Muskoka Bird Board - Archived Reports from October - December 2007
 
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Parry Sound Nature Club Christmas Bird Count
Posted on December 31, 2007 at 10:43:35 AM by J. Gardner

The 2007 count was conducted on December 30, 2007 by sixteen observers and a total of 31 species was recorded with 1316 individual birds. Weather conditions were -2 degrees under a general overcasst with light snow flurries and calm winds. Species of note included one Oregon Junco (a first time observation), 3 Bald Eagles, a Brown Thrasher. The Big Sound was still ice free but ice in the back bays probably reduced the waterfowl count.   Jim Gardner

Birds observed
Mallard 30
Black Duck 1
Goldeneye 54
Common Merganser 10
Cooper's Hawk 1
Herring Gulls 313
Ring-billed Gulls 15
Mourning Doves 10
Rock Doves 162
Pileated Woodpecked 2
Hairy " 27
Downy " 8
Blackbacked " 1
Blue Jay 77
American Crow 15
Raven 71
Blackcapped Chickadee 87
Whitebreasted Nuthatch 25
Redbreasted Nuthatch 4
Northern Shrike 1
Starling 78
Dark Eyed Junco 6
Snow Bunting 11
Pine Grosbeak 50
Common Redpoll 246
American Goldfinch 4
Bald Eagle 3
Bohemian Waxwing 1
Brown Thrasher 1
Oregon Junco 1

 

 

Algonquin Park CBC
Posted on December 30, 2007 at 11:29:54 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Dec. 30, 2007) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

The 34th annual Algonquin Provincial Park Christmas Bird Count
(sponsored by The Friends of Algonquin Park) was held on Saturday,
December 29. As expected in this winter of almost non-existent tree
seed crops here, the totals for species (23) and individuals (1,300)
were well below average. There were no unusual species. The only
finches recorded were Pine Grosbeak and Common Redpoll.

Unfortunately, as with several other Ontario counts this year, our ability
to detect birds was significantly compromised by the weather conditions
(snow squalls, often heavy, until late morning; and gusty winds all day).
Despite this, I think that the results are a fairly accurate indicator of
the impressive scarcity of birds (away from feeders) in central Ontario
this winter. I would like to thank the 67 observers for their great effort,
and all the people who helped to organize and run the count.

Total Species: 23 (average is 28)
Total Individuals: 1,300 (average is 5,028)
Birds Per Party Hour: 6 (lowest: 4 in 1983; highest: 91 in 1984)
Total Observers: 67 (highest ever was 68)
Temperature Range: minus 1 to plus 1 degrees C.
Snow depth: 15 to 60 cm

Below is the complete list. Please stop reading and delete now if you don't want to know the details!
Ruffed Grouse: 80 (high, but much lower than record high of 149)
Spruce Grouse: 1
Rock Pigeon: 6 (in MTO sand dome at East Gate, as usual)
Barred Owl: 2
Downy Woodpecker: 23
Hairy Woodpecker: 39
Black-backed Woodpecker: 9
Pileated Woodpecker: 9
Northern Shrike: 1
Gray Jay: 33
Blue Jay: 37 (essentially absent away from feeders)
American Crow: 1 (heard calling; rare here in winter)
Common Raven: 92
Black-capped Chickadee: 672 (scarce away from feeders)
Boreal Chickadee: 13
Red-breasted Nuthatch: 121 (most left this fall)
White-breasted Nuthatch: 12
Brown Creeper: 14
Golden-crowned Kinglet: 37
Dark-eyed Junco:1 (at Visitor Centre feeder)
Snow Bunting: 1
Pine Grosbeak: 68
Common Redpoll: 23
Unidentified birds: 5

Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park CBC Compiler
Dwight, Ontario

 

 

Muskoka Field Naturalists - next meeting Jan. 3
Posted on December 28, 2007 at 10:00:03 PM by Barbara Taylor

MFN meeting Thursday, Jan. 3 at 7:30 p.m., Bracebridge
From the Wakerobin, newsletter of the Muskoka Field Naturalists:

Ken Morrison on Raptors
Ken Morrison, a member of the Huntsville Nature Club and formerly with the Ministry of Natural Resources, is an avid birder, excellent photographer and taxidermist. He will share his knowledge of raptors in a lecture and slide presentation and perhaps bring along some of his fine taxidermy specimens.

September through January meetings will be at the Latter Day Saints Church located at 705 Cedar Lane, Bracebridge (corner of Taylor Rd. & Cedar Lane near Home Depot). Visitors welcome to attend.

 

 

Algonquin Park Update: 27 December
Posted on December 27, 2007 at 05:16:23 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Dec. 27, 2007) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

The good news for birders here this week was that the rain
on December 23 has resulted in compaction of the deep snow
and some formation of a crust. This has made getting around
on snowshoes much better.
The Visitor Centre (km 43) will be open daily on December
27 to 30, from 10 am to 4 pm.

The following summary outlines observations made during
the last week for birds often sought by visiting birders here.
IT IS UNCHANGED FROM LAST WEEK.

FINCHES:
Pine Grosbeak: About 20-50 daily at the Visitor Centre feeder,
with a large number of adult males.
Common Redpoll: About five at the Visitor Centre feeder,
regularly.
No other finch species reported.

RESIDENT BOREAL SPECIES:
Spruce Grouse: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road
(which is plowed to the gate at Cameron Lake Road junction).
Black-backed Woodpecker: No reports.
Gray Jay: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road.
Boreal Chickadee: No reports.

BIRDERS:
Please let us know the date, number and location of birds you observe
when you visit Algonquin Park. This information is stored in the
Algonquin Visitor Centre database, and will help us to assist other
birders here.

Should anyone plan to visit the East Side of Algonquin, please note
that the Barron Canyon Road will not be plowed from December 21
to January 2.

Good birding.
Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, Ontario

 

 

Belted Kingfisher
Posted on December 27, 2007 at 11:46:09 AM by dbritton

This morning at 10:00 am there was a Belted Kingfisher on the Dee River at the Rostrevor Rd. Bridge, just north of Windermere Road about 2 km east of the village of Windermere. The bird appeared active and healthy and was last seen flying downriver, to the west of bridge. The Dee River, is almost completely open, as it is in all but the coldest weather.

 

 

Re(2): Wild Turkeys
Posted on December 31, 2007 at 02:26:47 PM by janice house

Moira Payne had 3 turkeys in her front yard this weekend. (Houston Rd north of Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Wild Turkeys
Posted on December 26, 2007 at 05:19:43 PM by Terry & Marion Whittam

7 Wild Turkeys crossed the lake and walked up our driveway 10km east of Washago.
Other birds include about 25 redpolls and 1 Red winged crossbill who hangs with the redpolls.

 

 

Re(1): Wild Turkeys
Posted on December 26, 2007 at 03:03:27 PM by Barbara Taylor

Around 2 p.m. today there were fifteen of them on Beaumont Dr. near #240...looked like they were heading for the river. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Wild Turkeys
Posted on December 26, 2007 at 12:11:21 PM by janice house

Yesterday afternoon we watched 10 turkeys march across the farm field opposite our house (1206 Doe Lake Rd). The 3 horses feeding at the barn were very interested too.

 

 

Re(1): Snow Buntings
Posted on December 26, 2007 at 09:17:53 PM by Marilyn Kisser

wow! I have never seen a snow bunting at the feeders here, just outside Rosseau! lucky you!

 

 

Snow Buntings
Posted on December 24, 2007 at 09:41:46 PM by J. Gardner

Our bunting population continues to grow, back to somewhat normal proportions. We have something over 30 coming to the feeders now. I think you can count 28 in this picture. June Gardner (Hurdville)

 

 

Barred Owl, Red-tailed Hawk
Posted on December 23, 2007 at 01:45:56 PM by marywillmott

Dec 22 In Bracebridge flying over zellers toward Bracebridge Villa, a Red -Tailed Hawk. Dec 21 a Barred Owl on the trail at Covered Bridge (house #70) Seen by Gerald Willmott

 

 

Northern Shrike - Huntsville
Posted on December 21, 2007 at 10:48:14 AM by Kip Daynard

Yesterday (Thursday) at 4pm I saw a Northern Shrike perched on the top of a Spruce at the Ravenscliffe Rd. exit off Hwy 11 on the SE corner (opposite the Tim Horton's).

 

 

Algonquin Park Update: 20 December
Posted on December 21, 2007 at 09:08:15 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Dec. 21, 2007) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Snow continues to pile up in Algonquin Park. As is usual at
this busy time, there were no reports from visiting birders
this week.

The Visitor Centre (km 43) will be open daily on December
27 to 30, from 10 am to 4 pm.

The following summary outlines observations made during
the last week for birds often sought by visiting birders here.

FINCHES:
Pine Grosbeak: About 20-50 daily at the Visitor Centre feeder,
with a large number of adult males.
Common Redpoll: About five at the Visitor Centre feeder,
regularly.
No other finch species reported.

RESIDENT BOREAL SPECIES:
Spruce Grouse: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road
(which is plowed to the gate at Cameron Lake Road junction).
Black-backed Woodpecker: No reports.
Gray Jay: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road.
Boreal Chickadee: No reports.

BIRDERS:
Please let us know the date, number and location of birds you observe
when you visit Algonquin Park. This information is stored in the
Algonquin Visitor Centre database, and will help us to assist other
birders here.

Should anyone plan to visit the East Side of Algonquin, please note
that the Barron Canyon Road will not be plowed from December 21
to January 2.

Good birding.
Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, Ontario

 

 

GRAVENHURST-BRACEBRIDGE CHRISTMAS BIRD COUNT 2007...full report
Posted on December 20, 2007 at 08:57:10 PM by Al Sinclair

GRAVENHURST-BRACEBRIDGE CHRISTMAS BIRD COUNT 2007

The 28th Gravenhurst-Bracebridge Christmas Bird Count was held on December 16, 2006 with 22 observers in 7 groups covering the 24 km diameter circle centred between the towns. We started the day with a winter storm warning in effect and predictions that this could be the worst storm in 60 years. It wasn’t quite that bad but we had more than 20 cm of snow fall during the count. The conditions reminded us of counts in the 1980s with cold weather for several weeks leading up to the count and cold and snowy conditions on count day. All lakes and rivers were frozen except for the centre of Lake Muskoka that we really couldn’t see because visibility was only about half a kilometer due to heavy snow. The birds were mostly gathered at feeders and very few birds were observed flying in the rural areas. Later in the day many of the back roads were not passable because of snow accumulation. A total of 1241 birds of 30 species were found, well below the last 10 years average of 2710 birds and 35 species, but similar to numbers counted in the 1980s.

Since the lakes and rivers were all frozen we found no ducks or gulls. The snow was deep, up to 60 cm in most areas, leaving few weed seeds visible so only one Snow bunting and 2 Tree Sparrows were found However there were some unusual birds in the area. This year the seed crop in the boreal forest was poor so some species that normally stay farther north were moving south through Muskoka and visiting feeders and trees with fruit, mostly crabapples. A flock of 25 Bohemian Waxwings was in Bracebridge behind the Post Office and 4 more were in the south end of Gravenhurst. Pine Grosbeaks and Common Redpolls were widespread, two species that we often don’t see for several years. Other finch species were absent or in very low numbers.

Some of the good birds found were Boreal Chickadee(1), White-throated Sparrow(1), and Cooper’s Hawk (1), all at feeders in Bracebridge. Hoary Redpolls (3) were found in flocks of Common Redpolls in Gravenhurst. 15 Northern Cardinals were found this year a new count high. The usual feeder birds, Black-capped Chickadee, Hairy and Downy Woodpeckers, Nuthatches and Blue Jays were in normal numbers. 81 European Starlings and 49 Rock Pigeons were lower numbers than normal. The 4 species with the highest counts were Black-capped Chickadee (315), Common Redpoll (201), BlueJay (115), and Mourning Dove (118).

Following the count the results were tallied at a potluck supper in Bracebridge. Thanks to Karen Love, Ingrid Schultz and Mary Ann & Terry Johnson for organizing the meal. And finally the results of the Team competition: Gravenhurst led by Dan Burton had 24 species and Bracebridge led by Al Sinclair had 24 species, like last year another tie….wait… an email just came in, Goodyears had a Ruffed Grouse on Sunday, Bracebridge has 25. BRACEBRIDGE WINS!!!

GRAVENHURST TEAM
G1- Janice House, Moira Payne, Heather Harris
G2- Dan Burton, Allan Aubin
G3- Pauline & Jim Goodfellow, Cyril & Marion Fry
G4- Rosemarie Hinzmann, Ron Stager,
species seen = 24
individuals counted = 823

BRACEBRIDGE TEAM
B6&10-Sam & Earle Robinson, Ernie Giles, Al Sinclair
B7- Heather Coupland, Stephanie Lehman
B8- Tom & Mary Smith, Bill Dickinson
B9- Joan Paget, Bob Burton

species seen = 25
individuals counted = 418

WEATHER: cloudy, steady snow, -12/-12 C, SNOW COVER 57 cm, WIND 11 to 15 km/hr

 

 

Boreal Chickadee...Bracebridge
Posted on December 20, 2007 at 07:38:30 PM by Al Sinclair

Today I was able to relocate the Boreal Chickadee that was seen on the Christmas Bird Count. At around 2pm this afternoon it was with a group of Black-capped Chickadees in a large spruce tree at the corner of Aubrey Street and Woodland Drive.

Directions: Go north on the main street(Manitoba) to Ann Street turn right towards the hospital, go past the hospital to Aubrey St, turn left and go 1 block to Woodland Drive.

 

 

Huntsville CBC (December 18)
Posted on December 20, 2007 at 09:47:39 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Dec. 19, 2007) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

The 14th annual Huntsville Christmas Bird Count was held on
Tuesday, December 18. After some early morning very light
freezing drizzle, it was cloudy, calm and not too cold for the
rest of the day, providing good conditions for birding. The
only open water was in some sections of the Muskoka River.
Knee-deep powdery snow made off-road travel challenging.
Forty species were observed, two above the count average.

Record highs were set for 10 species. Previous highs are
shown in parentheses.

Red-tailed Hawk: 4 (2)
Wild Turkey: 55 (18)
Barred Owl: 5 (4)
Hairy Woodpecker: 102 (62)
Pileated Woodpecker: 13 (10)
Northern Shrike: 6 (3)
Black-capped Chickadee: 1456 (1367)
White-breasted Nuthatch: 165 (105)
Pine Grosbeak: 211 (208)
Common Redpoll: 581 (242)

New Species for the Count:
Northern Saw-whet Owl: 1 (observed roosting during the day)
Hoary Redpoll: 3

Unusual Species for the Count:
Gray Jay: 2 (not recorded since 2003)
Boreal Chickadee: 1 (not recorded since 2001)
White-throated Sparrow: 1 (at a feeder)
European Goldfinch: 1 (an escape photographed near a feeder,
and not included in the species total)

Finches:
Pine Grosbeak: 211
Purple Finch: 6 (at one feeder)
Common Redpoll: 581
Hoary Redpoll: 3
American Goldfinch: 62
Evening Grosbeak: 14 (at two feeders)

I appreciate the great effort by our 20 field observers, and
several feeder watchers. Thanks to Kevin Clute for organizing
the electronic tally, and to Lyn Griffin and Pat Tozer for
preparing the great post-count supper.

Ron Tozer
Huntsville CBC Compiler

 

 

Re(3): Hairy woodpecker
Posted on December 20, 2007 at 11:29:25 AM by Barbara Taylor

It's the female Hairy Woodpecker that tosses the seed in our yard, but only in the fall. The male behaves himself. At this time of year they concentrate on the suet and rarely visit the seed feeders. The goldfinches seem to be the worst for throwing sunflower seeds out of the hanging feeder...maybe they're looking for nyger seed. ;)

 

 

Re(2): Hairy woodpecker
Posted on December 20, 2007 at 07:28:41 AM by ron tozer

Birds, and especially Blue Jays, throw sunflower seeds out of feeders as they sort through them for larger, higher quality seeds. The birds may sense larger kernels by weight, as well as girth and appearance. Black sunflower seed is very attractive to woodpeckers, as well. I suspect the apparent difference in seed-handling between the male and female Hairy Woodpeckers you observed is a coincidence or individual variation, rather than an actual sex-related behavioural difference. However, another possibility might be that the male dominates the female at the feeder, and so she selects a seed quickly and departs, rather than taking time to sort through for a higher quality seed. That might be something to watch for.

 

 

Re(1): Hairy woodpecker
Posted on December 19, 2007 at 08:10:02 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Hi Dennis,
I don't know why they do it either but I had some sunflower seed that, on inspection, did not seem to be of very high quality and few of the hulls had nuts in them. I have since got seed that looks to be fuller and they are no longer throwing all the seed on the ground.
A lot of the other birds were throwing the seed as well- Nuthatches and blue jays, for example

 

 

Hairy woodpecker
Posted on December 19, 2007 at 06:56:32 PM by Dennis Wilks

Can someone explain?
I noted last year and again this year that the male bird lands on my bird feeder and scoops out the black oiled sunflower seeds, emptying the feeder onto the ground in short order. Rarely does it take a single seed. ( my feeder contains only black oiled sunflower seed ) I have also noted that the female will land on the feeder, pick up a single seed, take it over to a tree, ram it into an opening in the bark, proceed to eat it and then return for a single seed. She does not scoop them out. Why?

 

 

Barred owl
Posted on December 19, 2007 at 06:39:31 PM by Dennis Wilks

A Barred owl is back at my place, sitting atop the bird feeder. Just arrived today. I had one here 2 years ago.
Location-S. Portage Rd & Brunel Rd, Huntsville

 

 

Northern Flicker
Posted on December 18, 2007 at 08:58:10 AM by marywillmott

At Beaumaris Hwy 118 West , I had a Northern Flicker at the fat feeder.

 

 

Gravenhurst-Bracebridge Christmas Bird Count...species list
Posted on December 17, 2007 at 09:54:02 PM by Al Sinclair

Premlim. list of species seen on count day Dec 16. Full report to follow in a couple of days.

COOPER'S HAWK 1
WILD TURKEY 28
ROCK DOVE 49
MOURNING DOVE 118
DOWNY WOODPECKER 19
HAIRY WOODPECKER 28
PILEATED WOODPECKER 2
BLUE JAY 152
AMERICAN CROW 4
COMMON RAVEN 14
BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE 315
BOREAL CHICKADEE 1
RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH 11
WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH 23
BROWN CREEPER 1
BOHEMIAN WAXWING 29
EUROPEAN STARLING 81
NORTHERN CARDINAL 15
AMERICAN TREE SPARROW 2
WHITE-THROATED SPARROW 1
DARK-EYED JUNCO 25
SNOW BUNTING 1
PINE GROSBEAK 69
COMMON REDPOLL 201
HOARY REDPOLL 3
PINE SISKIN 1
AMERICAN GOLDFINCH 27
EVENING GROSBEAK 3
HOUSE SPARROW 16

Total Species 29
Gravenhurst Team 24 species
Bracebridge Team 24 species

 

 

Lone Pine Siskin
Posted on December 17, 2007 at 08:45:55 PM by RichardCorcelli

The lone Pine Siskin observed near Muskoka Bay during CBC 2007.  photo

 

 

Re(1): Strange question
Posted on December 18, 2007 at 01:04:59 PM by Barbara Taylor

Wow! Five hawks together like that outside of migration would seem quite rare. Perhaps your feeders were bringing in even more birds than usual after the big snowstorm. The abundance of easy prey may have attracted more hawks from around the neighbourhood. We've seen both Cooper's and Sharp-shinned hunting in our yard over the past few weeks, and we are close to where you live. There also may be a Northern Goshawk doing fly-overs, judging from the reaction of some of the squirrels in the yard, although we haven't seen it.

Monday morning the birds at our feeders seemed more relaxed than usual...probably because the hawks had all congregated over at your place Ted. :)

 

 

Re(2): Strange question
Posted on December 18, 2007 at 05:40:00 PM by Ted Gardner

Thats my Mamma! Question is 5 in a group??

 

 

Re(1): Strange question
Posted on December 18, 2007 at 11:42:45 AM by Al Johnston

Not that rare, Ted. Check out J. Gardner's post and great pics of Dec. 4.

 

 

Strange question
Posted on December 17, 2007 at 06:27:22 PM by Ted Gardner

On Monday morning my wife and her sister witnessed something very different....The birds at our feeders quickly dispersed and in the trees were 5 in total
either Sharpshined Hawks or Coopers...ID'd with binocs!
they spent anywhere from 1 hour to 1 and a half hours in the maples behind the house. Did anyone else see anything close?...the ladies are positive they were hawks! Seems very rare to me??

 

 

Re(1): Gravenhurst-Bracebridge Christmas Bird Count
Posted on December 16, 2007 at 03:03:38 PM by Ted Gardner

Here is our list from 120 meadow hieghts Bracebridge.

14 blue jays
5 mourning doves
2 hairy woodpeckers
1 downey woodpecker
4 Black capped Chickadees
2 white breasted nuthatches
3 slate coloured juncos
6 Pine Grosbeaks
2 Evening Grosbeaks
1 Pileated Woodpecker
and 7 Pigeons who were quickly dispatched by a ....
1 Coopers Hawk (positive ID)

none of our fairly regular Goldfinches , starlings, Redpolls and Red Breasted Nuthatches

 

 

Gravenhurst-Bracebridge Christmas Bird Count
Posted on December 16, 2007 at 02:39:48 PM by Barbara Taylor

Here is today's count for our yard at 96 Glendale Rd., Bracebridge:

Northern Cardinal (2 - M&F)
Dark-eyed Junco (6)
Hairy Woodpecker (4)
Downy Woodpecker (3)
Red-breasted Nuthatch (2)
White-breasted Nuthatch (3)
Black-capped Chickadee (10)
Blue Jay (5)
Mourning Dove (27) - a record for our yard!

 

 

Re(1): Northern Shrike Breakfast
Posted on December 17, 2007 at 08:22:12 PM by Marilyn Kisser

wow! you really have your share of predators this month! this is an amazing shot - hard to believe that the shrike is not that much larger than the grosbeak!

 

 

Northern Shrike Breakfast
Posted on December 16, 2007 at 12:35:47 PM by J. Gardner

Here is a photo of a Northern Shrike taken through the bedroom window. The shrike nailed a Pine Grosbeak against the door on our deck. He then took it down to the snow and posed with his trophy. June Gardner (Hurdville) photo

 

 

Re(1): Five Bald Eagles
Posted on December 20, 2007 at 08:32:12 PM by Marilyn Kisser

a lone bald eagle flew over our place today - heading towards highway 141 in Rosseau! awesome!

 

 

Five Bald Eagles
Posted on December 16, 2007 at 10:03:59 AM by Alex Mills

I participated in the Burk's Falls CBC on Friday Dec. 14. I was unable to go to the wrap-up after to see what all five groups got, but Chris Evans and I spent an enjoyable day around Magnetawan.

We found a white-throated sparrow at a feeder (no juncoes or tree sparrows). At dusk, we watched a Barred Owl hunting in an ash lowland woods.

At the mouth of the Magnetawan River (where it flows into Ahmic Lake), there was something dead on the ice that was big enough to attract five Bald Eagles (3 adults and 2 immatures).

 

 

Gravenhurst-Bracebridge Christmas Bird Count - This Sunday Dec 16
Posted on December 15, 2007 at 12:39:17 PM by Al Sinclair

The Gravenhurst-Bracebridge Audubon CBC is happening tomorrow. We can always use more counters so everyone is welcome to join us for the day, have some fun with other birders and make a contribution to bird studies. We divide into groups and cover a 24 km (15 mile) diameter circle counting every bird we see. Our circle is centered between Gravenhurst and Bracebridge a bit east of Hwy 11 and is just large enough to include both the Gravenhurst and Bracebridge Landfill sites. After the count we join to tally the results and enjoy a potluck dinner. For more information or if you see a "GOOD BIRD" in the circle on count day please send me an email.

 

 

Re(1): Common Redpolls
Posted on December 31, 2007 at 04:54:50 PM by janice house

I bought a niger seed sock several weeks ago, yesterday a lone redpoll was feeding. A hairy woodpecker was the first to investigate the day I put it up (Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst)

 

 

Common Redpolls
Posted on December 14, 2007 at 08:07:36 PM by RichardCorcelli

Common Redpolls from a flock of 50+ at our Nyger Seed Sock on Muskoka Bay.  photo

 

 

Algonquin Park Update: 13 December
Posted on December 14, 2007 at 09:57:44 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Dec. 13, 2007) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

All lakes along Highway 60 are now ice-covered, and snow
is knee-deep in the woods. Should anyone plan to visit the
East Side of Algonquin, please note that the Barron Canyon
Road will not be plowed from December 21 to January 2.

The following summary outlines observations received during
the last week for birds often sought by visiting birders here.

FINCHES:
Pine Grosbeak: Up to 40 daily at the Visitor Centre feeder,
with a large number of adult males.

Common Redpoll: Small flock at the Visitor Centre feeder
on December 13, after several days with none.

No other finch species reported.


RESIDENT BOREAL SPECIES:
Spruce Grouse: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road
(which is plowed to the gate at Cameron Lake Road junction).

Black-backed Woodpecker: No reports.

Gray Jay: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road.

Boreal Chickadee: No reports.

BIRDERS:
Please let us know the date, number and location of birds you observe
when you visit Algonquin Park. This information is stored in the
Algonquin Visitor Centre database, and will help us to assist other
birders here. Thanks.

Good birding.
Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, Ontario

 

 

Redpolls
Posted on December 13, 2007 at 12:34:43 PM by janice house

Moira has a niger sock, just counted 25 redpolls feeding on the sock. (Houston Rd north of Bracebridge) Lots more in her trees and other feeders

 

 

Pine Grosbeaks
Posted on December 13, 2007 at 09:36:00 AM by mmcanally

I have a flock of 10 Pine Grosbeaks and a flock of 20 Redpolls coming to my feeders at Britannia Road in Huntsville.

 

 

Re(1): Brown Creeper
Posted on December 21, 2007 at 10:45:28 AM by Kip Daynard

Today we had a Brown Creeper on a dead cedar in our yard. First I've seen here since the spring.
1380 Bay Lake Rd.
RR1 Emsdale

 

 

Brown Creeper
Posted on December 13, 2007 at 08:42:16 AM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there was a Brown Creeper working the pine trees in our yard - hadn't seen one here since October. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Red-necked Grebe on Fairy Lake, Huntsville
Posted on December 12, 2007 at 02:08:45 PM by ron tozer

There was a Red-necked Grebe on Fairy Lake, off the river mouth, in Huntsville this morning. It was visible from behind the LCBO.

 

 

Re(2): Northern Shrike - Huntsville
Posted on December 13, 2007 at 09:32:47 AM by mmcanally

Just got to posting this now, but on Friday, December 7, saw a Northern Shrike right outside my window at Ward Edmonds GM, and it landed and caught a small mammal and flew back across Highway 11. We are located beside Swiss Chalet in Huntsville on Hanes Road.

 

 

Re(1): Northern Shrike - Huntsville
Posted on December 12, 2007 at 10:41:38 AM by janice house

Moira has had shrikes at her home for about a month, they have been trying to attack her budgies through her sliding door (Houston Rd north of Bracebridge)

 

 

Northern Shrike - Huntsville
Posted on December 10, 2007 at 12:31:38 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning around 11:30 a.m. there was a Northern Shrike perched in a small tree at the left side of the on-ramp loop from Aspdin Rd. to Hwy. 11 south.

 

 

Snow Buntings
Posted on December 9, 2007 at 03:42:17 PM by J. Gardner

An observation. Over the last 16 years we have had from 300 (during the eastern ice storm) buntings down to just 3 last winter. The warmer winters saw a tremendous drop off from our normal 50 birds. With the return of real winter this year, the snow buntings are back. We have several visits a day from 12 (hoping for more) buntings. The photo is of one, on the deck feeder. June Gardner  (Hurdville)  photo

 

 

Fisher
Posted on December 9, 2007 at 10:51:28 AM by JoanPaget

Bob, Ruth and I watched a fisher maraud our compost bin for about an hour on Friday morning. It was a large male who seemed to enjoy grapefruit skins and tomatoes. He carried off goodies to a stash somewhere nearby. We are located on Partridge Lane, about 5 minutes west of Bracebridge.

 

 

Oops! one less scaup
Posted on December 9, 2007 at 08:57:54 AM by jim griffin

I scoped that "scaup" in better light this morning and after many looks, have realized that the white ring around the tip of the bill( couldn't see it in fading light) as well as at the base of the bill make this one a male Ring Necked Duck. I guess I'm the "scaup goat" on this one.

 

 

Hairy Woodpecker
Posted on December 8, 2007 at 06:00:21 PM by RichardCorcelli

Not particularly noteworthy but a very nice Hairy Woodpecker at our suet log near Muskoka Bay. [rotated 90 degrees to fill the frame]  photo

 

 

Re(1): 2 Birds !!
Posted on December 8, 2007 at 07:46:45 PM by Marilyn Kisser

I am going to have to take a drive past 120 Meadow Heights just to see all the action!

 

 

2 Birds !!
Posted on December 8, 2007 at 05:29:42 PM by Ted Gardner

 

Its not a great picture but it may be rare as you have a Pileated Woodpecker and a wild Turkey in the same shot!
We had 6 wild turkeys and a pair of Pileated woodpeckers arrive mid afternoon....never boring here at 120 Meadow Hieghts Bracebridge.  photo

 

 

Lesser Scaup
Posted on December 8, 2007 at 05:00:41 PM by jim griffin

I have been watching a solitary female Lesser Scaup on the river at Port Sydney; south of the road 10 bridge.

 

 

Re(2): Weasel in da House!
Posted on December 7, 2007 at 10:53:18 PM by B. Korol

Good news......around 8:30 p.m on Friday, I managed to shoo my little white friend out the door, where I am sure he's feasting on mice in the yard!!!!

 

 

Re(3): Weasel in da House!
Posted on December 8, 2007 at 04:42:53 PM by Ted Gardner

Home Hardware in Gravenhurst has every size available.

 

 

Re(1): Weasel in da House!
Posted on December 7, 2007 at 03:19:28 PM by Al Johnston

You could get a live-trap at Ellwood Epps on hwy 11 near Orillia but you could probably get one closer. A squirrel trap would do and bait it with meat. Wear gloves when you open the trap to release it. Good luck.

 

 

Weasel in da House!
Posted on December 7, 2007 at 12:11:41 PM by B. Korol

Last night I didn't get much sleep. I kept on getting woken up by mysterious noises in my kitchen. After several searches I finally found the source. I am pretty sure this is an Ermine (Short-tailed Weasel), that probably came in through my dryer vent. I think I've got it contained in a smaller part of my basement, but am still trying to track down some live-traps. Anybody have any suggestions as to how to safely capture and release it?
I live in Ravenscliffe, NW of Huntsville.  photo

 

 

Algonquin Park Update: 6 December
Posted on December 7, 2007 at 09:43:17 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Dec. 7, 2007) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Of all the lakes along Highway 60, only Smoke Lake has any
open water now. At least one Northern Shrike has appeared
almost daily this week at the Visitor Centre feeders. Two
sightings of Northern Goshawk suggest that many stayed north,
likely feeding on the large Ruffed Grouse population.


The following summary outlines observations received during
the last week for birds often sought by visiting birders here.

FINCHES:

Pine Grosbeak: Up to 30 daily at the Visitor Centre feeder.
A few seen elsewhere.

Common Redpoll: A few, irregularly, at Visitor Centre feeder.

No other finch species reported.


RESIDENT BOREAL SPECIES:

Spruce Grouse: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road
(which may not be plowed, and is gated at Cameron Lake Road
junction).

Black-backed Woodpecker: No reports.

Gray Jay: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road.

Boreal Chickadee: No reports.


OTHER SIGHTINGS OF NOTE:

Great Gray Owl: One perched on the telephone cable at km 1.5
on Highway 60 at 8 a.m. on December 3, was not observed later
that morning, or since.



BIRDERS:
Please let us know the date, number and location of birds you observe
when you visit Algonquin Park. This information is stored in the
Algonquin Visitor Centre database, and will help us to assist other
birders here. Thanks.


Good birding.

Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, Ontario

Directions:
Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400, 11
and 60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400. From
Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the
park. Kilometre markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from the West
Gate (km 0) to the East Gate (km 56). Permits and information are
available daily at both gates throughout the winter, including the
Algonquin Information Guide showing locations discussed here.

The Visitor Centre (km 43) is open on weekends (10 to 4) through the
winter. Recent bird sightings and information, plus feeders, can be found
there. Birders visiting during the week are welcome to contact staff for
birding information via the service entrance (right end of the building
as you face it from the parking lot).

 

 

Re(2): Pine Grosbeaks...anybody?
Posted on December 6, 2007 at 11:23:47 PM by Marilyn Kisser

we have a male and female visiting our feeders daily - sure wish there were more! just outside of Rosseau

photo

 

 

Re(1): Pine Grosbeaks...anybody?
Posted on December 7, 2007 at 08:23:02 AM by Ron Stager

GBA (Greater Barkway Area)
We have a group of 12-18 pine grosbeaks visiting our feeder for the last week and a half. Also a small group of redpolls (need to get the binoculars on the light coloured one). One tree sparrow now and then.
Ron

 

 

Re(1): Pine Grosbeaks...anybody?
Posted on December 6, 2007 at 03:43:02 PM by Ted Gardner

aprox 15 in this afternoon as well as 3 evenings
120 meadow hieghts Bracebridge

 

 

Re(1): Pine Grosbeaks...anybody?
Posted on December 6, 2007 at 02:36:13 PM by J. Gardner

We have up to 26 Pines coming in each day, despite our marauding Cooper's Hawk. Actually, the hawk hasn't made an appearance today. We are in Hurdville, near Lake Manitouwabing.

 

 

Pine Grosbeaks...anybody?
Posted on December 6, 2007 at 12:58:31 PM by Al Sinclair

With the Gravenhurst-Bracebridge Christmas Bird Count less than 2 weeks away (Dec 16) I am wondering how many Pine Grosbeaks are still in Muskoka. Here we have around a dozen regulars at the feeder that I have been pampering, hoping they stay for the count. Today with the snow flurries we had a bigger group, 18. Are there any others out there?

 

 

Evening Grosbeaks
Posted on December 6, 2007 at 09:45:42 AM by RichardCorcelli

Evening Grosbeaks arrived at our feeders on Muskoka Bay this morning among the Common Redpolls and Pine Siskins.  photo

 

 

Re(1): Coyote
Posted on December 5, 2007 at 07:59:59 PM by ann hansen

We live up at the top of Lankin Ave near the golf course in the Covered Bridge subdivision. We frequently hear coyotes at night, especially in the spring and fall. Sometimes they sound like they are right outside the house, other times I know they are out in the golf course. I've never seen one up here though.

 

 

Coyote
Posted on December 5, 2007 at 10:43:18 AM by Barbara Taylor

A first for our back yard! This morning a coyote came to the edge of the wooded area behind our house, but got startled by something and retreated out of view before I was able to grab my camera. It was following an established deer trail that has been used for several years. We've never seen a coyote in the neighbourhood, but heard some howling/yipping one evening west of here, near the new part of Covered Bridge Trail. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Barred Owl
Posted on December 4, 2007 at 10:02:07 PM by Marilyn Kisser

this barred owl has been hunting in the mornings here - I think he prefers the squirrels, but he did make a stop at the small bird feeder today! all the chickadees headed off quickly! (just outside of Rosseau)  photo

 

 

Re(2): Red-shouldered Hawk - Huntsville
Posted on December 10, 2007 at 01:57:24 PM by Kip Daynard

How big is the juvenile Red-tail you've been seeing and is it a typical eastern specimen or is there anything unusual about it? The one I saw was quite a small buteo. I know Red-tails can vary a lot in size (and judging size can be unreliable), but I don't recall ever seeing one this small. My first impression was that it was not much more than the size of a Broad-wing and I don't recall ever having this impression from a bird seen this close up which turned out to be a Red-tail. It was seen on a very good migration day - there was quite a lot of movement in the skies. I had just seen a Bald Eagle about 2 kms north. This bird also showed no patagial marks, nor black leading edge to wing, nor belly band.

Kip

 

 

Re(1): Red-shouldered Hawk - Huntsville
Posted on December 7, 2007 at 11:50:30 AM by B. Korol

Hi Kip,
For what its worth, we see a juvenile Red-tailed Hawk almost daily around our office here in Arrowhead, which is less than 1 km from your sighting.

 

 

Red-shouldered Hawk - Huntsville
Posted on December 4, 2007 at 12:45:45 PM by Kip Daynard

On Sat. Dec. 1st I saw what I believe to be an immature Red-shouldered Hawk flying southwards over Hwy 11 in Huntsville south of the Arrowhead exit. I understand this is a bit late for adult Red-shoulders and quite late for immatures. My look was short but I am pretty certain of the id as I got a decent look at the underside. It was clearly a buteo by shape, smaller than a Rough-leg and completely lacking the dark wrist marks and belly band expected of that species. Seen against a blue sky it was quite evenly pale (light barring?) underneath except for a prominent bright slash across the inner primaries contrasting strongly with black wing tips.

Kip Daynard
RR1 Emsdale

 

 

Re(5): this morning's photo
Posted on December 6, 2007 at 02:11:43 PM by Nigel

Apologies!!!!! closer scrutiny and an email, have corrected my ID! they are both Sharp-shinned hawks. The size of the prey on the first bird is more in keeping with a Cooper's but a closer look shows the jay isn't much smaller than the hawk!! gutsy bird!

 

 

Re(4): this morning's photo
Posted on December 5, 2007 at 09:32:56 PM by Nigel

These are actually two different birds.......both females judging from the prey size. The one with the blue jay is an adult Cooper's hawk and the one with the woodpecker is a sharp-shinned hawk......excellent photos!

 

 

Re(5): this morning's photo
Posted on December 6, 2007 at 00:15:06 AM by Ted Gardner

YES....this is nature...enough said.

 

 

Re(4): this morning's photo
Posted on December 5, 2007 at 02:32:31 PM by Al Johnston

First of all, June and Jim, great pics! Secondly, if you really want to discourage the "highly efficient hunter", take down your bird feeders which create a schmorgasbord of sorts for most raptors. Personally, I'd leave them up and let nature take it's course. Just my 2 cents.

 

 

Re(3): this morning's photo
Posted on December 5, 2007 at 09:41:30 AM by Barbara Taylor

Here's an update from June & Jim Gardner:

Getting to be too much of a good thing. Here is the Cooper's Hawk with this morning's breakfast, what appears to be a Hairy Woodpecker. Does anybody know how to discourage this highly efficient hunter. June Gardner  photo

 

 

Re(2): Jim's photos
Posted on December 4, 2007 at 01:13:29 PM by Barbara Taylor

Jim's photos taken through the window this morning: photo1  photo2  photo3

 

 

Re(1): Cooper's Hawk
Posted on December 4, 2007 at 08:01:28 AM by J. Gardner

We just saw the same horrible story repeated on the front lawn. The take down was much closer to the house this time, so we could see the struggle of the jay. Jim was able to get a couple of shots again.

 

 

Cooper's Hawk
Posted on December 4, 2007 at 07:40:42 AM by J. Gardner

Yesterday we were lucky enough to see a Cooper's Hawk take a Blue Jay. He took it to ground plucked out the breast feathers. He sat long enough for Jim to get out and get a couple of pictures. He then lifted off carrying the carcass of the jay through a thicket and out of sight. All this on the front lawn. In Hurdville, near Lake Manitouwabing.

 

 

Re(1): Great Gray Owl in Algonquin Park
Posted on December 3, 2007 at 11:47:28 AM by ron tozer

The Great Gray Owl in Algonquin was not found by an observer searching the area later this morning. These irrupting owls frequently keep moving until they encounter an area with a significant number of small mammals, so subsequent sightings of this bird may be unlikely. I will post if it is seen again.

 

 

Great Gray Owl in Algonquin Park
Posted on December 3, 2007 at 09:44:41 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Dec. 3, 2007) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.


Kevin Clute and Lee Pauzé just phoned to report a Great Gray
Owl on the utility wires at km 1.5 along Highway 60 in Algonquin
Park at 8 am this morning.

As with the Northern Hawk Owl at Port Weller on Saturday, the
appearance here of this boreal forest owl is likely indicative of an
expected southward irruption of these birds due to a crash of the
vole population on the breeding grounds, as reported earlier by
Ron Pittaway.

Ron Tozer
Dwight, Ontario

 

 

Re(1): Bald Eagle
Posted on December 3, 2007 at 10:18:33 AM by Kip Daynard

My wife and I saw an adult Bald Eagle on Sat. Dec. 1st fly over Hwy 11 just a few kilometers north of Huntsville near Arrowhead Provincial Park. It was flying towards town.
Kip Daynard
RR1 Emsdale

 

 

Bald Eagle
Posted on December 3, 2007 at 09:15:37 AM by Dawn Sherman

We had a mature Bald Eagle fly over our house this morning on Main Street in Huntsville.

 

 

There is a reason for Pigeons!
Posted on December 2, 2007 at 02:36:01 PM by jim griffin

my feeders are regularly covered by about a dozen pigeons and I sometimes wonder why I bother; I got my answer today: about 9 am, what I'm sure was a juvenile Northern Goshawk took an aggressive run at a feeder load of pigeons but flew off empty "handed" and then this afternoon as the pigeons gradually got up the courage to return, a Red Tailed Hawk cruised by close to rattle them again. I guess I'll just keep them around as useful links in the food chain.

 

 

Turkeys
Posted on December 1, 2007 at 03:22:39 PM by janice house

Driving home from Toronto today we saw at least 4 dozen turkeys in a field on the north east side of Udney.

 

 

Pine Siskins
Posted on November 30, 2007 at 08:12:14 PM by RichardCorcelli

In reply to Barbara Taylor's question, we have quite a few Pine Siskins amongst a large flock of Common Redpolls at our feeders on Muskoka Bay, just opposite the Segwun/Wenonah.

 

 

Algonquin Park Update: 29 November
Posted on November 30, 2007 at 08:58:30 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Nov. 30, 2007) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

All small lakes and ponds are frozen now, and there is nearly
30 cm of snow (and counting!) in most areas of the Park.
The bigger lakes are open, so a few ducks may still be
lingering, although there were no reports this week.

The winter gate is now closed on Opeongo Road, and the
road is irregularly plowed.

The following summary outlines observations received during
the last week for birds often sought by visiting birders here.

FINCHES:

Pine Grosbeak: Up to 30 regularly at the Visitor Centre feeder.
A few seen elsewhere.

Purple Finch: No reports.

Red Crossbill: No reports.

White-winged Crossbill: No reports.

Common Redpoll: Up to 20 regularly at the Visitor Centre feeder.
A few observed elsewhere.

Pine Siskin: Four at the Visitor Centre (November 29).

American Goldfinch: No reports.

Evening Grosbeak: No reports. (Correction of last week's update:
this species was last seen at the Visitor Centre on November 18.)

REGULAR BOREAL SPECIES:

Spruce Grouse: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road.

Black-backed Woodpecker: four seen from the chain across the old
railway to West Rose Lake (November 26).

Gray Jay: reported along Opeongo Road, at Visitor Centre, and
at Wolf Howl Pond area.

Boreal Chickadee: reported on Arowhon Road (3.8 km from Highway
60), and along old railway near chain gate, Wolf Howl Pond and West
Rose Lake (November 26).

OTHER SIGHTINGS OF NOTE:

Sharp-shinned Hawk: young female stalking birds at the Visitor Centre
feeder on November 23. Late for this species in Algonquin.

American Three-toed Woodpecker: a female was photographed (sent
to me) on Spruce Bog Boardwalk on November 25. If walking
backwards on the trail, the location was described as about 325 m before
reaching the open bog. It was not found by others later, but may be
still in the area. This bird may be the forerunner of a possible "echo
flight" of this boreal forest woodpecker, following last winter's
major irruption.

BIRDERS:
Please let us know the date, number and location of birds you observe
when you visit Algonquin Park. This information is stored in the
Algonquin Visitor Centre database, and will help us to assist other
birders here. Thanks.

Good birding.

Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, Ontario

Directions:
Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400, 11
and 60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400. From
Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the
park. Kilometre markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from the West
Gate (km 0) to the East Gate (km 56). Permits and information are
available daily at both gates throughout the winter, including the
Algonquin Information Guide showing locations discussed here.

The Visitor Centre (km 43) is open on weekends (10 to 4) through the
winter. Recent bird sightings and information, plus feeders, can be found
there. Birders visiting during the week are welcome to contact staff for
birding information via the service entrance (right end of the building
as you face it from the parking lot).

------------------------------------------------
*ONTBIRDS is presented by the Ontario Field Ornithologists - the provincial birding organization.
For instructions to join or leave ONTBIRDS visit http://www.ofo.ca/information/ontbirdssetup.php
ONTBIRDS Guidelines may be viewed at http://www.ofo.ca/information/ontbirdsguide.php

 

 

Re(4): Dove ID?
Posted on December 1, 2007 at 01:42:51 PM by Marilyn Kisser

we tried this morning but no luck - it is hanging around with the mourning doves - it comes to the feeders and seems to have no problem eating the black oil sunflower seeds - it seems to have survived all that snow we got the past few days - we will continue to monitor it

 

 

Re(3): Dove ID?
Posted on December 1, 2007 at 12:08:38 PM by Al Johnston

They're native to Africa so you're probably right about it not surviving the winter. Good luck in trying to capture it, Marilyn and please keep us posted.

 

 

Re(2): Dove ID?
Posted on November 30, 2007 at 07:34:50 PM by Marilyn Kisser

I have been told it is a ring necked dove - a tangerine variety and is a domestic bird - I may try to catch it and bring it somewhere safe - apparantly it will not survive this harsh winter

 

 

Re(1): Dove ID?
Posted on November 30, 2007 at 03:40:26 PM by Al Johnston

My guess would be a colour-variant of a rock pigeon. Any other thoughts?

 

 

Dove ID?
Posted on November 29, 2007 at 10:12:33 PM by Marilyn Kisser

this dove has been around the feeders the past couple of days - anyone know what it is? just outside of Rosseau

photo

 

 

Pine Siskin
Posted on November 28, 2007 at 10:39:59 AM by Barbara Taylor

This morning a lone Pine Siskin visited our feeder.  Has anyone else seen Siskins recently?

 

We had six Woodpeckers come in to feed at the same time so I had to put out a second suet cage. They were getting very aggressive towards each other as they impatiently waited their turn. There are two females of each species (Hairy and Downy) and one male of each. A pair of Pileateds also stop by once in a while but they weren't part of the traffic jam this morning. The number of Mourning Doves has increased to sixteen now. Other regulars are Dark-eyed Juncos, White-breasted and Red-breasted Nuthatches, Blue Jays, and Black-capped Chickadees. The resident pair of Northern Cardinals are infrequent visitors now that many other birdfeeders are well stocked around the neighbourhood. (Bracebridge)

(addendum...as of 3 p.m., make that 23 Mourning Doves!)

 

 

Goldeneye
Posted on November 27, 2007 at 02:59:38 PM by MaryWillmott

Two male Common Goldeneyes and one female Bufflehead today on Milford Bay at Beaumaris. My flock of Redpolls at Beaumaris has grown to 50 to 60 birds (fill three feeders every 2nd day (yips) Any easy way of finding a Hoary?

 

 

Redpolls
Posted on November 26, 2007 at 03:17:33 PM by J. Gardner

Our flock of redpolls, anywhere from 5 to 15, appears to be a mixed group of Commons and Hoary Redpolls. (Hurdville)

 

 

Re(1): White-throated Sparrow...Bracebridge
Posted on December 1, 2007 at 03:14:11 PM by janice house

I just returned from a week in Toronto and have a juvenile feeding on the ground under the feeders beside our cedar hedge. (Doe Lake Rd., Gravenhurst)

 

 

White-throated Sparrow...Bracebridge
Posted on November 25, 2007 at 11:06:31 AM by Al Sinclair

We have had a White-throated Sparrow in our yard for the past three days. It has not been seen eating at the feeders yet even though there is food on the ground. It is foraging on the ground in the flower garden near the feeder. This species should be south of here by now but there has been a few records of them spending the winter in Muskoka near a feeder.

 

 

Algonquin Park - Pine Grosbeak, Northern Shrike
Posted on November 24, 2007 at 08:02:28 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Lev Frid on ONTBIRDS (Nov. 24, 2007) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Today I was birding the West Side of Algonquin Park. First on the list
was the Spruce Bog Boardwalk, which produced one GRAY JAY at the end
of the trail. At the Visitor Centre, two PINE GROSBEAKS, a male and a
female, were observed below the feeders from the Upper observation
deck, and a few RED-BREASTED NUTHATCHES and COMMON REDPOLLS at the
feeders. At Opeongo road, I observed 10 PINE GROSBEAKS fly overhead
and land in a White Pine. A NORTHERN SHRIKE was also observed at the
entrance of Opeongo Road. BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEES were also present in
all three locations in decent numbers.

 

 

Re(2): Common Redpolls
Posted on December 1, 2007 at 03:19:25 PM by janice house

We have half a dozen at our feeders, Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst

 

 

Re(1): Common Redpolls
Posted on November 25, 2007 at 10:46:39 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

I have one in Bala!

 

 

Re(1): Common Redpolls
Posted on November 24, 2007 at 08:01:10 PM by Terry & Marion Whittam

We saw about 25 Redpolls eating grit on Winhara Rd half way between Bracebridge and Gravenhurst today.

 

 

Common Redpolls
Posted on November 24, 2007 at 07:48:38 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there were about 30 Common Redpolls eating grit on the road by #105 Meadow Heights Dr. in Bracebridge. There were also several smaller flocks of just 5-7 birds scattered around the neighbourhood.

 

 

Costa Rica Bird Tour
Posted on November 23, 2007 at 10:40:19 AM by nickbartok

Hello Muskoka Birders,

I wanted to inform you of a new business venture offering bird tours. We are offering our fist trip to Costa Rica this winter in February and are looking for 10 eager participants to enjoy the sun, track birds and do some bird banding. The cost is only $1000 + flight and some food. Much cheaper than most tour agencies.

Please check out our website at: www.asioadventures.ca

Some of you know the name Asio; it is the genus name for short-eared owls and our mascot, as it is world renouned.

We are also birding Amherst Island on December 22 and 23, and invite people to come along. If you are interested please contact me.

Nick Bartok

ps. I cleared this posting with Barbara, as it is advertising, but for a local birder.

 

 

Algonquin Park Update: 22 November
Posted on November 22, 2007 at 09:29:03 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Nov. 22, 2007) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.


The arrival of significant snow cover in the Park provided another indicator
of the current scarcity of birds. Typically, winter finches are attracted to
sand and salt on the highway in Algonquin. However, it was possible to drive
the entire 56 km through the Park this week and not see even one bird on the
road.

More evidence of the apparent departure of finches from this area included
the absence of Evening Grosbeaks at the Visitor Centre feeder (none since
November 15), after they had been regular in small numbers earlier.


The following summary outlines reports received during the last week for
birds often sought by visiting birders here.

FINCHES:

Pine Grosbeak: About 15 regularly at the Visitor Centre feeder. A few seen
elsewhere.

Purple Finch: No reports.

Red Crossbill: No reports.

White-winged Crossbill: No reports.

Common Redpoll: A few regularly at the Visitor Centre and West Gate feeders.
Very few observed elsewhere.

Pine Siskin: No reports.

American Goldfinch: one at Visitor Centre (November 20).

Evening Grosbeak: No reports.


BOREAL SPECIES:

Spruce Grouse: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road.

Black-backed Woodpecker: One at Wolf Howl Pond on November 8. No reports
since, but there were very few birders here this week.

Gray Jay: reported recently at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Opeongo Road, Visitor
Centre, and Wolf Howl Pond.

Boreal Chickadee: reported at Wolf Howl Pond.


OTHER SIGHTINGS OF NOTE:

Hoary Redpoll: One reported at the Visitor Centre on November 7. Only report
so far this fall.

Marten and Fisher: At least one of each of these large weasels has been
visiting the Visitor Centre suet feeders irregularly this past week.


BIRDERS:
Please let us know the date, number and location of birds you observe when
you visit Algonquin Park. This information is stored in the Algonquin
Visitor Centre database, and will help us to assist other birders here.
Thanks.


Good birding.

Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, Ontario

Directions:
Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400, 11
and 60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400. From
Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the
park. Kilometre markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from the West
Gate (km 0) to the East Gate (km 56). Permits and information are
available daily at both gates throughout the winter, including the
Algonquin Information Guide showing locations discussed here.

The Visitor Centre (km 43) is open on weekends (10 to 4) through the
winter. Recent bird sightings and information, plus feeders, can be found
there. Birders visiting during the week are welcome to contact staff for
birding information via the service entrance (right end of the building
as you face it from the parking lot).

 

 

Boreal Birds
Posted on November 22, 2007 at 08:59:06 AM by Barbara Taylor

Ron Pittaway has posted a very interesting update on Ontbirds about the movement of various boreal bird species, including owls and redpolls. You can read his report at: http://mailman.hwcn.org/pipermail/ontbirds/Week-of-Mon-20071119/016991.html

 

 

Port Sydney birds
Posted on November 21, 2007 at 07:05:59 PM by jim griffin

Red Tailed Hawk sited today perched near hwy 11 east side just south of Stephenson rd #1 about 12:30 pm.

Belted kingfisher (male) on the river at Port Sydney bridge (north side)approx. 4:00 pm

Hooded Mergansers (2 pairs)on the river at Port Sydney, south of bridge along with a couple of pairs of Common Golden eye.

 

 

Re(1): Pine Grosbeaks
Posted on November 22, 2007 at 06:47:27 PM by janice house

I counted 8 in our neighbourhood flock this morning as I was brushing off the car. Geoff took a picture of a lone bird that was feeding most of today beside our cedar hedge. The flock are feeding at 1026 Laycox Rd most mornings when I walk by with the dogs.

 

 

Re(2): Pine Grosbeaks
Posted on November 21, 2007 at 03:06:15 PM by J. Gardner

Here in Hurdville, near Lake Manitouwabing, we have had Pine Grosbeaks for several weeks now. We have a collection of 6 or 8 that arrives with the Bluejays in the morning, and can be seen at any time of the day. We also have a small collection of 3 and 4 beautiful males that comes sporadically through the day. They will use the feeders, but seem to prefer to pick over the leavings on the ground.

 

 

Re(1): Pine Grosbeaks
Posted on November 21, 2007 at 09:10:02 AM by Wayne Bridge

I have had pine grosbeaks (at least 1 male & 2 females) "investigating" my feeders since Nov. 1, off and on (Kearney). They don't seem to be able to negotiate the squirrel-proof feeder - maybe it's grosbeak-proof too? Our spruce and pines have no cones and same story for berries on the cherries and viburnums.

 

 

Re(1): Pine Grosbeaks
Posted on November 21, 2007 at 08:34:15 AM by MaryWillmott

There has been three Pine Grosbeaks around my feeder and the red berries in the marsh at Beaumaris for the last week.

 

 

Re(1): Pine Grosbeaks
Posted on November 20, 2007 at 09:49:27 PM by Al Sinclair

We had 5 Pine Grosbeaks at our feeder here today, 8 km east of Bracebridge. 2m,2f,1 im male

 

 

Pine Grosbeaks
Posted on November 20, 2007 at 03:23:42 PM by Barbara Taylor

Don Bailey reports there were several Pine Grosbeaks feeding in the crabapple tree at 117 Meadow Heights Dr. earlier today. This morning we saw a small flock of them in a maple tree by #103 Glendale Rd. So far none have visited our nearby feeders. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Sunday Birds
Posted on November 20, 2007 at 07:40:31 PM by Dave Wright

We returned home (3 Queen St Bracebridge) after 4 days away and this morning we had 20 to 30 redpolls at the feeders. Dave W

 

 

Sunday Birds
Posted on November 18, 2007 at 10:43:38 PM by MaryWillmott

I enjoyed seeing a Red Tail Hawk at Center Milford Bay Rd. Highway 118 West. At Milford Bay, Beaumaris there were several Buffleheads and one Loon. At Butterfly Lake Glen Orchard , I saw Hooded Mergansers. At my feeder at Beaumaris I have 8 to 10 Common Redpolls along with the usual crowd. Every morning I have a pair of Mallards come in for corn.

 

 

Snow Goose at Grandview Resort
Posted on November 18, 2007 at 03:34:49 PM by ron tozer

At 2 p.m. today, we saw a blue morph adult Snow Goose among about 300 Canada Geese grazing on the Grandview Resort golf course along Highway 60, east of Huntsville.

 

 

Red-necked Grebes at Port Sydney
Posted on November 18, 2007 at 03:31:02 PM by ron tozer

There were two Red-necked Grebes visible from the dock on Mary Lake at Port Sydney around noon today. One bird was near the southern-most island, and the other was near shore in the southwest corner of the lake.

 

 

Re(2): Barrow's Goldeneye
Posted on November 18, 2007 at 03:27:54 PM by ron tozer

See Di Labio, B., R. Pittaway, and P. Burke. 1997. Bill colour and identification of female Barrow's Goldeneye. Ontario Birds 15(2): 81-85. They note: The most important field marks differentiating female Common and Barrow's goldeneyes are head shape and bill size, not bill colour. They reported having seen female Common Goldeneyes with extensive yellow-orange or even all yellow-orange bills on many occasions.

We also failed to locate any goldeneyes other than Commons (about 4) on the river below the bridge at Port Sydney this morning. However, we met Janice and Moira and they advised that there were more goldeneyes there yesterday, so this section of river should be watched.

 

 

Re(1): Barrow's Goldeneye
Posted on November 18, 2007 at 01:47:32 PM by Barbara Taylor

We tried to find the Port Sydney Goldeneyes late this morning but only managed to see one male Common Goldeneye downstream from the bridge.

Do female Common Goldeneyes ever have a completely yellow bill or does that indicate a Barrow's? This morning there were two female Goldeneyes on the Muskoka River by #1447 Beaumont Dr. (across from Santa's Village) in Bracebridge. They were constantly diving so it was difficult to get a good look at their head shape. One had a completely yellow bill. The other had a mostly yellow bill with just a bit of black.

 

 

Barrow's Goldeneye
Posted on November 17, 2007 at 09:28:27 PM by janice house

Moira and I went to Huntsville today via South Mary Lake Rd - # 10 - Brunel Road. We spotted several Common Goldeneye pairs and we believe there was a pair of Barrow's Goldeneye with them; #751 on S Mary Lake Rd just before the bridge in Port Sydney. If anyone is in the area, please confirm the sighting. A Brown Creeper was working the White Pine at # 751 while we watched the Goldeneye's. We saw a Hooded Merganser pair at Goodwin Park, five pairs of Hooded Mergansers/one female Common Merganser at the pond at Heritage Park. Geoff was hunting north of Wier Lake in Bent River today and saw a Great Grey Owl.

 

 

Common Redpolls
Posted on November 17, 2007 at 11:44:23 AM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there have been small flocks of Redpolls feeding in the birch trees along Glendale Rd. in front of #86 and #96. (Bracebridge)

Earlier today at the frozen Bracebridge Ponds we only found a few Mallards at the north edge of cell 2 where there was still a small patch of open water. About 120 Canada Geese flew in from the river and decided to land on the ice in cell 1. Every once in a while a goose would stumble and break through the ice - quite comical to watch.

 

 

Algonquin Park Update: 17 November
Posted on November 17, 2007 at 11:31:07 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Nov. 17, 2007) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

As expected in this non-seed crop year, the forest in Algonquin
Park seems to be getting ever quieter. Many finches, Black-capped
Chickadees and Red-breasted Nuthatches appear to have moved out.
Also in response to the poor to non-existent natural food situation,
feeders in Algonquin and nearby Muskoka have been reporting
good numbers of these birds. However, at least the finches often
appear to be moving through, with frequent changes in numbers
and species at feeders.

The following summary outlines reports received during the last
week for birds often sought by visiting birders here.

FINCHES:

Pine Grosbeak: regular at Visitor Centre feeder. Small numbers
away from feeders.

Purple Finch: two flying over (November 13). Most are gone.

Red Crossbill: one undocumented report.

White-winged Crossbill: no reports.

Common Redpoll: widespread in small numbers; regular at
the Visitor Centre and West Gate feeders. Often seen feeding
in weed patches.

Pine Siskin: two at Visitor Centre feeder (November 13).

American Goldfinch: one at Visitor Centre feeder, irregularly.

Evening Grosbeak: up to 20 at the Visitor Centre feeder;
occasional flyovers elsewhere.


BOREAL SPECIES:

Spruce Grouse: seen at Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo
Road, including displaying males apparently responding to
spring-like day length.

Black-backed Woodpecker: no reports.

Gray Jay: reported at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Opeongo Road,
Visitor Centre, and Wolf Howl Pond.

Boreal Chickadee: reported at Spruce Bog Boardwalk. Try
Opeongo Road as well.


OTHER BIRDS OF NOTE:

Golden Eagle: single migrating adults were observed on
November 11 and 16.

Bohemian Waxwing: a few reported; most may have already
passed through.


BIRDERS:
Please let us know the date, number and location of birds you
observe when you visit Algonquin Park. This information is stored
in the Algonquin Visitor Centre database, and will help us to assist
other birders here. Thanks.

BIRDERS FROM THE BRANTFORD AREA: PLEASE SEND
ME THE DATE, LOCATION AND NUMBERS FOR YOUR
WOODPECKER, REDPOLL, AND CROSSBILL SIGHTINGS
FROM LAST WEEK IN ALGONQUIN.

Good birding.

Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, Ontario

Directions:
Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400, 11
and 60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400. From
Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the
park. Kilometre markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from the West
Gate (km 0) to the East Gate (km 56). Permits and information are
available daily at both gates throughout the winter, including the
Algonquin Information Guide showing locations discussed here.

The Visitor Centre (km 43) is open on weekends (10 to 4) through the
winter. Recent bird sightings and information, plus feeders, can be found
there. Birders visiting during the week are welcome to contact staff for
birding information via the service entrance (right end of the building
as you face it from the parking lot).
------------------------------------------------
*ONTBIRDS is presented by the Ontario Field Ornithologists - the provincial birding organization.
For instructions to join or leave ONTBIRDS visit http://www.ofo.ca/information/ontbirdssetup.php
ONTBIRDS Guidelines may be viewed at http://www.ofo.ca/information/ontbirdsguide.php

 

 

Boreal Chickadees - Algonquin Park
Posted on November 14, 2007 at 04:59:40 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Bruce Ripley on ONTBIRDS (Nov. 14, 2007) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.


On Tuesday 13th en route to Bracebridge to visit some friends, I did some "hurry up" birding in Algonquin Park. My first significant sighting was a flock of 8 BOHEMIAN WAXWINGS in someones frontyard just north of Bancroft which gave me my 400th ABA species for the year. In the town of Whitney I located 3 PINE GROSBEAKS at a feeder and a PINE SISKIN and AMERICAN GOLDFINCH. At the Visitor Centre in Algonquin Park there were 2 more BOHEMIAN WAXWINGS as well as a flock of 15 COMMON REDPOLLS and another AMERICAN GOLDFINCH. On the Spruce Bog Boardwalk I came across a male SPRUCE GROUSE courting a female SPRUCE GROUSE in the middle of the path just before the boardwalk. I have seen this event before but never in November. They must have thought it was April. I slowly approached to within four metres and watched the courtship ritual for about five minutes. As I backed away the male flew just over my head and landed on a branch about two metres away. I almost always bring my camera along, but as this wasn't really a birding trip, I left my camera at home. How unfortunate!
At Wolf Howl Pond I came across 4 GRAY JAYS which landed right beside me for another perfect photo opportunity. I noticed some peanut shells on the ground from a previous birder which is probably why they came so close. At this same location I heard then observed 2 BOREAL CHICKADEES. I also saw a GREAT BLUE HERON in the park. Although it wasn't overly birdy in the park, Algonquin always has something good to see. In Bracebridge there were 3 PINE GROSBEAKS and 20 COMMON REDPOLLS along Curling Road.

Cheers
Bruce Ripley

Algonquin Park is located on Hwy. 60, east of Huntsville. Hunstville can be
reached from Toronto by taking Highways 400 and 11, north.

Km. 43 Visitor Centre feeders. There are two feeders; one below the
observation deck and one north of the main building.

Km. 42.5 Spruce Bog Boardwalk
Km. 15.4 Arowhon Road

Take Arowhon road north off of Hwy 60 for about 5 km. Where the
road branches in three (old rail line) at the large Arowhon Resort sign, take the right
branch and drive about 100m along the old rail bed until you reach the chain
across the road and park there. The rail bed can then be walked. After
about 15 minutes it joins up with the upper part of the Mizzy Lake trail
and passes by Wolf Howl Pond and West Rose Lake. Return on same route from West Rose Lake.

Bracebridge is about 30 minutes south of Huntsville. Curling Road is located beside the South Muskoka Golf Course.

 

 

Common Redpolls, Bala - photos
Posted on November 14, 2007 at 04:34:34 PM by Barbara Taylor

Eleanor Kee Wellman sent the following report for Nov. 12 along with some of her photos from that morning:


This morning about 11 am I looked out to see a couple of Common Red Polls on a tree. They came in for a look at the goldenrod and flew off. Soon after more than 100 of the dear little things came in and took over the local goldenrod, the Stiff Goldenrod and the Monarda Fistulosa seed heads. Some of the plants had fourteen birds on them. It was an amazing invasion!

The Stiff Goldenrod is one of the seed included in the Septic Bed Meadow Mix put together by the Wildflower Farm and meant to be sown on the sand of a new septic bed. The birds spent most of their time on the prairie species.

After about an hour of flying in and out they discovered the bird feeders then disappeared!

It was just the thing to brighten an otherwise dull day.

photo1  photo2  photo3  photo4


Regards,
Eleanor
(Bala)

 

 

Buffleheads & Hooded Mergansers
Posted on November 13, 2007 at 12:06:49 PM by JenniferHoare

There are three Hooded Mergansers (2 males and 1 female) lingering along the South Branch of the Muskoka River between the Baysville Dam and Fairy Falls. There was also a female Bufflehead seen just above the Baysville Dam.

 

 

Pine Grosbeaks
Posted on November 13, 2007 at 12:02:50 PM by JenniferHoare

There were about 1/2 a dozen Pine Grosbeaks hanging out on the Baysville Waterfront Walkway, by the hwy 117 bridge. They seemed eager to watch me as well and I was able to get a good look at these lovely ladies and lads.

 

 

Common Redpolls
Posted on November 13, 2007 at 10:36:40 AM by janice house

Just came back from Bracebridge, small flock of redpolls in the birch tree at 106 Meadow Heights.

 

 

Pine Grosbeak
Posted on November 12, 2007 at 01:51:24 PM by janice house

My neighbour had a female/immature hit their window this morning, she carried it around for a while in the house then it sat on her shoulder. When I went by with the dogs around noon it was sitting on the door frame of their truck, they picked it up and brought it over for me to get a closer look and it flew to a nearby pine tree. They have a crab apple tree in their front yard where the birds usually feed. (Doe Lake Rd. Gravenhurst)

 

 

Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on November 11, 2007 at 12:06:41 PM by Barbara Taylor

There were no new ducks at the Ponds this morning. The western half of each cell was covered in ice. There were six Snow Buntings inside the fenced area around the dumping ponds (between cells 3 and 4). There was a female Northern Pintail in cell 1 and a male in cell 4. The pair of Gadwall were still in cell 3. A few Green-winged Teal were in cell 3. Scattered about were American Black Ducks, Buffleheads, Lesser Scaup, and Mallards.
Ponds Map - (north is approx. towards the top of the map, west is towards the pipeline)

 

 

Pine Grosbeaks, Bohemian Waxwings, Red-tailed Hawks
Posted on November 11, 2007 at 08:29:22 AM by Goodyear

Pine Grosbeaks and Bohemian Waxwings continue to visit our crabapple tree at 117 Meadow Heights this morning. Yesterday morning (11:40) as we were leaving the Lagoons we scanned the skies and found a kettle of 4 Red-tailed Hawks slowly circling in a SW direction. We continued to watch and then saw another kettle of 12 Red-tailed Hawks and one Red-shouldered Hawk.

 

 

Re(1): Northern Shrike
Posted on November 11, 2007 at 08:41:57 AM by Wayne Bridge

We have had a northern shrike perching around our Kearney property for a week and a friend living near Lake Waseosa has had one in her rural yard also.

 

 

Northern Shrike
Posted on November 9, 2007 at 09:20:40 PM by SueSpeck

A Northern Shrike? Earlier this evening my husband was re-filling the feeders. It was a heavier feeding going on at the time than normal, so much so that the chickadees were landing on his hat! A few minutes later, once indoors he glanced outside and noticed that all of the feeding birds were gone. BUT... there was a bird the size of a robin on the ground stabbing at something dark in colour. In watching, this bird then clutched it's prize and then flew off with it into the boggy field. In checking our books for reference, we believe that it was a Northern Shrike that claimed a Dark-Eyed Junco (of which were feeding below). What a sight to see!

 

 

Re(2): Pine grosbeaks
Posted on November 11, 2007 at 12:37:13 PM by Dave Wright

Four Pine grosbeaks arrived at our feeder this am. Dave W
(Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(3): Pine grosbeaks
Posted on November 10, 2007 at 08:51:26 PM by Al Sinclair

We have had Pine Grosbeaks flying over here east of Bracebridge for a couple of weeks. Today the first one, a female, came into our feeder and was eating black sunflower seeds. We also had the first Redpoll at our feeder today.

 

 

Re(2): Pine grosbeaks
Posted on November 10, 2007 at 04:42:26 PM by janice house

I watched 2 from our deck this afternoon, I have heard them all week while walking the dogs (Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst). Just came back from a walk in Annie Williams Park in Bracebridge and I heard them in the tops of the big pines along the east side.

 

 

Re(1): Pine grosbeaks
Posted on November 10, 2007 at 04:08:56 PM by Barbara Taylor

Just got back from a walk along Meadow Heights Dr. in Bracebridge. There were six Pine Grosbeaks in a crabapple tree in front of #117 and two more feeding on crabapples by #85.

 

 

Pine grosbeaks
Posted on November 9, 2007 at 04:05:12 PM by apearse

Six males and a female at our feeder area this afternoon. All feeding on seed on the ground under feeders. Unusual. Location is 71 Bonnell Rd Bracebridge

 

 

Re(1): Algonquin Park Boreal Chickadees
Posted on November 11, 2007 at 01:33:18 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Maureen Smith on ONTBIRDS (Nov. 11, 2007) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Sorry for not posting but last Sunday I had an excellent sighting of two BOREAL CHICKADEES on the Spruce Bog Trail right where there is a bench dedicated to Arthur Despard. I did not realize that there had been no other sightings of them reported last week. Maureen Smith

 

 

Algonquin Park Update: 9 November
Posted on November 9, 2007 at 01:22:26 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Nov. 9, 2007) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

The following summary outlines reports received during the last
ten days for birds often sought by visiting birders here.

FINCHES:

Pine Grosbeak: widespread in small numbers; regular at Visitor
Centre feeder.

Purple Finch: no reports; all may have departed.

Red Crossbill: no reports from Highway 60; one sighting from
Lake Travers on the East Side, where the pine-type is regular.

White-winged Crossbill: no reports.

Common Redpoll: widespread in small numbers; regular at
the Visitor Centre feeder.

Pine Siskin: most appear to have departed; one or two irregularly
at the Visitor Centre feeder.

American Goldfinch: same status as Pine Siskin.

Evening Grosbeak: a few regularly at the Visitor Centre feeder;
occasional flyovers elsewhere.


BOREAL SPECIES:

Spruce Grouse: seen at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Opeongo Road
(near winter gate and 1 km north of there), and Wolf Howl Pond.

Black-backed Woodpecker: one reported at Western Uplands
Backpacking Trail entrance (km 3 on Highway 60).

Gray Jay: reported at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Opeongo Road, and
Visitor Centre feeders.

Boreal Chickadee: no reports; best locations to try are Spruce Bog
Boardwalk, Opeongo Road, and Wolf Howl Pond. Usually detected
by hearing vocalizations.

OTHER BIRDS OF NOTE:

Bohemian Waxwing: occasional small flocks noted, but less
frequently in last few days.

Northern Cardinal: a male flying south across Highway 60 at
km 25.3 on November 5, and another male that visited a feeder
at Site 26 in Mew Lake Campground for about two weeks during
late October/early November (but went unreported until after it
had disappeared), were typical of dispersing birds of this species
that occasionally show up in Algonquin during the period from
late October to late November.


BIRDERS:
Please let us know the date, number and location of birds you observe
when you visit Algonquin Park. This information is stored in the
Algonquin Visitor Centre database, and will help us to assist other
birders here. Thanks.

Good birding.

Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, Ontario

Directions:
Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400, 11
and 60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400. From
Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the
park. Kilometre markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from the West
Gate (km 0) to the East Gate (km 56). Permits and information are
available daily at both gates throughout the winter, including the Algonquin
Information Guide showing locations discussed here.

The Visitor Centre (km 43) is open on weekends (10 to 4) through the
winter. Recent bird sightings and information, plus feeders, can be found
there. Birders visiting during the week are welcome to contact staff for
birding information via the service entrance (right end of the building
as you face it from the parking lot).
----------------------------------------------------------
*ONTBIRDS is presented by the Ontario Field Ornithologists - the provincial birding organization.
For instructions to join or leave ONTBIRDS visit http://www.ofo.ca/information/ontbirdssetup.php
ONTBIRDS Guidelines may be viewed at http://www.ofo.ca/information/ontbirdsguide.php

 

 

Re(1): Unusual feeder bird
Posted on November 9, 2007 at 03:42:44 PM by Marilyn Kisser

I would love a pileated to come to my feeder - a friend of mine in Washington State has them come to her suet feeders daily!

 

 

Unusual feeder bird
Posted on November 9, 2007 at 01:02:59 PM by Barbara Taylor

Eleanor Kee Wellman sent this photo of a new species for her feeder list.
Pileated Woodpecker, Bala

 

 

Snow Buntings
Posted on November 9, 2007 at 12:25:50 PM by janice house

Moira reported seeing 8-9 snow buntings flying over the field behind McDonalds in Bracebridge yesterday

 

 

Re(1): Winter Finch irruption
Posted on November 8, 2007 at 09:11:44 AM by Wayne Bridge

Up here in Kearney - Muskoka suburbs - I have 6 chickadees and 4 red-breasted nuthatches constantly at my feeders. A pair of pine grosbeaks come occasionally. There were 12 goldfinches at one time yesterday. I've seen no siskins or redpolls yet; the occasional junco, and 1 tree sparrow.

 

 

Re(1): Winter Finch irruption
Posted on November 7, 2007 at 11:54:29 PM by Marilyn Kisser

my feeders near the house and in the woods are very busy with chickadees and nuthatches - I guess the lack of seed cones is why - just outside of Rosseau

 

 

Winter Finch irruption
Posted on November 7, 2007 at 07:54:42 PM by Barbara Taylor

Ron Pittaway has posted an update on Ontbirds about the Winter Finch irruption currently underway. You can find the report here. His earlier Winter Finch Forecast is here.

A few days ago we walked east of Henry marsh in Bracebridge looking for Pine Grosbeaks since they had been there in the 2005 irruption - but no luck. There seemed to be fewer numbers of chickadees and nuthatches than other years as well. When we looked at the tops of the firs and spruces, we realized why - absolutely no seed cones visible anywhere!

 

 

Re(1): Common Redpolls, Bala
Posted on November 7, 2007 at 11:52:11 PM by Marilyn Kisser

I've had a couple at the finch feeders the past couple of days - just outside of Rosseau

 

 

Common Redpolls, Bala
Posted on November 7, 2007 at 07:03:48 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

I had about a dozen Common Redpolls here this afternoon. They didn't stay and didn't come into the feeders even though I had niger out.

 

 

Pine Grosbeaks at Bay Lake today
Posted on November 7, 2007 at 10:52:28 AM by Kip Daynard

A pair was calling back and forth from the trees around our house. First I've heard (but haven't been out much lately).

 

Gray Jays
Posted on November 6, 2007 at 12:41:54 PM by janice house

Geoff was in Bent River on Monday and saw 2 jays in the woods in the south/west side of the field at the end of Neil Bethune Rd.

 

 

Re(1): Bohemian Waxwings
Posted on November 5, 2007 at 11:53:17 AM by Barbara Taylor

At 11:30 a.m. today we found 15 Bohemian Waxwings in an ornamental crabapple tree by 35 Meadow Heights Dr., just west of Kevin Cres. There was a female Northern Cardinal in the Goodyear's crabapple tree but no Waxwings. About thirty Common Redpolls were feeding in the birch trees at 106 Meadow Heights. (Bracebridge)

 

directions: From Hwy. 11 take Taylor Rd. west into Bracebridge. Turn right at Manitoba St. Turn left onto Meadow Heights Dr. (zoom in on green arrow on map)

 

 

Re(1): Bohemian Waxwings
Posted on November 4, 2007 at 04:22:36 PM by ron tozer

Small flocks of Bohemian Waxwings have been reported almost daily for the past week along Highway 60 in Algonquin Park, and so observers should be on the lookout for them in Muskoka. A flight of this species had been predicted for this fall by Ron Pittaway in his winter finch forecast (see www.ofo.ca), due to the poor crop of native mountain-ash berries in northern Ontario.

 

 

Bohemian Waxwings
Posted on November 4, 2007 at 04:00:31 PM by Goodyear

At 3:45 we had a flock of approximately 30 Bohemian Waxwings feeding in our Miniature Crab tree in our front yard (117 MeadowHeights Drive Bracebridge). The birds stayed for about five minutes and now seem to be making a tour of the neighbourhood.

 

 

Mergansers
Posted on November 4, 2007 at 12:00:30 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there were some Common Mergansers on the Muskoka River by the entrance to Kerr Park. Further along Beaumont Dr., there were two pairs of Hooded Mergansers in the pond behind the new house just west of Stephens Bay Rd. There weren't any Canada Geese on the river today, but we found over 300 of them at the Muskoka Highlands driving range on South Monck Dr. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Cardinals/Woodcock
Posted on November 4, 2007 at 07:26:32 AM by janice house

We have had 3 cardinals here all week, male, female and a juvenile male, Geoff managed to get some pictures. A lone woodcock was calling Thursday night about 6:30 from the farm field across from the house (Doe Lake Rd)

 

 

Northern Shrike - Kearney
Posted on November 3, 2007 at 05:29:50 PM by Wayne Bridge

I was blessed with a wonderful view, from only a few meters away, of a Northern Shrike perched in a tree near our deck. I watched as it made a strike. Unsuccessful. I was kind of glad; it was near where a most handsome Gapper's red-backed vole lives. The vole is really an attractive little creature that gives me great enjoyment watching it through the binoculars.

 

 

Bracebridge Ponds - ducks and finches
Posted on November 3, 2007 at 01:00:44 PM by dbritton

Spent an hour and a half birding the Ponds today, good selection of ducks and the clear calm weather was perfect for hearing he overflying finches - of note:

Northern Pintail- male (cell 4) and female (cell 1)
Gadwall - pair (cell 3)
Green-winged Teal - 15 (cells 2,3,4)
Lesser Scaup - 35 (cells 1 and 2)
Bufflehead - 90 (cells 1,2,4)
Snow Buntings - flock of 30 on the ground between cells 3 & 4
Pine Grosbeak - 1 flew over calling south of cell 4
Common Redpoll - a few flyovers and a flock of about 15 feeding on birch catkins at the NW corner of cell 4
American Goldfinch - a few flyovers
Evening Grosbeak - flock of 30 flew over cell 4

 

 

Belted Kingfisher
Posted on November 3, 2007 at 12:26:36 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning at the Bracebridge Ponds there was a Belted Kingfisher chattering away from atop a dead tree east of cell 4. A male Northern Pintail was in cell 4 and a male Gadwall was in cell 3.  About two hundred Canada Geese came in from the north and landed on the Muskoka River by Annie Williams Park - I didn't see any Snow Geese with them.

 

 

Red Tailed Hawk
Posted on November 1, 2007 at 07:12:46 AM by janice house

Twice I have seen a hawk perched in the trees at the Hwy 141 exit at Hwy 11. I assume the bird is hunting the rock doves that live under the overpass.

 

 

Finches on the move
Posted on October 31, 2007 at 06:03:20 PM by Al Sinclair

Today we had Pine Grosbeak, Evening Grosbeak and Redpolls flying over our yard east of Bracebridge on Hwy 118E. Also Siskins and Goldfinches at the feeders.

 

 

Re(1): porcupine advice
Posted on October 31, 2007 at 01:10:08 PM by Barbara Taylor

Do you know anyone who could lend you a Fisher? ;)
You could try encircling the trunks of your favourite trees with 30 inch wide bands of aluminum flashing. We had to attach metal flashing to the plywood walls of our shed to keep them from chewing it.

P.S. - If you have a salt lick for the deer, you are also attracting porcupines.

 

 

porcupine advice
Posted on October 30, 2007 at 12:41:44 PM by John Challis

On our property on the northern suburbs of Washago, we have a resident porcupine who took to an oak for much of last winter, denuding much of the upper branches. This morning, he appeared in the top of a mature oak on another spot. This tree's a really nice mast tree, and I'd hate to see it weakened by being turned into a winter banquet hall. I'm also a little leery about the plywood on the canoe shed I'm just finishing now.
Pogo, our goofball dog, would gladly help us; she's been to the vet seven times for quill removal and has yet to really get the point.
And so, to advance an oft-repeated query: If anyone has successfully discouraged a porcupine from their lot -- short of using a bullet -- I'd be pleased to know the technique.

 

 

Re(1): evening grosbeaks
Posted on November 2, 2007 at 02:55:48 PM by Barbara Taylor

Don Bailey reports that yesterday there were about sixty Evening Grosbeaks sitting in a tree on Meadow Heights Dr., Bracebridge. A Sharp-shinned Hawk flew in and started hunting them.

 

 

evening grosbeaks and great blue heron
Posted on October 29, 2007 at 08:42:44 PM by Marilyn Kisser

a great blue flew up out of the pond on Saturday evening - today, while I was at work, my husband reported that there were at least 20 evening grosbeaks at the feeders - of course I missed it! just outside of Rosseau

 

 

Re(1): Great Blue Herons, Mourning Cloak
Posted on October 30, 2007 at 12:44:36 PM by John Challis

We had a painted lady on our cosmos late last week.  (Washago)

 

 

Great Blue Herons, Mourning Cloak
Posted on October 29, 2007 at 12:55:29 PM by Don Clement

A pair of Great Blue Herons were at one of our beaver ponds here near Germania on Saturday. Also, a Mourning Cloak Butterfly on a rock near the house one day last week.

 

 

Re(2): Snow Buntings
Posted on November 1, 2007 at 07:01:50 AM by janice house

yesterday morning I heard the snow buntings in the farm field across from my home (Doe Lake Rd)

 

 

Re(1): Snow Buntings
Posted on October 31, 2007 at 12:25:53 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there were about twenty Snow Buntings feeding by the dumping ponds between cell 3 & 4. The male Gadwall is still in cell 3. Nothing else of note.

 

 

Horned Lark, Snow Buntings
Posted on October 29, 2007 at 12:37:57 PM by Barbara Taylor

Don Bailey reports there was a Horned Lark and Snow Buntings between cell 1 and 2 this morning at the Bracebridge Ponds. A Northern Shrike flew into the trees east of cell 1.

 

 

Algonquin Park Birds
Posted on October 28, 2007 at 08:40:54 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Bruce Di Labio on ONTBIRDS (Oct. 28, 2007) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.


Hi Everyone
Spent the day birding various trails along Hwy. 60 in Algonquin Park.
The weather varied from sun to heavy overcast with snow flurries and windy.
The highlight of the outing was a small flight of raptors between 11:00 a.m.
and 12:30 p.m. at the Old Airfield. A total of 37 individuals were observed
migrating south including 3 Bald Eagle, 1 Golden Eagle, 27 Red-tailed Hawk,
5 Rough-legged Hawk and 1 Northern Harrier. Winter finches were scarce and
we observed 4 Pine Grosbeak, 3 Red Crossbill, 11 Common Redpoll, 7 Pine
Siskin and 1 Evening Grosbeak. We also had 2 Northern Shrike and a single
Bohemian Waxwing at the Old Airfield. A total of 9 Gray Jays were seen at
Wolf Howl Pond, Spruce Bog Trail and Opeongo Lake Road. Boreal Chickadees
were heard at Wolf Howl Pond and Opeongo Lake Road. No luck with Spruce
Grouse or Black-backed Woodpecker.

good birding, Bruce

 

 

Algonquin Park bird update: 27 October
Posted on October 27, 2007 at 04:57:13 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Oct. 27, 2007) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.


Some winter finches, although still scarce, showed increasing
numbers this past week in Algonquin Park, and nearby areas in
Muskoka. The species and number of individuals at feeders
seemed to be changing regularly, perhaps suggestive of birds
moving through in search of seed crops (almost totally lacking
here).

Reports of finches this week along Highway 60 in Algonquin
Park were:

Pine Grosbeak: scarce, but more numerous and widespread.
Purple Finch: most seem to have departed.
Red Crossbill: no reports.
White-winged Crossbill: one small flock.
Common Redpoll: a few at feeders, and feeding on White Birch.
Pine Siskin: small numbers regular at Visitor Centre feeder.
American Goldfinch: a few at Visitor Centre feeder; most seem to
have departed.
Evening Grosbeak: small numbers at Visitor Centre feeder.

Reports of northern species included:

Spruce Grouse: Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road.
Black-backed Woodpecker: Spruce Bog Boardwalk.
Gray Jay: Visitor Centre, Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Opeongo Road,
Wolf Howl Pond on Mizzy Lake Trail.
Boreal Chickadee: Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Wolf Howl Pond.

A Bohemian Waxwing, briefly near the Visitor Centre feeder on
October 26, may have been the first here of the predicted movement
this fall.

The Visitor Centre Red-bellied Woodpecker was last seen October 20.
A late Eastern Bluebird at the Old Airfield (October 21), and Red-
necked Grebe (October 21-23) and Horned Grebe (October 21) on
Lake of Two Rivers, were noteworthy sightings.


Please let us know the date, number and location of birds you observe
when you visit Algonquin Park. This information is stored in the
Algonquin Visitor Centre database, and will help us to assist other
birders here. Thanks.

Good birding.

Ron Tozer
Dwight, Ontario

Directions:
Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400, 11
and 60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400. From
Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the
park. Kilometre markers on Highway 60 in the Park go from the West
Gate (km 0) to the East Gate (km 56). Permits and information are
available daily at both gates throughout the fall and winter, including
the Algonquin Information Guide showing locations discussed here.

The Visitor Centre (km 43) is open daily, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., until
October 28, and will be open on weekends (10 to 4) through the winter.
Recent bird sightings and information, plus feeders, can be found there.

 

 

Yellow-rumped Warblers and N. Shrike
Posted on October 27, 2007 at 10:49:57 AM by Goodyear

This morning at the lagoons on the west side of cell 4 we saw 3 Yellow-rumped Warblers and a 1st winter Northern Shrike. No new ducks since Barbara's last post. (Bracebridge)

 

 

pine grosbeak
Posted on October 26, 2007 at 10:01:37 PM by Marilyn Kisser

this male pine grosbeak was at the feeders this morning - what a sight to see! we didn't get one pine grosbeak all of last winter - hope this is a sign of good things to come! (just outside Rosseau)  photo

 

 

Re(2): trumpeter swan #903
Posted on October 29, 2007 at 08:23:02 PM by Marilyn Kisser

how nice to get this info - hope she and her family winter well

 

 

Re(1): trumpeter swan #903
Posted on October 29, 2007 at 10:36:01 AM by Barbara Taylor

I just received the following from Harry Lumsden (founder of the Ontario Trumpeter Swan Reintroduction Program):

#903 is a female, hatched in 2004. On 17 Dec 2004 she was at Wye Marsh. She was rebanded on 12 Jan 2007 at LaSalle Park Burlington where she wintered. She left in April. Thank you for reporting this band number.
Cheers, Harry Lumsden

 

 

Re(2): trumpeter swan family
Posted on October 27, 2007 at 07:08:27 PM by Marilyn Kisser

Al, I did report them to the wyemarsh on line last evening - I will foreward a photo now also - and Samantha, I should have know this would be called Macs pond - after Mac Dixon!

 

 

Re(1): trumpeter swan family
Posted on October 27, 2007 at 02:51:42 PM by Samantha

Hi there, that pond is called Mac's pond, and you are so lucky to have seen those birds! They are not hard to miss, but I did! I went this morning to see them because I heard they were there, but they had already left, perhaps to fly south. Shame, but hopefully there will be more. I do most of my birding in B.C's Okanagan valley and Iam only home for 1 week, so its great to hear what else has been spotted!

cheers,
sam

 

 

Re(1): trumpeter swan family
Posted on October 27, 2007 at 02:04:27 PM by Al Sinclair

Very nice photo and confirmation of successful breeding. I expect the Trumpeter Swan Restoration project would be interested in this sighting. You can send reports with the date, location and tag numbers seen to swans@wyemarsh.com. I would include a link to the photo.

 

 

trumpeter swan family
Posted on October 26, 2007 at 09:55:34 PM by Marilyn Kisser

we saw this trumpeter swan family in a swamp on hiway 141 west of Rosseau - opposite if the turn off to Turtle Lake Road - one of the adults had a yellow tag #903 - I amsume they are from the Wye Marsh! what a treat!  photo

 

 

rufous-sided towhee
Posted on October 25, 2007 at 10:23:24 PM by Marilyn Kisser

this male rufous-sided towhee was on the ground under the feeders most of the day yesterday! sorry the photo is not that great, but it was dull and raining, and the towhee decided to turn his back to me! (just outside of Rosseau) photo

 

 

Redpolls
Posted on October 25, 2007 at 11:37:45 AM by Barbara Taylor

This morning at the Bracebridge Ponds there was a small flock of Common Redpolls feeding in the birch trees west of cell 3. The Gadwalls, Northern Pintails, and at least one American Wigeon were still in cell 3. By the time I left the Gadwalls had moved onto the little island and were almost completely hidden from view by the weeds/reeds. Still several Scaup in cells 1 & 2, but no Redheads. Buffleheads, American Black Ducks, Green-winged Teal, and Mallards were also present.

 

 

Re(1): cardinal
Posted on October 27, 2007 at 03:32:30 PM by Samantha

Hi there, just wanted to attempt to answer your question about Cardinals in Muskoka. I have only been birding for almost 1 year and most of it has been done in the Okanagan Valley in B.C, but hopefully some of my knowledge helps you out with understanding this beautiful bird! Cardinals have almost always been present in high numbers throughout southern Ontario, and Muskoka is technically in the South-eastern portion of Ontario, so for them to be seen in the area isn't uncommon. The natural habitat of a Cardinal includes woodland, suburbs, gardens, swamps and thickets. They are usually permanent residents throughout their ranges but may relocate to avoid harsh weather or scarce food sources. Therefor, if you have a bird feeder, you might be attracting more birds in general this year, compared to other years if you didnt have a feeder. Cardinals are abundant across Eastern U.S from Maine to Texas, and in Canada- Ontario, Quebec, and Nova Scotia. The habitat extends as far west in the U.S as the border with Mexico, and as far south as Guatemala and northern Belize. Cardinals are also very territorial birds, therefor a male may not allow another male to enter his territory which means you wont seem as many around your home. However, if you have that feeder full, there may be more than usual in one area in order to stock up on food for the winter. Cardinals are seed-eating birds, mostly weed-seed, grains and some fruits. So, hopefully Cardinals are on the rise in the Muskoka area, but I do know that I usually see them every winter and fall when Iam home, so they are not entirely rare either. It could just be that the Cardinals you are seeing really enjoy your bird feeder! hope this helps somewhat...
cheers,
sam

 

 

cardinal
Posted on October 24, 2007 at 10:07:36 AM by Nancy

Have a young male cardinal at my bird feeder yesterday and today. (Bent River)  First one I have seen in the 12 years we have lived here. Are they becoming more common in Muskoka?

 

 

Re(1): Common Buckeye
Posted on October 22, 2007 at 09:23:58 PM by Al Sinclair

Buckeye is very rare here, great find. It is on the Muskoka checklist, I can recall two previous sightings, both from Georgian Bay shoreline.

 

 

Common Buckeye
Posted on October 22, 2007 at 01:20:44 PM by Ron Stager

Hi
I was working in the pasture field during lunch hour break and saw a Common Buckeye butterfly. This might be a new species for Muskoka: I suspect he blew up from down south during the last couple of days. These guys like open areas and along roads/power lines.

There are orange sulfurs and some of the hibernating species (Mourning Cloak, Compton Tortoiseshell)flying as well but it might be good to look for some other rare or new species. Little Yellow is one example and there might be more.

See ya
Ron
(Barkway)

 

 

Gadwalls, Wigeon - Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on October 21, 2007 at 11:55:55 AM by Barbara Taylor

At the Bracebridge Ponds 11 a.m. this morning...

Cell 3:
American Wigeon (3)
Gadwall (pair)
Northern Pintail (6)

Cell 4: Northern Pintail (pair)

Cell 2: Redhead (4)
, Ring-necked Duck (1)

Many Bufflehead in cell 4 and several Lesser Scaup in cells 1 and 2. Green-winged Teal, Mallards, and American Black Ducks in all cells. A Monarch was at the south end of cell 4 and an American Lady was on some Butter-and-Eggs flowers south of cell 2.  Bracebridge Ponds Map

 

 

Re(2): Algonquin Park bird update: 19 October
Posted on October 27, 2007 at 04:59:08 PM by Barbara Taylor

The Red-bellied Woodpecker was last seen Oct. 20. See the Algonquin Park update for Oct. 27 just posted at top of Bird Board.  I don't think the Visitor Centre will be open on weekdays when you plan to go, but you will still be able to see the feeder at the front.

Algonquin Park Visitor Centre: (613) 637-2828
Algonquin Park Information: (705) 633-5572

 

 

Re(1): Algonquin Park bird update: 19 October
Posted on October 27, 2007 at 03:40:17 PM by Samantha

Hi Ron,

I was just wondering if any of those birds you mentioned were still hanging around the feeder, especailly the Red-bellied Woodpecker? Iam only around for 1 week, home from the Okanagan Valley in B.C, where I have done most of my birding. I would be ready to drive into the park on Monday, especailly if there have been some good recent sightings. There were 3 Trumpeter Swans in Mac's Pond yesterday, near Rosseau where I live.
cheers,
Sam.

 

 

Algonquin Park bird update: 19 October
Posted on October 19, 2007 at 03:59:07 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (Oct. 19, 2007) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.


The Red-bellied Woodpecker which showed up at the feeder at the
Algonquin Visitor Centre (km 43 on Highway 60) on Monday
(October 15) is still coming for black sunflower seeds there today.
Other species frequenting this feeder, which is located on the parking
lot side of the building, included Rusty Blackbird, Purple Finch, Pine
Siskin, and Evening Grosbeak.

A three-hour boat tour of Lake Opeongo on October 17 tallied a
minimum count of 154 Common Loons, including one adult still
feeding a young. Other interesting sightings on this Opeongo trip
were: four adult Bald Eagles; a total of 29 Double-crested Cormorants
(lingering very late for Algonquin due to the mild weather); and a
female House Sparrow at the Access Point dock. The House Sparrow
is very rare in Algonquin Park now, this being only the third record
since 2002.

During the past ten days, there have been first observations this fall
in Algonquin for Rough-legged Hawk, Northern Shrike, American
Tree Sparrow, Snow Bunting, Pine Grosbeak, and Common Redpoll.
Red Crossbills (Type 2, with larger-sized bills, that feed on White Pine
cones) continue to be seen on the East Side of Algonquin Park (e.g.,
Barron Canyon Road), but there have been no recent reports from
Highway 60. White-winged Crossbills were unreported recently.
As expected, most finch numbers are low due to the lack of cones.

Finally, an interesting sighting at the Old Airfield on October 16
involved an apparent Hoyt's Horned Lark, with an adjacent Northern
Horned Lark for direct comparison. The Northern subspecies of the
Horned Lark passes through Algonquin from mid-September to early
November, and very rarely an individual of the Hoyt's race is seen
with them.

Please let us know the date, number and location of birds you observe
when you visit Algonquin Park. This information is stored in the
Algonquin Visitor Centre database, and will help us to assist other
birders here. Thanks.

Good birding.
Ron Tozer
Dwight, Ontario

Directions:
Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400, 11
and 60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400. From
Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the
park. Kilometre markers on Highway 60 in the Park go from the West
Gate (km 0) to the East Gate (km 56). Permits and information are
available daily at both gates throughout the fall and winter, including
the Algonquin Information Guide showing locations discussed here.

The Visitor Centre (km 43) is open daily, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., until
October 28, and will be open on weekends through the winter. Recent
bird sightings and information, plus feeders, can be found there.

 

 

Re(1): Pine Siskins and Evening Grosbeaks galore!! (PICS)
Posted on October 24, 2007 at 10:09:41 AM by Nancy

Wonderful. We have a few evening grosbeaks and siskins but not nearly as many as you.
I feed striped sunflower seeds ~ cracked corn for the doves and grouse.  (Bent River)

 

 

Re(1): Pine Siskins and Evening Grosbeaks galore!! (PICS)
Posted on October 22, 2007 at 07:48:27 PM by Marilyn Kisser

I have lots of siskins here, but only the odd evening grosbeak! they are probably my favourite bird!

(just outside Rosseau)

 

 

Pine Siskins and Evening Grosbeaks galore!! (PICS)
Posted on October 19, 2007 at 02:13:32 PM by willowbeachbirding

On the weekend we had hundreds of Pine Siskins arrive and this morning about 40 Evening Grosbeaks have arrived and are still hanging around eating my Safflower seeds!! The Grosbeaks are a lifer for me!! Lorena, Willow Beach (Lake Simcoe)  photo1   photo2  photo3  photo4

 

 

Re(1): Brants at Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on October 18, 2007 at 03:42:20 PM by Barbara Taylor

The Brants could not be found this afternoon. In case they return, if anyone sees them please post a report or send me an email. Thanks.

 

 

Brants at Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on October 18, 2007 at 11:21:55 AM by Barbara Taylor

Around 10:30 a.m. this morning there were 24 Brants in cell 1 at the Bracebridge Ponds. Redheads, Lesser Scaup, and Northern Pintails were in cell 2 (now 2 male Pintails). Four Hooded Mergansers in cell 2. Many Bufflehead scattered about. Large flock of American Tree Sparrows by the dumping ponds between cell 3 & 4.

Bracebridge Ponds map

 

 

Algonquin Park
Posted on October 18, 2007 at 08:22:10 AM by Wayne Bridge

I took a drive along Hwy. 60 yesterday. There was a loon on Lake of Two Rivers near Killarney Lodge. At Opeongo where Costello Creek flows in there was a great blue heron, a pair of black ducks, and 5 redhead ducks. The most exciting was a great view, through the binoculars, of a fisher right on the highway (near Beaver Pond Trail).

 

 

Woodcocks
Posted on October 18, 2007 at 08:18:10 AM by janice house

at approximately 7:10 this morning a woodcock flew in front of me as I took the dogs for their morning walk, a second one could be heard across road. (Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst)

 

 

Re(1): Red-bellied Woodpecker in Algonquin Park
Posted on October 17, 2007 at 11:37:28 AM by BonnieDeVillers

Hi, We have a few pairs of Red-bellied Woodpeckers since 2006. We moved in this area ( Tiny beachs in Lafontaine) since l986 and these birds are now established and breeding here. The birds come to my feeder almost every day. They love popcorn. They bring their babies here and feed them popcorn. Very beautiful bird.

 

 

Red-bellied Woodpecker in Algonquin Park
Posted on October 16, 2007 at 09:33:02 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Kevin Clute on ONTBIRDS (Oct. 16, 2007) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Algonquin Park's second-ever Red-bellied Woodpecker appeared at the
Visitor Centre feeder (at km 43) yesterday (Monday, October 15), and
is present again this morning. It may hang around for awhile, since it
is eating and storing black sunflower seeds. Other birds coming to the
feeder include: Purple Finch, Pine Siskin, Evening Grosbeak and Rusty
Blackbird. The feeder is located in front of the building, viewable
from the driveway to the service entrance.

Please let us know the date, number and location of birds you observe
when you visit Algonquin Park. This information is stored in the
Algonquin Visitor Centre database, and will help us to assist other
birders here. Thanks.

Good luck.

Kevin Clute and Ron Tozer
Dwight, Ontario

Directions:
Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400, 11
and 60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400. From
Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the
park. Kilometre markers on Highway 60 in the park go from the West
Gate (km 0) to the East Gate (km 56). Permits and information are
available daily at both gates throughout the fall and winter.

The Visitor Centre (km 43) is open daily, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., until
October 28, and will be open on weekends through the winter. Recent
bird sightings and information, plus feeders, can be found there.

 

 

Bluebirds
Posted on October 16, 2007 at 08:23:02 AM by janice house

Moira informed me that 3 bluebirds have been at the farm at the end of the Houston Rd for the past 5 days. (off Falconburg Rd north of Bracebridge)

 

 

Winter? Evening Grosbeaks and Common Redpoll
Posted on October 14, 2007 at 05:58:24 PM by Goodyear

We had two Evening Grosbeaks visit our feeders late yesterday afternoon, and this afternoon we saw one Common Redpoll in the thickets on the west side of cell 4. We also have 12 Siskins coming to our feeders. (Bracebridge)

 

 

"Weeping Widow"... a mushroom...photos
Posted on October 13, 2007 at 06:49:54 PM by Al Sinclair

This mushroom was fruiting in the grass at our place this week. This is a hard one to key out, tried but failed because the mottled and white edged gills and black spore print led to the wrong genus, Panaeolus. I eventually found it by flipping through a book (often the quickest and easiest method). It is called Weeping Widow because of the water droplets that form on the black gills. Also called the Velvet Psathyrella because of hairs on the cap. After I found it I realized that I had seen it before, a fairly common mushroom that fruits in grass along paths or roads. One reference says often near nettles; interesting because we have nettles growing only about 30 feet from them.
scientific name: Lacrymaria velutina (aka Psathyrella velutina). I posted 3 photos below, the first one shows what it looks like when wet, the second one was taken the next day in dry weather, the third shows the spore print I took. The caps are about 5cm (2 in) in diameter.  photo1  photo2  photo3

 

 

Saving Endangered Species...story from Muskoka in the Star
Posted on October 13, 2007 at 01:04:52 PM by Al Sinclair

This article appeared in today's Toronto Star (Oct,13/07). The Anne mentioned in the story is Anne Lewis from Six Mile Lake.  http://www.thestar.com/sciencetech/article/266334

 

 

Algonquin Park
Posted on October 12, 2007 at 10:42:04 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Jeff Skevington on ONTBIRDS (Oct. 12, 2007) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Hello Ontbirders,

I was birding Lake Traverse on the east side of
Algonquin Park again today. The first of the northern
finches are starting and it appears that it could be a
Northern Goshawk migration year. I had 4 of the
latter, including an adult female eating an American
Black Duck it had caught. Finches included: 2 Pine
Grosbeaks, 4 Common Redpolls, 11 Red Crossbills, 1
Purple Finch and 2 Pine Siskins. Highlight of the day
was watching a LeConte's Sparrow from 3 m away as snow
fell around it at dawn.

There was a modest raptor movement (good for
Algonquin) today: 4 Turkey Vultures, 2 Osprey, 8 Bald
Eagles, 5 Northern Harriers, 2 Sharp-shinned Hawks, 22
Red-tailed Hawks, 1 Rough-legged Hawk, 1 American
Kestrel, 1 Merlin and of course the 4 Northern
Goshawks.

Other highlights included 2 Red-necked Grebes, 2
Lapland Longspur, and 1 Black-backed Woodpecker.

Lake Traverse is at the end of Sand Lake Road (nearest
towns are Petawawa and Pembroke). Access is primarily
by canoe. The raptors were mostly moving down the east
side of the lake. The LeConte's Sparrow was in a marsh
mid-way up the west side of the lake.

Good birding,
Jeff

 

 

wood thrush
Posted on October 12, 2007 at 09:51:16 PM by Marilyn Kisser

There was a wood thrush feeding under the bird feeders late yesterday afternoon (just outside of Rosseau)

 

 

Fox Sparrows
Posted on October 12, 2007 at 03:38:24 PM by Bob Burt

There were three Fox Sparrows at Henry Marsh today in the shrubbery where the Henry Rd. trail leaves the forest. As well, we saw two otters frolicking in the water near the back of the marsh.

 

directions: In Bracebridge, from traffic lights at Eccelstone Dr. and Wellington St., follow Beaumont Dr. to Henry Rd.

 

 

Re(1): Bracebridge Ponds...update
Posted on October 14, 2007 at 01:07:15 PM by Barbara Taylor

Highlights this morning:
cell 4: Northern Pintail (1 male & 1 female)
cell 3: Northern Pintail (5 female)
cell 2:
Redhead (3 male & 2 female)
Ring-necked Duck (1 male & 2 female)
Bufflehead (2 female)

Also Mallards, Lesser Scaup, Green-winged Teal, Wood Ducks, American Black Ducks. There were a few American Tree Sparrows scattered about - first we've seen this fall.

 

 

Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on October 12, 2007 at 12:15:34 PM by Barbara Taylor

Highlights this morning:
cell 4: Northern Pintail (male)
cell 3: Northern Pintail (4 female)
cell 2:
Redheads (3 male & 2 female)
Common Goldeneye (male)
Double-crested Cormorant
Ring-necked Duck (male)
Buffleheads (2 female)

Also Mallards, Lesser Scaup, Green-winged Teal, Blue-winged Teal, Wood Ducks, American Black Ducks.

 

 

Wilson's Snipe
Posted on October 11, 2007 at 12:01:42 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning at the Bracebridge Ponds a Wilson's Snipe flew up from the south bank of cell 2, and after briefly landing on the road, it went into hiding at the NW corner of cell 3. Also, there are now three male Redheads in cell 2. (Bracebridge Ponds map - south is approx. towards bottom of map and west is towards the pipeline)

 

 

Blue-headed vireo at Bracebridge ponds
Posted on October 9, 2007 at 03:10:51 PM by Doug Smith

Went to see the pintails and redheads and the golden plover at the ponds at around noon today and was not disappointed. Also saw a very pale (leucistic?) mallard with other mallards in cell 2. And there was a blue-headed vireo with a flock of both species of kinglets along the road near cell 3.

 

 

Trumpeter Swan, Ross's Goose and others - Algonquin Park
Posted on October 9, 2007 at 09:08:35 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Jeff Skevington on ONTBIRDS (Oct. 8, 2007) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Angela, Alexander and I are just back from two
excellent days canoeing and birding on Lake Traverse
in Algonquin Park. Highlights are as follows:
Sunday October 7th:
Cackling Goose (3 ~ 3rd park record), Bald Eagle (1),
Merlin (1), Peregrine Falcon (1 adult chasing
Ring-necked Duck), Le Conte's Sparrow (1), Nelson's
Sharp-tailed Sparrow (4) and Red Crossbill (2). The
sparrows are in the wetland at the south-central end
of the lake. Both species appear to be regular in
there this time of year. Boots are recommended but
waders are not necessary this year because of low
water.

Today (Monday October 8th):
Snow Goose (50 - both Greater and Lessers), Ross's
Goose (1 - first park record), Trumpeter Swan (2 -
first park record), Northern Shoveler (1),
Green-winged Teal (57), Surf Scoter (1), White-winged
Scoter (4), Red-breasted Merganser (11), Horned Grebe
(1), Greater Yellowlegs (1), Pectoral Sandpiper (1),
Dunlin (2) and an early Snow Bunting (1). Most of the
birds were at the south end of the lake either in or
near the marsh. The Geese flew over in one flock.

Lake Traverse is on the east side of Algonquin. The
nearest towns are Petawawa and Pembroke. Take the Sand
Lake Road to the access point for Travsere. It is near
km marker 72 (about an hour in from the highway).

Autumn birding at Traverse is typically best on rainy
or overcast days although species like Nelson's
Sharp-tailed Sparrow are likely possible most days
right now. Typical northern birds like Gray Jays, and
Black-backed Woodpecker were also seen. There were few
finches (a few siskins and the Red Crossbills).

Good birding,
Jeff

 

 

Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on October 8, 2007 at 06:28:39 PM by janice house

I met Moira at the ponds today at 1:30, male pintail was in cell 2, redhead male in cell 2, 3 black ducks in cell 1,
2 black ducks in cell 4, a male bufflehead in cell 2, at least 12 green-winged teal in 1 & 2, several greater scaup in cell 2, lots of lesser scaup in 1 and 2, lots of mallards and a few wood ducks in cell 1 and 2, 2 canada geese in cell 1, at least 6 ring-necked ducks in cell 1. We also spotted a beautiful coyote on the road at the north end of cell 4, it was sniffing horse droppings, it made its way slowly to the path towards the pipeline doing a lot of sniffing, we stood very still and it came back towards us at least half way along the cell. We watched it for at least 15 minutes, it even pounced into the grass after a mouse? just like a fox would. Lots of sparrows around and a few gold finch. At Henry Marsh we spotted 7 ring-necked ducks.

 

 

Re(1): rusty blackbird
Posted on October 8, 2007 at 09:47:11 PM by Grace Taylor

Hi John,
We had 4 rusty blackbirds here this am. (Kirk Line)

thanks for the photo, even with all the mishaps it is good.

Heard of a nesting pair at Rowanwood this summer.
Grace

 

 

rusty blackbird
Posted on October 8, 2007 at 01:15:22 PM by John Challis

 

Had one rusty blackbird rummaging in our backyard this afternoon. There might have been one or two others around, but couldn't confirm them. We've had purple finches at the feeders for about a week now, too.
I apologize for the image quality; it was done at max. digital zoom (48x) and through glass ... on one leg, leaning over the bed ... on my tiptoes ... various other excuses. (Washago)  photo

 

 

Re(1): Pine Siskins
Posted on October 10, 2007 at 09:28:15 PM by Marilyn Kisser

I have a flock of at least 20 hitting the finch feeders here - just outside of Rosseau

 

 

Pine Siskins
Posted on October 8, 2007 at 12:04:33 PM by Wilf Yusek

I have at least 6 Pine Siskins coming to my feeders this morning. I am on Prospect Lake.

 

 

Bracebridge Ponds - American Golden-Plover, Redhead
Posted on October 7, 2007 at 11:33:44 AM by dbritton

This morning, I had an American Golden-Plover in flight and calling at the Bracebridge Ponds. It appeared to fly up out of Cell 1, circled several times over Cell 2 and then flew off to to the south.

The male Redhead previously reported was still in Cell 1 along with two female Redheads amongst a flock of about 20 Lesser Scaup. Other ducks of note were a male and female Northern Pintail in Cell 1 and a female Hooded Merganser in Cell 4.

Notable landbirds included many sparrows (White-crowned, White-throated, Song, Swamp and Savannah), a flyby American Pipit and a flock of about 15 Rusty Blackbirds in the swamp at the NE corner of Cell 4.

 

 

American Pipit
Posted on October 6, 2007 at 05:20:07 PM by MarleneWalker

Saw American Pipit yesterday while biking on Limberlost Road, northeast of Huntsville

 

 

Re(1): Turkey Vultures on the move
Posted on October 6, 2007 at 08:56:33 PM by J. Gardner

October 5, Jim Gardner was delighted to see 45 to 50 plus turkey vultures using the thermals over the MacDougall Township dump on the MacDougall Road, obviously in migration mode. Earlier in the morning, I saw a dozen or so vultures sitting in snaggy trees near the same road with their wings spread to the morning sun.

 

 

Turkey Vultures on the move
Posted on October 6, 2007 at 05:00:01 PM by Barbara Taylor

This afternoon eleven Turkey Vultures took advantage of the stop in the rain to continue their migration. They were spiralling far up into the clouds above Dura, and then soared away to the south. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): 2 Great Horned Owls calling
Posted on October 8, 2007 at 08:17:19 PM by ghall45

Beautiful birds! I raised 2 chicks about 20 years ago, when I lived in the Niagara area, I have a few pictures I could send you...live just north of Huntsville now. I've have never seen/heard any in this area.

I recently shot some video of a Barred owl not far from my cabin.

 

 

2 Great Horned Owls calling
Posted on October 4, 2007 at 11:08:41 PM by LesleeTassie

We frequently hear a great horned owl calling at night by our place, occassionally two.
We haven't heard it through much of the summer though, which is unusual.
It was nice to once again hear them last night. One called in a lower pitch than the other, and they called back and forth well into the night.
We are located on Santa's Village Road in Bracebridge, just the town side of the small bridge at the pipeline. We have perfect habitat for owls around our place and Beaver Creek runs behind our house.
Leslee

 

 

Re(1): Redhead
Posted on October 5, 2007 at 01:20:15 PM by Wilf Yusek

The Redhead was in cell 2 this morning with all the Scaup

 

 

Re(2): Wilf's photos...Pintail
Posted on October 6, 2007 at 11:53:06 AM by Barbara Taylor

Here is Wilf Yusek's photo of one of the two female Northern Pintails that were still in cell 1 yesterday.

 

 

Re(1): Wilf's photos...and update
Posted on October 4, 2007 at 04:04:03 PM by Barbara Taylor

Here are Wilf's photos of the Redhead and the Horned Lark.  As of 3 p.m. the Redhead was still in cell 1 as well as two female Northern Pintails. A male Northern Pintail was still in cell 2.  (Bracebridge Ponds map)

 

 

Redhead
Posted on October 4, 2007 at 02:37:35 PM by Wilf Yusek

At the Bracebridge Lagoons this morning I saw a male Redhead in cell 1, mixed in with all the Mallards. I also saw 1 Horned Lark on the road between cell 1 & 3

 

 

Bald eagle
Posted on October 4, 2007 at 02:11:29 PM by Doug Smith

An immature bald eagle passed over Port Carling earlier this morning, flying up the Indian River and crossing over the town to Lake Rosseau.

 

 

Rusty Blackbird - Almaguin Highlands Golf Course
Posted on October 4, 2007 at 08:20:29 AM by Kip Daynard

Yesterday evening around 6pm I came across a female Rusty Blackbird, still in breeding plumage, on the tees to hole #3. She was quite unconcerned with my presence, sharing the white tees with me and permitting me to tee off without interrupting her foraging in the grass!

The Almaguin Highlands Golf Course is on Three Mile Lake Rd. just off Hwy 11 near Katrine.

 

 

Re(1): Late butterflies & male Pintail
Posted on October 5, 2007 at 08:02:10 AM by janice house

Oct 4th a Monarch flew over my car in the Independant parking lot at 1pm in Bracebridge

 

 

Late butterflies & male Pintail
Posted on October 3, 2007 at 03:26:17 PM by Barbara Taylor

This afternoon at the Bracebridge Ponds we found a Clouded Sulphur butterfly and also one Monarch. Both were at the west side of cell 2 where they were sheltered from the strong wind.

There is once again a male Northern Pintail in cell 2. He was staying at the north end, while a female Pintail was at the south end. The lone American Wigeon is still in cell 1. There were several Lesser Scaup in cell 2. Five Turkey Vultures soared overhead and a Merlin flew low towards cell 4.

 

 

Re(5): Northern Goshawk - Bay Lake
Posted on October 18, 2007 at 01:25:54 PM by Marilyn Kisser

thanks Garth - Al Sinclair also has pointed out the differences - so now I will have to make it my mission to actually get to see a Goshawk - and maybe even snap a shot!

 

 

Re(4): Northern Goshawk - Bay Lake
Posted on October 16, 2007 at 10:59:35 PM by Garth N. Baker

Hi Marilyn;
I feel that this is a Red-tail account the Tail on a Goshawk normally is 5 or 6 distinct Barsedged in white. The Supercillum(eyebrow) is white and has no White around the Bill and Chin. Although the Goshawk is often confused in Flight with a Buteo, the longer Tail and White undertail Coverts are very distinguishing Features. If I had the Computor Smarts I would post a photo of a Juvie Goshawk and Red-tail for a Comparison.
Cheer's Garth

I was at Turtle Lake at Thanksgiving, but the weather wasn't the greatest for Birding!

 

 

Re(3): Northern Goshawk - Bay Lake
Posted on October 13, 2007 at 08:10:43 PM by Marilyn Kisser

I have had some other "bird" people identify it as a Goshawk - I just know it was not a Coopers or Sharpie due to his larger size - thanks for your ID - and yes, he has top spot so far on my backyard list!

 

 

Re(2): Northern Goshawk - Bay Lake
Posted on October 13, 2007 at 04:05:48 PM by Garth N. Baker

Hi Marilyn;
I believe your Hawk is a Juvie Red-tail. Although not as common as a Coopers or Sharpie at the Feeders,they make an occasional appearance.Very Cool Bird for anyones Backyard List.
Garth

 

 

Re(1): Northern Goshawk - Bay Lake
Posted on October 10, 2007 at 10:00:09 PM by Marilyn Kisser

took this shot of an immature at the big bird feeder last week - beautiful bird - just outside Rosseau

photo

 

 

Northern Goshawk - Bay Lake
Posted on October 2, 2007 at 08:46:09 PM by Kip Daynard

Yesterday morning around 8am I saw a 1st year Goshawk in an area of open canopy hardwoods to the south of King Side Rd.. My dog, a mid-sized Border Collie/German Shepherd cross was on the trail in front of me when I saw a largish raptor fly up to a perch about 60ft away. I did not have my binoculars, but I could see well enough to make out a large, barrel-chested accipiter, perched in an alert manner looking very intently in our direction. I gave a small squeak to see if I could draw it closer and it instantly thrust itself into the air and swooped low directly over my dog at which point it began a sequence of powerful flaps and veered left within 15 feet or so of me. What a great look... and for a second I had the distinct impression that it had sized up my dog for its breakfast!

 

 

Bird Board Update
Posted on October 2, 2007 at 06:58:49 PM by Barbara Taylor

Thanks to everyone for all your reports. All posts for July thru September are now available in the Archived Reports. I try to monitor the Bird Board on a regular basis. If you want to bring something to my attention, just send me an email and I'll get back to you as soon as possible.

Barbara Taylor
muskoka_birder@hotmail.com

 

 

Muskoka Field Naturalists - next meeting Oct. 4
Posted on October 2, 2007 at 08:59:54 AM by Barbara Taylor

MFN meeting Thursday, Oct. 4, 7:30 p.m., Bracebridge
from the Wakerobin, newsletter of the Muskoka Field Naturalists:

How Healthy Is Our Watershed And What Can You Do About It?
MNR's Judi Brouse will report on the health of our watershed. Judi is the Director of Water Programs for the District of Muskoka.

September through January meetings will be at the Latter Day Saints Church located at 705 Cedar Lane, Bracebridge (corner of Taylor Rd. & Cedar Lane near Home Depot). Visitors welcome to attend.

 

 

Shoo-fly Plant
Posted on October 1, 2007 at 08:10:23 PM by Al Sinclair

This years "strange plant under the bird feeder" is The Shoo-fly Plant (Nicandra physalodes), also known as the Apple of Peru. We found this unusual plant a few weeks ago growing on the compost pile where we dumped the sunflower hulls that collected under the bird feeder. See photos below I took today. Also below is some information we found on different web sites.

"Shoo-fly Plant is an annual plant native to Peru. It is the only species in the genus Nicandra. They are known for their property of repelling insects.

Nicandra physalodes is a weedy annual plant that was introduced from South America as an ornamental gardening plant. In Illinois it can be found growing wild in various counties except in the NW area of the state. This plant grows to a height of 2-5 feet tall, the foliage and stems are reported to be poisonous to mammals and untouched by deer. This member of the Nightshade Family grows well in moist soils in full or partial sun.

'Shoo-fly Plant', as it is commonly called, is reported to be a natural insect repellent. One website I found explained that juices from the stems and leaves were added to milk and set out for flies. When flies drank from this concoction they supposedly died shortly after. It is also called 'Apple of Peru' because it is native to that area and produces a small fruit similar to tomatillos the fruit is dry and inedible."

photo1  photo2

 

 

Re(1): birdfeeders with photo
Posted on October 2, 2007 at 11:33:41 AM by willowbeachbirding

EEEKKKKKKK, that would certainly be a sight!!!! Lucky you, I think!!!! Lorena

 

 

birdfeeders with photo
Posted on October 1, 2007 at 01:27:22 PM by Wayne Bridge

This was a great morning for watching the birdfeeders: 2 blue jays, 2 crows, 2 red-breasted nuthatches, several chickadees, a flock of 10 chipping sparrows, 4 white-crowned sparrows (2 adult & 2 immature), 2 red squirrels and a few chippies plus...8 of these on our back deck!!  (Kearney)  photo