009 at 07:50:31 PM by Jim Griffin

My first siting like others has usually been May 6, but this year it is May 2 in Port Sydney: had a male ruby throat at my feeder at 7:00 pm today. Just for interest this is also the earliest I have had my feeder up. (take it in at night to avoid tempting the the bruins)

 

 

Ragged Rapids, Bala
Posted on May 2, 2009 at 02:09:32 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

This morning I headed to Ragged Rapids Rd for my first real spring bird outing.

Two Broad-winged Hawks
1 Hermit Thrush
Robins
Blue Jays
chickadees
Mallards
Eastern Phoebe
Black-throated Green Warblers
Yellow-rumped Warblers
Nashville Warblers
Pine, Black & White, Ovenbird, White-throated Sparrow.

Not many species but nice to be out. Some Trailing Arbutus is in bloom along with a few Wake Robins.

 

 

Hummingbird
Posted on May 2, 2009 at 09:36:54 AM by marywillmott

First Ruby Throated Hummingbird of the season this AM at the sugar feeder.  (Beaumaris)

 

 

Re(1): Trumpeter Swans - photo
Posted on May 1, 2009 at 07:06:04 PM by Barbara Taylor

I sent those tag numbers to Harry Lumsden and the Wye Marsh, so hopefully we will get some background information about the swans.

 

 

Trumpeter Swans - photo
Posted on May 1, 2009 at 07:01:24 PM by Bob Healey

Trumpeter Swans at the Bracebridge Sewage Lagoons April 28, 2009. Tags - H18 & E49.  photo1  photo2

 

 

Re(1): Ruddy Duck still there...
Posted on May 2, 2009 at 11:54:21 AM by Barbara Taylor

The Ruddy Duck was still in cell 1 this morning...nice of him to stick around for the MFN hike around the lagoons. Other highlights were a Merlin flying low over cell 1 and a male Yellow Warbler in the shrubbery west of cell 4. A Nashville Warbler was singing near the SW corner of cell 4 and Brown Thrashers were singing by the Kerr Park parking lot.  Same “regular” ducks as yesterday plus a few Ring-necked Ducks in cell 4.

 

 

Ruddy Duck - Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on May 1, 2009 at 04:10:08 PM by Barbara Taylor

At 3:30 p.m. today there was a male Ruddy Duck in cell 1 along with a few Scaup, Bufflehead, Mallards, a pair of Blue-winged Teal, a male Green-winged Teal, Wood Ducks, and two Spotted Sandpipers. The Ruddy Duck appeared to be still mostly in non-breeding plumage. The Sora called again west of cell 4, and a few Rusty Blackbirds were also in the vicinity. A pair of Killdeer were on the roadway by the north-east corner of cell 3.
Bracebridge Ponds Map (north approx. at top of map, west approx. at left)

 

 

Morning walk
Posted on May 1, 2009 at 03:22:27 PM by CatMacLean

The morning walk in Huntsville include two new birds today. An ovenbird and a Black-Throated Green warbler. Also a partridge and some Myrtle warblers.

 

 

Re(1): Rose Breasted Grosbeak?
Posted on May 1, 2009 at 03:20:14 PM by CatMacLean

Yes a Rose breasted. I find them spectacular and I love the song. We have had one around for two days now.

 

 

Rose Breasted Grosbeak?
Posted on May 1, 2009 at 01:22:08 PM by Robert MacEwan

Kilworthy - I think this is a Rose Breasted Grosbeak, has been in and out of my feeder (niger seed) for the last few hours, nice looking bird !  photo

 

 

Sora - Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on April 30, 2009 at 01:02:51 PM by Barbara Taylor

There was a Sora calling west of cell 4 around noon today. Only a few ducks...nothing notable. A Black-and-white Warbler was south of cell 4, and a Yellow Warbler was singing near the Lagoon Lane gate.

 

 

Grosbeak
Posted on April 30, 2009 at 09:26:09 AM by CatMacLean

Saw a Rose Breasted at the feeder this morning in Huntsville and heard Evening Grosbeaks flying over head. Saw a blue-headed (Solitary) vireo, Myrtle warbler and a Hermit thrush on our morning walk. Still lots of Pine Siskens at the feeder with Goldfinches.

 

 

Swallows/Brown headed Cowbirds
Posted on April 30, 2009 at 08:11:12 AM by janice house

A pair of northern rough winged swallows joined the tree swallows this morning. (Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst) The cowbirds have been busy displaying and chasing the females around our yard.

 

 

Re(1): First Hummingbird
Posted on April 30, 2009 at 09:46:51 AM by GayleCarlyle

Wow, that is early for a hummingbird. The earliest we have one recorded is May 6th.
Best get my feeder up tonight!

 

 

First Hummingbird
Posted on April 29, 2009 at 07:59:07 PM by janice house

Geoff saw a male ruby throat dash out of our cedar hedge after work tonight. Good thing I bought a new feeder this winter. (Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst)

 

 

First Dragonfly
Posted on April 29, 2009 at 04:10:42 PM by Dinny and Neil Nimmo

We were happy to see our first Common Green Darners (2) working back and forth on our septic bed today....Moon River Bala. We even saw one grab a fly out of mid-air! Glad they are hear before bug season.

 

 

Sparrow
Posted on April 29, 2009 at 03:46:47 PM by CatMacLean

Saw my first white-throated sparrow this morning and my husband saw a white crowned. Also my bloodroot is in full bloom. (Huntsville)

 

 

Re(1): Red Squirrel, Bala
Posted on April 30, 2009 at 07:30:37 PM by Barbara Taylor

I've seen them do that in our yard too, but they haven't seemed to do much damage, at least not compared to the deer herd that has overwintered in our neighbourhood the past two winters. Funny how the deer started to spend the winters here only after the Mattamy subdivision clearcuts. Oh well, it's great for the landscaping businesses...every spring lots of new cedar trees are bought to replace those overbrowsed "brown sticks with green tops".

Here's a good article on Red Squirrels including food habits:
http://www.ofnc.ca/fletcher/our_animals/squirrels/red-squirrels_e.php

 

 

Re(2): Red Squirrel, Bala
Posted on April 30, 2009 at 04:46:03 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Hi John,
Sounds like you need a relocation service!
I realize you're not supposed to move them but sometimes, I think, it is a matter of human survival!

 

 

Re(1): Red Squirrel, Bala
Posted on April 29, 2009 at 01:25:16 PM by John Challis

If it's a red oak, maybe he's colouring his fur...
In truth, I have a suspicion that anything a red squirrel does has as a secondary objective the annoyance of humans. They have stripped the bark from around the holes a sapsucker has drilled in a maple and have been lapping at the sap -- but only on the tree in front of our picture window. They have eaten all the buds off our two rhododendrons, two springs in a row. They have chewed a five-inch wide entrance hole in a bird box that was a gift from a good friend. Through the winter they shredded the burlap wind guard I'd created for the rhodo -- presumably to use for nesting material but maybe just to destroy it. Grey squirrels have gnawed through the metal base on our squirrel-proof feeder, allowing the seeds to drop through.
I could go on but my blood pressure is rising, which is just what the damn things want.

 

 

Red Squirrel, Bala
Posted on April 29, 2009 at 12:36:47 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

I am watching a bratty red squirrel biting off oak twigs, chewing off the bark and eating the buds. I don't every remember seeing this before. Do they always do this and I've just missed seeing it before?

 

 

Re(1): All gone...
Posted on April 29, 2009 at 12:41:38 PM by Barbara Taylor

Don Bailey was over at the Ponds this morning and reports that all the "good birds" are gone. Only a few of the regulars still there...Ring-necked Ducks, Lesser Scaup, Buffleheads, Wood Ducks, Mallards. Also still a Spotted Sandpiper in cell 1.

 

 

Horned Grebes, Gadwalls and more - Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on April 28, 2009 at 08:48:35 PM by Barbara Taylor

A lot of new birds at the Ponds tonight. A pair of Gadwall, a Horned Grebe, and a pair of American Wigeon in cell 2. Another Horned Grebe in cell 1 along with seven Northern Shovelers (3M,4F) and a Spotted Sandpiper. Two Trumpeter Swans that still had some juvenile plumage were in cell 3, and thanks to Bob Healey's scope we were able to read the yellow wing tags E49 and H18. Just as the sun was setting the swans flew up, circled around and headed towards the north-west. In cell 4 there was another pair of American Wigeon, and a few Common Goldeneyes (one adult male and six apparent "inbetween plumage"). Cell 4 also had all the regulars...Ring-necked Duck, Mallard, Lesser Scaup, Blue-winged Teal, Green-winged Teal, Wood Duck, Bufflehead. A small flock of Rusty Blackbirds were in the shrubbery west of cell 4.

 

Re(2): Rose-breasted grosbeak
Posted on April 29, 2009 at 06:46:55 PM by janice house

We had a male at our feeders at lunch time today, beautiful. (Doe Lake Rd. Gravenhurst)

 

 

Re(1): Rose-breasted grosbeak
Posted on April 29, 2009 at 08:46:51 AM by GayleCarlyle

What a coincidence! We had a gorgeous male rose-breasted grosbeak at our feeder last evening.
We also have sapsuckers busy making noise up and down our road. One loves our metal civic address sign and doesn't seem to mind us standing close to watch.
We live on Green River Drive in Washago

 

 

Rose-breasted grosbeak
Posted on April 28, 2009 at 01:13:56 PM by Marilyn Kisser

what a nice surprise to see a male rose breasted grosbeak at the feeder this morning ... also a yellow bellied sapsucker woke me up nice and early with his tapping on the shed's steel roof! just outside of Rosseau

 

 

Re(1): Spotted Sandpiper - Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on April 28, 2009 at 09:30:20 AM by janice house

A pair of spotted sandpipers flew over us this morning on our dog walk. My brother had unidentified sandpipers in his garden in Stouffville this morning.

 

 

Spotted Sandpiper - Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on April 27, 2009 at 09:38:21 PM by Barbara Taylor

Early this evening there was a Spotted Sandpiper at the west side of cell 4. A few Tree Swallows were joined by two Barn Swallows swooping low over cell 4. A beaver startled a Green Heron in the flooded area west of cell 4 and it gave several loud squawks. A Broad-winged Hawk circled overhead and then flew down into the woods south of cell 3. A few Common Green Darner dragonflies were flying low along the sheltered west edge of cell 3 and cell 4...a very warm but windy evening. No new ducks - a few Blue-winged Teal, Green-winged Teal, Wood Ducks, Mallards, Bufflehead, Ring-necked Ducks, and Lesser Scaup mostly in cell 4. The Spring Peepers were almost deafening tonight!

 

 

Re(4): Pine Siskins, Bala
Posted on May 1, 2009 at 06:46:33 PM by Marilyn Kisser

I've never seen anything like it! I'd say up to 75 siskins .. mixed in with goldfinches and purple finches! filling the feeders 2-3 times a day! and noisy! just outside of Rosseau..

 

 

Re(3): Pine Siskins, Bala
Posted on May 1, 2009 at 08:06:48 AM by janice house

I have at least 50 that roam around the neighbourhood, Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst.

 

 

Re(1): Pine Siskins, Bala
Posted on April 28, 2009 at 04:13:23 PM by DiannaWolfe

We have 10-15 siskins frequenting our feeder just west of Gravenhurst.

 

 

Re(1): Pine Siskins, Bala
Posted on April 28, 2009 at 12:17:32 PM by GayleCarlyle

We still have about 3 or four siskins around the niger feeder and sunflower feeder.
Also about 8 goldfinches and 6 purple finches.
We have had to take the niger feeder down and bring it in the house this week because some scrounger (raccoon we suspect) has twice pulled it off the tree limb and emptied it over night.
Niger seed way too expensive for that nonsense.
(Green River Drive in Washago)

 

 

Re(2): Pine Siskins, Bala
Posted on April 28, 2009 at 00:50:34 AM by Marilyn Kisser

all my nyger feeders are full of siskins .. along with a few goldfinch and purple finch mixed in ...my yard is definately in song! (just outside of Rosseau)

 

 

Re(1): Pine Siskins, Bala
Posted on April 27, 2009 at 09:59:30 PM by Barbara Taylor

We were down to just four Pine Siskins yesterday, but today suddenly a crowd of 30 appeared and I had to refill the feeder. A lot more American Goldfinches showed up today too for some reason - maybe the neighbours have shut down their feeding stations for the season and the birds just happened upon our yard of plenty. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Pine Siskins, Bala
Posted on April 27, 2009 at 06:38:20 PM by CatMacLean

I have four or five still.  (Huntsville)

 

 

Re(1): Pine Siskins, Bala
Posted on April 27, 2009 at 07:04:02 PM by J. Gardner

Still a mob of siskins here near Manitouwabing Lake. Running out of Nyjer rapidly.

 

 

Re(1): Pine Siskins, Bala
Posted on April 27, 2009 at 08:16:24 PM by Al Sinclair

Still have close to 100 here east of Bracebridge.

 

 

Pine Siskins, Bala
Posted on April 27, 2009 at 04:59:55 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

I still have lots of Pine Siskins around. There were up to 50 yesterday. Do others still have them at their feeders?

 

 

Pine Warbler in Bala
Posted on April 27, 2009 at 02:03:51 PM by Dinny and Neil Nimmo

Our first warbler of the season ...a pine warbler was seen on Hurlings Point in Bala.

 

 

Re(2): Warblers and vireos
Posted on April 29, 2009 at 08:08:14 AM by janice house

I heard my first blue-headed vireo this morning.

 

 

Re(1): Warblers and vireos
Posted on April 27, 2009 at 09:51:47 PM by Barbara Taylor

Your Blue-headed Vireo (name was changed from Solitary Vireo) is right on time. They are usually the first Vireo to show up, quite often in the last week of April in the Muskoka area.

 

 

Warblers and vireos
Posted on April 27, 2009 at 08:35:52 AM by CatMacLean

The early morning walk was very musical, wood thrush, phoebe, kinglets, chipping sparrow,a Myrtle warbler, and I heard a Solitary Vireo. Is this early for a vireo? (Huntsville)

 

 

Cranes et al. in Arrowhead
Posted on April 25, 2009 at 07:03:25 PM by Burke Korol

Had a pleasant day of birding in Arrowhead Provincial Park today, between the rain showers.
Highlights were an OSPREY fishing and a pair of SANDHILL CRANES circling over the Beaver Pond.
Lots of WOOD DUX and BUFFLEHEADS too.
Beating my previous early date by 5 days was a singing BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLER along with many YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS.
A DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT was an odd sight circling high overhead with the thermals and moving northward.

 

 

Re(2): Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst
Posted on April 26, 2009 at 06:57:30 AM by Rae

What an outing, Janice!

 

 

Re(1): Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst
Posted on April 25, 2009 at 07:51:55 PM by janice house

Snuck out without the dog tonight, saw the male kingfisher presenting his sweetie with a small minnow which she held on to for the longest time, the brown creeper was singing and the beaver came over to check me out, the muskrat was puddling about, the yellow rump warblers were calling, the peepers finally got so loud I came home.

 

 

Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst
Posted on April 25, 2009 at 08:26:14 AM by janice house

On my dog walk at 6:30 this morning I heard my first hermit thrush, brown thrasher and I believe a nashville warbler. The bittern was calling and sitting 20 feet from the side of the road in full view.

 

 

Re(2): Algonquin Park: Sandhill Crane
Posted on April 26, 2009 at 07:05:24 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Bruce Di Labio on ONTBIRDS (April 26, 2009) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Hi Ontbirds
Today, April 26th, spent the day birding various sites along Hwy. 60 in Algonquin Park. The weather conditions changed considerably from yesterday with a cool low of 2c and occasional rain today. We managed to locate a male Spruce Grouse along Spruce Bog, 1 Boreal Chickadee at Tea Lake Dam and 1 Black-backed Woodpecker near Km 8. The highlight was a Sandhill Crane flying over Hwy.60 calling and then landed in a marsh along the highway between Km.23 and Km.24. Other birds of note included 1 Savannah Sparrow at the Old Airfield and 1 Blue-headed Vireo at Tea Lake Dam.

good birding, Bruce
Di Labio Birding Website
Courses and Field Trips
http://www.dilabiobirding.ca

 

 

Re(1): OFO Algonquin Park Trip
Posted on April 25, 2009 at 09:51:23 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (April 25, 2009) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

About 75 people in 31 cars participated in a successful Algonquin Park birding trip today, the 20th year for this OFO outing. Occasional rain did not significantly hinder our efforts. The combined observer list totaled 67 species.

Highlights for many were the male and female Spruce Grouse north of the register box on Spruce Bog Boardwalk, the two Boreal Chickadees that Maris Apse spotted for us at Spruce Bog Boardwalk parking lot and which provided excellent views, and the male Black-backed Woodpecker excavating a nest cavity in the second utility pole west of Leaf Lake Ski Trail (km 53.8). A record was set when Gray Jay was not seen all day, for the first time in the 20 years of these outings. Unfortunately, the decline of the Gray Jay in Algonquin Park due to climate warming has now reached the point where it is quite easy to miss this species in late April, when the birds are focused on feeding young in the nest.

Other noteworthy sightings included:
American Wigeon: pair on Lake of Two Rivers after heavy rain
Blue-winged Teal: pair on Costello Creek
Green-winged Teal: pair on Sunday Creek at Spruce Bog Boardwalk
Red-necked Grebe: one on Lake of Two Rivers after heavy rain
Merlin: pair at a nest in white pine at east end of West Gate parking lot
Eastern Towhee: singing male along Tea Lake Dam road

I would like to thank all the participants today, and especially Kevin Clute who assisted ably with finding the birds.

Ron Tozer

 

 

Algonquin Park birding update: 23 April
Posted on April 25, 2009 at 07:49:39 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (April 24, 2009) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Here are some sightings from the past week:
Spruce Grouse: Male at Spruce Bog Boardwalk north
of the register box.

Black-backed Woodpecker: Male still excavating nest
cavity in second utility pole west of Leaf Lake Ski Trail
entrance on April 17.

Gray Jay: Opeongo Road, and Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

Boreal Chickadee: try Opeongo Road, and Spruce Bog
Boardwalk.

Rose-breasted Grosbeak: first alternate male at Visitor
Centre feeder eating black sunflower seeds on April 20-22;
previous earliest date was May 3.

Pine Siskin: 10+ at Visitor Centre feeders.

Evening Grosbeak: 6 at Visitor Centre feeders all week.

Notes:
First sightings of spring this week included: Bufflehead,
American Bittern, Osprey, and Rose-breasted Grosbeak.

A female Fisher was at the Visitor Centre suet feeder
on April 23.

Whiskey Rapids Trail, and Mizzy Lake Trail remain
closed as of today.

Please report your Algonquin sightings to me (including
date, number and location) for our park records. Thanks.

Good birding.
Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, Ontario

Directions:
Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways
400, 11 and 60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on
Highway 400. From Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then
follow Highway 60 to the park. Kilometre markers along Highway
60 in the Park go from the West Gate (km 0) to the East Gate
(km 56). Get your park permit and the park tabloid (with a map
of birding locations mentioned here) at the gates.

The Visitor Centre at km 43 has recent bird sightings and
information. The centre is open daily from 10 am to 5 pm.
starting this weekend.

 

 

Re(1): Green Heron, Savannah Sparrow
Posted on April 25, 2009 at 11:17:59 AM by Barbara Taylor

Took a walk around the Bracebridge Ponds this morning between thunderstorms but couldn't find the Field Sparrow. There was a male Yellow-rumped Warbler in the shrubbery west of cell 4 and a Savannah Sparrow by the fence around the dumping ponds east of cell 4. A Green Heron flew overhead. A Killdeer was calling from the muddy lot east of cell 1. No new ducks.

 

 

Field Sparrow
Posted on April 24, 2009 at 08:55:29 PM by Goodyear

We went for a walk around the Bracebridge Lagoons this evening and we scared up a Field Sparrow that had been on the road on the west side of Cell 4. It flew up into the short bushes bordering the wet area, where we had great views of it. A single Ruby-crowned Kinglet was the only other bird of note.

 

 

Re(2): Trumpeter background info...
Posted on May 7, 2009 at 11:17:09 AM by Barbara Taylor

I just received the following background information from Harry Lumsden:
Swan 910 was caught on 2 Feb 2007 at LaSalle Park. He was reported at Wye Marsh on 7 Apr 2008 and in late April was back at LaSalle.

 

 

Re(1): Trumpeter Report
Posted on April 29, 2009 at 02:08:52 PM by Barbara Taylor

I've forwarded the report to Harry Lumsden and Wye Marsh. If I receive any background info on the swan I'll post an update.

 

 

Trumpeter Report
Posted on April 24, 2009 at 08:40:16 PM by J. Gardner

Just had a call from Nancy Taylor who lives on a pond at the corner of McKellar Center Road and Hurdville Road (near Manitouwabing Lake) that a trumpeter swan is on the pond (8.30 p.m.). The swan is tagged with the number 910. Would somebody pass this sighting along to Harry Lumsden or the keeper of numbers.

 

 

White Crowned Sparrow
Posted on April 24, 2009 at 07:18:56 PM by janice house

I saw my first white crowned sparrow feeding in our yard after dinner tonight. (Doe Lake Rd. Gravenhurst)

 

 

Milbert's Tortoiseshell
Posted on April 24, 2009 at 02:51:29 PM by Barbara Taylor

Forgot to mention in my earlier post...there was a Milbert's Tortoiseshell butterfly feeding on some Coltsfoot flowers at the "T" in the trail at Henry Marsh this morning. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Bears are awake!
Posted on April 24, 2009 at 10:32:08 AM by Marilyn Kisser

I just wanted to let you all know that a bear was by during the night and got into the feeders ... time to bring them in at night! just outside of Rosseau!

 

 

Chipping Sparrow
Posted on April 24, 2009 at 08:57:39 AM by Barbara Taylor

Had our first Chipping Sparrow of the year this morning. (Bracebridge)
Listen to one at: http://www.learnbirdsongs.com/birdsong.php?id=11

 

 

Wood Thrush
Posted on April 24, 2009 at 07:57:48 AM by CatMacLean

During my early morning walk, I heard a Wood Thrush singing along with the Winter Wren. (Huntsville)

 

 

Re(1): American Robin Nest in Arrowhead
Posted on April 24, 2009 at 06:54:18 AM by ron tozer

The earliest ever American Robin nest with eggs in Algonquin Park was April 30.

 

 

American Robin Nest in Arrowhead
Posted on April 23, 2009 at 11:20:07 PM by Burke Korol

Found an American Robin nest today with 2 eggs in Arrowhead Provincial Park.
How does 23 April compare to other egg dates in this area?

 

 

Re(1): and Leopard Frogs today...
Posted on April 24, 2009 at 01:30:27 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there were a few Leopard Frogs calling west of cell 4. No new ducks at the Bracebridge Ponds and only a couple Mallards and Bufflehead seen at Henry Marsh. The Trans Canada Trail between the Ponds and the Marsh has a few wet/mucky areas right now, but we managed to get through without any soakers. It's amazing how quickly the beavers have flooded out the large area west of cell 4 with their new dam.

Frog calls and species guide:
http://www.torontozoo.com/adoptapond/frogs.asp

 

 

American Bittern, Wood Frogs - Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on April 23, 2009 at 07:58:35 PM by Barbara Taylor

Tonight between 6:30-7 p.m. the American Bittern was calling from the flooded area west of cell 4, while a Ruffed Grouse was drumming north of cell 4. Several Wood Frogs were "quacking" just north-west of cell 4. A pair of Northern Flickers put on an interesting show as they performed their spring courtship ritual which included a lot of tail fanning and neck bobbing. Not many ducks tonight - cell 4 had Ring-necked Duck, Bufflehead, Blue-winged Teal, Mallard, Wood Duck, Lesser Scaup.
Bracebridge Ponds Map (north approx. at top of map, west approx. at left)

 

 

Osprey
Posted on April 23, 2009 at 08:11:11 AM by janice house

An osprey soared over the house this morning (Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst)

 

 

hermit thrush
Posted on April 22, 2009 at 12:42:25 PM by John Challis

Walking the dog on Green River Drive, Washago, this morning, we heard our first hermit thrush in full song, as well as its call note. Welcome back, songster!

 

 

Re(1): Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst
Posted on April 24, 2009 at 04:46:03 PM by janice house

Yesterday after supper Casey and I scared up the bittern, he flew towards Beaver Creek and took a tumble as he touched the hydro wires. I could not see if he continued on or went down in the farm field. Last weekend I noticed that one of the male dark eyed juncos has a band on his right leg.

 

 

Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst
Posted on April 22, 2009 at 12:15:16 PM by janice house

This morning at the swamp past Laycox Rd I heard my first yellow rump warbler. Golden crowned kinglets were calling, american bittern was making his pumping sound, brown creepers were calling, 2 male hooded mergansers were in view and 3 cormorants flew over

 

 

Kinglets, Bala
Posted on April 22, 2009 at 11:04:58 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Both Ruby-crowned and Golden-crowned Kinglets here this morning!
I had a report from a fellow who saw and heard two Sandhill Cranes flying over Doe Lake Road yesterday.

 

 

Broad-winged Hawk, Bala
Posted on April 21, 2009 at 05:58:58 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

A Broad-winged Hawk was perched on a wire crossing Muskoka Rd 38 just west of Hwy 169 this afternoon at about 4 pm.

 

 

Swallows etc.
Posted on April 21, 2009 at 04:31:21 PM by CatMacLean

This morning on the Fairy Vista trail, Huntsville, I saw two tree swallows along with a kestral, mallards, a black duck, a goose and the song sparrows were busy singing. Heard a partiridge drumming for the first time as well in our bush and saw the Broad-Wing hawk in the afternoon.

 

 

Re(1): Evening Grosbeaks etc.
Posted on April 22, 2009 at 07:57:57 AM by Wayne Bridge

I've had a flock of (at least) 21 evening grosbeaks emptying my sunflower feeder every day since Saturday (Kearney).

 

 

Evening Grosbeaks etc.
Posted on April 21, 2009 at 11:31:19 AM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there were a few Evening Grosbeaks near the intersection of Glendale Rd. and Daleman Dr. and a White-crowned Sparrow was singing just west of Kevin Cres. along Meadow Heights Dr. There were several Pine Siskins, Purple Finch, American Goldfinch, and Dark-eyed Juncos at the west end of Meadow Heights Dr. (Bracebridge)

 

 

roosting woodpecker
Posted on April 20, 2009 at 03:21:57 PM by John Challis

About 5:30 or 6 last night, a woodpecker -- probably a female yellow bellied sapsucker, by the plumage that was visible -- tucked itself into an oblong notch in a rotting basswood trunk that's been turned into modern art by the neighbourhood pileateds. Gayle had seen it pecking at the hollow a little earlier. The space was barely deep enough to fit the full width of its body. It hunkered down with its head tucked sideways -- I think it may have jammed its beak into the wood for more support. And it stayed there, I'm assuming, for the rest of the night. Forgot to look again this morning to see if it was still there. I've heard that woodpeckers will simply lean against the trunk of a tree for the night, as long as there's a bit of shelter overhead, but had never witnessed it before. We're on Green River Drive in Washago.

 

 

Rose-breasted Grosbeak - Algonquin Park
Posted on April 20, 2009 at 01:08:31 PM by JustinPeter

Hi all,
I just had a male Rose-breasted Grosbeak appear at the Algonquin Park Visitor Centre off the viewing deck, possibly attracted by the raucous of blackbirds and Evening Grosbeaks. This is the earliest record of this species for the Park by almost 2 full weeks (previous earliest record: May 3)!
Cheers,
Justin

 

 

Bluebird & Kestrels, Beatrice Town Line
Posted on April 19, 2009 at 12:20:30 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

This morning there was one male bluebird on a utility wire along Beatrice Town Line along with a male and female kestrel. No Brewers Blackbirds seen.

 

 

Re(1): swan
Posted on April 19, 2009 at 10:34:38 AM by Al Johnston

Gerry, yellow wing tags would indicate that it's a Trumpeter. Thanks for the report.

 

 

swan
Posted on April 19, 2009 at 10:01:42 AM by Gerry Lannan

At 700am I saw a swan(tundra?) in the Magnetewan R about 2k NE of Kearney.Wing tags--seen through tree branches--appeared to be EOO.

 

 

Re(1): Sandhill Crane at Torrance Barrens
Posted on April 21, 2009 at 05:56:06 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

I saw a single, very rusty, adult, Sandhill Crane a bit beyond the Torrance Barrens parking lot along the side of the road at 3:30 this afternoon.

 

 

Sandhill Crane at Torrance Barrens
Posted on April 18, 2009 at 09:37:52 PM by dinnynimmo

A solitary Sandhill Crane was seen at the Torrance Barrens on Saturday. Three possible Sandhill cranes were seen on Friday flying over Hwy 169 west of Gravenhurst

 

 

Bracebridge Lagoons to Henry Marsh
Posted on April 18, 2009 at 01:28:11 PM by Goodyear

We enjoyed a late morning walk around the Lagoons and over to Henry Marsh this morning. There was a pair of American Wigeon in Cell 4, along with many Bufflehead, Ring-necked Ducks, L. Scaup, Mallards, Wood Ducks, and a few Green-winged Teal and Blue-winged Teal. There was a single Rusty Blackbird in the woods west of Cell 2, and 2 singing Swamp Sparrows and an American Bittern in the newly beaver-created wetland west of Cell 4. A Winter Wren was singing in the woods on the way to Henry Marsh. 2 Northern rough-winged Swallows were feeding with several Tree Swallows over Henry Marsh.

 

 

Snowy Owl
Posted on April 18, 2009 at 08:42:13 AM by ron tozer

Laura Tozer saw a Snowy Owl near the pavement along northbound Highway 11 at the Alpine Ranch road at 5:30 this morning. The owl had relatively few dark spots, and was probably an adult male, heading back north after wintering in southern Ontario.

 

 

Algonquin Park Birding Update: 16 April
Posted on April 17, 2009 at 08:33:42 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (April 17, 2009) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Here are some sightings from the past week:

Spruce Grouse: Male at Spruce Bog Boardwalk north
of the register box; and 2 males in black spruce at north
end of Opeongo Road (east side).

Northern Saw-whet Owl: Singles calling at km 4, km 8
and km 19 on April 15.

Black-backed Woodpecker: Male excavating nest cavity
in second utility pole west of Leaf Lake Ski Trail
entrance on April 11. One at km 8 on the weekend.

Gray Jay: Opeongo Road, and Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

Boreal Chickadee: One in black spruce at north end
of Opeongo Road, and one at Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

Common Redpoll: flocks of 50 to 100 flying north early
in the week. Few to none at Visitor Centre feeder now.

Hoary Redpoll: One at Visitor Centre feeder on April
10 and 11.

Pine Siskin: 30+ at Visitor Centre feeders.

Evening Grosbeak: 20 at Visitor Centre feeders all week.

Notes:
First sightings of spring this week included: Ring-necked
Duck, Common Loon, Rough-legged Hawk, Northern
Harrier, American Kestrel, Ring-billed Gull, Belted Kingfisher,
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, Tree Swallow, Barn Swallow
(April 15; ties earliest ever), Winter Wren, Golden-crowned
Kinglet, Eastern Meadowlark .

Whiskey Rapids Trail, Mizzy Lake Trail, and both
backpacking trails are closed due to flooding.
Please report your Algonquin sightings to me (including
date, number and location) for our park records. Thanks.

Good birding.
Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, Ontario

 

 

Honeybees - photo
Posted on April 16, 2009 at 03:52:27 PM by Barbara Taylor

The Honey Bees have been very busy today visiting the Dwarf Iris and white Scilla flowers. You can see all the yellow pollen they've collected in the pollen baskets (corbicula) on their hind legs. (Bracebridge)  photo1  photo2

 

 

Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on April 16, 2009 at 11:45:40 AM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there were a few more ducks at the Bracebridge Ponds...and it was nice and quiet since they haven't started construction of the new plant yet. The ducks were all in cell 4 except for a few Buffleheads in cell 1. At least 40 Painted Turtles were sunning themselves along the north bank of cell 2.

Today's List:
Ring-necked Duck
Green-winged Teal
Blue-winged Teal
Lesser Scaup
Wood Duck
Mallard
Bufflehead
Double-crested Cormorant
Canada Goose
Killdeer
Red-tailed Hawk
Northern Harrier
Turkey Vulture
Song Sparrow
Common Grackle
Red-winged Blackbird
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
American Robin
American Crow
Blue Jay
Black-capped Chickadee
White-breasted Nuthatch
American Goldfinch

Pine Siskin
Ring-billed Gull
Ruffed Grouse (heard drumming)

Note that the roadway at the south side of cell 3 now ends in a bit of a ditch near the west end so best to stick to the north side of cell 3. Bracebridge Ponds Map (north approx. at top of map):  http://s5.photobucket.com/albums/y175/naturepics/birdboard/pondsmap.jpg

 

 

pair wood ducks (photo)
Posted on April 15, 2009 at 07:42:43 AM by garyschultz

out looking for loons yesterday in algonquin park (no luck)
stopped in at Long long Lake just before the west gate and was able to clearly see 5 Canadian geese and a pair of wood ducks, on my travels through the park was able to also see 7 moose along hwy 60. photo

 

 

Re(1): return of hummingbirds?
Posted on April 26, 2009 at 09:32:56 PM by Robert MacEwan

thanks to all for posting these dates for me, I've been watching for the sapsuckers and saw my first one today, hopefully the Hummingbirds are having a safe trip and won't be far behind.

 

 

Re(2): return of hummingbirds?
Posted on April 15, 2009 at 08:33:04 PM by Wilf Yusek

My earliest record is May 5/2007 and May 6/2008, at Prospect Lake just east of Uffington.

 

 

Re(1): return of hummingbirds?
Posted on April 15, 2009 at 10:09:49 PM by John Challis

We're in Washago (just minutes from downtown Kilworthy!) -- last year our first hummer arrived on May 5; the year before it was May 7. These seem to be normal dates around here.
Also around this time I usually record first black-throated green warblers, black-and-white warblers and other warblers, great crested flycatcher. A good week or two for spring arrivals.

 

 

Re(2): return of hummingbirds?
Posted on April 15, 2009 at 08:33:04 PM by Wilf Yusek

My earliest record is May 5/2007 and May 6/2008, at Prospect Lake just east of Uffington.

 

 

Re(1): return of hummingbirds?
Posted on April 15, 2009 at 09:36:12 AM by Barbara Taylor

I don't have data specific for Kilworthy, but the earliest arrivals of Ruby-throated Hummingbirds in the Muskoka area are usually in the first week of May. It will always depend on weather conditions from year to year. Here is a copy of a post from 2005 that you might find interesting...
----------------------------------
Re(1): hummingbird - arrival dates
Posted on April 15, 2005 at 01:39 PM by Barbara Taylor
I asked Rick Stronks if he could provide some information about arrival dates for Ruby-throated Hummingbirds in Alqonquin Park. (Thanks Rick.) Here is his reply:

Hi Barbara,
The average spring arrival date for Ruby-throated Hummingbird in
Algonquin is May 12, while the earliest record is May 3. As you know,
the return of hummers is closely tied to the activity of Yellow-bellied
Sapsuckers. For the first month or two, Ruby-throated Hummingbirds rely
on the tree sap from the holes left by sapsuckers. Their average return
date is April 14 and this year we have only had one confirmed.

So, although it is always possible to get a very early date, it seems
unlikely. While other birds do make early forays to check out the
habitat (i.e., loons looking for open water), hummingbirds do not have
the fat reserves to be able to afford such investigative journeys.

Hope this helps,
Rick Stronks
Chief Park Naturalist
Algonquin Visitor Centre
-----------------------------------

 

 

Re(1): return of hummingbirds?
Posted on April 15, 2009 at 07:31:17 AM by garyschultz

it will be soon,to help us all there are a couple of web sites that report and show the migration progress,
gary
large map showing progress: http://www.hummingbirds.net/map.html
ontario hummingbird project: www.ontariohummingbirds.ca

 

 

return of hummingbirds?
Posted on April 15, 2009 at 00:32:29 AM by Robert MacEwan

I don't know much about Hummingbirds, can anyone give me a "guesstimate" of when they return to this area (I'm in Kilworthy)and I think they are Ruby Throated Hummingbirds, I would like to have my feeders out waiting for them when they arrive, thanks
Robert

 

 

frogs, flicker
Posted on April 14, 2009 at 11:17:50 PM by John Challis

Our neighbour Barry photographed three yellow shafted flickers picking off midges on his lawn, while the snow was still there last week.
Our swamp has spring peepers, woodfrogs and leopard frogs all calling tonight.
We're on Green River Drive in Washago.

 

 

Loon/Buffleheads
Posted on April 14, 2009 at 09:05:46 PM by janice house

today a loon appeared in the bay in front of Allport Marina, half a dozen male buffleheads were displaying and or fighting over a female in one of the boat slips (Beaumont Drive Lake Muskoka)

 

 

Sapsuckers
Posted on April 14, 2009 at 05:24:27 PM by CatMacLean

Had two males and one female sapsucker in our woods in Huntsville this am.

 

 

Ice-out and Loon, Bala
Posted on April 14, 2009 at 11:05:57 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

The ice was out of my small lake Sunday, April 12 and a loon was calling from the lake this morning at 6:30 am. Wonderful to hear!

 

 

Phoebe on Moon River
Posted on April 14, 2009 at 09:36:07 AM by Dinny and Neil Nimmo

Heard an Eastern Phoebe yesterday down the Moon River in Bala. Also a Mourning Cloak was fluttering beside the road.

 

 

Kingfisher, Heron
Posted on April 13, 2009 at 01:09:17 PM by DinnyNimmo

A kingfisher was at Hwy 169 in Bala opposite the GreeneStone Resort on Easter Sunday. A great blue heron was in the marsh at Medora Lake on Saturday.

 

 

Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on April 13, 2009 at 12:44:12 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there were only a few ducks at the Bracebridge Ponds - Lesser Scaup, Wood Ducks, Mallards, Buffleheads in cells 1,2, and 4. A pair of Blue-winged Teal in cell 4, and a Double-crested Cormorant in cell 1. A Belted Kingfisher flew overhead chattering as it went. A Pileated Woodpecker was busy chiselling out a large hole in one of the new hydro poles at the south side of cell 3 where the new plant is going to be built. Two Painted Turtles were sunning themselves in the north-west corner of cell 2.

At Henry Marsh there were some Buffleheads, Mallards, Wood Ducks, Canada Geese, and Hooded Mergansers. An American Kestrel was hunting at the south end of the marsh, and a Turkey Vulture soared past.

 

 

Common Loon
Posted on April 13, 2009 at 10:41:15 AM by Jim Griffin

Easter Monday is marked by the arrival of a Common Loon on the river at Port Sydney as well as a Pied-billed Grebe: these sitings were on the river south of the Rd 10 bridge.

 

 

Shrike, Thrush, Buntings
Posted on April 13, 2009 at 09:18:55 AM by Goodyear

We saw the Northern Shrike again singing from the top of a tall tree at the east side of the clear cut at the corner of Manitoba Street and Clearbrook Trail (Bracebridge). We also scared up a flock of about 30 Snow Buntings in the same area. At Henry Marsh we saw a Hermit Thrush, and a Kestrel hunting at the south end of the marsh. A lone Sandhill Crane flew overhead.

 

 

Snow Buntings
Posted on April 12, 2009 at 07:49:54 PM by Barbara Taylor

This afternoon there were about 8 Snow Buntings feeding at the side of the road a bit west of Carnarvon along Hwy. 118.

 

 

American Bittern
Posted on April 12, 2009 at 07:36:28 AM by janice house

Geoff just got back from the morning dog walk, a bittern was making the pumping call close to the Tomingas Rd (Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst, approx 2 klm from hwy 11)

 

 

Algonquin Birding
Posted on April 11, 2009 at 09:19:41 AM by Burke Korol

Yesterday in Algonquin a group of us found a male BLACK-BACKED WOODPECKER near the Tea Lake Dam road. We hiked the Spruce Bog Trail and within 100 m of the parking lot we found BOREAL CHICKADEE, GRAY JAY, EVENING GROSBEAK and a pair of SPRUCE GROUSE. At the visitor centre we had lots of finches, et al. including HOARY REDPOLL and our first TREE SWALLOW of the year. Late in the day, on Opeongo Road we picked up a NORTHERN HARRIER and a SHARP-SHINNED HAWK.

 

 

Re(1): Owls at Arrowhead PP
Posted on April 11, 2009 at 09:32:07 AM by GarthNBaker

I will be doing my Nocturnal OwlSurvey this weekend around Turtle Lake/Orrville area.

 

 

Owls at Arrowhead PP
Posted on April 11, 2009 at 09:18:07 AM by Burke Korol

Last night myself and 4 birders from Toronto had a good outing in Arrowhead Provincial Park. We only needed two stops and about 30 minutes to find a very vocal NORTHERN SAW-WHET OWL (doing both the 'saw-whet' sound and the classic 'tooting') and a pair of BARRED OWLS.

 

 

Sandhill Crane
Posted on April 11, 2009 at 07:38:23 AM by Dawn Sherman

A Sandhill Crane flew over our house this morning on Main Street in Huntsville.

 

 

Re(1): Unidentified bird
Posted on April 10, 2009 at 09:58:31 PM by ron tozer

The bird in the photos is a Northern Mockingbird. The apparent yellow tone around the head could be staining acquired during feeding.

 

 

Unidentified bird
Posted on April 10, 2009 at 07:22:13 PM by JohnGriffiths

 

This fellow flew up and down spreading his feathers.
note the yellow around the head
Any help would be great
Picture taken in Arizona - photo
but hopeing you can help ID this guy
Thanks

 

 

The River @Port Sydney
Posted on April 10, 2009 at 12:00:44 PM by Jim Griffin

A flock of 11 Ring-necked Ducks(9 males 2 females) arrived this morning to join a pair of Common Mergansers and a pair of Hooded Mergansers on the river, just south of the Rd 10 bridge.

 

 

Doe Lake Rd Birds (Gravenhurst)
Posted on April 10, 2009 at 09:52:49 AM by janice house

At 7am today while walking the dog I saw 2 pairs of hooded mergansers and 8 wood ducks(1 female) in the little swamp between Laycox Rd and Tomingas Rd. Two brown creepers were calling in the same area. We have a male northern harrier cruising the farm field across from the house and 2 tree swallows preening on the hydro wires.

 

 

Algonquin Park Birding Update: 9 April
Posted on April 9, 2009 at 09:45:34 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (April 9, 2009) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Here are some sightings from the past week:

Wild Turkey: Same two still in the Two Rivers
Store area this week.

Spruce Grouse: Male at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, about
100 m north of the register box on April 5.

Bald Eagle: An adult over Highway 60 near Centennial
Ridges Road on April 9.

Black-backed Woodpecker: One 200 m north of the
culvert on Opeongo Road on April 5.

Gray Jay: Opeongo Road, and Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

Boreal Chickadee: One on Spruce Bog Boardwalk
just past the first boardwalk on April 5.

Common Redpoll: big flock at the Visitor Centre
feeder this week. Several along highway and Opeongo
Road.

Hoary Redpoll: One at Visitor Centre feeder on April 4.

Pine Siskin: 30+ at Visitor Centre feeders.

Evening Grosbeak: 5+ at Visitor Centre feeders all week.

Notes:
New arrivals this week included: Common Goldeneye,
Northern Flicker.

Arowhon Road and Rock Lake Road are now closed
to public travel due to muddy spring melt conditions.

Whiskey Rapids Trail is closed due to flooding on the
Oxtongue River section.

Please report your Algonquin sightings to me (including
date, number and location) for our park records. Thanks.

Good birding.
Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, Ontario

 

Pied-billed Grebe
Posted on April 9, 2009 at 12:09:32 PM by Barbara Taylor

Around 11 a.m. today there was a Pied-billed Grebe on the Muskoka River at the big bend just before #1484 Beaumont Dr. where the river comes right up to the road. Same spot we usually see one in the spring.

There is still enough water at Henry Marsh to attract a few ducks - Mallards, Wood Ducks, Hooded Mergansers, Canada Geese, Great Blue Heron. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Phoebe
Posted on April 9, 2009 at 12:09:06 PM by nickbartok

Delighted to come home for Easter and hear a Phoebe singing near Beachgrove Public School in Gravenhurst, despite the snow.

 

 

Merlins
Posted on April 9, 2009 at 11:25:20 AM by GayleCarlyle

Thurs. Apr. 9
A pair of merlins were flying and calling at the end of our road, Green River Drive, Washago, this morning.
There has been a pair nesting around there for several years now.

 

 

Re(1): Sandhill Cranes
Posted on April 9, 2009 at 12:01:46 PM by Barbara Taylor

There was a Sandhill Crane flying south-east over Henry Marsh this morning, calling as it went by. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Sandhill Cranes
Posted on April 9, 2009 at 11:07:15 AM by janice house

I just spoke to Tim Mason who lives on the Luckey Rd in the Raymond valley, a pair of cranes just touched down in their yard, the birds usually stay for a few weeks.

 

 

Fox sparrows
Posted on April 8, 2009 at 02:10:29 PM by GayleCarlyle

Tues. April 7 & 8th
We have fox sparrows hanging around our place. Last evening there were 7 of them feeding on a seed mix we put down underneath a fir tree where there was no snow. The poor birds were so hungry they didn't seem to mind my presence and quickly flew back down once there was more food provided.
They were joined by chipping and tree sparrows and juncos.
This morning, they were all back feasting.
Also, about 40 redpolls, siskins, & goldfinches gobbling up niger seed.

 

 

Re(1): Woodcock
Posted on April 9, 2009 at 07:52:31 AM by egtaylor

We have had a woodcock for 3 days now in his old familiar spot under the pine tree. This is the first year he's been back for about 5 years. I thought he would have roosted in the tree, but he seems to have spent the night hunched up on the ground.

 

 

Woodcock
Posted on April 8, 2009 at 08:47:39 AM by CatMacLean

The other day, my "bird" dog put up a woodcock. This morning when I let the dogs out I could hear it's call coming from the woods.  (Huntsville)

 

 

Redpolls etc, Bala
Posted on April 7, 2009 at 10:32:51 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

I had about 100 Common Redpolls arrive today and some were still feeding just before dark. Several siskins, goldfinches and Purple Finches came in as well.

 

 

Bird Board downtime
Posted on April 7, 2009 at 01:10:14 PM by Barbara Taylor

Earlier today there was a problem with the Bird Board's hosting operations which kept some people from accessing the board. This only affected certain Internet Service Providers, so you may not have noticed the outage. All should be back to normal now.

I did post a notice on the back-up webpage this morning. You might want to bookmark the page in case you have any trouble accessing the board in the future: http://muskoka.tripod.com/birding/mbb.htm

 

 

RedPolls galore!
Posted on April 7, 2009 at 10:04:37 AM by Ted Gardner

We have a flock of 150 plus Redpolls mixed with Pine Siskins,and Goldfinches visiting our feeders the last 3 days or so>Also aprox 12 Juncos, 8 tree sparrows and a single Song sparrow
120 meadow hieghts Bracebridge

 

 

Song Sparrows
Posted on April 7, 2009 at 08:01:10 AM by Debbie Adams

Along with 15 Redpolls, 6 Juncos,Red and White Breasted Nuthatches, Chickadees, Blue Jays, Hairy and Downy Woodpeckers, 2 Song Sparrows arrived at our feeder. Given the weather,no doubt they are singing the blues!
(Walker's Point)

 

 

Fox Sparrow
Posted on April 6, 2009 at 04:25:10 PM by CatMacLean

Our Fox sparrow is still with us along with large flocks of Juncos and Red-polls (Huntsville)

 

 

Otter
Posted on April 6, 2009 at 03:58:20 PM by Terry & Marion Whittam

Yesterday morning we watched a very large Otter eat 3 bull frogs! The large Otter popped up through the ice in front of the cottage and was busy for about 10 minutes chewing down what looked like a bullfrog. Once finished, the Otter did a perfect jackknife dive back down the hole in the ice. Within 30 seconds the Otter popped back up the hole with another large bullfrog and proceeded to eat this second one as I watched in my telescope. Once again as soon as it finished the second confirmed bullfrog the Otter proceeded back down the hole and again within 30 seconds came up with a 3rd much larger bullfrog. Water depth would be about 8 feet and muddy so I assume the bullfrogs would be wintering on the bottom buried in the mud! The Otter seemed to know exactly where to hunt for the bullfrogs and indeed made me think they were all together on the bottom of the lake in a little colony!
Anyone have any comments on bullfrogs and how they winter?
Thanks Terry

 

 

Re(2): Thrush
Posted on April 8, 2009 at 11:06:20 AM by JoanPaget

We have several hundred redpoles a mixture of Juncos Siskens, Goldfinch,3 Foxsparows Treesparrows,4 Purple finch,a HERMIT Thrush along the front of our house yesterday, a female Rosebreasted Grosebeak the day before.My first sighting of a pair of Bluebirds was Mar. 28.We live on Partridge Lane ,B.B.

 

 

Re(1): Thrush
Posted on April 8, 2009 at 08:47:49 AM by ron tozer

This certainly sounds like a Hermit Thrush, the first of the brown-backed thrushes to return in spring. The average arrival date in Algonquin Park is April 16, with the earliest ever date on April 8, so your bird was right on schedule at Orillia.

 

 

Thrush
Posted on April 6, 2009 at 02:46:44 PM by GayleCarlyle

apr. 6, 2:40pm
Just now outside the window at our office in Orillia, there was a thrush standing on the picnic table.
it was facing me so it was hard to see the back but it had definite spots on the upper part of its breast.
When I moved to get a closer look at it, it took off and there was a rusty tone to its back.
Could it have been a hermit thrush? I'm positive it was a thrush but not certain on which species.
Poor thing out there in the snow today.

 

 

Meadowlark, Kinglets
Posted on April 5, 2009 at 01:15:26 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there was a Meadowlark in the field at the west side of Beaumont Dr. just past the junction with Beaumont Farm Rd. (first one we've seen this year)

There was a Phoebe singing near the parking area at Henry Rd. and a few Golden-crowned Kinglets in the woods along the Henry trail. Henry Marsh is fully open now and there was enough water from recent rains and snowmelt to attract a few ducks - Mallards, Buffleheads, and Hooded Mergansers...also a Great Blue Heron. But the water is draining away quickly because there is no longer a beaver dam to hold it back and the beaver baffles installed last year are still working well. Might be a good spot to look for migrating shorebirds later on.


directions to Henry Marsh:
From traffic lights at Eccelstone Dr./Wellington St. in Bracebridge, take Beaumont Dr. along the Muskoka River to Henry Rd. on your left. There is a parking area at the end of Henry Rd. by the trailhead. At the "T" in the trail, turn right (west) to view the marsh.

 

 

Re(3):1st Winter Wren here also
Posted on April 5, 2009 at 03:45:23 PM by CatMacLean

Always seems to me WINTER wren is a misnomer.

 

 

Re(2):1st Winter Wren here also
Posted on April 5, 2009 at 12:40:20 PM by Al Sinclair

We had a Winter Wren singing here this morning east of Bracebridge. 1st of the year and earliest ever. Our 1st in 2008 was April 7, 2nd earliest date.

 

 

Re(1): Fox Sparrow
Posted on April 6, 2009 at 10:35:49 AM by Barbara Taylor

A Fox Sparrow has just appeared at our feeder on this very snowy morning...first one we've seen this year.

Update April 6...at 4:30 p.m. now two Fox Sparrows.
Update April 7...this morning now three Fox Sparrows.

(Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Fox Sparrow
Posted on April 5, 2009 at 03:36:34 PM by janice house

our first fox sparrow is kicking up leaf litter under my spruce trees, heard my first phoebe calling this afternoon (Doe Lake Rd. Gravenhurst)

 

 

Fox Sparrow
Posted on April 5, 2009 at 09:39:54 AM by CatMacLean

 

For the 15th year we have had a Fox Sparrow come to our feeders. Heard him singing this morning along with a Winter Wren. The sparrow will be gone in a couple of days though.  photo

 

 

Lots of Birds in Huntsville
Posted on April 4, 2009 at 10:57:19 PM by Burke Korol

With the snow today, I made sure my feeders were well stocked. It paid off - there must have been 100 birds here for much of the day. I think I ended up with 15 species. Highlights were 2 male PURPLE FINCHES, 20 DARK-EYED JUNCOS, 2 AMERICAN TREE SPARROWS and still tons of siskins, redpolls and goldfinches.

The best 'bird' of the day was MINK, which I photographed from my kitchen window. I won't post the pictures because the poor light and heavy snow made the animal look barely identifiable. That was the 15th mammal species I've had here in the past 3.5 years.

I wonder if the presence of this mustelid has anything to do with recent lack of squirrels at my feeders??

 

 

Pileated Woodpecker...now a pair?
Posted on April 4, 2009 at 03:11:08 PM by Barbara Taylor

A juvenile female Pileated has been visiting our suet every day since early winter. Today she was accompanied by an adult male! They seemed to be getting along quite well, so perhaps she has found a mate. Her brown back is starting to appear much blacker now so she must be molting into adult plumage...there were a couple of dangling feathers a few days ago.

Today's snowy weather has brought a large number of Purple Finches to our feeders along with many Pine Siskins, Common Redpolls, Dark-eyed Juncos, American Tree Sparrows, and tons of American Goldfinches...quite a colourful display now that the Goldfinches are "yellowing up". (Bracebridge)

 

 

Robins
Posted on April 4, 2009 at 11:31:40 AM by sam robinson

On this snowy morning a dozen or more robins were squeezed on a bare patch of grass feeding and for the first time I observed two robins and a starling feeding on the seed heads of the staghorn sumac. (Bracebridge)

 

 

white-winged crossbill
Posted on April 4, 2009 at 11:26:16 AM by Wayne Bridge

I had a female white-winged crossbill at my feeder this morning. Had one a few weeks ago also - maybe the same loner? Also a large combined flock of redpolls and siskins (at least 5 dozen) plus several juncos and tree sparrows feeding at my ground feeding area.  (Kearney)

 

 

Bluebirds/ Swallows
Posted on April 4, 2009 at 09:05:43 AM by janice house

Moira's neighbours reported seeing bluebirds and tree swallows on March 31st, we have nest boxes at their farm. (Houston Rd N of Bracebridge)

 

 

Sharp Shinned Hawk
Posted on April 3, 2009 at 05:40:37 PM by janice house

I just got home from work, looked out at my feeders and thought there were more rusty blackbirds feeding, grabbed my binoculars only to find all the birds gone and a sharpy sitting on top of my Sontag feeder at the edge of the deck. (Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst)

 

 

Bird Board Update
Posted on April 3, 2009 at 07:55:02 AM by Barbara Taylor

Thanks to everyone for all your reports.
All posts for January thru March are now available in the Archived Reports.

Need help posting photos? Find easy to follow instructions and try a test post on the Nature Photos Board.
New to the Bird Board? See the Posting Guidelines for helpful tips about using the board.

I try to monitor the Bird Board on a regular basis. If you want to bring something to my attention, just send me an email and I'll get back to you as soon as possible.

Barbara Taylor
email: muskoka_birder@hotmail.com

 

 

Algonquin Park Birding Update: 2 April
Posted on April 3, 2009 at 07:53:29 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (April 3, 2009) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Here are some sightings from the past week:

Wild Turkey: same two still in the Two Rivers
Store area this week.

Spruce Grouse: Male at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, about
30 m north of the register box on March 29.

Gray Jay: Opeongo Road, and Spruce Bog.

Boreal Chickadee: One at Spruce Bog Boardwalk
parking lot on March 29.

Common Redpoll: about 50 at West Gate feeder on March 27,
but only 1 by March 29.

Hoary Redpoll: 1 at West Gate feeder on March 29.

Pine Siskin: 30+ at Visitor Centre feeders, including one
Green Morph on March 29.

Evening Grosbeak: 15+ at Visitor Centre feeders all week.
A few at Spruce Bog parking lot on March 26 and 27.

Notes:
New arrivals this week included: Wood Duck, American
Black Duck, Green-winged Teal, Red-breasted Merganser (early),
Great Blue Heron, Northern Saw-whet Owl, Eastern Phoebe,
American Tree Sparrow, Dark-eyed Junco, Song Sparrow,
Snow Bunting, Rusty Blackbird.

Arowhon Road and Rock Lake Road are now closed
to public travel due to muddy spring melt conditions.

Please report your Algonquin sightings to me (including
date, number and location) for our park records. Thanks.

Good birding.
Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, Ontario

 

 

Re(2): Hawks
Posted on April 3, 2009 at 06:21:13 PM by CatMacLean

I had a very clear look at this hawk as he was perched in the top of a tree in our field and stayed there quite a while. His call was unmistakable as were the banded tail feathers.
I find that many birds are moving in early this year.

 

 

Re(1): Hawks
Posted on April 3, 2009 at 08:05:11 AM by Barbara Taylor

Your Broad-winged Hawks are the first report I've seen this year...usually don't see any until mid to late April. No sightings of them at Ontario hawk watches yet, but Red-shouldered and Red-tailed still moving through.

 

 

Hawks
Posted on April 2, 2009 at 04:22:02 PM by CatMacLean

Our resident pair of Broad-wings are back and the Phoebe was singing this morning. (Huntsville)

 

 

Yellow-bellied sapsucker
Posted on April 2, 2009 at 01:37:12 PM by DiannaWolfe

Our first yellow-bellied sapsucker of the year appeared in the yard this afternoon. (Just west of Gravenhurst)

 

 

turkey tom display (photo)
Posted on April 2, 2009 at 09:31:10 AM by garyschultz

 

all winter we have had wild turkeys on oxtongue lake visiting the feeders 1 tom and 7 hens.....for the first time i had the chance of a photo op just when the tom was in full display.  photo

 

 

osprey (photo)
Posted on April 2, 2009 at 09:21:30 AM by garyschultz

 

whilst driving down hwy 35 south noted a large bird flying southwards to some trees,lucky for me a side rd i had taken went right under the tree in which an osprey was enjoying a large lunch, the photo was taken in poor conditions yesterday in the rain.  photo

 

 

Northern Harrier
Posted on April 2, 2009 at 07:59:51 AM by janice house

Last night at 5:30 a harrier swooped in front of my car and crossed hwy 11 at the Doe Lake Rd overpass (Gravenhurst)