Muskoka Bird Board - Archived Reports from April - June 2007
 
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Re(1): Bluebirds
Posted on June 28, 2007 at 07:51:06 PM by janice house

after dinner tonight I had to check out the bluebird box, found a piece of fishing line sticking out of the box, when I pulled it out it was all entangled with feathers and grass, people should be more careful.

 

 

Bluebirds
Posted on June 28, 2007 at 08:26:06 AM by janice house

I cleaned out the two birdboxes in our yard on the weekend after the two tree swallow families fledged. Within 15 minutes the male bluebird I have seen around for the past two weeks started checking out the boxes. Since then the female has been busy with nesting material. (Doe Lake Rd)

 

 

Bronze Copper - Henry marsh
Posted on June 26, 2007 at 10:01:59 PM by Barbara Taylor

This afternoon I found a Bronze Copper butterfly a short distance west of the bridge at Henry Marsh and a Milbert's Tortoiseshell by the bridge. There were several dragonflies including Common Whitetail, Chalk-fronted Corporal, a Dot-tailed Whiteface, and a Twelve-spotted Skimmer. Three female Ebony Jewelwing damselflies were near the spot where the snowmobile trail heads east off the Henry Rd. trail.

I haven't seen or heard any American Bittern at the marsh until today. One flew up from the stream north of the bridge and went to the far south end of the marsh out of sight.

 

Ebony Jewelwing photo1  photo2

Bronze Copper photo

 

 

Re(2): Monarch wipe-out
Posted on July 7, 2007 at 08:04:32 PM by Marilyn Kisser

I heard on the news last evening that a township around the French River also wiped out a colony of monarch's to extend a graveyard - maybe some education to the townships would be an idea - I have lots of milkweed on my property and love it!

 

 

Re(1): Monarch wipe-out
Posted on June 26, 2007 at 09:58:13 PM by Wayne Bridge

Barbara, we had the same thing happen last year in Kearney. One day lots of milkweed at our roadside, the next day a 4-foot swath cleared along the road. I wonder if a citizen could go to the town and suggest waiting until monarch larvae/pupae time was right. But who could choose a time? We have SO MANY this year along our 600ft frontage, but it is just a matter of time until the roads crew - and I do not "blame" them - clears the swath. What to do?

 

 

Monarch wipe-out
Posted on June 26, 2007 at 08:44:26 PM by Barbara Taylor

I was over at the Bracebridge Ponds this evening and couldn't believe what has been done. At least four to six feet of grasses/wildflowers/milkweed has been cut down along the edge of all the roadways around the cells. While it might keep the bugs further away from walkers, unfortunately it also wiped out about 90% of this year's crop of Monarch eggs and caterpillars that were on the milkweed plants. I sure wish the town had a "nature consultant" who could give some good advice on when to do these sort of projects...

 

Only birds of interest were two southbound Lesser Yellowlegs flying over cell 3 and a Green Heron flying towards Kerr Park.

 

 

Re(2): Eleanor's photography shows...
Posted on July 2, 2007 at 01:59:59 PM by Barbara Taylor

Doug, you better update Eleanor too...my post is an exact copy of what she sent me. :)

 

 

Re(1): Eleanor's photography shows...
Posted on July 2, 2007 at 12:10:16 PM by Doug Smith

Thank you for posting the information about Eleanor's show and talk at the Muskoka Lakes Museum in August -- greatly appreciated. I just wanted to clarify when we are open -- we are open Wednesdays to Sundays, but closed Mondays and Tuesdays. Also, the talk on Wednesday, August 8th starts at 7:00pm, not 7:30pm -- you don't want to miss it.

 

 

Eleanor's photography shows...
Posted on June 26, 2007 at 01:44:26 PM by Barbara Taylor

Eleanor Kee Wellman has sent this wonderful photo of a Common Loon along with a description of her shows this summer for anyone interested in attending. Eleanor's website is at: http://www.eleanorkeewellman.com/


"Between the Sun and the Loon"
Algonquin Park Visitor's Centre, Friday, June 29 to Wednesday, August 1, 2007. The Visitor's Centre is open 9 am to 9 pm, seven days a week during the summer! This is my loon show that was in Bracebridge last summer with a few images added.

"Photographing Wildlife"
Muskoka Lakes Museum Gallery, Port Carling, Ontario, Saturday, August 4 to Friday, August 24, 2007. The Museum is open from 10 am to 5 pm Monday to Saturday and 12 pm to 5 pm on Sunday. Variety of wildlife subjects from Canada.

"Photographing Wildlife" Digital Presentation
Muskoka Lakes Museum, Port Carling, Wednesday, August 8 at 7:30 pm. How I go about photographing wildlife from birds to mammals in my own backyard to East Africa, the Falkland Islands and Northern Canada.

 

 

Re(1): Piping Plovers nesting in Bruce County...another website
Posted on June 26, 2007 at 06:33:19 PM by Al Sinclair

Pictures of the wire enclosure around the nest are posted here.
http://sbp.teledyn.com/node/790

 

 

Piping Plovers nesting in Bruce County...news story
Posted on June 25, 2007 at 12:52:13 PM by Al Sinclair

A good story on the Piping Plover pair found at Sauble Beach this spring was published this weekend in the Owen Sound Sun Times. Click on the link below.

Sun Times story

 

 

Re(1): Chipmunks
Posted on June 27, 2007 at 01:45:24 AM by Marilyn Kisser

I haven't really noticed a change in colour in the Rosseau area - however, it is a bumper crop of chipmunks this year

 

 

Chipmunks
Posted on June 25, 2007 at 11:07:50 AM by Barb Staples

The chipmunks around my place are considerably darker in colour this year. My nephew claims this is also the case around his Haliburton cottage. Has anyone else noticed this and could it be due to food storage, type of winter (?)

 

 

Upcoming Bala Butterfly Count
Posted on June 23, 2007 at 05:44:25 PM by ron

The annual Bala buttefly count will be next Saturday. This count is part of the North American Buttefly Association(NABA)counts and is a citizen science, and social, activity that is similar to the Christmas Bird Count of species diversity and abundance. Beginners are welcome.

The details:
Saturday June 30: Meet at 9:30 am at Ragged Rapids Hydro Parking Lot. Take Hwy 38 from Bala (past Jaspen Park) roughly 5 km to Ragged Rapids Rd. (make right turn), follow Ragged Rapids Rd to the hydro parking lot, keeping left all the way. Bring lunch. Nets will be available. After initial introduction and ID of butterflies, the group will split up for different routes, reconvening at Jaspen Park at 3:30 p.m. If it is raining heavily, or the wind is strong, postponement to Sunday is a distinct possibility. If in doubt, phone Al at 645-2848 or Ron at 684-9194. $4 donation is requested from the NABA organization to defray publication results. (July 1, rain date)

For more information, please contact me (Ron Stager, 684-9194, ronstager@sympatico.ca). Have a great week and see you there!

 

 

Evening Grosbeaks
Posted on June 22, 2007 at 06:11:25 PM by janice house

Geoff watched 8 evening grosbeaks and approx 20 goldfinch feeding in our yard today at noon. (Doe Lake Rd)

 

 

Large flock of Goldfinch
Posted on June 20, 2007 at 04:30:17 PM by Barbara Taylor

At the Bracebridge Ponds this morning there was a large flock of American Goldfinch along the roadway north of cell 4. There had to be at least 50 birds - mostly males, but a few females too. Two Pine Siskins were with them. They were feeding on the tall grass that has gone to seed, and several were finding something on the road itself.

 

 

Re(2): Nature in the Wilds of Bala
Posted on June 20, 2007 at 07:33:03 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

It is not rare to find rattlesnakes around where I live! I am actually within the bounderies of Bala. I see then here every year and am glad to have them! I think lots of people who live west of l69 see them sometimes.

 

 

Re(1): Nature in the Wilds of Bala
Posted on June 20, 2007 at 03:02:55 PM by Wayne Bridge

I, also, enjoyed the story. Is it rare to find a rattlesnake where you are, Eleanor? Are you closer to Georgian Bay than Bala?

 

 

Re(1): Nature in the Wilds of Bala
Posted on June 20, 2007 at 08:54:49 AM by Al Johnston

Great story, Eleanor. How long do you think it'll be before another chippie moves in to fill the vacuum left by the re-located one? In the meantime you could replant your flowers.

 

 

Nature in the Wilds of Bala
Posted on June 19, 2007 at 10:17:56 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Belatedly, I bought some annuals and perennials to fill some holes in my flower garden. I had forgotten that a chipmunk had pulled out, over and over again, whatever I planted last year. He did the same again this year! It was so hot that I decided to just water the disturbed plants and leave them until I had relocated the chipmunk.

I turned on the hose which is right by my front door and heard a buzzing. It was a rattlesnake about 2 ft from me. In the perfect spot to get one of the busy chippies. I left the water on with the sprayer off until the snake left.

This morning I checked and the snake was gone so I set out the live-trap for the chippie. Half an hour later I looked out the front door and there was a fox digging and trying to get the chippie out of the trap!

Niether the fox nor the snake got a meal and the chippie has been relocated!

 

 

Long Point
Posted on June 19, 2007 at 05:23:31 PM by Allan Aubin

We're a little late! The birds on the following list were seen on the MFN field trip to Long Point June 9 & 10. 78 species were seen but only selected ones are listed. The trip was led by Dan Burton. Details in the WakeRobin.

Mute Swan
Common Moorhen
Sandhill Crane
Forster's Gull
Black Tern
Purple Martin
N. Rough-winged Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Carolina Wren
Marsh Wren
Blue-winged Warbler
Blackpoll Warbler
Prothonotary Warbler
Hooded Warbler
Vesper Sparrow
Lark Sparrow

 

 

Re(1): Barred Owls
Posted on June 18, 2007 at 09:13:39 AM by Alex Mills

We have commonly had a brood of Barred Owls at our place at Magnetawan. The young have a very distinctive rising call that could be characterized as hissing. Its feature of rising in pitch is very distinctive. The closest way I can imitate it is to close my teeth together and inhale, working against the clenched teeth, and rising in pitch.

 

 

Barred Owls
Posted on June 17, 2007 at 06:46:34 PM by janice house

Went to visit Dad Thursday night at the cottage (Skeleton Lake Rd 3), winter wren was singing, and when we left about 9pm there was a Barred Owl sitting on a limb at the end of his driveway at the edge of the beaver pond. All I heard was a hissing noise, not the regular call, could this have been young that were afraid of the truck? The owl kept turning its head but I did not see any other birds. Shortly after passing Camel Lake Rd on Road 4 another Barred Owl flew in front of the truck and landed in low shrubs on the west side of the road.

 

 

Butterflys
Posted on June 17, 2007 at 06:32:27 PM by janice house

Milbert's tortoiseshell on the flowers at Home Hardware in Gravenhurst on Saturday, and one in our yard on Doe Lake Rd today, Monarch's and White Admirals too.

 

 

Re(2): caterpillar update...
Posted on June 17, 2007 at 07:32:43 PM by Barbara Taylor

I just checked a few milkweed in our yard and quickly found a dozen Monarch eggs. There were at least five small Monarch caterpillars on the same plants - all were less than a 1/4 inch in length.

 

 

Re(1): monarch larvae
Posted on June 17, 2007 at 04:36:49 PM by Barbara Taylor

Last year I found a small Monarch caterpillar in our yard on June 20, but I haven't kept records for other years. The first Monarch butterfly was seen in our yard last year on May 28, same date as this year. (Bracebridge)

Here are some pics from last year:
Monarchs mating June 5, 2006

Egg on milkweed June 12, 2006

Small caterpillar June 20, 2006 (on same plant that had the egg)

Large caterpillar June 29, 2006 (on same plant)

 

 

monarch larvae
Posted on June 17, 2007 at 11:09:55 AM by Wayne Bridge

I found two monarch larvae on milkweed leaves yesterday. One about 2 in. long, the other about .75 inch. I've checked my journals and that is by far the earliest I have found them. (Kearney now, Fergus-Elora before 2006). Milkweeds aren't even in bloom yet.

 

 

Re(2): Red Eyed Vireo
Posted on June 17, 2007 at 10:21:29 AM by JBurns

Neat! I guess I'm lucky to have had the chance to hold one. Their colouring is so beautiful, and those piercing red eyes!

 

 

Re(1): Red Eyed Vireo
Posted on June 17, 2007 at 07:01:19 AM by Al Sinclair

They are rarely seen up close but actually this species is one of the most abundant birds in North America and very common here . The reason they are not well known is that they spend almost all of their time in the tops of deciduous trees hidden by the leaves. However they are constantly singing "vireo...vireo" all day long, so if you recognize their song you can find them almost everywhere.

 

 

Red Eyed Vireo
Posted on June 17, 2007 at 01:53:45 AM by JBurns

Hello, I'm out at highways 169/118. A bird hit the window today, and it was a bit stunned. I held it for a bit and he flew off. I later identified it as a red eyed vireo.
Is this rare for muskoka?

 

 

Re(1): Nessus Sphinx Moth - photos
Posted on June 18, 2007 at 07:50:30 AM by Jim Griffin

Had one in my front yard (Port Sydney) last week feeding at lupins; those yellow bands really stand out.

 

 

Nessus Sphinx Moth - photos
Posted on June 15, 2007 at 05:10:59 PM by Barbara Taylor

This afternoon I found an Amphion floridensis (Nessus Sphinx Moth) feeding on our lilac. This is only the second time I've seen this species. The first time was May 30, 2004 on Browning Island, but I didn't have a camera handy.  photo1  photo2  photo3  photo4

 

 

Re(1): A lucky duck...
Posted on June 16, 2007 at 06:41:12 PM by Dave Hawke

The poor turtle! After all that work to lose your dinner. Hopefully it found something else to sustain itself, expecially with the egg laying season upon it.

 

 

A lucky duck...
Posted on June 14, 2007 at 01:58:43 PM by Barbara Taylor

Wilf Yusek sent the following report and photos he took at the Bracebridge lagoons yesterday morning:

I watched this Mallard struggling in the water about 50 feet from the shore, using his wings like paddles trying to get to shore. Then I realized that a turtle had a grip on its foot which I saw when it reached the shore. The poor bird had quite a struggle as I watched it for about 15 minutes before it got to the shore and got free from the turtle. You can see the turtle hanging on in the second picture. He was a big snapper. I watched the Mallard as he rested on the shore completely exhausted, panting like a dog. About 10 minutes later he was still on the shore but seemed calmed down, lucky duck. photo1  photo2  photo3

 

 

turtle digging a nest
Posted on June 14, 2007 at 08:08:57 AM by Robert MacEwan

9:30 Wed. morning on the southern side of cell 2 at the Bracebridge ponds a (snapping?) turtle came out of the grass right in front of me and began to dig her nest, I wasn't close enough to see if or how many eggs she laid, (this picture was taken with a 300 zoom lens) it took her less than 10 minutes to complete the job and then she scampered back to the water) photo

 

 

Re(1): dragonfly identification
Posted on June 14, 2007 at 11:58:44 AM by Al Sinclair

Celithemis elisa, Calico Pennant, female

 

 

dragonfly identification
Posted on June 13, 2007 at 09:40:40 PM by dawn sherman

Also wondering if anyone could identify this dragonfly. It was found in Huntsville. photo

 

 

Re(2): tree identification
Posted on June 14, 2007 at 12:52:17 PM by dawn sherman

Thanks!
That would explain why I couldn't find it in any of my tree books.

 

 

Re(1): tree identification
Posted on June 14, 2007 at 11:56:16 AM by Al Sinclair

My guess is Sorbus thuringiaca, Bastard Service Tree. Ornamental that would have come from a nursery.

 

 

tree identification
Posted on June 13, 2007 at 09:36:44 PM by dawn sherman

I was wondering if anyone could help identify this tree. It is growing in a park in the town of Latchford (near Temagami)  photo1  photo2  photo3

 

 

Re(3): field guides...
Posted on June 13, 2007 at 07:44:39 PM by Wayne Bridge

Thanks Barbara. This Bird Board has been a tremendous help (and inspiration) to me. I look forward to joining MFN for the next season...Wayne

 

 

Re(2): field guides...
Posted on June 13, 2007 at 11:48:22 AM by Barbara Taylor

For some good moth websites, jump to the Butterflies/Moths section on my Birding and Nature Links. There should be a new field guide out soon for the Dragonflies and Damselflies of Algonquin Park and surrounding areas. I contacted the Friends of Algonquin Park bookstore this morning and they said it is currently in the "proof" stage so should be available sometime later this year. (initially it was supposed to be ready last summer, but was delayed and more illustrations were being added)

Wayne, here's a copy of Al's earlier post which I retrieved from the Archived Reports:
Moth books
Posted on March 29, 2007 at 09:51:44 PM by Al Sinclair


Moth Books:
Moths of Eastern North America
Charles Covell Jr.
Virginia Museum of Natural History
Special Publication Number 12

Le guide des Papillons Du Quebec
Louis Hadfield
Brouquet
www.broquet.qc.ca

 

 

Re(1): Owl-eyed Bird-dropping Moth...photo
Posted on June 13, 2007 at 10:24:58 AM by Wayne Bridge

Al, you earlier this year mentioned a good moth field guide (or two) and I neglected to write the info down. Could you repeat it? Also, can you recommend a good dragonfly guide? We have so many this year. Also, I gather there are several species of hummingbird moths? Thanks, Wayne Bridge.

 

 

Owl-eyed Bird-dropping Moth...photo
Posted on June 12, 2007 at 08:48:38 PM by Al Sinclair

Owl-eyed Bird-dropping Moth, Cerma cora, hodges #9061.
This moth with the interesting name was at my light Monday morning. It is the first time I have seen this species.  photo

 

 

Sand Lake Breeding Bird Survey
Posted on June 11, 2007 at 08:24:30 PM by Alex Mills

I had perfect weather on Saturday (June 9) morning for the Sand Lake Breeding Bird Survey.

In all, I found 729 birds of 76 species. The top 5, in order, were Red-eyed Vireo (78), Ovenbird (57), White-throated Sparrow (45), American Robin (39), and Chestnut-sided Warbler (31).

It was disappointing to find only one swallow (a single Barn); this family's numbers have plummeted!

Other finds were a Northern Parula, 11 Mourning Warblers, 2 Yellow-bellied Flycatchers, an Olive-sided Flycatcher, and an Eastern Meadowlark.

 

 

Re(1): Killdeer nest
Posted on June 15, 2007 at 08:51:01 AM by Barbara Taylor

This morning the nest was empty - no eggs and no Killdeer. I didn't see any pieces of eggshell so perhaps a gull or crow raided the nest. A fresh ATV track was only an inch from the edge of the nest...so it wouldn't have lasted much longer anyways.

 

 

Killdeer nest
Posted on June 11, 2007 at 01:01:05 PM by Barbara Taylor

There is a Killdeer nest on the gravel roadway north of cell 4 at the Bracebridge Ponds. We first noticed the nest Saturday morning when two Killdeer ran up the road ahead of us doing their broken wing trick. There were three eggs then, but this morning there were four. So far no vehicles have crushed the eggs as the nest is almost dead center on the road. Eventually I fear the nest will be destroyed by the ATVs that frequently roar around the ponds. This also happens to be a popular section of the Trans Canada Trail.

 

 

Merlin - Almaguin Highlands Golf Course
Posted on June 11, 2007 at 11:11:14 AM by Kip Daynard

This post is rather late, but for the record on Thursday evening I saw a Merlin fly low over the #3 green. It had been perched on Ward Island in the Magnetawan River just opposite hole #3. Also seen or heard on the course:

Mourning Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Magnolia Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
American Redstart
Pine Warbler
Black-and-White Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Ovenbird
Eastern Meadowlark
Savannah Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Chipping Sparrow
Alder Flycatcher
Great-crested Flycatcher
Indigo Bunting (x3)

 

 

hummingbird moth
Posted on June 10, 2007 at 08:49:11 PM by Marilyn Kisser

 

Had a couple in the yard today, just outside Rosseau  photo

 

 

Peck Lake Trail
Posted on June 10, 2007 at 07:23:25 PM by Wayne Bridge

I wanted some pink lady slippers photographs so, because I knew a spot where they grow (in Algonquin Park), Beth & I took a trip down to Hwy 60 (from Kearney) today. At Peck Lake Trail we viewed: pink lady slippers, twinflowers, blue bead lily, probably thousands of bunchberry, yellow pond lily, bull, green & mink frogs, many large tadpoles, toadlets only a few weeks old, one BIG snapping turtle sunning, and a loon on nest. On the way home were two moose beside Hwy 60. Great day!

 

 

Lepidoptera in our yard today
Posted on June 10, 2007 at 06:26:21 PM by Al Sinclair

Lepidoptera in our yard today (June 10/07)
White Admiral (1)
Canadian Tiger Swallowtail (many)
American Lady (1)
Hobomok Skipper (4)
Tawny-edged Skipper (1)
Indian Skipper (1)
Hummingbird Clearwing (5)
Snowberry Clearwing (1) smaller than Hummingbird CW, wears a black mask

Photos from today:
Indian Skipper (female upper and under sides)

Snowberry Clearwing (side and back view)

 

 

Algonquin Birds - Rusty Blackbird, Red Crossbill
Posted on June 10, 2007 at 10:09:10 AM by dbritton

This morning, from 5:30 to 8:30 am I birded the upper part of the Mizzy Lake Trail Loop in Algonquin Park, accessed by the old rail bed off of Arowhon Rd. Overall birding was excellent, there was no wind and the cold overnight temperatures kept the mosquitoes within tolerable limits.

The two most interesting birds were:
1. a pair of RUSTY BLACKBIRDS at Wolf Howl Pond right where the Mizzy Lake Trail meets the old rail bed. The male was "singing" in the top of a spruce along the edge of the berm and the female was in a nearby tree.


2. an early morning flyover of a calling female RED CROSSBILL on the rail bed west of Wolf Howl Pond.

Other Algonquin breeding specialties were well in evidence, including: Yellow-bellied Flycatcher (5), Olive-sided Flycatcher (1), Blue-headed Vireo (2), Gray Jay (2), Boreal Chickadee (1), Golden-crowned Kinglet (2), Ruby-crowned Kinglet (5), and 13 species of warblers, including Northern Parula (3) and Canada (1).

DIRECTIONS - From Highway 60, turn off on Arowhon Rd., about 15 km east of the West Gate. Continue north for about 6km until the road forks into three, turn right onto the old railbed and continue a short distance, parking where there is a chain across the road. Walking this rail bed for about 500m will join up with the upper part of the Mizzy Lake Trail at Wolf Howl Pond. Continuing along this trail will take you past West Rose Lake another 300m past this a productive coniferous swamp.

 

 

Small Magpie Moth
Posted on June 9, 2007 at 09:45:05 PM by Barbara Taylor

I found this interesting moth in our yard tonight. I have never seen one before, but I believe it is Eurrhypara hortulata, Small Magpie Moth, Hodges #4952.  photo1  photo2  photo3

 

 

Mourning Warbler and Brewer's Blackbirds
Posted on June 9, 2007 at 06:55:48 PM by dbritton

This morning there was a male Mourning Warbler singing along Wharf Road in Bracebridge on the wooded hillside across from the parking lot for the wharf just below the falls. He was singing persistently, high up in the trees, but with a little patience I managed to get a decent look at him, near the pathway leading up the hillside to the end of Kimberly Avenue.

In addition, a male and a female Brewer's Blackbird were seen in the traditional spot along Beatrice Town Line about 50m north of the intersection with Falkenburg Road

 

 

Black Bear
Posted on June 9, 2007 at 04:46:59 PM by Marilyn Kisser

 

I bring the feeders in at night, but this fellow came a little early - just outside of Rosseau photo

 

 

red fox with kits
Posted on June 7, 2007 at 10:02:42 PM by Robert MacEwan

as I was driving home this evening a fox and 3 kits ran across the road (Fraserburg) in front of me, I was only able to get a pic of 3 of them, one hid in the grass, that's the adult with her(?) back to you as she makes sure they are all safely off the road - maybe it was Mom and Dad with 2 kits and not one adult with 3 kits? anyway - it was a nice sight to see  photo

for camera buffs
Canon Digital Rebel, 28 to 55 lens, automatic high speed action setting, out the open window of my running truck, no flash, lots of light but no direct sun

 

 

Coon Disaster
Posted on June 7, 2007 at 07:19:54 AM by J. Gardner

we have 44 twinned boxes on the property, roughtly l8 acres of pasture. We had 36 Tree Swallow nests, 2 Bluebird nests and 1 House Wren. The coon got 29 swallow nests, including sitting females, 2 bluebird nests and 1 house wren nest. There were also 5 Tree Swallow nests with the young dead from cold and wet. A disaster from the swallows perspective. We are located at the south end of Lake Manitouwabing.

 

 

Re(3): Hummingbird Melee - Photos
Posted on June 7, 2007 at 08:35:10 PM by Marilyn Kisser

I had multiple hummers at all 5 of my feeders yesterday - I have been worried about all the baby birds due to the cold and wet

 

 

Re(2): Hummingbird Melee - Photos
Posted on June 6, 2007 at 02:49:01 PM by J. Gardner

We witnessed the same hyperactivity around the hummer feeders yesterday. Just keeping up the energy levels during the cold snap. Unfortunately, the cold and wet weather was disastrous for many nests of Tree Swallow babies, newly hatched. And, a marauding coon who has learned to bypass the guards on the boxes did up several more boxes of Tree Swallows, including the female sitting in the box. A Bad Day.

 

 

Re(1): Hummingbird Melee - Photos
Posted on June 6, 2007 at 09:40:49 AM by willowbeachbirding

WOW!!! You are SO lucky!!! I have never witnessed this. Glad you were able to get pictures!!! Thanks for sharing.

 

 

Hummingbird Melee - Photos
Posted on June 5, 2007 at 08:52:52 PM by Kip Daynard

Perhaps due to the cold, wet weather we're having today, we've witnessed the most amazing activity at our hummingbird feeders. We don't normally have more than three or four hummers at once, but this afternoon I've counted at least 12 individuals at two feeders. Almost all are feeding at the one more sheltered feeder and they seem much more congenial than usual, four birds sitting and generally two in the air around the feeder all at once, alternating places with each other, at times with very little aggression. Amazingly, many times we've seen two birds feeding in the same hole at once for 30-40 seconds at a time, one bird hovering just above another sitting bird or in some cases standing on its back or head!

Some photos below. In the 2nd shot one hummer is standing on the back of another and they are both drinking from the same opening. Can you see all seven hummingbirds in the last 2 shots?

photo1  photo2  photo3  photo4

 

 

Re(1): Ruddy Ducks - Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on June 4, 2007 at 05:38:32 PM by Barbara Taylor

Don Bailey reports they were still there in cell 1 around 5 p.m.

 

 

Ruddy Ducks - Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on June 4, 2007 at 04:13:50 PM by Barbara Taylor

This afternoon there were two Ruddy Ducks in cell 1 at the Bracebridge Ponds.  Most likely both males but the light was dim and no scope. One male was almost in full breeding plumage but no blue bill visible. The other had a bright white cheek patch and dark cap but otherwise appeared overall grayish.

 

 

Canadian Tiger Swallowtails - Photos
Posted on June 4, 2007 at 11:29:24 AM by Kip Daynard


photo1  photo2  photo3

 

 

Re(1): Black Bear - Bay Lake
Posted on June 5, 2007 at 00:56:25 AM by Marilyn Kisser

we have a large bear coming almost nightly into the yard - I bring in the feeders in the evening now (just outside Rosseau)

 

 

Black Bear - Bay Lake
Posted on June 4, 2007 at 10:17:12 AM by Kip Daynard

A bear visited our yard last night. It knocked over and ripped the top off a large bird feeder to get at some remnants of sunflower seed. It also climbed onto our deck and pulled down a suet hanger and a mostly-full hummingbird feeder. We've sighted bears in the area before, but this is the first time we've found evidence of one in our yard. While birding on the Bruce Peninsula on Saturday, we saw a Black Bear cross Lindsey Rd near Pike Bay. Am. Bittern calling most evenings at dusk from the SE corner of Bay Lake.

 

 

beaumaris birds
Posted on June 4, 2007 at 07:13:28 AM by gerald willmott

This morning on the dog walk I heard the first American Bittern, on Beaumaris, this year. Other sightings of note: A pair of Canada Geese still floating around with their two chick, growing fast. Mother mallard with approximately 10 chicks. A humming birds closely following a Sap Sucker to several different locations.

 

 

Muskoka Field Naturalists - next meeting June 7
Posted on June 2, 2007 at 01:19:34 PM by Barbara Taylor

From the WAKEROBIN - Newsletter of the Muskoka Field Naturalists

June 7, Thursday, 7:30 p.m., Gravenhurst
Ken Stuart from the Ontario Puma Foundation will present a program on the Eastern Cougar. There has been cougar sightings in Muskoka! (note: guest speaker presentation will be at beginning of meeting)

Visitors welcome to attend. Meetings from February thru June will be held at 7:30 p.m. at Calvary Baptist Church in Gravenhurst, corner of First and Brock Streets (across from Giant Tiger). Membership Information & Program Updates: MFN website

 

 

Re(1): Olive-sided Flycatcher
Posted on June 2, 2007 at 04:09:14 PM by dbritton

Hi Eleanor, I covered the Hekkla/Bear Cave area for the Ontario Breeding Bird atlas and had an Olive-sided Flycatcher singing in exactly the same spot on June 21, 2003

 

 

Olive-sided Flycatcher
Posted on June 2, 2007 at 12:26:15 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

This mornings trip up Bear Cave Rd, Rosseau, allowed a bird I haven't heard for several years. Up near the end of the road is an open wetland surrounded by dead trees. The Olive-sided Flycatcher was singing but I couldn't get it to come in for a close look.

 

 

Wild Turkey - photo
Posted on June 2, 2007 at 08:39:03 AM by Barbara Taylor

David Hatch sent these photos he took of a Wild Turkey and her nest at Clevelands House in Minett on May 30.

photo1   photo2

 

 

Saw-whet Owlets!
Posted on June 1, 2007 at 11:42:23 AM by Kip Daynard

On April 30th the female was sitting on 6 eggs. The owls have been calling quietly on and off for much of the month of May, but as of yesterday I hadn't heard them for several nights. Two nights ago I set up a vigil near the nestbox at dusk in the hopes of seeing the adult visiting the nestbox to feed the young. I suppose they wait until its fully dark to begin feeding as I watched until it was quite dark with no sign of activity. Upon looking in the nestbox last night I found 3 chicks huddled quietly in the bottom. It was a bit difficult to see given the light and the fact that I had to use a small mirror and a flashlight to see them. This morning by way of a small digital camera I managed to get some pictures (see below).  photo

It seems possible that one or two may have already fledged, although I suspect they'd be hanging about outside the nest as I understand they are dependent on the adult for 2-3 more weeks after fledging. I didn't see the adults last night and wonder if perhaps the female has left the area. I understand that often the female leaves the area after moving out of the nest (18 days or so after hatching) to find another mate while the male stays for another month or so to feed the young and see them through fledging.

 

 

Moose
Posted on May 31, 2007 at 09:26:09 AM by Barbara Taylor

Our neighbour reports seeing a Moose last evening while out for a walk around Meadow Heights, Bracebridge.

 

 

Mourning Warbler - photo
Posted on May 30, 2007 at 05:58:30 PM by Barbara Taylor

Wilf Yusek took this photo of a Mourning Warbler today at the Bracebridge Ponds. The bird can't always be seen, but you can hear it singing in the woods west of cell 2 a short distance north of cell 3. You can listen to the song at http://identify.whatbird.com/obj/340/_/Mourning_Warbler.aspx

 

 

Semipalmated Sandpipers - photo
Posted on May 30, 2007 at 05:51:47 PM by Barbara Taylor

Wilf Yusek reports there were 33 Semipalmated Sandpipers at the Bracebridge Ponds in cell 4 today. They were at the north east side approx 20 yards south of the north end.  Bracebridge Ponds map

Here are two of Wilf's photos of the birds: photo1  photo2

 

 

Re(2): Black Bear
Posted on May 31, 2007 at 08:30:39 PM by Barbara Taylor

Are all the bears moving to Bracebridge? :)
Just after 7:30 p.m. tonight there was a bear sitting beside a house on Ridge Valley Dr. It ran off as dog walkers approached.

 

 

Re(1): Black Bear
Posted on May 30, 2007 at 07:31:14 AM by janice house

there was a deer on Dr Parlett's lawn on Monday, do you think the bear was after it?

 

 

Black Bear
Posted on May 29, 2007 at 09:59:16 PM by Dave Wright

Pat and I saw a black bear at the back of the arena Mon. 2 am - no ice skates. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Hummingbird Moth and Black Bear
Posted on May 28, 2007 at 09:24:07 AM by Barbara Taylor

Yesterday there was a "hummingbird moth" feeding at some Sweet Woodruff in our garden. It didn't let me get close enough for a positive identification, but most likely a Hemaris diffinis (Snowberry Clearwing). I seem to recall they are the most common in our area and are flying sooner than the other species found here - Hemaris thysbe (Hummingbird Clearwing) and Hemaris gracilis (Slender Clearwing).

Also last night just before 10 p.m. we had a Black Bear come up onto our back deck. I guess it was going to investigate our barbecue, but ran off when I went to the door and turned on the outside light. There was another report of a bear in a backyard near the Pines last week so they are roaming now.
(Glendale Rd. near Kevin Cres., Bracebridge)

 

 

MFN Baillie Birdathon results
Posted on May 27, 2007 at 04:41:42 PM by Al Sinclair

10 members of the Muskoka Field Naturalists participated in the Baillie Birdathon on May 26/27,2007. We birded the Bracebridge Ponds from 7am to 9:30 am on the 26th then divided into 3 groups to cover as much of Muskoka as possible. The list of species seen below is the combined list for all groups. Pledges received will be sent to Bird Studies Canada to be used for bird related projects. Two of the best bird species found were Gray Jays at the Novar spruce bog and a Yellow-billed Cuckoo seen well on Medora Lake Rd near Bala. The total for the birdathon was 119 species.

SPECIES SEEN
Common Loon
Pied-billed Grebe
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Green Heron
American Bittern
Canada Goose
Wood Duck
Green-winged Teal
Mallard
American Black Duck
Blue-winged Teal
Lesser Scaup
Hooded Merganser
Common Merganser
Turkey Vulture
Cooper's Hawk
Broad-winged Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Wild Turkey
Ruffed Grouse
Virginia Rail
Sora
Killdeer
American Woodcock
Wilson's Snipe
Lesser Yellowlegs
Spotted Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
Ring-billed Gull
Herring Gull
Caspian Tern
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Black-billed Cuckoo
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Barred Owl
Whip-poor-will
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Belted Kingfisher
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Hairy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
Alder Flycatcher
Least Flycatcher
Eastern Phoebe
Great Crested Flycatcher
Eastern Kingbird
Tree Swallow
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Bank Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Barn Swallow
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Cedar Waxwing
House Wren
Gray Catbird
Brown Thrasher
Eastern Bluebird
Veery
Swainson's Thrush
Hermit Thrush
Wood Thrush
American Robin
Black-capped Chickadee
Red-breasted Nuthatch
White-breasted Nuthatch
Gray Jay
Blue Jay
American Crow
Common Raven
European Starling
Blue-headed Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
Golden-winged Warbler
Nashville Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Magnolia Warbler
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
Pine Warbler
Bay-breasted Warbler
Blackpoll Warbler
Black-and-white Warbler
American Redstart
Ovenbird
Northern Waterthrush
Mourning Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Wilson's Warbler
Canada Warbler
Scarlet Tanager
Chipping Sparrow
Field Sparrow
Vesper Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Northern Cardinal
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Indigo Bunting
Bobolink
Red-winged Blackbird
Eastern Meadowlark
Brewer's Blackbird
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
Baltimore Oriole
Purple Finch
Pine Siskin
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow
////---- STATISTICS ----/////
Species seen - 119

Participants: Neil Nimmo, Dinny Nimmo, Allan Aubin, Janice House, Stephanie Lehman, Bill Dickinson, David Goodyear, David Kent, Wilf Yusek, Al Sinclair

 

 

Re(4): Common Goldeneye
Posted on May 29, 2007 at 08:15:08 AM by janice house

common goldeneye was still in cell 1 at 7:30 pm on May 28th, no sign of the redhead, veery calling south side of cell 4.

 

 

Re(3): Common Goldeneye - photo
Posted on May 28, 2007 at 04:31:12 PM by Barbara Taylor

Here is a photo Wilf Yusek took of today's Common Goldeneye. Thanks Wilf.

 

 

Re(2): Common Goldeneye, no Redhead
Posted on May 28, 2007 at 01:27:11 PM by Barbara Taylor

Wilf Yusek reports that at 1:20 p.m. today the Redhead cannot be found, but there is now a male Common Goldeneye in cell 1.

 

 

Re(1): Redhead, Wigeons - Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on May 27, 2007 at 02:50:36 PM by Al Sinclair

At 2:30pm the Redhead was in cell 1 at the south end swimming with Mallards.

 

 

Redhead, Wigeons - Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on May 27, 2007 at 01:26:55 PM by Barbara Taylor

As of 12:45 p.m. today there is a male Redhead, a couple American Wigeons, a pair of Green-winged Teal, Wood Ducks, and a few American Black Ducks amongst the many, many Mallards in cell 4. A pair of Blue-winged Teal were in the marshy area east of cell 4. Bracebridge Ponds map

Directions are only approximate. North is at the top of the map towards Kerr Park and West is at the left of the map towards the pipeline. So the NW corner of cell 4 is the top left corner of cell 4 on the map.

 

 

Re(4): Monarch
Posted on May 28, 2007 at 08:04:59 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Interesting, I was 100 ml north of Duluth, Minnesota, from last Tuesday to Saturday and saw two Monarchs playing around the same location each of those days.

 

 

Re(3): Monarch
Posted on May 27, 2007 at 03:16:48 PM by janice house

saw 2 at Covered Bridge Trail west of Zellers in Bracebridge yesterday.

 

 

Re(2): Monarch - North Muskoka
Posted on May 27, 2007 at 02:56:09 PM by Al Sinclair

We were out all day yesterday, May 26, in the northern part of Muskoka doing the Baillie Birdathon. Saw 2 Monarchs, one at the end of Marsh Rd on Lake Veron, one on Bear Cave Rd north of Hekkla.

 

 

Re(1): Monarch - Bracebridge
Posted on May 27, 2007 at 01:28:04 PM by Barbara Taylor

Saw my first Monarch butterfly of the year at the Bracebridge Ponds around noon today.

 

 

Monarch, Kearney
Posted on May 27, 2007 at 08:16:55 AM by Wayne Bridge

Saw the first monarch in Kearney (for me) Saturday May 26 at about 4 p.m.

 

 

mallard
Posted on May 27, 2007 at 08:14:19 AM by gerald willmott

This morning on my dog/bird walk i saw mother mallard herding her 10 chicks into the bullrushes of a small pond that joins up with Lake Muskoka. There is also pair of Canada Geese with two gosslings in the same pond.  We also have been seeing Alder Flycatchers.
Gerald Willmott

 

 

Black-throated Blue Warbler & Great Crested Flycatchers
Posted on May 26, 2007 at 07:57:38 PM by Barb Staples

My first-ever sighting 5 pm today of a Black-throated Blue Warbler, a solitary male - from all angles in sunlight he appeared considerably darker above than any guides portray. Also a pair of Great Crested Flycatchers are nesting nearby. Located undeveloped end of Sunny Lake, Gravenhurst.

 

 

Monarch
Posted on May 26, 2007 at 11:44:58 AM by dawn sherman

I saw my first Monarch on the Hunter's Bay Trail today in Huntsville.

 

 

Re(1): Mourning Warbler at Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on May 25, 2007 at 08:22:26 PM by Kip Daynard

Heard a Mourning Warbler outside my house on Bay Lake this morning. First of season for me in Muskoka/Parry Sound and a first ever yard record!

 

 

Mourning Warbler at Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on May 25, 2007 at 09:15:30 AM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there was a Mourning Warbler at the Bracebridge Ponds very near the spot there has been one in past years. It was singing at the edge of the woods west of cell 2 at the very south end of the cell. West of cell 4 there was a Blackpoll Warbler and at least three Sora calling. A Veery was singing near the NW corner of cell 4. A Lesser Yellowlegs was at the south shoreline of cell 4.

Directions are only approximate. North is at the top of the map towards Kerr Park and West is at the left of the map towards the pipeline. So the NW corner of cell 4 is the top left corner of cell 4 on the map. Bracebridge Ponds map

 

 

Blackpoll Warbler east of Bracebridge
Posted on May 24, 2007 at 09:57:59 PM by Al Sinclair

Today at 8:30 am I heard the unusual song of a Blackpoll Warbler in our back yard ( sounds like a grasshopper). Located it foraging in a large maple where it stayed for about 15 minutes before moving on. First one we have had in our yard in about 10 years. Also had our first Cedar Waxwings of the year here this morning.

 

 

Re(1): Common Nighthawk
Posted on May 24, 2007 at 09:51:49 PM by Al Sinclair

Last night, May 23, in a 30 minute period around 6pm, we had 4 Nighthawks fly by heading north, one at a time. Hwy 118E 8km east of Bracebridge

 

 

Common Nighthawk
Posted on May 24, 2007 at 08:00:39 PM by janice house

just came back from dog walk, 2 nighthawks flew over head
(Doe Lake Rd.)

 

 

Re(1): Curve-toothed Geometer Moth
Posted on May 22, 2007 at 06:11:32 PM by Al Sinclair

This species was abundant this year, 75 at my light east of Bracebridge on May 9. The adults fly in May, numbers dropping off now.

 

 

Curve-toothed Geometer Moth
Posted on May 22, 2007 at 04:11:13 PM by Barbara Taylor

This afternoon I found this moth hiding on the shady side of our house. It appears to be a Curve-toothed Geometer. (Bracebridge)  photo

 

 

Wilson's warbler
Posted on May 22, 2007 at 02:52:42 PM by Wayne Bridge

At the Burk's Falls lagoons this a.m. I was treated to a great look at a male Wilson's warbler. Others included spotted sandpipers, Canada geese, brown thrasher, common yellowthroat, and a male bobolink beside the lane.

 

 

Blackburnian
Posted on May 22, 2007 at 07:23:57 AM by gerald willmott

I found Beaumaris' first Blackburnian Warbler on my morning dog walk. Poor dog gets tired of me staring at trees and listening. The Blackburnian had a quiter and thinner song than i had thought. When my hearing failes me, this bird will be out of my range! I also noticed it would fly down a tree and then work its way to the top.
Gerald Willmott
Beaumaris

 

 

Re(1): Addendum to Algonquin Park update
Posted on May 22, 2007 at 08:18:20 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (May 22, 2007) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.


Spruce Grouse:
Three were observed along Arowhon Road, south of the old railway,
on May 13.

Boreal Chickadee:
Two were reported along the old railway about 300m beyond the chain
gate as one proceeds toward Wolf Howl Pond on May 13. Do not block
access through the chain gate. This site is accessible via the Arowhon
Road at km 15.4 on Highway 60. See Park Tabloid (available at park
gates) for more details.

Good birding.

Ron Tozer (semi-retired Algonquin Park Naturalist)
Dwight, Ontario

 

 

Algonquin Park birding update: 21 May
Posted on May 21, 2007 at 04:07:27 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (May 21, 2007) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.


The following summarizes recent birding reports for some northern
species in Algonquin Provincial Park. Please let us know if you have
additional information.

Barred Owl:
Heard regularly in the hardwood habitat from the West Boundary to
about Lake of Two Rivers. Sites to listen include: km 2, km 16, km 18,
km 23, km 27, and km 29. These are locations where Barred Owls
were seen and/or heard following the playing of the owl survey
recording during April, after sunset.

Northern Saw-whet Owl:
Still being heard singing regularly throughout the Highway 60
Corridor, starting soon after sunset. A record high count was obtained
on our three Highway 60 owl surveys during April.

Spruce Grouse:
There have been recent sightings at Spruce Bog Boardwalk and
along Opeongo Road. This grouse becomes harder to locate in
late May and during June.

American Three-toed Woodpecker:
No reports have been received since early April.

Black-backed Woodpecker:
This woodpecker has been reported at Spruce Bog, and along
Mizzy Lake Trail in the Wolf Howl Pond/West Rose Lake section.

Gray Jay:
Birds are still being seen at Spruce Bog and along Opeongo Road.
Adults and their fledged young are inconspicuous during late May and
through June.

Boreal Chickadee:
No recent reports. This chickadee is difficult to locate now.
Females are incubating eggs, or soon will be.

Red Crossbill:
Still being seen regularly in small numbers. There have been recent
sightings of fledged young.

White-winged Crossbill:
Present in low numbers still. Interestingly, there have been no reports
of fledged young of this crossbill, despite all the apparent breeding
behaviour seen in late winter and early spring.

Pine Siskin:
Still common, with many sightings of fledged young during May.

Evening Grosbeak:
A few are being seen, especially in parking lots where they frequently
go under vehicles to access encrusted salt deposits left from the winter.

Moose:
A few are still regular along the highway, especially in early morning and
evening.

Black Flies:
On cooler, breezy days they are not too bad yet. However, in some sheltered
locations, on warmer, cloudy days, they have been numerous. Be prepared!
Birders seeking warblers and other birds here are advised to get in the
field early in the morning, when black flies are less active in the cool
temperatures.

As always, please let us know the date, number and location of birds you
observe when you visit Algonquin Park. In particular, we would like your
assistance with spring arrival dates. Please add your sightings to the
sheets posted in the Visitor Centre lobby.
Your bird sightings information is stored in the Algonquin Visitor Centre
database, and will help us to assist other birders visiting the Park.
Thanks.

Good birding.
Ron Tozer (semi-retired Algonquin Park Naturalist)
Dwight, Ontario

Directions:
Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400, 11
and 60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400. From
Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the park.
Kilometre markers on Highway 60 in the park go from the West Gate
(km 0) to the East Gate (km 56). Permits and information are available
daily at both gates. The free Algonquin 2007 Information Guide has a map
showing the location of sites mentioned in this report.

The Visitor Centre (km 43) is open daily, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., from May 18
to June 28. Recent bird sightings and information can be obtained there.
------------------------------------------------------
*ONTBIRDS is presented by the Ontario Field Ornithologists - the provincial birding organization.
For instructions to join or leave ONTBIRDS visit http://www.ofo.ca/ontbirdshow.htm
ONTBIRDS Guidelines may be viewed at http://www.ofo.ca/ontbirdsguide.htm

 

 

Covered Bridge Trail
Posted on May 21, 2007 at 11:32:07 AM by Barbara Taylor

This morning we finally found our first Canada Warbler of the year. It was singing near the entrance to the Covered Bridge subdivision in Bracebridge. Nearby along the trail that follows Beaver Creek there were Chestnut-sided Warblers, Common Yellowthroat, Alder Flycatchers, Gray Catbird, and a Brown Thrasher.

 

 

Wilf's Photos
Posted on May 20, 2007 at 04:52:40 PM by Barbara Taylor

Wilf Yusek sent these two photos he took today. Thanks Wilf.
Wilson's Phalarope

Semipalmated Plover (Wilf found three this morning in the south-east corner of cell 4)

 

 

Re(1): Ruddy Duck and shorebirds
Posted on May 20, 2007 at 03:53:58 PM by Barbara Taylor

This afternoon we couldn't find the Wilson's Phalarope, but the female Ruddy Duck was still there. Three Semipalmated Plovers were in the south-east corner of cell 3 (near the Lagoon Lane entrance) - still there as of 3 p.m. At the west shoreline of cell 4 there was one Semipalmated Plover near the south end and one Solitary Sandpiper near the north end. There was one Lesser Yellowlegs in cell 1 and forty or so Least Sandpipers. Spotted Sandpipers and Killdeer were also scattered about.

Directions are only approximate. North is at the top of the map towards Kerr Park and West is at the left of the map towards the pipeline. So the NW corner of cell 4 is the top left corner of cell 4 on the map.

Bracebridge Ponds map

 

 

Wilson's Phalarope, Ruddy Duck...Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on May 20, 2007 at 10:47:14 AM by Al Sinclair

Wilf Yusek called from the Ponds at 10:45 am today to report a Wilson's Phalarope and Ruddy Duck in the middle toward the north end of cell 1.

 

 

oven bird
Posted on May 20, 2007 at 01:21:50 AM by Marilyn Kisser

the oven birds wake me up early every morning, so I went out looking for them yesterday early - photo taken just outside Rosseau on Crawford Street, off the Aspdin Road  photo

 

 

Windermere Birds
Posted on May 19, 2007 at 11:20:25 AM by dbritton

I birded the area along Windermere and Dee Bank Roads between Rostrevor and Irwin Klingbeil roads. Overall, birding was excellent, with 70 species heard and seen. Of note were: both Eastern Towhee and Mourning Warbler singing on Irwin Klingbeil Road, near its northern intersection with Dee Bank Road. On Rostervor Rd. about 100m north of the bridge I had a Philadelphia Vireo and a Wilson's Warbler. Notably there we no Golden-winged Warblers heard - this area has been a reliable breeding spot for at least the last 8 years.

 

 

Canadian Tiger Swallowtail
Posted on May 18, 2007 at 05:35:42 PM by Ron Stager

Since the weather was nice, I took a long lunch-hour to look for butterflies along Merkley and Lewisham Roads (east of Barkway). Saw 14 species over a short period of time with the following notable:
Canadian Tiger Swallowtail (first of year)
Red Admiral (lots probably more than 20: I didn't see a single one last year)
Juvenal's Duskywings (very abundant)

Other species seen
Cabbage White
Mustard White
Clouded Sulfur
Eastern Pine Elfin
Brown Elfin
Spring Azure
Silvery Blue
Eastern Comma
Grey Comma
Dreamy Duskywing
Common Roadside Skipper

Brings to mind the Bala Butterfly count on June 30 : some of the species seen today are still around for the count. Please let me know if you are interested in participating.
Ron Stager

 

 

Request for Monarch Butterfly Sightings
Posted on May 18, 2007 at 11:24:14 AM by davisdon

In the past, I have appreciated receiving reports from this excellent nature sightings board of "first" sightings of monarch butterflies. Again this year, Journey North - an award winning-internet based science program - requests your first sightings of adult monarch butterflies, eggs and larva. You may register at www.learner.org/jnorth to report your sighting directly there, or post it to this list where I can see it.

Of course, Journey North also looks for other "first sightings" of other species as spring arrives across the continent. For those wanting to report other Ontario butterfly sightings, check out the Google group "Ontario Butterflies".


This week, I have received a number of reports of adult monarch sightings from the Toronto area, including Toronto Islands, Scarborough as well as Oshawa. For details on setting up a "Monarch Waystation", go to www.monarchwatch.org.
Thanks again.
Don Davis
Toronto, ON

 

 

Semipalmated Plovers at Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on May 18, 2007 at 09:11:53 AM by Barbara Taylor

This morning three Semipalmated Plovers, two Killdeer, and five Least Sandpipers were all together on the west shore of cell 4 near the south end. (all still there as of 8:30 a.m. when I left)  Bracebridge Ponds map

A Sora was calling near the south-west corner of cell 4, along with a pair of Gray Catbirds. A male Wilson's Warbler was low in the thickets along the pipeline/snowmobile trail west of cell 4. Two Green Herons were in the wet area west of cell 4 near the north end. A Virginia Rail was calling from the flooded area north of cell 4. A Black-billed Cuckoo and a Wood Thrush were near the NW corner of cell 4. Many warblers and a Red-eyed Vireo at the edge of the woods west of cell 2, but no Mourning Warbler yet. Baltimore Orioles and Eastern Kingbirds were in the woods near the NE corner of cell 4.

At Kerr Park an Eastern Meadowlark was singing near the west fenceline and an Eastern Bluebird was near one of the nestboxes there. A pair of Brown Thrashers were in the shrubbery near the viewing stand. A pair of Blue-winged Teal were in the little pond by the parking lot.

 

 

rose-breasted grosbeak
Posted on May 17, 2007 at 09:03:24 PM by Marilyn Kisser

this male visited the feeders for a couple of days last week - each year we find the numbers of the rose-breasted grosbeaks has been declining here - Crawford Street, Rosseau  photo

 

 

indigo bunting
Posted on May 17, 2007 at 08:55:59 PM by Marilyn Kisser

this is the first year the indigo bunting has come to the finch feeders - just outside Rosseau on Crawford Street

photo

 

 

Palm Warbler
Posted on May 17, 2007 at 03:58:45 PM by wilf yusek

Took a fast look at the lagoons this a.m. saw a Palm Warbler in the trees, bushes across the road on the east side of cell 1 approx near the middle of the cell (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Sandhill Cranes seen on Muskoka Bay golf course...photo
Posted on May 17, 2007 at 08:31:50 PM by Marilyn Kisser

I heard 2 sandhill cranes fly over the house here just outside of Rosseau the other morning

 

 

Sandhill Cranes seen on Muskoka Bay golf course...photo
Posted on May 15, 2007 at 05:19:29 PM by Al Sinclair

Yesterday, May 14, 2007, Lauren Ackerman spotted 2 Sandhill Cranes on the 8th hole at the Muskoka Bay golf course in Gravenhurst. She sent the photo below.

 

 

Re(2): Warbler photos
Posted on May 17, 2007 at 08:36:39 PM by Marilyn Kisser

I'm not far from Bear Cave, and I hear the warblers very early every morning - I'll have to get out there for some photos too

 

 

Re(1): Warbler photos
Posted on May 15, 2007 at 06:31:33 PM by Barbara Taylor

Eleanor has sent these two photos of the warblers. Thanks Eleanor. Great shots!
Canada Warbler   Magnolia Warbler

 

 

Bear Cave Rd. N of Rosseau
Posted on May 15, 2007 at 02:40:23 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

I headed to Bear Cave Road this morning and got 13 species of warber.
Nashville, Yellow, Chestnut-sided, Magnolia, Black-throated Blue, Black-throated green, Yellow-rumped, Pine, Black & White, Ovenbird, Northern Waterthrush, Common Yellowthroat and Canada. That is a big warbler day for me in Muskoka! I do have a difficult time telling Canada and Magnolia apart when quickly attempting to get photographs. I got some of each of the two.

 

 

Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on May 15, 2007 at 12:57:22 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning at the Bracebridge Ponds there was a Tennessee Warbler singing west of cell 4 - first we've found this spring. A Sora was calling west of cell 4 and a Virginia Rail was north of cell 4. There were three Solitary Sandpipers, six Least Sandpipers, and a couple Spotted Sandpipers along the west shoreline of cell 4. At least nine young Canada Geese with their parents in cell 2. A Broad-winged Hawk soared low overhead, and an American Kestrel flew past carrying a mouse in its feet. The Northern Waterthrush was again singing near the NW corner of cell 4 as well as some Gray Treefrogs, and many of the warbler species mentioned in earlier posts.  Bracebridge Ponds map

 

 

 

Bonaparte's Gulls etc - Bernard Lake and Lagoons
Posted on May 14, 2007 at 11:11:01 AM by Kip Daynard

A quick visit to the Bernard Lake this morning revealed 19 Bonaparte's Gulls sitting on some rocks off the point to the SW side of the lake (visible from Bernard Lake Dam). A Common Loon and several Ring-billed and Herring Gulls were also in the same bay.

In the west cell of the sewage lagoons I found the following waterfowl:

1 Lesser Scaup
5 Common Goldeneyes
10 Buffleheads
2 Ring-necked Ducks
8 Wood Ducks
8 Mallards

At least 5 Spotted Sandpipers were also present on the banks of the lagoon and flying over Stirling Creek and Bernard Lake. Other species heard or seen in the area include:

5 Yellow Warbler
1 Magnolia Warbler
2 Nashville Warbler
1 Hermit Thrush
2 Pileated Woodpecker
etc.

DIRECTIONS
Coming the south take Hwy 11 north past Burk's Falls. Turn right on North Horn Lake Rd East. Turn left on Muskoka Rd, then right on S. Lake Bernard Rd. After crossing the railway tracks, turn left on High Rock Rd. and follow 2.5 kms or so to the Bernard Lake Dam. The lagoons are on the left, Bernard Lake is on the right.

 

 

Southwood Rd.
Posted on May 13, 2007 at 11:35:46 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

This morning I drove and made many stops along Southwood Rd. from Torrance to Smith Rd. One species I didn't mention last report was Field Sparrow of which I heard several today. Several Brown Thrashers. Lots of Chestnut-sided Warblers among others. Broad-winged Hawks last evening. The only surprise was an adult male Merlin.

 

 

Thrasher
Posted on May 13, 2007 at 09:35:38 AM by nickbartok

Brown thrasher has returned yet again to nest in the hedge at my parents house on fraserburg road
must be going on 10 years now!!

 

 

Lagoons - Rail and Warblers
Posted on May 12, 2007 at 09:29:17 AM by goodyear

We birded the Bracebridge Lagoons early this morning. Despite the chill we found some good birds. Male Magnolia, 2 male Blackburnians, and a male Northern Parula at the NW corner of Cell 4. Also lots of Yellows, Yellow-rumped, Palm, and 2 Black and Whites. We heard and then saw a Virginia Rail in the flooded area north of Cell 4. Many Bank, Barn, Tree, and Rough-winged Swallows over Cells 1 and 2. 4 Least Sandpipers on the mud flat at the south end of Cell 2.

 

 

baltimore oriole
Posted on May 11, 2007 at 09:24:41 PM by John Challis

We've had a Baltimore oriole around our place for three days now. Today, a female was at our hummingbird feeder sipping nectar -- and was chased away by a belligerent hummer.
Hermit thrush have also been around this evening, and this morning heard first black-throated blue, first red-eyed vireo (pretty sure it wasn't the blue-headed). Nashville warblers are quite numerous along our road (Green River Drive, Washago). And the ovenbirds have been growing in numbers all week.

 

 

Northern Parula - Bay Lake
Posted on May 11, 2007 at 02:44:20 PM by Kip Daynard

First of season heard today around 2pm.

 

 

Re(2): Orange-crowned Warbler - Burk's Falls Lagoons
Posted on May 11, 2007 at 04:55:44 PM by Kip Daynard

Wayne,
What I usually do is walk around the trail to the west of the south cell. Then about midway across, by leaving the trail and walking up to the fence you can get an excellent view of both cells while still staying outside the fence (Some smallish conifers on that edge make for a decent blind, whereas crossing the fence tends to flush whatever birds are on the water).

 

 

Re(1): Orange-crowned Warbler - Burk's Falls Lagoons
Posted on May 11, 2007 at 04:27:09 PM by Wayne Bridge

Kip, I know it's posted, but can one actually walk around to the farthest (from the gate) lagoon? It's very difficult trying to see well from the gate area??

 

 

Orange-crowned Warbler - Burk's Falls Lagoons
Posted on May 11, 2007 at 12:06:56 PM by Kip Daynard

I found a male Orange-crowned Warbler this morning feeding at eye level right beside the fork in Lagoon Lane across the road from the boat storage yard. He was very obliging, showing off his beautiful orange crown at close range (making me sorry I left my camera at home)! Other species present included:

2 American Redstarts
2 Nashville Warblers
4 Yellow Warblers
6 Chestnut-sided Warblers
1 Ovenbird
4 Black-throated Green Warblers
1 Common Yellowthroat
3 Black-and-White Warblers
4 Bobolinks (singing on west side of south cell)
2 Swamp Sparrows
etc.

Dozens of Chimney Swifts, Barn and Tree Swallows were hunting over the lagoons. 2 Bufflehead and 3 Lesser Scaup in the south cell. A strange sight to the south-east of the lagoons was a Raven flying about with absolutely no tail feathers!

Directions
Exit Hwy 11 at Hwy 520 (Ontario St.) and follow into the centre of town. Turn east onto Yonge St. and follow this across the bridge over the South Magnetewan River. After crossing the railway tracks, take a left on Lagoon Lane. The lagoon is at the end.

 

 

Golden-winged Warbler at Henry Marsh
Posted on May 11, 2007 at 10:41:54 AM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there was a male Golden-winged Warbler in the open area to the left of the Henry Trail as you leave the woods (same spot as last year). He flew up into the large dead tree and sang several times before descending back down into the shrubbery. Other birds in the area were a Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Common Yellowthroat, Yellow Warbler, Chestnut-sided Warbler, Black-throated Green Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Black-and-white Warbler, Nashville Warbler, Baltimore Oriole, Ovenbird, many American Goldfinch, Purple Finch, Swamp Sparrow, White-throated Sparrow, Song Sparrow, and Belted Kingfisher.


directions to Henry marsh:
From Hwy. 11 take Hwy.118W to first set of traffic lights at Eccelstone Dr. and Wellington St. in Bracebridge. Turn left onto Beaumont Dr., and continue to Henry Rd. There is a parking area at the end of Henry Rd. by the pile of woodchips at the trailhead.

 

 

sighting
Posted on May 10, 2007 at 06:57:23 PM by davidkent

cape may warbler seen from the Kerr Park parking lot May 10th

 

 

Explosion of Bird Song
Posted on May 10, 2007 at 12:46:30 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Yesterday I drove from Torrance to Hwy 11 on Southdown Rd. and there was bird song everywhere! The same species singing next to each other and across the road too.

Too many of these species to count - Warblers - Black & White, Black-throated Green,Chestnut-sided, Pine, and Yellow. I have never heard so many of the above species as well as Least Flycatchers. One Eastern Towhee heard.

One Black-throated Blue singing on Ragged Rapids Rd. A couple of Red-eyed Vireos and today I thought I heard a Wood Thrush.

Warbling Vireos and Yellow Warblers at the IGA,Port Carling, along with a Caspian Tern, mentioned by Virginia Pray.

 

 

Re(1): Lagoons – more…
Posted on May 10, 2007 at 08:35:51 AM by Goodyear

I forgot to mention that we heard a Sora calling from the wet area west of Cell 4. We also saw a Bittern in the "lake" that the beaver has created N of Cell 4.

 

 

Lagoons - Bay-breasted and Orange-crowned
Posted on May 9, 2007 at 07:18:46 PM by Goodyear

We birded the Bracebridge  Lagoons after work this evening and had great looks at two male Bay-breasted Warblers and an Orange-crowned Warbler. They were with a large, loose flock of Yellow-rumps, Nashville, Yellow, and Palm Warblers that were working the trees/shrubs at the NW corner of cell 4. A male Scarlet Tanager was singing near the Lagoon Lane gate - neon red against the early tree buds!

 

 

Pileated eating eggshells
Posted on May 9, 2007 at 06:37:40 PM by Barbara Taylor

A female Pileated Woodpecker has been coming to our garden to feed on bits of eggshell that I sprinkle on the soil. She was just here again a few minutes ago. The garden is very close to several large White Pine trees so I guess she feels quite safe foraging on the ground there. A couple days ago she called loudly and her mate came to join her in the yard, and then they flew off together. In past years we've seen Blue Jays, a female Cardinal, a female Hairy Woodpecker, a Great Crested Flycatcher, Grackles, Robins, and even Brown Thrashers feeding on the eggshells, but never a Pileated until now. (note: the eggshells are from hardboiled eggs, so they're safe for the birds to eat)

 

 

Port Carling birds
Posted on May 9, 2007 at 11:54:09 AM by Virginia Pray

This a.m. in Port Carling we have a Yellow Bellied Sapsucker, a number of White Crowned Sparrows, a Caspian Tern over the river and a Loon just below the IGA. Male Hummers are frequent at the feeder.

 

 

Wed. May 9 at Magnetawan
Posted on May 9, 2007 at 11:14:31 AM by Alex Mills

This morning there were more new arrivals in evidence here.
Among 12 species of warblers this morning were MAGNOLIA, CHESTNUT-SIDED, GOLDEN-WINGED, and AMERICAN REDSTART.
Also present were VIRGINIA RAIL, LEAST FLYCATCHER, BROWN THRASHER, VEERY, RUSTY BLACKBIRD, AND WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW.
Yesterday at twilight, I heard an OVENBIRD deliver its above-the-canopy flight song.

 

 

Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on May 9, 2007 at 10:37:04 AM by Barbara Taylor

This morning at the Bracebridge Ponds the birding was great! The best spots for warblers were at the NW corner of cell 4, the Lagoon Lane gate, and the viewing stand at Kerr Park. The shorebirds were mostly in cell 1 and 3. The Rusty Blackbirds were west of cell 3. American Toads were calling north of cell 4.

Today’s birds:
Warbling Vireo
Ovenbird
Northern Waterthrush
Nashville Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Black-and-white Warbler
Palm Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Least Flycatcher

Baltimore Oriole
Brown Thrasher
Eastern Bluebird
Eastern Meadowlark
Rusty Blackbird
White-crowned Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Lesser Scaup
Wood Duck
Bufflehead
Blue-winged Teal
Solitary Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
Lesser Yellowlegs
Greater Yellowlegs
Spotted Sandpiper
Killdeer

 

 

May 10th
Posted on May 10, 2007 at 11:02:46 AM by Kip Daynard

SCARLET TANAGER
AMERICAN REDSTART
YELLOW WARBLER
HERMIT THRUSH
Nashville Warbler
Black-and-White Warbler
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Northern Waterthrush
Ovenbird
Least Flycatcher
Great-crested Flycatcher
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
etc.

first of season for me in caps

 

 

Bay Lake arrivals
Posted on May 9, 2007 at 09:04:53 AM by Kip Daynard

Black-throated Green Warbler and Rose-breasted Grosbeak arrived on Sunday. Yesterday, I heard my first Ovenbird. Today: Least Flycatcher, Great-crested Flycatcher, Black-and-White Warbler heard around the house.

 

 

beaumaris birds
Posted on May 9, 2007 at 07:23:14 AM by gerald willmott

Todays new birds,
Yellow warbler and least flycatcher
Beaumaris

 

 

Bobolink
Posted on May 9, 2007 at 07:12:15 AM by J. Gardner

May 8 a Baltimore Oriole and male Bobolink turned up.

 

 

Bala Update, May9
Posted on May 9, 2007 at 06:17:10 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Chestnut-sided warblers, Ovenbirds, Yellow Warbler plus additional birds of warblers that arrived earlier. Black & Whites in many places.

 

 

Magnetawan
Posted on May 8, 2007 at 07:26:00 PM by Alex Mills

At Magnetawan:
Yesterday morning (Monday May 7), there was a BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER singing from the hemlocks at the lakeshore. Today, there was a BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER singing at a nearby beaverpond, and an EVENING GROSBEAK flew overhead.

 

 

bluebird
Posted on May 8, 2007 at 07:16:04 AM by gerald willmott

I had nearly despaired that there would be no blue birds at our boxes on Beaumaris Golf Course this year, but as I crested a hill and looked down at the boxes I was surprised to see a male and female flying in and out of a box. I even saw the male feeding the female, I don't know if they do this, but it appeared so. Also there were tree swallows nesting in the other two boxes. I didn’t think that they would tolerate each other is such close proximity. This means that out of 5 boxes, three have tree swallows and one has a blue bird family.
Also there has been a Brown Thrasher calling on location for the past week and the orioles have returned to our feeder. Oh, there is also a pair of hoodies hanging around.
Gerald,
Beaumaris

 

 

Phoebe using Robin's Nest
Posted on May 8, 2007 at 06:31:08 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

A Robin built a nest last year by my front door. It attempted to raise 3 families there. It raised part of each brood but something got one or two eggs each time.

Someone suggested that I should leave the nest there and I did.

This year, as I reported to the MFN last week, an Eastern Phoebe is using the old nest. I found a smashed egg on the porch the other day and assumed that the phoebe had left. I see that it is sitting in the nest at night and hope it is, at least, partly successful. Last summer it nested in a place where red squirrels pass to get to my bird feeders and none of the nesting were successful.

 

 

Re(1): Bala Area
Posted on May 7, 2007 at 08:40:44 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

I missed mentioning a hummer as well!

 

 

Bala Area
Posted on May 7, 2007 at 08:39:45 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

New today I heard both American Bittern and Great-crested Flycatcher at my place.
I have at least 3 pairs of Purple Finches coming to my feeders and at least one male was doing it wing flutter display. The female sat, unmoving, as the male hopped up and down one branch than moved to several more fluttering its wings and head feathers raised. It turned all around so she could get a good look at his splendid colour! This was a first for me. I did get pictures but through the window.
I still have about 20 Wood Ducks coming in.

 

 

American Bittern
Posted on May 7, 2007 at 08:29:03 PM by janice house

just came back from our walk, bittern calling from the swamp between Laycox Rd and Tomingas Rd. (Doe Lake Rd Gravenhurst)

 

 

Ruby throated Hummingbird
Posted on May 7, 2007 at 08:22:47 PM by Dave Wright

Our first R-t. Hummingbird showed up today about
9:00am I put 3 feeders out last night just at dusk.

(Bracebridge)

 

 

Torrance Barrens
Posted on May 7, 2007 at 06:19:40 PM by George Bryant

Friday, May 4 I had 3 Woodcock, 1 or 2 (not sure) American Bitterns, 5 Whip-poor-will (I was surprised they were all back), 2 Ruffed Grouse beside the road, 1 Wild Turkey which I almost hit,7 Wilson's Snipe, Tree Frogs (I thought it was early for this) Leopard Frogs close & loud, Peepers, American Toads. No Wood Frogs so I guess they've stopped calling.
Carden Alvar gets a lot of attention, Torrance Barrens none and yet it has
some many special features (dark skies, quiet environs)

 

 

Kerr Park birds
Posted on May 7, 2007 at 12:32:07 PM by Bob Burt

This morning at Kerr Park in Bracebridge there was a pair of Brown Thrashers near the viewing stand. There was also an Eastern Bluebird, Eastern Kingbird, and a Green Heron at the edge of the pond by the parking lot.

 

 

Henry Marsh Bracebridge
Posted on May 7, 2007 at 08:56:30 AM by terry & marion whittam

We had a quick visit to Henry marsh Saturday morning. While standing on the bridge wondering what to take a picture of I heard a 3 note shorebird call coming towards us from the far side of the marsh. The bird circled me and proceeded to land about 5 meters away. With the sun behind me I proceeded to take a few shots! Also saw the Pied bill grebe mentioned by Al Aubin. No bitterns at all!  Yellowlegs

 

 

Re(1): New arrivals
Posted on May 7, 2007 at 12:59:34 PM by Barbara Taylor

A Warbling Vireo has arrived at the Bracebridge Ponds. It was singing near the NW corner of cell 4 around noon today. The Northern Waterthrush which had been singing there on Saturday chose to be silent today.

 

 

New arrivals
Posted on May 7, 2007 at 08:26:28 AM by sam robinson

The Brown Thrashers and Rose-Breasted Grosbeaks returned to our garden on Dill Street in Bracebridge yesterday.

 

 

Whippoorwill, Bala
Posted on May 7, 2007 at 05:52:54 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Awakened at 5 am this morning by the welcome call of a Whippoorwill outside my window. This is the 7-8 year I have heard them here.

 

 

Bird Board will be offline briefly....
Posted on May 6, 2007 at 04:46:16 PM by Barbara Taylor

The Bird Board hosting service will soon be doing a bit of maintenance which may require a few hours downtime. If you try to reach the board during that time you will see a message advising you when it will be back online. All recent posts can be viewed on the back-up webpage during the brief downtime.

The Nature Photos Board is currently offline as it is now undergoing the maintenance.

 

 

Solitary Sandpipers
Posted on May 6, 2007 at 02:14:59 PM by Barbara Taylor

Don and Bev Bailey report two Solitary Sandpipers at the Bracebridge Ponds this morning - one in cell 3 and the other in cell 4.  Bracebridge Ponds map

 

 

Bala Update
Posted on May 6, 2007 at 01:49:17 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

New arrivals at Ragged Rapids Rd. this morning - 2 Least Flycatchers.
Pair of Rose-breasted Grosbeaks arrive here a few minutes ago!

 

 

Algonquin Park
Posted on May 6, 2007 at 01:48:14 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Bruce Di Labio on ONTBIRDS (May 6, 2007) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Yesterday, May 5, did a quick run through Algonquin Park. The most productive area was Wolf Howl Pond/West Rose Lake where 1 Boreal Chickadee and 2 Black-backed Woodpecker were observed along the old railway bed. Also present were small numbers of Evening Grosbeak, Red Crossbill, White-winged Crossbill and Pine Siskin. Warblers were few with Yellow-rumped scattered around and a few Pine warbler and Nashville Warbler. At Spruce Bog 1 male Black-backed Woodpecker was observed and 1 male Spruce Grouse near the gate along Opeongo Road.
good birding, Bruce

 

 

Big East River
Posted on May 5, 2007 at 10:51:55 PM by Kip Daynard

Just returned from an overnight canoe trip on the Big East river from Distress Lake to Arrowhead Provincial Park. Over this stretch of 25kms or so of river I counted the following:

8 Spotted Sandpipers* (in pairs or individually - more common on rockier upper section of river)
16 Least Sandpipers* (in small groups of 2 to 6 - found on sandy bars and muddy banks more in lower section)
4 Northern Rough-winged Swallows* (nest-building in bank)
1 Tree Swallow
33 Yellow-rumped Warblers
1 Nashville Warbler*
4 Northern Waterthrush
1 Eastern Kingbird*
5 Belted Kingfishers
3 Wood Ducks
16+ Common Mergansers
1 Osprey* (Distress Lake)
2 Broad-winged Hawks
2 Ruby-crowned Kinglets
2 Golden-crowned Kinglets
1 Brown Creeper
6 White-throated Sparrows (one sang at our campsite until well after midnight)
etc.
(* first of season for me)

 

 

Correction;Lagoons
Posted on May 6, 2007 at 03:04:03 PM by Allan Aubin

For the sake of accuracy: During our Lagoon Walk yesterday we did see Buffleheads as well as Lesser Scaup.

 

 

Bracebridge Lagoons
Posted on May 5, 2007 at 08:32:02 PM by Allan Aubin

Thirteen of us met at Kerr’s Park today for the annual Lagoon Walk. We also covered Henry’s Marsh. The best sightings were in the marsh. Many excellent birders attended, and we were pleased when Barbara Taylor joined us. As well, Melissa Kosowan an assistant editor with the Osprey Group of Publications made the trek and was accompanied with a photographer. She promises a write-up in the “Cottage Times” May 17.

It was somewhat cool and somewhat breezy but clear and sunny.
We had a plethora of spotting scopes but a dearth of ducks. In all, we recorded 38 species. Highlights included the following:
A persistently singing Northern Waterthrush
A Greater Yellowlegs which calmly posed for the photographer
At least two Great Blue Herons
A Pied-billed Grebe
And to end the day, Janice House spied a Bluebird in the park
Only one diving duck was spotted, a Lesser Scaup. Puddle ducks seen were Mallards, Wood Ducks and Blue-winged Teal. Other than the waterthrush only a Yellow-rumped warbler was heard.

 

 

Re(1): RTHU
Posted on May 7, 2007 at 10:37:01 AM by Kip Daynard

A neighbour reported the first hummingbird arrival to Bay Lake yesterday (May 6).

 

 

Re(1): RTHU
Posted on May 6, 2007 at 11:18:27 AM by kvpray

We also had our first Hummingbird at our feeder May 5th. Looking back in my diary one appeared on May 5th 2006. Virginia Pray Port Carling

 

 

RTHU
Posted on May 5, 2007 at 03:12:06 PM by Wilf Yusek

Had my first Ruby-throated Hummingbird at my feeders today, nice male. Prospect Lake.

 

 

Snakes, Bala
Posted on May 5, 2007 at 06:12:23 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Last Wedsnesday, during a yard cleanup, a Smooth Green Snake and a Dekay's Brown Snake were found in the leaf litter on my septic bed. The bed is planted with a Prairie Wildflower mix and is only cleaned up every 2-3 years. The cleanup opened up lots of spots for nesting turtles!

 

 

Ragged Rapids Rd, Bala, Update
Posted on May 5, 2007 at 06:09:15 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Yesterday morning, though quiet, a couple of Black-throated green warbler and a couple of Black & Whites were welcome additions.

 

 

Re(1): Bumblebees
Posted on May 6, 2007 at 07:07:15 PM by Barbara Taylor

Bob Bowles tells me that Bombus tenarius is common and the only orange-banded one in the East while Bombus huntii tends to be more western.

Barb Staples sent me this photo of one she had at Sunny Lake last fall.

 

 

Bumblebees
Posted on May 4, 2007 at 05:00:53 PM by Barbara Taylor

There were two of these pretty bumblebees in our garden this afternoon on the Scilla. Appears to be Bombus ternarius, the Red-tailed Bumble Bee, according to diagrams on this Michigan entomology webpage. Does anyone know if there are other orange-banded bumblebees in our area? (Bracebridge)

photo1  photo2  photo3

 

 

Re(1): Northern Waterthrush
Posted on May 5, 2007 at 05:12:58 PM by Barbara Taylor

One was singing this morning at the Bracebridge Ponds in the wet woods to the north of cell 4 near the west end - same spot as last year. Allan Aubin heard it calling there on Thursday, May 3.

 

 

Northern Waterthrush - Bay Lake
Posted on May 4, 2007 at 09:16:28 AM by Kip Daynard

First of the season heard today at a traditional territory near my house.

 

 

Green Heron, Fox
Posted on May 3, 2007 at 02:07:33 PM by Barbara Taylor

Today around noon there was a Green Heron catching minnows in the little stream north of the bridge at Henry Marsh. A Red Fox was hunting in the meadow next to the Trans Canada plant entrance along Beaumont Dr. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Hooded Merganser
Posted on May 2, 2007 at 11:26:03 PM by terry & marion whittam

We are seeing a lot more hooded mergansers this spring...including this photogenic guy with a twinkle in his eye!

Hooded merganser

 

 

Blue Grosbeak not seen since Friday
Posted on May 6, 2007 at 11:39:51 AM by Kip Daynard

It may still be around, but to my knowledge the Blue Grosbeak reported previously has not been seen since Friday afternoon. I was away yesterday but several birders searched in my absence. I looked for an hour or so this morning with no luck.

http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=en&q=45%C2%B030'2.11|2N+79%C2%B012'8.24|2W&ie=UTF8&ll=45.500572,-79.202328&spn=0.041871,0.059824&t=h&z=14&iwloc=addr&om=1

DIRECTIONS
From Huntsville take Hwy 11 north about 10 minutes. At Novar take Hwy #592 North about 5 minutes. At Bay Lake Rd., turn right and follow for about 10 minutes keeping to Bay Lake Rd. The Grosbeak has been seen between #1380 and #1451.

 

 

Re(1): Blue Grosbeak is still here!
Posted on May 4, 2007 at 12:43:59 PM by Kip Daynard

I just saw the Grosbeak again with Martin and Kathy Parker at 12:25pm. It was very close to where it was seen this morning - between #1454 and #1464 on both sides of the road. It was quite low down, perching just a few feet off the ground.

 

 

Re(1): Blue Grosbeak is still here!
Posted on May 4, 2007 at 01:12:52 PM by Dawn Sherman

Trish Healy and I were lucky enough to run into Jim this morning who located the bird and shared a view through his scope with us. Thanks again Jim!

 

 

Blue Grosbeak is still here!
Posted on May 4, 2007 at 10:28:36 AM by Kip Daynard

I've just been told by Jim Fairchild that he saw the Grosbeak at the same location (1451 Bay Lake Rd.) just 5 minutes ago. Apparently two other birders saw it as well.

 

 

Re(2): Blue Grosbeak Relocated
Posted on May 4, 2007 at 09:42:43 AM by Kip Daynard

Thanks for the analysis and info, Al.

This bird also showed much more pronounced black on the lores and around (especially below) the bill than I've ever seen in Indigo Buntings. This is visible in the third photo.

It also exhibited a tail flicking behaviour which I understand is characteristic of this species.

Jim Fairchild and I searched this morning for about an hour with no luck. I've had to start my work day, but I believe Jim is still out searching.

 

 

Re(1): Blue Grosbeak Relocated
Posted on May 3, 2007 at 06:05:29 PM by Al Sinclair

Great find! Too bad it's not in Muskoka (I don't keep a Parry Sound list). Reports of Blue Grosbeak in the spring are usually written off by the sceptics as just an Indigo Bunting that still has some brown on the wings. In this case the photos are convincing despite the poor quality. The shape and proportions of the body are right, the brown on the wing is in the right areas and the tail appears to have a white spot at both corners of the bottom edge (a field mark shown in Sibley). Looks to me like your report the Rare Bird committee should be accepted, possibly a first from the Parry Sound District. Please keep us informed if it stays in the area.

BTW I know of two reports of this species in Muskoka in recent years, one turned out to be an Indigo Bunting when a photo was examined, the other was not confirmed, no photo taken.

 

 

Re(1): Blue Grosbeak at Bay Lake!
Posted on May 3, 2007 at 08:00:54 PM by Stan Fairchild

I saw the Blue Grosbeak at 5.pm today. It was in the same location you reported lot 1451. It flew two lots farther up but did not come down close enough to get a picture.
GOOD BIRD THANKS

 

 

 

Blue Grosbeak Relocated
Posted on May 3, 2007 at 10:13:06 AM by Kip Daynard

I relocated the Blue Grosbeak again this morning at 8:45am and 9:10am. It seems to be sticking to a peninsula which sticks into the middle of Bay Lake which seems to act as a mini migrant trap. Today it was seen between #1441 and #1451 Bay Lake Rd. first on the south side of the road, then on the north. I lost it around 9:15am.
Google Maps Link

 

 

Blue Grosbeak at Bay Lake!
Posted on May 2, 2007 at 10:49:06 PM by Kip Daynard

At 6:30PM this evening, while eating dinner, my wife and I noticed an unusual bluish bird out the living room window. To my amazement I found it to be an adult male BLUE GROSBEAK!

I managed to snap off some hand-held photos (see below). Alas they are quite blurry but its chestnut wing-bars and stout bill are just visible.  photo1  photo2  photo3

Unfortunately, the bird disappeared while I was retrieving my tripod. An hour or more of searching failed to relocate it. I'll certainly repost if it turns up again. A report will be submitted to the OBRC.

DIRECTIONS
From Huntsville take Hwy 11 north about 10 minutes. At Novar take Hwy 592 North about 5 minutes. At Bay Lake Rd., turn right and follow for about 10 minutes keeping to Bay Lake Rd. The Grosbeak was seen at #1380 to the north side of the house.

Kip Daynard
RR1 Emsdale

 

 

More Barred Owls
Posted on May 2, 2007 at 09:48:12 PM by terry & marion whittam

Friday April 26th we stopped to listen to the spring frog chorus 10km east of Washago. Unprompted 2 Barred owls started their frantic crys! They then settled into their normal calling. Saturday April 27th we returned and once again the pair was calling back and forth.

 

 

Owl Howl results
Posted on May 2, 2007 at 09:06:29 PM by terry & marion whittam

Marion, Terry, Bob, Judy and Dan Whittam did our annual Owl howl survey down Big Chute road April 21, 2007. The route takes us from Muskoka down into Simcoe County. We had a record 12 Barred Owls at 5 of 10 stops with a big response at stop #6 with a record 5 Barred Owls responding. Lots of Spring peepers, Western Chorus and Wood frogs at every stop. Weather 7C and little wind.

 

 

American Wigeons, Green Heron
Posted on May 2, 2007 at 12:17:40 PM by Barbara Taylor

Don Bailey reports this morning at the Bracebridge Ponds there were two pair of American Wigeon, a Green Heron, and a little unidentified shorebird flying from cell 4 towards cell 1. No Yellowlegs were seen.

Bracebridge Ponds map

 

 

Ragged Rapids RD, Bala
Posted on May 2, 2007 at 10:33:21 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

This morning there was a little more bird song along Ragged Rapids Rd. than yesterday. Winter Wrens, Blue-headed Vireo, Yellow-rumped Warblers, Pine Warbler, a surprise to me was a Northern Waterthrush, Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers, Chipping, Song, Swamp and White-throated Sparrows. Wakerobins in bloom, Dutchman's Breeches, Trailing Arbutus.

 

 

Re(1): Lagoon directions
Posted on May 3, 2007 at 04:01:35 PM by Wayne Bridge

Thanks, Kip for this and the hummingbird advice. Wayne

 

 

Lagoon directions
Posted on May 3, 2007 at 01:53:13 PM by Kip Daynard

When coming from the south, exit Hwy 11 at Hwy 520 (Ontario St.) and follow into the centre of town. Turn right on Yonge St. and follow this across the bridge over the South Magnetewan River. After crossing the railway tracks, take a left on Lagoon Lane. The lagoon is at the end. I recommend parking your car a few hundred feet from the end so you don't disturb any waterfowl on the ponds.

 

 

Re(1): Burk's Falls Lagoon etc.
Posted on May 3, 2007 at 11:43:18 AM by Wayne Bridge

Hi Kip. Could you pass along directions to the Burks Falls lagoon? Thanks, Wayne.

 

 

Re(1): Burk's Falls Lagoon etc.
Posted on May 2, 2007 at 10:11:39 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Could have been Sora Rail as we had them on Manitoulin near Gore Bay last Wednesday.

 

 

Burk's Falls Lagoon etc.
Posted on May 1, 2007 at 11:06:23 PM by Kip Daynard

This morning I visited the Burk's Falls lagoon and found the following:

1 Green-winged Teal
12 Bufflehead
9 Wood Duck
4 Mallard
6 Canada Geese
3 Ruby-crowned Kinglets
1 Swamp Sparrow
1 Eastern Meadowlark
2 White-throated Sparrows
2 Savannah Sparrows
1 Northern Harrier (female)
4 Turkey Vultures
etc.

I also heard what I thought might perhaps be a Rail but the call sounded atypical to my ears and was given only twice. I can best describe it as 'keeeek' but to my knowledge sounding far too drawn-out to be a Virginia Rail and a bit too flat (and early!) to be a Sora, although Sora would be my best guess.

On the south side of town on Legitt's Rd. I found:

4 Tree Swallows
7 Barn Swallows
1 Brown Thrasher
28 American Robins (in one small field)
152 Canada Geese flying in one long skein

 

 

Re(2): hummingbird question
Posted on May 2, 2007 at 07:59:11 AM by Alex Mills

Things seem to be early this year, with the first sightings of Rose-breasted Grosbeaks and House Wren already in Simcoe County. There have been scattered late April hummingbird sightings this year in Ontario, including one near Elliot Lake before the first of May!

If you check Barbara Taylor's March 21 posting on this Muskoka Bird Board (Spring migration ...hawk watch reports) you can find a link she recommends that documents the arrival of hummers.

 

 

Re(1): hummingbird question
Posted on May 1, 2007 at 11:26:35 PM by Kip Daynard

Hi Wayne,

The first hummers typically arrive at Bay Lake the week of May 15th-20th. I believe the early date for Algonquin is May 5th. So, I'd say early next week should definitely catch the first arrivals.
The Journey North site already shows sightings as far north as the Sault and by the look of it even Temiskaming!
Journey North - 2007 Hummingbird Map

 

 

Bird Board Update
Posted on May 1, 2007 at 09:50:33 AM by Barbara Taylor

Thanks to everyone for all your reports. All posts for April are now available in the Archived Reports. Just a reminder to bookmark the back-up webpage. Important notices will be posted there in the event of any problems with the Bird Board hosting service, and there is also a copy of all recent posts.


Need help posting photos? Find instructions and do a test post on the Nature Photos Board.
New to the Bird Board? See the Posting Guidelines for helpful tips about using the board.

I try to monitor the Bird Board on a regular basis. If you want to bring something to my attention, just send me an email and I'll get back to you as soon as possible.

Barbara Taylor
muskoka_birder@hotmail.com

 

 

Milbert's Tortoiseshell
Posted on April 30, 2007 at 06:47:11 PM by janice house

Moira spotted the butterfly as were walking along the west side of cell 3 at the Bracebridge Ponds Sunday at 4:30pm

 

 

Whip-poor-will and Sping Azure
Posted on April 30, 2007 at 10:11:18 AM by Ron Stager

A whip-poor-will gave a brief!!! call last night. I guess it is time to put up (oops, clean and fill) the hummingbird feeders. Several spring azure (butterflies) around our house on Sunday (both lucia and marginata forms) First black fly yesterday ( there was one mosquito about a week earlier but I hadn't seen or heard one since).

 

 

round bardsville
Posted on April 30, 2007 at 07:12:10 AM by gerald willmott

Yesterday (Sunday) on a leisurely bike around Muskoka I heard and then saw a Yellow-rumped Warbler on the Butter'n Egg road, a pair of Kestrels and several Flickers at the Beatrice Town Line, and a Broad-wing Hawk where Windemere road meets Muskoka #4. Down Windemere Road there were Meadow Larks, and Savannah Sparrows.
A great day!
Gerald
Beaumaris

 

 

Re(2): posting photos...
Posted on April 30, 2007 at 11:22:00 AM by Barbara Taylor

There are some instructions about posting photos on the Nature Photos Board. You can try a test post there if you'd like.

 

 

Re(1): Spring in Magnetawan
Posted on April 30, 2007 at 08:13:32 AM by Wayne Bridge

Thank you for sharing your pictures - I haven't figured out how to do that yet.

 

 

Spring in Magnetawan
Posted on April 29, 2007 at 08:30:23 PM by Peter Mills

Enjoyed a long weekend up at Magnetawan, Parry Sound and saw lots of beautiful spring life:

247 Spotted Salamanders  46 Red-spotted Newts

Some early Bloodroot – photo1 photo2

Lots of mosquito larvae in vernal pools....the coming storm.

Trout Lily   Displaying Woodcock

And finally, a juvenile Red-bellied Snake.

 

 

Re(2): Lesser Yellowlegs, no Long-tailed Ducks
Posted on April 29, 2007 at 02:11:15 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning Sam Robinson and I could not find the Long-tailed Ducks. The male Northern Shoveler was still in cell 1. A male Green-winged Teal was in cell 2 along with several Lesser Scaup. A couple of Lesser Yellowlegs have joined the four Greater Yellowlegs in cell 3. A Ring-necked Duck was in cell 4. Two Ospreys flew overhead, heading north. Two Belted Kingfishers were chattering north of cell 4.  Bracebridge Ponds map

At the Henry Marsh there were four Ring-necked Ducks, and a pair of Wood Ducks. Not even one Swallow seen today. Three Turkey Vultures flew along the ridge south of the marsh, while two Cranes soared away to the north. They had to be Sandhill Cranes because of their size, and the overall grayish look to them when first seen at lower altitude. But as they soared higher and turned, the sun hit them a certain way, making them appear quite white with black wingtips...wishfully hoping for wayward Whooping Cranes. :)

(Henry Marsh is accessed from Henry Rd. which is west of Kerr Park along Beaumont Dr., Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Long-tailed Ducks, Northern Shoveler
Posted on April 28, 2007 at 03:11:34 PM by ron tozer

Additional birds at the lagoons this morning included: Double-crested Cormorant (2 flying over), Blue-winged Teal (pair), Northern Shoveler (pair), Greater Yellowlegs (4 in Cell 3), and Brown Thrasher (1 at Kerr Park). At Henry Marsh, there were several Tree Swallows and Barn Swallows, plus a pair of Northern Rough-winged Swallows.

 

 

Long-tailed Ducks, Northern Shoveler
Posted on April 28, 2007 at 12:31:49 PM by Barbara Taylor

As of 12:15 p.m. there is a pair of Long-tailed Ducks and a male Northern Shoveler in cell 1 at the Bracebridge Ponds. Thanks to Ron Tozer and others we met at Henry marsh for the tip.  Bracebridge Ponds map

 

 

kingfisher
Posted on April 28, 2007 at 09:11:35 AM by gerald willmott

Last evening about dusk, which came exceptionally early with the mist, a male King Fisher caught three fish, bashed their heads against what was handy and gulp them down. It was a short spring for those fishies. Also last night and this a.m. a cormorant has flown overhead. Tree swallows are nesting in boxes, and the Blue Bird, which I had been keeping an eye on has not been heard since last weekend. Oh, Ruby Crown Kinglets have been calling out mighty songs.
Gerald
Beaumaris

 

 

Re(1): Fox
Posted on April 29, 2007 at 01:14:48 AM by gerald willmott

Gary, I saw that fox! It was at the bottom of the 10th tee. Ran up the ashpalt path towards the maintenance sheds. Where do you think its den would be?
Gerald

 

 

Fox
Posted on April 27, 2007 at 06:34:18 PM by Gary Kaye

I saw for the first time a very big shiney bushy tailed fox carrying what appeared to be a very large rabbit. I have seen lots of both, but not quite like this time. The fox was spotted on Beaumaris Island on Thursday April 26. I watched and followed him for about 200 yards. He was very clearly travelling back to his den with enough determination that was was not going to let me bother him, so I didn't.

 

 

swans
Posted on April 27, 2007 at 06:20:38 PM by Gary Kaye

At 6:15 on Friday 27, 2007 a very large, very white single Mute Swan swam past my front door in Milford Bay

 

 

Muskoka Field Naturalists - next meeting May 3
Posted on April 27, 2007 at 01:47:57 PM by Barbara Taylor

From the WAKEROBIN - Newsletter of the Muskoka Field Naturalists
May 3, Thursday, 7:30 p.m., Gravenhurst
"The Carden Alvar and its Birds!" by David A. Homer, retired university teacher/senior administrator and Carden resident. The presentation traces the natural history of the Carden Alvar; introduces its distinctive plants and insects; outlines its threats and what is being done about them; and finally presents a survey of the grassland and unique birds of the area utilizing the outstanding photographic images of Wildlife Photographer Larry Kirtley.

Visitors welcome to attend. Meetings from February thru June will be held at 7:30 p.m. at Calvary Baptist Church in Gravenhurst, corner of First and Brock Streets (across from Giant Tiger). Membership Information & Program Updates: MFN website

 

 

Algonquin Park bird report: 26 April
Posted on April 27, 2007 at 09:30:17 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (April 27, 2007) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.


The following summarizes the birding situation in Algonquin
Provincial Park for northern species during the past week. THIS
IS THE FINAL WEEKLY REPORT FOR THIS YEAR.

NEW INFORMATION SINCE LAST WEEK IS PRESENTED
AT THE START OF EACH SPECIES OR SECTION BELOW.

Ice:
The ice went out of the last large lakes (including Opeongo) on
Sunday (April 22).

Roads:
The Arowhon Road is expected to be open to the public again
this week.

Moose:
A few are becoming regular along the highway, especially
in early morning and evening.


Spruce Grouse:
Displaying males and females (some calling) were observed at
Spruce Bog and Opeongo Road (near gate and at north end) this
week.


American Three-toed Woodpecker:
None were reported this week. It is probable that this woodpecker
is returning northward now. In previous irruptions, some have
lingered here into mid-May, or later.



Black-backed Woodpecker:
A female near Post 9 on Spruce Bog Boardwalk, and one on a utility
pole at Cache Lake, were observed on April 21. One was at km 8 on
April 22. Another was near the East Gate warehouse on April 24.



Gray Jay:
Birds were seen at Spruce Bog and along Opeongo Road this week.


Boreal Chickadee:
Four or five were observed in the black spruce area along the north
end of Opeongo Road on April 21.


Purple Finch:
Widespread, often singing.


Red Crossbill:
About 15 were noted by one birder along the highway on April 24,
as numbers dramatically decline.


White-winged Crossbill:
Only a few birds, some still singing, were observed along the highway
this week. A birder on April 24 reported only 4.


Pine Siskin:
Still common, with many singing and displaying. A few still on the
road, but most salt has been washed away now.


Evening Grosbeak:
A few were seen at the West Gate feeder, Mew Lake, and the Visitor
Centre feeder.




As always, please let us know the date, number and location of birds you
observe when you visit Algonquin Park. In particular, we would like your
assistance with spring arrival dates. Please add your sightings to the
sheets posted in the Visitor Centre lobby.

Your bird sightings information is stored in the Algonquin Visitor Centre
database, and will help us to assist other birders visiting the Park.
Thanks.

Good birding.

Ron Tozer (retired Algonquin Park Naturalist)
Dwight, Ontario

Directions:
Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400, 11
and 60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400. From
Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the park.
Kilometre markers on Highway 60 in the park go from the West Gate
(km 0) to the East Gate (km 56). Permits and information are available
daily at both gates throughout the winter. The free Algonquin 2007
Information Guide has a map showing the location of sites mentioned in
this report.

The Visitor Centre (km 43) is open daily, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., starting on
April 28. Recent bird sightings and information, plus feeders, can be found
there.

 

 

Broad-winged Hawks - Bay Lake
Posted on April 26, 2007 at 12:30:20 PM by Kip Daynard

First Broad-wings of the season arrived at Bay Lake today. During a 45 minute walk I saw two individuals - an adult and an immature, both light-phase.  On the subject of phases, I understand dark-phase Broad-Wings are extremely uncommon in the east, perhaps numbering just 1 in 50,000. Anyone seen any or know of any records in this area?

 

 

Greater Yellowlegs - Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on April 25, 2007 at 12:25:32 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning at the Bracebridge Ponds there was a Greater Yellowlegs about half way along the north shore of cell 3. It flew up and circled around, calling several times, and eventually landed at the south-east shore of cell 3. There weren't any new species of ducks but the numbers are growing. I counted 260 Bufflehead, 12 Lesser Scaup, 10 Wood Ducks, 2 Ring-necked Ducks, and a pair of Green-winged Teal. An Eastern Meadowlark was singing at Kerr Park.  Bracebridge Ponds map

 

 

White Winged Crossbills
Posted on April 25, 2007 at 07:18:33 AM by janice house

Moira reports the female crossbill has been gathering material from her driveway, believes they are nesting in her yard (Houston Rd., NE of Bracebridge)

 

 

Magnetawan
Posted on April 24, 2007 at 09:05:59 PM by Alex Mills

I was in Magnetawan today and heard my first Yellow-rumped Warbler of the spring singing there.
While driving there from Huntsville, I saw only one Tree Swallow.

 

 

Tree Swallows
Posted on April 24, 2007 at 02:35:32 PM by J. Gardner

Our tree swallows have been here in Hurdville for several days. But, we feel that their numbers are down from past years. They are getting down to nesting quickly.

 

 

White-throated Sparrows, Pied-billed Grebe
Posted on April 24, 2007 at 12:17:23 PM by Barbara Taylor

There was a Pied-billed Grebe at Henry marsh this morning. Three Barn Swallows swooped back and forth over the marsh, but still no Tree Swallows. A Sharp-shinned Hawk and two Turkey Vultures flew overhead, heading north.

A few White-throated Sparrows were in full song along the new trail that follows the Muskoka River from the end of Wilson's Falls Rd. towards the new Sportsplex. There were also several Golden-crowned Kinglets, Ruby-crowned Kinglets, and a couple of Yellow-rumped Warblers. Two Red-tailed Hawks and a Broad-winged Hawk soared overhead. So far today has been great for hawk migration! (Bracebridge)

 

 

Blue-headed Vireo, Yellow-Rumped Warbler etc. - Bay Lake
Posted on April 23, 2007 at 10:42:05 AM by Kip Daynard

The beautiful warm weekend brought 10 new arrival species to our neck of the woods. Its amazing what three sunny 20+ degree days can bring...

New Arrivals this morning
1 Blue-headed Vireo
1 Yellow-rumped Warbler
1 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
2 Tree Swallows
1 Belted Kingfisher
1 Chipping Sparrow
1 White-throated Sparrow
1 Eastern Phoebe (late)
1 Common Loon (flying over)
2 Northern Flicker (Apr 21 is pretty late - 2004 early date was Mar 30)

Others
10 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (Apr 18)
1 Dark-eyed Junco
2 White-winged Crossbill
1 Golden-crowned Kinglet
2 Bufflehead
3 Mallard
51 Canada Geese
1 Pileated Woodpecker
4 Ruffed Grouse
3 Winter Wren
2 Song Sparrow
12+ Pine Siskin
6 American Goldfinch
etc..

The Saw-whet owl is still here in our nest box and was tooting virtually non-stop the last three nights from 9:30pm to 5:30am!

 

 

First Broad-winged Hawk...Bracebridge
Posted on April 22, 2007 at 06:27:07 PM by Al Sinclair

At 5pm today April 22, our first Broad-winged Hawk of the year circled low over the house and called a couple of times to announce his return. It's tempting to think that it was one of the birds that nested near here last year dropping in to say hello. Our first last year was April 17. Hwy 118E 8km east of Bracebridge.

 

 

Re(1): birds
Posted on April 22, 2007 at 08:43:19 PM by janice house

update from Skeleton Lake, pair of hood mergansers in the bay 7:pm

 

 

birds
Posted on April 22, 2007 at 02:31:56 PM by janice house

just came back from Moira's house, sapsucker, pair of white winged crossbills and heard a winter wren on the Old Falconburg Rd, continued on to Skeleton Lake Rd 3, Dad reports 4 common mergansers, a loon, while we were sitting on the deck, the winter wren sang, and we heard a red shouldered hawk and the barred owl calling

 

 

Re(1): OFO Trip: Algonquin Park (21 April)
Posted on April 23, 2007 at 03:01:36 PM by Wayne Bridge

Thanks Ron, I always look forward to your Algonquin updates. Today I saw a couple barn swallows over our yard in Kearney - no tree swallows that I've seen.

 

 

OFO Trip: Algonquin Park (21 April)
Posted on April 22, 2007 at 12:19:40 PM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (April 21, 2007) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.


Forty-one OFO members and friends enjoyed a wonderful warm (22
degrees C.) birding trip in Algonquin Park today. As with previous OFO
trips here, our primary goal was to find the boreal species that birders
regularly seek in the Park. In the process, we were treated to a very
pleasant day of birding, with 57 species being tallied by the group.

A male and female Spruce Grouse were observed well by everyone north of
the register box on Spruce Bog Boardwalk. This was a lifer for several
people. A female Black-backed Woodpecker near Post 9 on that trail, and
another of these often elusive woodpeckers on a utility pole at Cache Lake,
were enjoyed by many members of the group, but missed by many others,
unfortunately. Four or five Boreal Chickadees at the north end of Opeongo
Road allowed fleeting views for most observers. As is often the case with
this chickadee, they were often frustratingly well-hidden in the black
spruce trees. Gray Jays were fed on Opeongo Road, near their nest where
large young will be fledging very soon. Common Ravens often flew over for
identification comparison with American Crows. Despite extensive searching
of areas where American Three-toed Woodpeckers have been observed
recently, we were unable to find one today; most of these boreal woodpeckers
may have headed back north following the largest winter irruption on record
in Algonquin Park.

First observations of this spring in Algonquin today included Osprey (two),
Sharp-shinned Hawk, Horned Lark (northern race), Vesper Sparrow, and
Savannah Sparrow. A rather early Barn Swallow at the West Gate was
seen there first on Friday. Interestingly, there still have been no Tree
Swallow sightings in Algonquin this spring, likely reflecting the increasing
scarcity of this aerial forager here, plus the extensive mortality among
migrant Tree Swallows that has occurred during cold weather this month.

Thanks again to all those who attended. It was a magnificent day to be out
birding.
Ron

 

 

beaumaris
Posted on April 22, 2007 at 08:55:04 AM by gerald willmott

This weekend the sapsuckers and flickers arrived. Also I flushed pair of Wood Ducks from a tree cavity. A red oak with a large opening facing east about 60 feet or more up. Too bad they will not stay as it is on an busy access road. Yet there is a pond nearby. The blue bird is still here, yet he has not chosen a nest box. Each day he is at the top of a tree calling for a mate, and while he is doing this tree swallows have taken 2 of the 5 boxes. I wonder when the females show up.
Gerald

 

 

Re(1): Leopard Frogs
Posted on April 23, 2007 at 11:23:12 AM by Barbara Taylor

Last evening there were a few Leopard Frogs calling west of cell 3 at the Bracebridge Ponds. You could hardly hear them because of the many Spring Peepers and Wood Frogs calling as well.

 

 

Coltsfoot and Wood Frogs
Posted on April 21, 2007 at 02:07:01 PM by Barbara Taylor

There weren't many ducks at the Bracebridge Ponds this morning. A pair of Green-winged Teal have joined the few Scaup, Buffleheads, Wood Ducks, and Mallards in cell 2. A Hermit Thrush was near the Lagoon Lane gate, a Killdeer was at the east end of cell 3, and a Red-tailed Hawk soared overhead. There were Wood Frogs and Spring Peepers calling north of cell 4. Here's a good website to help identify frogs and their calls: http://www.torontozoo.com/adoptapond/frogs.asp.

At the Henry marsh there were no ducks. A Belted Kingfisher flew over the marsh, a Northern Flicker was calling nearby, and a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker was "knocking" loudly.  A butterfly landed amidst a large clump of Coltsfoot that is in bloom by the "T" in the trail - it appeared to be a Milbert's Tortoiseshell.

 

 

Sand Hill Crane
Posted on April 21, 2007 at 01:28:43 PM by Carol Wagg

We heard and then saw our first sand hill crane of the season here today about noon. It flew over the usual landing sites, but did not land. They can frequently be seen in the fields across the road from us at 1611 Doe Lake Road. Last year the first sand hills we saw were a group of 4.

 

 

sapsucker, finally
Posted on April 21, 2007 at 11:30:52 AM by Wayne Bridge

Kearney: I was beginning to despair of having any yellow-bellied sapsuckers arrive in Kearney this spring! Remember, we are quite a bit north and UP (i.e. highland area) of Doe Lake Road, Gravenhurst (for example). Flickers arrived a couple days ago and today we finally had a sapsucker out back. No spring peepers yet, though. [I find it quite interesting to track the northward move of things on this web site! Sapsuckers and peepers for example. We don't get cardinals up here - yet.]

 

 

cardinal/bittern/catbird
Posted on April 20, 2007 at 08:06:11 PM by janice house

A bittern circled the yard this morning about 6:30, I have been watching a male cardinal since 6:30 pm he just flew off, and a catbird was calling tonight. We very rarely have cardinals. The longest they have been here is 2 weeks in the spring. (Doe Lake Rd.)

 

 

Vesper Sparrow
Posted on April 20, 2007 at 08:00:58 PM by Barbara Taylor

Earlier today we had two Chipping Sparrows come to our feeder – the first this year.  While I watched them I was sure I heard the call of a Vesper Sparrow, but couldn't see it. Right now the Vesper Sparrow is feeding on our front lawn! (96 Glendale Rd., Bracebridge)

 

 

Chipping Sparrow, Bala
Posted on April 20, 2007 at 07:53:00 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

First Chipping Sparrow I have seen was at my feeder this afternoon.

 

 

Algonquin Park Bird Report: 19 April
Posted on April 20, 2007 at 09:23:22 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (April 20, 2007) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

The following summarizes the birding situation in Algonquin
Provincial Park for northern species during the past week.

NEW INFORMATION SINCE LAST WEEK IS PRESENTED
AT THE START OF EACH SPECIES OR SECTION BELOW.

Snow and Ice:
Only remaining snow is in small remnant patches in deep shade,
but it is wet and muddy in many places. Ice is breaking up in
smaller lakes and ponds due to breezy warm days this week.

Moose:
Very few being seen at puddles along the highway.

Northern Saw-whet Owl:
Single owls were heard at km 4, 6, 10, 12, 14 and 16 during an
owl survey from the West Gate to km 18 on the evening of April
19. This species is heard in good numbers on owl surveys every
four years here, and 2007 is such a year. This periodicity is likely
related to prey abundance. Saw-whets were present in numbers this
past winter here, although usually most likely migrate southward.

Barred Owl:
This owl was heard at km 2, 16 and 18 during the owl survey on
April 19.

Spruce Grouse:
Displaying males and females (some calling) were observed at
Spruce Bog and Opeongo Road (near gate and at north end) this
week. Prime time for viewing has started.

American Three-toed Woodpecker:
A female was observed at the kettle bog of Spruce Bog Boardwalk
trail on April 13. Another bird was behind the washrooms near the
entrance to that trail on April 14. A female was NW of the register
box on Spruce Bog Boardwalk on April 19.

Listening for the relatively quiet tapping sounds made by the American
Three-toed as it flakes off bark is the best way to find them.

Black-backed Woodpecker:
One was reported along Opeongo Road north of the Costello Creek
culvert on April 14, and there were three observed along that road
on April 19 (two near the gate and one south of there).

Gray Jay:
Birds were seen at Spruce Bog and along Opeongo Road this week.

Boreal Chickadee:
One group of birders reported at least a dozen in the black spruce area
along the north end of Opeongo Road on April 19.

Purple Finch:
Numerous, with many singing.

Red Crossbill:
Fewer on the road this week, but one group reported over 50 during a
day of birding on April 19.

White-winged Crossbill:
A significant drop in numbers on the road, but a party birding all day
on April 19 reported seeing at least 25.

Pine Siskin:
Still very common, with lesser numbers on the road but many singing
and displaying.

Evening Grosbeak:
The week began with about a dozen at the Visitor Centre feeders, but
the number was down to three on April 19. Dispersal of the large flock
present all winter was fairly rapid once warmer temperatures arrived.

Note: Rock Lake Road has been re-opened to public travel. Due to
wet and muddy places on the Arowhon Road, it will remain closed,
likely for a couple more weeks. Your patience is appreciated.

As always, please let us know the date, number and location of birds you
observe when you visit Algonquin Park. In particular, we would like your
assistance with spring arrival dates. Please add your sightings to the
sheets posted in the Visitor Centre lobby.

Your bird sightings information is stored in the Algonquin Visitor Centre
database, and will help us to assist other birders visiting the Park.
Thanks.

Good birding.
Ron Tozer (retired Algonquin Park Naturalist)
Dwight, Ontario

Directions:
Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400, 11
and 60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400. From
Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the park.
Kilometre markers on Highway 60 in the park go from the West Gate
(km 0) to the East Gate (km 56). Permits and information are available
daily at both gates throughout the winter. The free Algonquin 2006
Information Guide has a map showing the location of sites mentioned in
this report.

The Visitor Centre (km 43) is open weekends, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Recent
bird sightings and information, plus feeders, can be found there. Contact
staff via the Visitor Centre service entrance during working hours on
weekdays for access to view the feeders.

 

 

Killdeer/Kingfisher
Posted on April 19, 2007 at 09:22:22 PM by janice house

heard a Killdeer tonight at dusk in our yard (Doe Lake Rd). Moira saw a Kingfisher at Hillman Lake today.(Houston Rd off Falconburg Rd north of Bracebridge)

 

 

Bats
Posted on April 19, 2007 at 09:05:09 PM by Doug Smith

Tonight we saw 2 bats out over a swampy area, hawking what insects they could find. I'm assuming they were little brown bats, but I couldn't be sure.

 

 

"The Infant" moths flying...photo
Posted on April 19, 2007 at 07:27:49 PM by Al Sinclair

Yesterday afternoon a moth called "The Infant" flew through our yard and stopped long enough on the driveway for me to get a photo. This is the day-flying moth with orange hind wings that looks like a small butterfly when flying but disappears when it lands because of the camouflage colours of the fore wings. They are not very common at our place likely because there are not many birch trees, their food plant, near us. I think this is only the second time I have seen one here (east of Bracebridge). BTW I saw a photo of the moth Eleanor reported in her post below and it was also an Infant.

 

 

Cormorants - Lake Muskoka
Posted on April 19, 2007 at 03:46:13 PM by Barbara Taylor

Double-crested Cormorants are back on Eleanor Island even though the lake has only been free of ice a couple days. This afternoon we counted 160 of them already! We could only see 8 Great Blue Herons but may have missed some hidden amongst all the cormorants.

 

 

Re(1): loon in Kearney
Posted on April 27, 2007 at 06:26:14 PM by Gary Kaye

We saw and heard our first loon of the year on Sunday April 22 on MIlford Bay in Lake Muskoka.

 

 

loon in Kearney
Posted on April 19, 2007 at 01:27:21 PM by Wayne Bridge

The ice went out on Hassard Lake (Kearney) on Tuesday and today we have a loon (there is a resident pair whose territory is Hassard Lake and the Magnetawan River to Beaver Lake).

 

 

Re(1): Butterflies, Bala
Posted on April 20, 2007 at 12:10:25 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Sorry! I misidentified the Coppers and they were really Infant Moths! So I better add a few as I counted only the ones I saw flying.

 

 

Butterflies, Bala
Posted on April 19, 2007 at 01:03:47 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

11:30 to 12:30 today I drove Ragged Rapids Rd very slowly as there were butterflies everywhere.
13 Mourning Cloaks
7 Eastern Commas
8 American Coppers.

I got a shot of another that could be a moth.
Amazing!

 

 

Bala Spring Happenings
Posted on April 19, 2007 at 09:39:45 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

A lone male loon arrive back on Tuesday. First spring peeper heard last night and the sweet song of a Hermit Thrush joined me on my first kayak around my lake. Spring is coming after all!

 

 

Am. Bittern
Posted on April 19, 2007 at 07:24:00 AM by J. Gardner

The first bittern heard and seen this morning. And Sandhill cranes chatting back in the bog end of our pond. Things are looking up.

 

 

Peregrine Falcon - Bay Lake
Posted on April 18, 2007 at 11:15:21 AM by Kip Daynard

Yesterday evening at 6:40pm, a Peregrine Falcon flew in front of my car as I drove along Bay Lake Rd. near Maple Drive. It was travelling ahead of me and towards the left so I got a rear/under-side view only. A dark falcon, uniformly barred underneath, and about the size of a crow I feel it could be nothing else. My visual memory recalls a bluish cast to the plumage, so I'd guess it was an adult but since the light was fading and the look was quick I can't be sure. I believe it may have been perched and flew as my car approached. It flew away low through the trees giving the appearance of heading for another perch - given the hour of day, perhaps to roost for the night. I returned this morning to see if it might still be around, but with no luck.

Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers returned here yesterday. I flushed an American Woodcock this morning while searching for the Falcon. The Saw-whet Owl was still in our nest box as of Sunday.

 

 

Re(1): Algonquin Park Last Saturday
Posted on April 18, 2007 at 09:18:09 PM by Marilyn Kisser

we were in the park a couple of weeks ago - and we were aware of the finch's coming on the road, so we were watching carefully - we had the same trouble on the Aspdin road for a while - fortunately, we have avoided the finches

 

 

Algonquin Park Last Saturday
Posted on April 17, 2007 at 05:34:17 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

I thought I posted this Saturday but it vanished.

It was very distressing to see how many birds were killed during my visit. I counted 16 between the East and West gates and another two beyond the West gate. Six had been killed in one group at the turn-off to Mew Lake Campground. I would guess that a transport got those. The group included 1 male White-winged Crossbill, 2 male Red Crossbills and 3 females.

The birds are on the road for the salt and gravel and sometimes wait too long to fly.

The Ravens are doing a booming business picking up the dead. I am sure there must have been more killed that the ravens got before I counted them.

Ron Tozer tells me that there is a notice on the radio that is available at the West Gate to blow your horn but the birds are really quite difficult to see unless you are watching for them.

If the 18 I saw were any indication hundreds must have been killed over the winter. Very sad!!!

 

 

Re(2): Spring Peepers and a few ducks...
Posted on April 19, 2007 at 07:13:11 AM by gerald willmott

Well, last night Lake Muskoka was completely open. And as if to welcome it the Spring Peepers were in full chorus, complete with a woodcock still doing his ritual. This morning there are some Ring-necked Ducks and Buffleheads in the bay of Milford Bay.
Spring is here!
Gerald, Beaumaris.

 

 

Re(1): Something missing?
Posted on April 18, 2007 at 09:10:31 PM by Marilyn Kisser

I agree spring is slow - but this morning I awoke to Phoebe singing and I also saw the first evening grosbeaks at the feeders since late last fall (5 miles outside of Rosseau towards Huntsville)

 

 

Re(1): Spring Peepers and a few ducks...
Posted on April 18, 2007 at 01:20:48 PM by Barbara Taylor

I think when the weather went back into "winter mode" for a while, that held back a lot of birds. The next few days should encourage them to continue northward. This morning at the Bracebridge Ponds the sunny warmer conditions convinced several Spring Peepers to start calling. Song Sparrows seemed to be in full song everywhere. There were a few Buffleheads, Mallards, Canada Geese and Wood Ducks, as well as nine Scaup in cell 2. A Killdeer was running along the roadway between cell 1 and 2.  Bracebridge Ponds map

At Henry marsh there were 16 Ring-necked Ducks, a few Bufflehead, and a Double-crested Cormorant. A Sharp-shinned Hawk was staking out the parking area on Henry Rd. (Henry Rd. is west of Kerr Park along Beaumont Dr., Bracebridge)

 

 

Something missing?
Posted on April 17, 2007 at 02:33:00 PM by J. Gardner

Is it my imagination or is this year's birding season slow? We have far fewer waterfowl on our pond and creek system, and the spring arrivals seem to be much delayed. Even the peepers are not singing yet.

 

 

Wild Turkey & ice out
Posted on April 17, 2007 at 11:59:04 AM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there was a Wild Turkey in the field beside Beaumont Dr., just before Beaumont Farm Rd. An American Kestrel was perched on one of the fence posts. Only a few Buffleheads at ice-free Alport Bay. (Bracebridge)

Lake Muskoka appears mostly open now, although there is still some ice well south of Browning Island.

 

 

pine warblers
Posted on April 16, 2007 at 02:14:11 PM by Wayne Bridge

On the weekend, I heard (didn't see) one or two pine warblers in the mixed woods behind our [Kearney] house.

 

 

Re(1): Barred Owls/Turtle Lake
Posted on April 18, 2007 at 09:13:29 PM by Marilyn Kisser

I have been treated to the barred owls call every morning this week - one calls, and at least 2 answer - 5 miles outside of Rosseau towards Huntsville

 

 

Barred Owls/Turtle Lake
Posted on April 16, 2007 at 09:47:32 AM by Garth N. Baker

On Saturday night I did my Owl Survey on the Turtle Lake/Orrville route with great sucess! Of 9 stops I had 5 Owls respond and give visuals as well.At my 7th stop I had a pair come directly in .It was my best outing for this route in 4 years of doing this route.

Of note there was not a single Peeper out,which is a first in the 4 years, A little to chilly yet!
Cheer's Garth

 

 

bluebird
Posted on April 16, 2007 at 07:05:12 AM by gerald willmott

Sunday a.m. I took a walk to where we had just planted two Bluebird boxes. I was surprised to see that the desired bird was there, checking out both boxes and gathering nest material. Question, the opening of the box faces south east. Should it be anyother direction? And how human tolerant are they?

 

 

Re(1): swallows, others
Posted on April 15, 2007 at 03:39:30 PM by Al Johnston

Thanks for the details about the midge hatch, John. I've had tree swallows back, here in Whitchurch-Stouffville for over 2 weeks now and a few days ago, I saw them working the surface of the pond and I couldn't see what they were catching.

 

 

swallows, others
Posted on April 15, 2007 at 02:43:07 PM by John Challis

Tree swallows have come back to the Washago area this weekend. They're probably responding to the hatch of midges out right now -- as well as some moths, and a mourning cloak. A phoebe has been working the back yard for bugs, too.
Also heard our first kingfisher this morning (Sunday), and a merlin pair has been letting their presence be known rather noisily.
Spring peepers have been starting to call, but aren't yet in full chorus. Earlier in the week, one by the ditch sounded decidely hoarse and hung over. One wood frog called last night in the marsh behind our place.
And two garter snakes emerged this morning as well, badly in need of a moult.
They'll probably all disappear again for a few days if the weather predictions are as dire as the media are making them out to be.

 

 

Sharp Shinned Hawk
Posted on April 14, 2007 at 12:55:47 PM by janice house

just watched a sharp shinned hawk circling over our house, gold finch was swooping at him. Found a good article in the l00th issue April/May 2005 of Cottage Life by Chris Earley showing comparisons of similar size raptors and what to look for as they fly over.

 

 

Re(1): Northern Harrier
Posted on April 15, 2007 at 08:39:32 AM by Wayne Bridge

I saw saw one hovering about 6 feet above an unseen prey in a field beside Hwy 11 just north of Katrine (Apr. 9).

 

 

Northern Harrier
Posted on April 14, 2007 at 10:12:12 AM by janice house

Geoff saw the harrier in the field behind the house at 1180 Doe Lake Rd yesterday at approx 5:30 pm (on the right, next to the old Dinsmore Sheep Farm)

 

 

dove love
Posted on April 13, 2007 at 11:46:27 AM by Wayne Bridge

The solitary mourning dove that spent the winter huddling under our (Kearney) roof eaves and the back deck overhang has successfully called in a mate! Now they eat cracked corn together "on" the deck rather than under it.

 

 

Algonquin Park Bird Report: 12 April
Posted on April 13, 2007 at 09:18:20 AM by Ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (April 12, 2007) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.


The following summarizes the birding situation in Algonquin
Provincial Park for northern species during the past week.

NEW INFORMATION SINCE LAST WEEK IS PRESENTED
AT THE START OF EACH SPECIES OR SECTION BELOW.

Snow and Ice:
Some open water has developed at river mouths, but all lakes
and ponds are still ice-covered. A thick layer of wet snow now
blankets the park after last night and today.

Moose:
A few at puddles along the highway are being seen irregularly.

Spruce Grouse:
A male was near the entrance of Spruce Bog Boardwalk on April 6.
The colder weather and snow will not encourage displaying by males.


Areas to search include: Spruce Bog Boardwalk (km 42.5 on Highway
60); the black spruce area south of Highway 60 opposite Spruce Bog
Boardwalk; and Opeongo Road (located at km 46.3) near the locked
gate, and farther north in black spruce bog area on the right (east) side.



American Three-toed Woodpecker:
Single males were observed near the start of Spruce Bog Boardwalk,
and near the locked gate on Opeongo Road, on April 6.
.

Listening for the relatively quiet tapping sounds made by the American
Three-toed as it flakes off bark is the best way to find them.



Black-backed Woodpecker:
A male was seen at km 8 on April 6.


Spruce Bog Boardwalk, along Opeongo Road, and utility poles at km 8
on Highway 60 are good areas to search. Check all conifer sites where
de-barked trees are in evidence. Imitations of Barred Owl calls, and
pishing, may elicit calls or movements by this woodpecker, helping to
locate them.


Gray Jay:
One was at the locked gate on Opeongo Road on April 6, and another
was seen farther north on the road the next day.


Boreal Chickadee:
Two were detected at the Opeongo Road locked gate on April 6.
There were single birds along Opeongo Road at the Costello Creek
culvert, and at the north end in the black spruce, on April 7.

Pine Siskin:
New sand and salt on the highway has resulted in larger numbers
on the road again.

Pine Grosbeak: OUTSIDE THE PARK
Two female-type birds eating gravel along Highway 127 south of
Whitney, just south of the power line, were reported on April 7.


Red Crossbill:
Numerous along the highway.


White-winged Crossbill:
Reported as very common along the highway on April 6.


Evening Grosbeak:
Frequently, there are 20 or fewer at the Visitor Centre feeders now,
but 60+ were reported there on April 7.


Note: Rock Lake Road has been re-opened to public travel. Due to
wet and muddy places on the Arohwon Road, it will remain closed,
likely for a couple more weeks. Your patience is appreciated.

As always, please let us know the date, number and location of birds you
observe when you visit Algonquin Park. In particular, we would like your
assistance with spring arrival dates. Please add your sightings to the
sheets posted in the Visitor Centre lobby.

Your bird sightings information is stored in the Algonquin Visitor Centre
database, and will help us to assist other birders visiting the Park.
Thanks.

Good birding.

Ron Tozer (retired Algonquin Park Naturalist)
Dwight, Ontario

Directions:
Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400, 11
and 60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400. From
Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the park.
Kilometre markers on Highway 60 in the park go from the West Gate
(km 0) to the East Gate (km 56). Permits and information are available
daily at both gates throughout the winter. The free Algonquin 2006
Information Guide has a map showing the location of sites mentioned in
this report.

The Visitor Centre (km 43) is open weekends, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Recent
bird sightings and information, plus feeders, can be found there. Contact
staff via the Visitor Centre service entrance during working hours on
weekdays for access to view the feeders.

 

 

Moon River Sightings
Posted on April 12, 2007 at 12:02:11 PM by Dinny and Neil Nimmo

Neil and I are on the Moon River in Bala. Today we spotted our first loon of the season. The last 4 days we have had a pied-billed grebe just off our dock...a first for us on the River, and about a week ago we saw a swan...probably a trumpeter but we only saw it from a distance.

 

 

Re(1): Hermit Thrush
Posted on April 12, 2007 at 09:56:28 AM by Barbara Taylor

Has anyone seen a Hermit Thrush yet in Muskoka? Depending on the weather, in past years they have been reported by mid-April. Last year one spent part of the winter in Gravenhurst. On Jan. 28, 2006 Dan Burton reported one feeding on Mountain Ash berries - it had first been seen Jan. 3.

 

 

Toronto /Hermit Thrush
Posted on April 12, 2007 at 08:15:56 AM by janice house

spoke to Dad last night - on April 8th he had 3 hermit thrush's in his back yard. He lives at Yonge & Steeles.

 

 

snow buntings
Posted on April 11, 2007 at 09:00:28 PM by Dawn Sherman

There was a flock of approx. two dozen snow buntings in the vacant lot across from Wendy's in Huntsville at 6:30 pm today.

 

 

Re(1): Kearney Waterbirds
Posted on April 11, 2007 at 03:29:17 PM by Kip Daynard

This morning at 8:45am numbers were similar to yesterday:

8 Hooded Mergansers
6 Common Mergansers
9 Ring-necked Ducks
1 Bufflehead
2 Canada Geese

A pair of American Kestrels and a Turkey Vulture flew over Perry Lake. Several Song Sparrows were singing. Male Red-winged Blackbirds are apparently on territory but still no sign of any females. Groups of 8-10 Common Grackles flying about together making a ruckus.

In the Little East River near Novar at 1:30pm I found a pair each of Mallards, Ring-necked Ducks and American Black Ducks.

 

 

Kearney Waterbirds
Posted on April 10, 2007 at 02:24:33 PM by Kip Daynard

Early this afternoon on Perry Lake in Kearney:

7 Hooded Merganser
5 Common Merganser
1 Bufflehead
8+ Ring-necked Ducks
8 Canada Geese

 

 

Re(4): winter wren
Posted on April 11, 2007 at 06:15:51 AM by ron tozer

March 27 is indeed an early date for Winter Wren. The earliest ever recorded in Algonquin Park was 26 March 1989, in an equally mild (at the time) spring.

 

 

Re(3): winter wren
Posted on April 10, 2007 at 09:55:45 PM by Kip Daynard

Didn't hear it again until almost a week later. Then, I had two on Apr 2, one at roughly the same spot as on Mar 27 and another about 1.5kms away at a traditional territory near my house.

Still no sign of the woodcock here, but the saw-whet owl was still in our nest box as of yesterday. Would a saw-whet owl regard a woodcock as prey?

 

 

Re(2): winter wren
Posted on April 10, 2007 at 01:55:46 PM by Alex Mills

Kip Daynard heard a very early one this year on March 27 at Bay Lake (see posting below for that report)

 

 

Re(1): winter wren
Posted on April 10, 2007 at 07:20:05 AM by ron tozer

Despite this year's winter-like conditions, some migrants are arriving about when we would expect them. The average first spring observation of Winter Wren in Algonquin Park over the last 21 years is April 7.

 

 

winter wren
Posted on April 10, 2007 at 07:10:24 AM by gerald willmott

I would have thought it just a little bit too early for this guy, but as I was walking the dog this a.m. there was a Winter Wren calling out his bubbly and complicated song. Interestingly last night the woodcock resumed calling. Spring just can't be held back.

 

 

bluebirds
Posted on April 9, 2007 at 07:08:28 PM by Carol Wagg

This morning a pair of bluebirds was checking out the nest boxes in our yard. Doe Lake Road in Gravenhurst.

 

 

Meadowlarks
Posted on April 9, 2007 at 06:16:26 PM by nickbartok

Meadowlarks are apparently back and singing along Fraserburg Road near the highway, despite the snow

 

 

Kingfisher and Brown-headed Cowbirds
Posted on April 9, 2007 at 05:01:34 PM by Goodyear

We saw a lone male Kingfisher at Henry Marsh this afternoon. He was waiting for the ice to melt?! All four cells of the Lagoons are now clear of ice. There were a few Mallards, Ring-necked, Scaup sp. and Wood Ducks present. A large flock of Grackles, Starlings, Red-wingeds, and Cowbirds have cleaned out our feeders for us over the last few days. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Huge flock of Robins
Posted on April 9, 2007 at 01:19:04 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there were well over 100 American Robins singing and foraging along the Trans Canada Trail just east of Stephens Bay Rd. from the Strawberry Bay Rd. access point. There were also a few Purple Finch, Red-winged Blackbirds, a pair of Pileated Woodpeckers, a "whinnying" White-breasted Nuthatch, and a drumming Ruffed Grouse.  (Bracebridge)

 

 

kestrel
Posted on April 9, 2007 at 07:41:25 AM by gerald willmott

Touring the back roads of Bardsville (didn't take long) yesterday there was an American Kestrel dining on a mouse. The Kestrel was perched on a hydro wire along the perennially flooded stretch of road where the Beatrice town line and the Falkenberg road meet.

 

 

frenzied feeding
Posted on April 8, 2007 at 03:28:21 PM by Wayne Bridge

Lots of action in our Kearney backyard feeders today. Species = black-capped chickadee, red-breasted nuthatch, blue jay, junco, tree sparrow, goldfinch, pine siskin, crow, hairy woodpecker, downy woodpecker, song sparrow, robin, red-winged blackbird, and evening grosbeak (female & two males).

 

 

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Posted on April 8, 2007 at 07:59:26 AM by Goodyear

Happy Easter! A Yellow-bellied Sapsucker was shivering to keep warm this morning as it clung to the trunk of our crabapple tree- 117 Meadow Heights Drive, Bracebridge.

 

 

Northern Flicker
Posted on April 7, 2007 at 05:06:50 PM by janice house

saw 2 today, one on our morning walk and one at the Falconburg Rd off Manitoba St/#4

 

 

Birds moving
Posted on April 6, 2007 at 06:57:23 PM by J. Gardner

Our winter population of Tree Sparrows dwindled to about 10. Today we have about 40 tree sparrows, which have to be mostly transients heading north. We have 12 juncos today, about 10 more than the residents.

 

 

red-shouldered nest
Posted on April 6, 2007 at 03:51:28 PM by gerald willmott

It was such a nice treat on a Good Friday walk. Just across the highway from the entrance to Beaumaris road at HW 118 there is an active Red-shouldered Hawk's nest, complete with Hemlock decorations and a circling and calling bird; not a bad day.
Beaumaris

Other exciting events included cleaning out Blue bird nest boxes and having a field mouse and i surprise each other. I think i jumped almost as high as it did.

 

 

Re(2): Fox Sparrows
Posted on April 8, 2007 at 08:01:54 AM by Goodyear

We had 1 in our yard yesterday. Dates of arrival for this species in our yard have been as early as March 30 and as late as April 9. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Fox Sparrows
Posted on April 6, 2007 at 06:46:16 PM by janice house

two in my yard today, also a female cowbird (Doe Lake Rd.,Gravenhurst)

 

 

Fox Sparrows
Posted on April 6, 2007 at 02:02:03 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning we came across two Fox Sparrows, an American Tree Sparrow, Song Sparrows, and Dark-eyed Juncos along the Trans Canada Trail between Henry Rd. and the Bracebridge Ponds. The birds were all east of "the dip". There was a Red-breasted Nuthatch chiselling out a nest in a dead tree - the hole was already large enough that the bird could disappear inside. A few Golden-crowned Kinglets were near the Henry marsh end of the trail. The marsh has re-froze with the return of this wintery weather. There were only a few Scaup, Buffleheads, Mallards, and Canada Geese at the Bracebridge Ponds.

 

 

Re(1): Red-bellied Woodpecker...Wendy's photo of Hillman Lake bird
Posted on April 7, 2007 at 10:18:39 AM by Al Sinclair

Wendy reported last night that they are still being seen. Single Red-bellied Woodpeckers have been seen before in Muskoka in winter and spring. What is unusual about this latest sighting is that there is a pair (female in the photo). If they stay and nest in the area it would will be a new breeding species for Muskoka. Another species expanding their range north due to a warming climate?

 

 

Red-bellied Woodpecker...Wendy's photo of Hillman Lake bird
Posted on April 6, 2007 at 01:48:41 PM by Al Sinclair

I just received a photo of one of the Red-bellied Woodpeckers that was at Wendy Fletcher's feeders this winter west of Bracebridge. See previous reports on the Bird Board.

 

 

Algonquin Park Bird Report: 5 April
Posted on April 6, 2007 at 09:00:02 AM by ontbirds

*This report was originally posted by Ron Tozer on ONTBIRDS (April 5, 2007) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.


The following summarizes the birding situation in Algonquin
Provincial Park for northern species during the past week.

NEW INFORMATION SINCE LAST WEEK IS PRESENTED
AT THE START OF EACH SPECIES ACCOUNT BELOW.

Snow and Ice:
The snow was almost completely gone this week, until a thin layer
of new snow arrived last night and today. Sub-freezing conditions are
expected to last through Easter weekend. Some open water has
developed at river mouths, but lakes and ponds are still ice-covered.

Moose:
The annual spring appearance of moose coming to roadside puddles
along Highway 60 is underway, with one or two being seen by most
people driving across the Park, especially in early morning or
evening. These animals drink the water and even ingest mud due
to its measurably higher salt content due to runoff from winter road
maintenance.


Spruce Grouse:
Sightings occurred on Spruce Bog Boardwalk near the register box,
and along Opeongo Road. With most of the snow gone, males can be
expected to be more actively displaying to the as yet disinterested
females.


Areas to search include: Spruce Bog Boardwalk (km 42.5 on Highway
60); the black spruce area south of Highway 60 opposite Spruce Bog
Boardwalk; and Opeongo Road (located at km 46.3) near the locked
gate, and farther north in black spruce bog area on the right (east) side.



American Three-toed Woodpecker:
Birders are continuing to find these northern woodpeckers. A male was
photographed near Post 6 on Spruce Bog Boardwalk, and another male
was found 15 m north of the locked gate on Opeongo Road, on March 31.
.

Listening for the relatively quiet tapping sounds made by the American
Three-toed as it flakes off bark is the best way to find them.



Black-backed Woodpecker:
A male was inspecting holes in a utility pole at the north end of Opeongo
Road on March 31, and another male between Posts 9 and 10 on Spruce
Bog Boardwalk was photographed the same day. Both males and females
are drumming, so listen for this clue to their presence.


Spruce Bog Boardwalk, along Opeongo Road, and utility poles at km 8
on Highway 60 are good areas to search. Check all conifer sites where
de-barked trees are in evidence. Imitations of Barred Owl calls, and
pishing, may elicit calls or movements by this woodpecker, helping to
locate them.


Gray Jay:
Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road are still the best places to look.


Boreal Chickadee:
No new reports were received, but Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo
Road are good locations to check. These birds should be vocalizing more
now than during the winter.


Finches on Highway 60:
A noticeable reduction in the number of finches seeking residual sand and
salt on the roadway was observed this week. In part, this is likely due to
no new material having been applied during the recent milder weather and
existing sand and salt being washed away by the rain. However, it appears
that there are really fewer siskins, crossbills and others around as well.



Red Crossbill:
There are still some birds being seen, and heard vocalizing.



White-winged Crossbill:
Significantly lower numbers being seen, but still present.


Evening Grosbeak:
The big flock that attended the Visitor Centre feeders all winter has been
reduced to about 15 birds this week.


Purple Finch, Pine Siskin, and American Goldfinch:
Small numbers of each seen this week.

Note: both the Arowhon Road and Rock Lake Road are posted CLOSED
TO PUBLIC TRAVEL and should not be used by birders.

As always, please let us know the date, number and location of birds you
observe when you visit Algonquin Park. In particular, we would like your
assistance with spring arrival dates. Please add your sightings to the
sheets posted in the Visitor Centre lobby.

Your bird sightings information is stored in the Algonquin Visitor Centre
database, and will help us to assist other birders visiting the Park.
Thanks.

Good birding.

Ron Tozer (retired Algonquin Park Naturalist)
Dwight, Ontario

Directions:
Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400, 11
and 60. Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400. From
Ottawa, take Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the park.
Kilometre markers on Highway 60 in the park go from the West Gate
(km 0) to the East Gate (km 56). Permits and information are available
daily at both gates throughout the winter. The free Algonquin 2006
Information Guide has a map showing the location of sites mentioned in
this report.

The Visitor Centre (km 43) is open weekends, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Recent
bird sightings and information, plus feeders, can be found there. Contact
staff via the Visitor Centre service entrance during working hours on
weekdays for access to view the feeders.

 

 

coopers at feeder
Posted on April 5, 2007 at 07:47:15 PM by gerald willmott

Got home at around 6pm this afternoon and there was a large Coopers Hawk checking out the feeder. He hung around long enough to allow a good look. What a red eye! Also there was a pair of merganzers hanging out in a sheltered bay.

 

 

Merlin at feeder
Posted on April 5, 2007 at 12:23:03 PM by Doug Smith

A merlin made a quick visit to my birdfeeder this morning, grabbing either a starling or a RWBB. I'm not sure which, as the merlin, (it seemed dark enough and large enough to say it was a female) covered it with her wings while she was wrestling with it on the ground. She stayed on the ground for a couple of minutes then flew off into the woods with her catch.

 

 

End of feeder season
Posted on April 4, 2007 at 01:20:33 PM by jim griffin

A big messenger passed through my yard last night and that of my neighbour and helped us take down/apart our bird feeding stations; the bears are out and are really partial to those old chunks of suet still hanging around.
This is the first time in 10 years in Port Sydney this has happened to us.

 

 

Re(1): Blue Jay mimicry
Posted on April 6, 2007 at 07:11:46 PM by janice house

we have had broad winged hawks nesting in the valley behind our cottage on Skeleton Lake for several years. I was fooled by a blue jay, I thought the hawk was in the cedar trees close to the dock but a blue jay popped out

 

 

Re(1): Blue Jay mimicry
Posted on April 4, 2007 at 02:14:13 PM by Alex Mills

At Magnetawan, blue jays do both broad-wingeds and red-shouldereds. I have made an effort to try to distinguish the real thing from the blue jay, but am not confident about being able to do so, especially with red-shouldereds

 

 

Re(1): Blue Jay mimicry
Posted on April 4, 2007 at 01:25:10 PM by Barbara Taylor

Funny you should mention the Broad-winged Hawk imitation since just yesterday I heard the call, was surprised by the early arrival...but then saw the real bird...a Blue Jay. For several years we had a female Blue Jay that would come to our back deck rail looking for peanut handouts. She would often give a convincing rendition of a Red-shouldered Hawk right after taking her peanut to a nearby pine tree.

 

 

Blue Jay mimicry
Posted on April 4, 2007 at 09:48:46 AM by Kip Daynard

The other day I was surprised to hear the high-pitched 'tuweeeee' of a Broad-winged Hawk, repeated several times at broadly spaced intervals. It really was a dead ringer for that call which I know well, but I thought this was quite unlikely given its still a couple of weeks before the first Broad-wings return. Upon trying to locate the source of the sound, I found only a Blue Jay. I didn't actually see him do it since once I located him, he began making the Blue Jay's typical scolding call. However, I think it could only have been the Jay since the scolding call replaced the 'tuweeeeee' and it was coming from the same general direction.

This is the second time Blue Jays have fooled me into thinking there was a raptor nearby. A couple of years ago I had a similar experience. I could've sworn there was a Red-shouldered Hawk circling nearby but upon investigation found a Blue Jay doing an incredibly realistic imitation (I actually saw that one do it).

Anyone else have some anecdotes of Blue Jay mimicry to relate?

 

 

saw-whet still here
Posted on April 3, 2007 at 11:13:25 AM by Kip Daynard

As of this morning the saw-whet owl is still present in the nest box. Emsdale, ON (see earlier post Mar. 29)

 

 

Merlin
Posted on April 2, 2007 at 12:30:58 PM by Barbara Taylor

Earlier today there was a Merlin in a tree on the west side of Kevin Cres. between Daleman Dr. and Brian Rd., Bracebridge. It was calling loudly and pecking at something in its feet. A Pileated Woodpecker soon appeared on a nearby tree, perhaps coming in to investigate what all the racket was about.

 

 

wild turkeys in Kearney
Posted on April 2, 2007 at 11:01:46 AM by Wayne Bridge

I was working in the kitchen when I heard something hit a window. I thought, "Oh no, not a bird." Then it hit again, and again, and I realized it was coming from downstairs. A couple weeks ago we had a red fox looking in the bird room window, greatly upsetting my parrots. Naturally, I thought it was happening again, but when I went to investigate, out of the corner of my eye I caught a glimpse of something large and black at the computer room window. Good God, not a bear already! But no, it was a very large wild turkey tom, head, neck and wattles fully engorged! It must have seen its own reflection and decided to defend its own territory (and the two hens he had in tow). What a great way to start an otherwise dreary day. [We are the last house in Kearney heading east to The Park - lots of bush and water.]

 

 

Re(1): Unusual Cedar Waxwing
Posted on April 2, 2007 at 10:15:12 AM by Alex Mills

What an interesting photo. This is obviously an individual with aberrant pigmentation, but it is interesting to see that it still has a yellow terminal tail band. The terminal tail band in cedar waxwings can be orange if they eat certain foods (e.g. an alien honeysuckle). Because of that, and because this bird still has a yellow band, it makes me wonder if the normal yellow band is entirely a dietary pigment, rather than a genetically determined one.

 

 

Unusual Cedar Waxwing
Posted on April 2, 2007 at 09:17:13 AM by Barbara Taylor

Received this photo of a white Cedar Waxwing, taken by G. Howe on March 26 in Alcona, SE of Barrie.

 

 

Owl Prowl Cancelled due to bad owling weather
Posted on April 1, 2007 at 07:16:40 PM by Al Sinclair

The Muskoka Field Naturalists Owl Prowl scheduled for tonight, April 1, has been cancelled because of the rainy weather. It may be rescheduled for later in the month.

 

 

new arrivals
Posted on April 1, 2007 at 01:05:37 PM by John Challis

It’s been a busy week and I haven’t had time to record our daily sightings on Green River Dr., Washago. Here’s an omnibus report for the last week.
Sat. Mar. 24; evening – woodcock twittering (or would that be a snipe?) overhead. Have heard him again a couple of times; first song sparrow;
Sun. Mar 25; first two great blue herons landed in the wetland by the road. Otter watched the dogs and I from the edge of the ice on the Green River; marsh hawk calling
Mon. Mar 26; eastern phoebe calling
Wed. Mar. 28; five ring-necked ducks in the river – three males, two females; flight of five herons passing overhead in the evening.
Thurs., Mar 29; a double-date of hooded mergansers, in courtship dances…hens unimpressed
Fri., Mar 30; old squaw in the river at the end of our road, photographed by neighbor Barry Peyton; two wood ducks in wetland behind the house. Unbelievably naïve spring peeper calling at dusk.
Sat. Mar 31; yellow-bellied sapsucker in the trees behind our house.
All week juncos have been trilling, but not in very large groups this year. Purple finches and goldfinches have been in abundance.

Sunday, April 1; Short-tailed albatross, circling overhead while singing "Bess, You Are My Woman Now".

 

 

port carling
Posted on April 1, 2007 at 11:50:29 AM by gerald willmott

Today at the Hazelwood trail there was NO sign of the Red-shouldered Hawk. However there were several Wood Ducks, Black Ducks, Mallards, Brown Creepers and the usual suspects. From the bottom of West Street in Port Carling (which is on the Indian River turn at the Indian River Trading Co.) there was one Ring-necked Duck, one American Widgeon, several Hooded Mergansers (male and female), Common Mergansers (male and female), Buffleheads, Common Goldeneyes and plenty of Herring Gulls.

 

 

Bird Board update
Posted on April 1, 2007 at 11:11:33 AM by Barbara Taylor

Thanks to everyone for all your reports. All posts for January thru March are now available in the Archived Reports.

Check out my list of Birding and Nature Links for websites helpful in identifying birds, dragonflies, butterflies, wildflowers, mushrooms, and more.

Need help posting photos? Find instructions and do a test post on the Nature Photos Board.
New to the Bird Board? See the Posting Guidelines for helpful tips about using the board.

I try to monitor the Bird Board on a regular basis. If you want to bring something to my attention, just send me an email and I'll get back to you as soon as possible.

Barbara Taylor
muskoka_birder@hotmail.com

 

 

Moose
Posted on April 1, 2007 at 08:40:34 AM by janice house

at approx 7:25 I spotted a moose in the field across from our house, with the scope we saw he was a young male looking pretty patchy. First one seen in the 14 years we have lived here. 1206 Doe Lake Rd.

 

 

beaumaris birds
Posted on April 1, 2007 at 08:38:40 AM by gerald willmott

Beaumaris birds.
Yesterday (March 31) walking around Beaumaris I heard the following:

3 Phoebe
1 Song Sparrow
5 Golden-crowned Kinglet
1 Turkey Vulture
2 Red-shouldered Hawk
Coyotes calling at 6am on Friday Morning

One freshly hit Ruffed Grouse that baked up well with onions, chives and a little butter. I have no idea who hit the poor bird, not I.

And very interestingly we have had a woodcock calling all night for the past 5 days. He has also been calling throughout the night and during the morning dawn. I had previously thought that they only call at dusk and dawn. Possibly it may have something to do with the excellent moonlight this week? He was absent last night.