Muskoka Bird Board - Archived Reports from October - December 2005
 
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Red Crossbills
Posted on December 31, 2005 at 05:17:16 PM by Goodyear

While snowshoeing/birding this afternoon at the Bracebridge Resource Management Centre, we saw 2 Red Crossbills feeding in the pines in the managed area surrounded by ski trail 1.

 

 

Muskoka Field Naturalists - next meeting January 5
Posted on December 31, 2005 at 12:07:56 PM by Barbara Taylor

 

JANUARY 5, 2006 THURSDAY MEETING 7:30 PM
Brent Patterson is a biologist who has worked in Nova Scotia, Nunavut, and currently leads Ontario's wolf research program. He will discuss the effects of a harvest ban on the population dynamics of wolves in Algonquin Park, the subsequent concerns which led to a moratorium on wolf hunting and trapping in the townships surrounding the Park, plus current research. Meeting to be held at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, 705 Cedar Lane, Bracebridge (south-east corner of Cedar Lane and Taylor Rd.). Visitors welcome to attend the meeting.
Membership Information & Program Updates: MFN website

 

 

Sharp -shinned Hawk
Posted on December 31, 2005 at 09:07:56 AM by Brian Pfrimmer

Dec 30th I watched an adult Sharp-shin
capture and eat a Black-capped Chickadee in the parking lot area of the Zone office in Arrowhead Provincal Park. There are feeders present at the site. The feathers flew and the bird was consumed in about 7 minutes. Arrowhead P.P. is about 6 km north of Huntsville just off Hwy 11.

 

 

Pine Siskin's
Posted on December 30, 2005 at 06:23:56 PM by Terry Whittam / Marion Whittam

Took this picture today of Pine Siskin's flocking to my brothers feeders in Port McNichol. Nice shot to study the coloring and striping of Pine Siskins.
Pine Siskin's

 

 

A Birdfeeder's perfect moment
Posted on December 30, 2005 at 06:05:39 PM by Ted gardner

This moring after filling all our feeders i sat and watched the backyard as the truck warmed up. In a 5 minute span i had 20 plus evening Grosbeaks,5 pine grosbeaks,2 Juncos, 5 or 6 Black-capped chickadees , 15 or more Blue jays, 2 hairy woodpeckers , 1 downey woodpecker, 2 white breasted Nuthatch,
5 starlings and 2 mourning doves and 5 or 6 pine siskens....and then in the middle of this our resident pileated woodpecker swooped in!! Oh! and the sun was out!! I went of to work with one really big smile. (120 Meadow Hieghts B.B.)

 

 

Red-bellied Woodpecker
Posted on December 30, 2005 at 05:57:59 PM by Terry Whittam / Marion Whittam

We had a great day birding today through Muskoka and north Simcoe County over to Port-McNichol. This female Red-bellied showed up over lunch in Port McNichol. Slightly blurry through the glass.
Red-bellied Woodpecker (female)

 

 

Evening Grosbeaks
Posted on December 30, 2005 at 05:28:12 PM by Terry Whittam / Marion Whittam

Evening Grosbeaks continue to visit our feeders 10k east of Washago....picture is a little blurry through the glass!
Evening Grosbeaks

 

 

Algonquin Park CBC
Posted on December 30, 2005 at 11:47:12 AM by Ron Tozer (on ONTBIRDS)

*This report originated on ONTBIRDS (December 30, 2005) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.


The 32nd Algonquin Provincial Park CBC was conducted on Thursday,
December 29, under excellent field conditions (about minus 2 degrees C,
fairly calm all day, and relatively good snowshoeing). Fifty-two
participants (staff and former staff of Algonquin Park and The Friends
of Algonquin Park, plus associates, with many travelling long distances
to attend) were able to undertake an accurate sampling of the birdlife
in Algonquin Park this year. And the results were spectacular!

Just 23 species were observed (average is 28), with a total of 1,228
individuals (average is 5,029). There were only 6 birds per party
hour (average is 28). The Algonquin winter woods is amazingly
quiet this year! However, this was not our lowest number in 32 years
of doing the count; there were only 4 birds per party hour in 1983, and
only 5 in 1985.

Unlike virtually all Ontario Christmas Bird Counts, the Algonquin Park
circle contains only about a half dozen bird feeders and no settlements.
With so little human influence, observed bird numbers tend to more
accurately reflect the prevailing natural food conditions.

The nearly total absence of a cone crop, plus this fall's large southward
movements of Black-capped Chickadees and Blue Jays, led us to
anticipate that there would be low numbers of birds this winter. There
were 584 Black-capped Chickadees on the count (compared with an
average of 1,084), and just 31 Blue Jays (average is 192).

Noteworthy observations were few, but did include an American
Black Duck (fifth time on the count, all singles) on the Madawaska
River (which had the only open water in the circle), and nine Black-
backed Woodpeckers (five of which were in Lake of Two Rivers
campground, mostly on spruce infested with wood-boring beetle
larvae). Despite concerted efforts, no Spruce Grouse could be found,
but it was recorded for count week.

Finches were limited to: Pine Grosbeak (148), White-winged Crossbill
(3), Common Redpoll (30), American Goldfinch (3) and Evening
Grosbeak (1).

Thanks to all our participants for their great effort in documenting the
dramatic paucity of birdlife in Algonquin Park this early winter. It was
a great day to be outdoors, despite the lack of birds.

Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park CBC Compiler
Dwight, Ontario

--------------------------------------
*ONTBIRDS is presented by the Ontario Field Ornithologists - the provincial
birding organization. For instructions to join or leave ONTBIRDS visit
http://www.ofo.ca/ontbirdshow.htm
ONTBIRDS Guidelines may be viewed at http://www.ofo.ca/ontbirdsguide.htm

 

 

Great Horned Owl
Posted on December 30, 2005 at 00:07:07 AM by Steve and Leslee Tassie

We've been concerned lately that we haven't heard our great horned owl for a couple of months. We've been hearing it quite regularily for a couple of years now around our home here on Santa's Village Road. Then, finally last night (December 28/05) at about 11:30 p.m. we heard him, close to the house. He continued on as we went to sleep. This is nice for us, we've grown accustomed to hearing him/her and this has been the longest gap of time gone by without hearing our owl.  (Bracebridge)

 

 

Hooded Merganser...Bracebridge
Posted on December 29, 2005 at 01:55:10 PM by Al Sinclair

A Hooded Merganser was paddling down the south branch of the Muskoka River today at 1:00pm. It was seen from Hwy118E 2.5 km east of Hwy 11.

 

 

Redpolls, Siskins, Grosbeaks, Juncos
Posted on December 29, 2005 at 12:47:21 PM by Goodyear

We have a flock of 20 Pine Grosbeaks and 1 Evening Grosbeak frequenting our crabapple tree (117 Meadow Heights Drive). We also had a flock of approx. 20 Redpolls and 32 Siskins at our feeders. One of the Siskins was very yellow, and had a large, bright-yellow wing patch, yellow undertail coverts, some yellow on the side of its upper breast,and was faintly streaked. This might be a Yellow adult Siskin. Has anyone else seen it? We also have two Juncos hanging around.

 

 

Re(2): What is this huge bird?
Posted on December 29, 2005 at 10:14:03 AM by Al Sinclair

It is most likely a Common Raven. Ravens and crows are know to occasionaly produce individuals with some white feathers on various parts of their body. Strange looking birds but they can be identified by their size and shape. Wingspan of a Common Raven is 53 inches, just over 4 ft.

 

 

Re(1): What is this huge bird?
Posted on December 29, 2005 at 09:51:10 AM by Barbara Taylor

It may be the same Common Raven that Doug Smith reported a while back. It had unusual white markings as you describe. Here's a copy of Doug's post:

Pied raven
Posted on October 29, 2005 at 12:30:25 PM by Doug Smith
There is a raven at the Canadian Tire parking lot in Bracebridge that has one white primary on its left wing, (and maybe a matching white primary on the right wing) and some white on its head. I have seen it on 2 different occasions.

 

 

What is this huge bird?
Posted on December 28, 2005 at 06:30:30 PM by Carol & Amelia

Our bird knowledge is limited, and we're hoping someone here can help. We spotted a bird from our office(in Bracebridge - near Manitoba St & Hwy 118W) that looks like a very large crow with a big white spot on the top of its head and white markings on its wings. We first saw the bird in October (so we're sure the white spots are not snow), and again a couple weeks ago. It's wingspan was well over 4 feet. None of the visitors to our office have been able to identify it, so any help would be appreciated.

 

 

coyote
Posted on December 27, 2005 at 10:36:11 PM by Steve & Leslee Tassie

We were surprised to see a coyote strolling ever so leisurely across our backyard (right up close to the house) on Boxing Day at 2:30 in the afternoon. He could hear us talking through the windows and just slowly sauntered on, sinking in the snow as he went. We are on the town side of the pipeline on Santa's Village Road. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Pine Grosbeaks, Bohemian Waxwing
Posted on December 26, 2005 at 03:15:05 PM by Barbara Taylor

About an hour ago there were approx. 40 Pine Grosbeaks taking turns feeding in the ornamental crabapple tree in front of #117 Meadow Heights Dr. Also a Bohemian Waxwing and many Pine Siskins in the area. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Piliated Woodpecker
Posted on December 25, 2005 at 08:53:58 PM by Terry Whittam / Marion Whittam

A noisey Piliated Woodpecker flew around the cottage at dusk this afternoon 10k east of Washago......seemed to enjoy going from tree to tree making just a lot of noise.

 

 

Pine Grosbeaks
Posted on December 25, 2005 at 02:02:41 PM by Dan Burton

I heard a lone Pine Grosbeak a few houses over and started imitating it from the upstairs bathroom window. In less than a minute, a whole flock of Pine Grosbeaks decended from the sky and landed in a tree right in front of me. There were about 20 altogether.  (Gravenhurst)

 

 

Red-tailed Hawk...Bracebridge
Posted on December 24, 2005 at 11:13:07 PM by Al Sinclair

A Red-tailed Hawk was sitting in a tree beside Hwy 11 today just south of the Fraserburg Rd overpass (1st bridge south of the Taylor Rd exit).

 

 

White Raven!!!!!
Posted on December 24, 2005 at 03:01:29 PM by Mi-Shell Jessen

Today at 2.35 pm a white raven flew over our deck (2520 Fraserburg road)in direction Pine and Leach Lake. The bird was seen from below and was/is completely white. We did not get a view of it from above to check the top feathers. It was crowing / cawing loudly attesting to the species.
What a mystical sight - just after the Solstice!

 

 

Re(2): Wild Turkeys, Corbetts Seed
Posted on December 23, 2005 at 05:39:54 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Other than the fact that her landlord told her to stop as he had complaints or complaint from neighbours, I have no idea.
There is no doubt that turkeys are as messy as Canada geese and that may be why.
She says that she gained a "reputation" from feeding the rock pigeons and that could be part of it.

 

 

Re(1): Wild Turkeys, Corbetts Seed
Posted on December 23, 2005 at 03:56:07 PM by Cindi

Why does she have to stop feeding them?

 

 

Wild Turkeys, Corbetts Seed
Posted on December 22, 2005 at 11:29:42 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Eileen has been told that she must stop feeding the turkeys behind her store. She stopped on Monday but the turkeys are still visiting the area looking for food.

It is hoped that someone nearby will make sure they are OK.

(Bracebridge)

 

 

Pileated Woodpecker
Posted on December 20, 2005 at 05:33:45 PM by Ted gardner

The Pileated we talked about almost a week ago has been pretty much a regular since. (accept the 18th you could have bet!)He or she is usually in about 8 am
again later in the morn aprox noon and somtimes back for a snack in the early evening. we put out some beef fat as he or she seems to kill a suet cake in a couple of days.
120 meadow heights B.B

 

 

Re(1): Gravenhurst-Bracebridge Christmas Bird Count
Posted on December 20, 2005 at 12:30:35 PM by Cindi

The brown thrasher arrived at my feeder on November 18/05 and has remained ever since. Seems to enjoy cracked corn and millet. (Bracebridge) Here are some photos
http://im1.shutterfly.com/procserv/47b5cc01b3127cce9652482c5f9e00000016108QbsWLls3bm
http://im1.shutterfly.com/procserv/47b5cc01b3127cce9652482fdead00000016108QbsWLls3bm
http://im1.shutterfly.com/procserv/47b5cc01b3127cce9652482ddeaf00000016108QbsWLls3bm
http://im1.shutterfly.com/procserv/47b5cc01b3127cce965232f15f7e00000016108QbsWLls3bm
http://im1.shutterfly.com/procserv/47b5cc01b3127cce965232f35f7c00000016108QbsWLls3bm
http://im1.shutterfly.com/procserv/47b5cc01b3127cce965232f0de4f00000016108QbsWLls3bm

 

 

Species List now posted
Posted on December 19, 2005 at 09:39:57 PM by Al Sinclair

Click on the link below for the complete list of species and numbers for the 2005 CBC.
Christmas Bird Count data

 

 

Gravenhurst-Bracebridge Christmas Bird Count
Posted on December 19, 2005 at 06:00:17 PM by Al Sinclair

The 26th Gravenhurst-Bracebridge Christmas Bird Count was conducted by 35 field participants on December 18, 2005. Temperature -3.6 to -0.5 degrees C, snow fall increasing from light to heavy during the day impairing visibility, large lakes and rivers open, snow cover 12 cm.

Preliminary Results:

Total Species: 37 (last 10 yr average, 36)
Total Individuals: 2788 (last 10 yr average, 2867)

New Species for count:
Brown Thrasher (1)

Infrequently observed species:
Wood Duck (1)
Glaucous Gull (2)
Gray Jay (1)
Common Grackle (1)

All-time Highs:
Wild Turkey (34)
Northern Cardinal (10)
Pine Siskin (314)

All-time Low:
None

Most abundant species:
Black-capped Chickadee (710)
European Starling (355)
Pine Siskin (314)

Finches:
Pine Grosbeak (72)
Common Redpoll (count week only)
Pine Siskin (314)
American Goldfinch (195)
Evening Grosbeak (109) highest since 1995

Worthy of Mention:
House Sparrow (134) up from 39 last year, cats were removed from the local horse boarding stable.

Team competition:
Gravenhurst 30 species, Bracebridge 29
Gravenhurst wins again!

Al Sinclair
Compiler
Bracebridge

 

 

Great Blue Heron - over FMI
Posted on December 19, 2005 at 05:36:41 PM by Bob Healey

Shortly before noon, I saw a GBH flying south through the snow-squall (probably wishing he had left sooner!) (Gravenhurst)

 

 

Re(1): ...the Tree Sparrow
Posted on December 20, 2005 at 08:43:09 PM by Barbara Taylor

Had two American Tree Sparrows at our feeder this afternoon. Wonder if the new guy is the one you saw in your yard Sunday...at least we can now say for sure there are two of them in the neighbourhood.
(Glendale Rd., Bracebridge)

 

 

Birds for the Count
Posted on December 18, 2005 at 03:53:46 PM by Goodyear

We went for a hike this afternoon along the Trans Canada Trail west of Henry Marsh and saw the following few birds taking cover from the snow:
Chickadees 19
G.C. Kinglets 2
R.B. Nuthatches 5
Raven 1
Pine Grosbeaks 2

At our feeders today:
Pine Siskins 2
R.B. Nuthatches 3
Tree Sparrow 1 (this might be the same one that is frequenting Barbara's feeders)
Blue Jays 3
Chickadees 8

 

 

Re(2): Christmas Bird Count today - Northern Shrike
Posted on December 18, 2005 at 06:51:35 PM by Jim Gardner

Just realized that I didn't explain "over this side". Parry Sound Nature Club out of Parry Sound. Sorry.

 

 

Re(1): Christmas Bird Count today - Northern Shrike
Posted on December 18, 2005 at 06:49:38 PM by J. Gardner

The Christmas Count was cancelled over this side because there was too much snow to move around in. With any luck, the count will be run sometime in very early January.

 

 

Christmas Bird Count today - Northern Shrike
Posted on December 18, 2005 at 12:56:17 PM by Barbara Taylor

A Northern Shrike just stopped by to check out our feeders. No wonder most of the regular birds have disappeared this afternoon. (Glendale Rd./Kevin Cres., Bracebridge)

Here is our yard list so far for today's Gravenhurst-Bracebridge Christmas Bird Count:
Northern Shrike - 1
American Tree Sparrow - 1
Dark-eyed Junco - 12
Mourning Dove - 15
Downy Woodpecker - 2
Red-breasted Nuthatch - 2
White-breasted Nuthatch - 3
Black-capped Chickadee - 20
Blue Jay - 5

 

 

Barred Owl
Posted on December 17, 2005 at 04:32:54 PM by Nick

Got a report of a barred owl on Whitehead Rd (near the end), which is off Parkers Point Rd. West of Gravenhurst on 169

 

 

PLEASE READ - Bird Board downtime
Posted on December 17, 2005 at 09:00:51 AM by Barbara Taylor

The Bird Board was offline for the past three days because of a fault with the server. The Boards2Go hosting service finally fixed the problem last night. Please refer to the back-up webpage if you have problems accessing the Bird Board in the future. I did post notices there about the downtime and gave an alternate place to post your sightings.

If you haven't already done so, please bookmark the Bird Board back-up webpage. You will find a copy of all recent sightings reports there. There is a also a server status link so you can check if the server is down if you can't access the Bird Board. If there is a problem with the Bird Board I will give an alternate location where you can post your sightings - in this case, it was the Ontario Nature Photos board. I have moved two posts from there to the Bird Board.

 

 

Siskins
Posted on December 16, 2005 at 09:40:27 AM by Barbara Taylor

About 30 Pine Siskins and a small flock of American Goldfinches at our feeders this morning. Heard some Pine Grosbeaks flying over, but they haven't visited the yard yet. The lone American Tree Sparrow is still here, hanging out with the Juncos. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Huntsville CBC
Posted on December 15, 2005 at 08:53:05 AM by Ron Tozer (on ONTBIRDS)

*This report originated on ONTBIRDS (December 14, 2005) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.


The 12th Huntsville Christmas Bird Count was conducted by 20 field
participants today (December 14). It was sunny and light cloud, but
cool. All lakes were frozen, except the north end of Mary Lake.

Preliminary results showed:

Total Species: 38 (average: 37)
Total Individuals: 3,325 (average: 2,511)

New Species for count:
Golden Eagle (1)

Infrequently observed species:
Common Loon (1)
Trumpeter Swan (1)
Bald Eagle (1)
Bohemian Waxwing (80)

All-time Highs:
Wild Turkey (11)
Black-capped Chickadee (1,234)
Red-breasted Nuthatch (113)
White-breasted Nuthatch (99)


Finches:
Pine Grosbeak (201)
White-winged Crossbill (2)
Common Redpoll (54)
Pine Siskin (79)
American Goldfinch (69)
Evening Grosbeak (25)


Ron Tozer
Compiler
Dwight, Ontario

---------------------------------------
ONTBIRDS is presented by the Ontario Field Ornithologists - the provincial
birding organization. For instructions to join or leave ONTBIRDS visit
http://www.ofo.ca/ontbirdshow.htm
ONTBIRDS Guidelines may be viewed at http://www.ofo.ca/ontbirdsguide.htm

 

 

Pileated Woodpecker
Posted on December 13, 2005 at 06:39:16 PM by Ted Gardner

My wife Robyne came home for lunch shortly after 1 pm today and was treated to a Pileated back and forth to the suet in the back yard. We hear him regularly but does not always make himself seen. (120 Meadow Heights B.B)

 

 

Snowy Owl
Posted on December 12, 2005 at 03:11:26 PM by Mary Willmott

Reports of a Snowy Owl being harassed by two crows near Young and Milton st. BB

 

 

Re(1): possible snowy and comment on ear tufts
Posted on December 12, 2005 at 05:35:29 PM by Alex Mills

Snowy Owls have small ear tufts, but they are not always visible. In fact, they usually aren't visible. I don't think Barred Owls ever have ear tufts.

 

 

possible snowy!!
Posted on December 12, 2005 at 01:04:42 PM by Nick

well, my step mother reports seeing an owl on baldwin road off ziska road in bracebridge. after going through a bird book with her she thinks it was a SNOWY. She says horrizontal barring, lots of white, but the sticker is little tufts at the ears. do snowy have or can they have tufts? barred seems like the most obvious, unless a tundra phase great horned is around (hense the white)

 

 

Tree Sparrow
Posted on December 12, 2005 at 09:56:58 AM by Barbara Taylor

A lone American Tree Sparrow showed up at our feeder this morning. Haven't seen one since the fall. We also have about a dozen Dark-eyed Juncos now.  (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Bohemian Waxwing
Posted on December 12, 2005 at 01:07:55 PM by Nick

from the great picture, looks like an adult female. feathers all look clean, and fresh. only 2 red waxy tips and a moderate amount of yellow on the rects (tail feathers), males have many waxy tips and lots of yellow

 

 

Re(2): Bohemian Waxwing
Posted on December 11, 2005 at 09:27:49 PM by Terry Whittam / Marion Whittam

Hi Bruce..... I'm using a Nikon D70 with a 300mm lense... 1/100sec at F5.6. and lots of patience....

 

 

Re(1): Bohemian Waxwing
Posted on December 11, 2005 at 08:21:50 PM by Bruce Missen

Terry,
Very nice picture! What are you using for camera equipment?

 

 

Re(1): Bohemian Waxwing
Posted on December 11, 2005 at 07:55:03 PM by Al Johnston

Great pic, Terry. Thanks for sharing. Al

 

 

Bohemian Waxwing
Posted on December 11, 2005 at 07:09:51 PM by Terry Whittam / Marion Whittam

A pair of beautiful very tame Bohemian Waxwings feed around the cottage this morning about 10k east of Washago. I first heard their "different" call then spotted them feeding on berries. They stayed around for a few hours and seemed to enjoy posing for the camera!
Bohemian Waxwing

 

 

Re(1): Bracebridge Turkeys
Posted on December 13, 2005 at 05:06:10 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Sorry to say that none of the eleven females I had coming for the last two winters have yet to put in an appearance.  (Bala)

 

 

Re(1): Bracebridge Turkeys
Posted on December 11, 2005 at 07:01:36 PM by Bob Healey

WOW!

 

Bracebridge Turkeys
Posted on December 11, 2005 at 06:01:11 PM by Terry Whittam / Marion Whittam

A nice group of Turkeys gather daily outside Corbetts Feed on Barron Dr., Bracebridge. (take Taylor Rd. east of Hwy. 11, then onto Taylor Court, then Barron Dr.)
Bracebridge Turkeys

 

 

Re(2): Glaucous Gull photos
Posted on December 13, 2005 at 05:02:17 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Glad to see you found one! I looked yesterday and didn't find any winter gulls at all. Lots of starlings and only a few ravens. Very few gulls, in fact.

 

 

Re(2): Glaucous Gull at the Bracebridge Landfill - photo
Posted on December 11, 2005 at 06:59:42 PM by Bob Healey

 

photo

 

 

Re(1): Glaucous Gull photos
Posted on December 11, 2005 at 03:13:50 PM by Al Sinclair for Bob

 

photo 1     photo 2

 

 

Glaucous Gull at the Bracebridge Landfill
Posted on December 11, 2005 at 01:45:02 PM by Bob Healey

This looked to be a 1st year bird. We observed at noon for about 1/2 an hour. I have medium-quality photo I'll send someone who can put up a URL image on the site.

 

 

Gravenhurst-Bracebridge Christmas Bird Count - Counters needed
Posted on December 11, 2005 at 11:43:36 AM by Al Sinclair

The Gravenhurst-Bracebridge Christmas Bird Count will be held next Sunday December 18. Two teams, one in Gravenhurst and one in Bracebridge will count all the birds in a 24km circle centered between the two towns. Following the count we will be meeting for a pot luck supper and compilation of the days count. If you would like to participate contact me by email for more details.

“Having fun while birding can yield important results that affect bird conservation,” says Dick Cannings, Bird Studies Canada’s Christmas Bird Count coordinator. “Bird Studies Canada and our partners at the National Audubon Society in the United States gather this huge database every year which is invaluable for biologists interested in population trends in wintering birds. The data is often used by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada to assess the status of Canadian bird species.”

For more info check out the website below and the article in this weeks Bracebridge Examiner.
The Christmas Bird Count

 

 

Northern Shrike, P. Grosbeaks
Posted on December 10, 2005 at 08:59:12 PM by Bob Healey

While looking for Barb's Pine Grosbeaks east of the Henry Rd. Marsh this afternoon, we saw an immature N. Shrike in a deciduous tree. Several chickadees in immediate vacinity were sounding the alarm. I tried to digiscope it, but the lighting was poor. We saw 15-20 Pine Grosbeaks.

 

 

White Moose get protection
Posted on December 10, 2005 at 06:17:09 PM by Al Sinclair

CBC radio news announced this week that the MNR will be drafting regulations to protect white Moose found near Foleyet in Northern Ontario. The move recognizes the Cultural Significance And Enhances Eco-tourism In Foleyet Area. Check the link below for a photo and background information.
White Moose Background Information

 

 

Moose
Posted on December 9, 2005 at 01:28:10 PM by Nick Bartok

Saw a young male moose (small rack) just east of Vankoughnet on hwy 118; dec 9th

 

 

Evening Grosbeaks
Posted on December 9, 2005 at 11:04:13 AM by Bob Burt

This morning there were a few Evening Grosbeaks near the corner of Brian Rd. and Meadow Heights Dr., Bracebridge. There were also some Pine Grosbeaks, Pine Siskins, and a Pileated Woodpecker calling.

 

 

wolves and moose
Posted on December 8, 2005 at 11:04:45 PM by Leslee Tassie

Mi-Shell Jessen called me about 10 p.m. Tuesday night to say that she'd just encountered 4 very large wolves that had cornered (surrounded) a full grown moose on Fraserburg road less than a km. from her and Peter's. When she came along in her vehicle the wolves fled into the bush and the moose was trembling so badly it could hardly find it's feet to move. It eventually walked along the road a bit in front of her before heading into the bush. We agreed that it probably wouldn't have been safe for long .....

 

 

Algonquin Park Birding Report: Dec. 8, 2005
Posted on December 8, 2005 at 03:22:04 PM by Ron Tozer (on ONTBIRDS)

*This report originated on ONTBIRDS (December 8, 2005) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.


Birder reports from Algonquin Park this week remained limited in variety
of species and numbers of individuals observed. Small lakes are
ice-covered, and the larger water bodies will soon follow. There is about
10-15 cm of fluffy snow on the ground along Highway 60.

In the Highway 60 Corridor, small groups of PINE GROSBEAKS are
being seen on the road, especially after sanding following plowing. A
flock of 55 COMMON REDPOLLS was noted at km 36 today.
AMERICAN GOLDFINCH, PINE SISKIN, and up to 15 Pine Grosbeaks
have been observed at the Visitor Centre feeders (km 43) during the past
week. A small flock of EVENING GROSBEAKS had been coming to the
feeders, but they have not been recorded there in the last few days.

Yesterday, there were three PINE MARTENS feeding on black sunflower
seeds at the Visitor Centre feeders, at the same time. At least one was
was always present throughout the morning.

Birders seeking Algonquin's "boreal" species (Spruce Grouse, Black-
back Woodpecker, Gray Jay, Boreal Chickadee) in the Highway 60
Corridor should concentrate on the three traditional areas which usually
produce the best results: the Old Railway from Arowhon Road (km 15.4
on Highway 60) to West Rose Lake, Spruce Bog Boardwalk (km 42.5)
and Opeongo Road (km 46.3). You will have to walk beyond the locked
gate on Opeongo Road, and four-wheeled drive may soon be needed to
access the road south of the gate, which is currently unplowed.

On the East Side of Algonquin Park, a birder travelling the Barron
Canyon Road all the way to Lake Travers on December 6 observed
small flocks of PINE GROSBEAKS on the road, several large flocks of
COMMON REDPOLLS feeding on Speckled Alder, two flocks of
WHITE-WINGED CROSSBILLS, and several RED CROSSBILLS
(of the resident form, with medium-sized bills, that feeds on White Pine
cones). Seven SPRUCE GROUSE were seen at Lake Travers (km 70),
where Jack Pine needles comprise much of their winter diet.

Visiting birders (often scarce here!) are asked to report their sightings,
(including locations, numbers and dates) to me (rtozer@vianet.on.ca).
Information about recent sightings is available in the Bird Sightings
binder in the Algonquin Visitor Centre lobby, and from staff.

Directions:
Algonquin Provincial Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways
400 and 11 to Huntsville, and then east on Highway 60. Get a tabloid at the
gate when you purchase your permit (required if you are going use trails or
go to the Visitor Centre). The tabloid has a map for locating the sites
mentioned above. There are km markers along the highway, from km 0
at the West Gate to km 56 at the East Gate.

Feeders at the Algonquin Visitor Centre can be observed during weekdays
(8 a.m. to 4.30 p.m.) by entering the building through the staff entrance
and asking permission from staff in the adjacent Friends of Algonquin Park
office. The Visitor Centre exhibits, bookstore and restaurant will be open
to the public on winter weekends, and daily from December 28 to January 1,
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Access to the Barron Canyon Road in Algonquin Park is via the Sand Lake
Gate, which is reached as follows: turn south off the Highway 17 bypass
onto County Road 26, at a point 3.5 km west of the Forest Lea Road (about
9 km west of Pembroke); travel 300 metres, then turn right at the Barron
Canyon Road and drive 26 km to the Sand Lake Gate. There are km markers
along the Barron Canyon Road (e.g., Sand Lake Gate is at km 18). The
Barron Canyon Road is open to public access all the way to Lake Travers (at
km 70.5), and is normally kept plowed during the winter.

Ron Tozer
Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired)
Dwight, Ontario

---------------------------------------
*ONTBIRDS is presented by the Ontario Field Ornithologists - the provincial birding organization. For instructions to join or leave ONTBIRDS visit http://www.ofo.ca/ontbirdshow.htm ONTBIRDS Guidelines may be viewed at http://www.ofo.ca/ontbirdsguide.htm

 

 

Winter Finches, Bald Eagle - east of Henry marsh
Posted on December 8, 2005 at 02:40:15 PM by Barbara Taylor

The trail east of Henry marsh is still a great place to find some winter finches. Today at 12:30 p.m. we saw approx. 30 Pine Grosbeaks, many Pine Siskins, and 7 White-winged Crossbills. At one point they were all concentrated in the fir trees where the trail "dips down" about half way over to the pipeline. As we neared the pipeline a very large bird soared into view, a 1st year Bald Eagle! On our return trip we saw a Ruffed Grouse as it burst out of a tree right next to us - quite startling when you're not expecting it.
 There were eight Mallards on the Muskoka River near Henry Rd.

Directions: from traffic lights at Eccelstone Dr. and Wellington St., head west on Beaumont Dr. to Henry Rd., Bracebridge. When you walk to the "T" in the trail, turn left (east) for the winter finches. Even though we've had a lot of snow, the trail was easy walking.
   (note: there is a snowmobile trail to your left before you reach the "T")

 

Directions from Toronto:
Bracebridge is about 2 hrs. drive north of Toronto. Take Hwy. 400 north until past Barrie, then continue north on Hwy. 11. Take first exit to Bracebridge and follow Hwy. 118 West until you come to the first set of traffic lights. Turn left onto Beaumont Dr. and continue to Henry Rd. There is a small parking area at the end of Henry Rd. by the pile of woodchips at the trailhead. Walk to the "T" in the trail, and turn left (east) - the winter finches were within 15 minute walk from the car. (note: there is a snowmobile trail to your left before you reach the "T")

 

 

woodpeckers
Posted on December 7, 2005 at 09:08:31 PM by Challis-Carlyle

A little late in getting this note out, but on Sunday we watched a pileated, a downy and three hairy woodpeckers all working the standing dead trees by our property (Washago, Green River Drive, off Cooper's Falls Road). The hairy has been drumming frequently, or at least was until the temperature began to plunge over the last few days.
The last week of November, it was so mild that the peepers were calling. And now we're under a knee-deep blanket.

 

 

Re(4): Sharp-shinned Hawk - age?
Posted on December 9, 2005 at 09:35:30 PM by Barbara Taylor

Thanks Nick. I'll try to get a better look at those eyes if it returns. The birds are very wary now when coming in to the feeders, so it's probably still around.

 

 

Re(3): Sharp-shinned Hawk - age?
Posted on December 9, 2005 at 01:23:50 PM by Nick Bartok

Eleanor would be correct with the eye assessment, usually. The eye colour is not always 100% correct; just helpful. In this case, it was probably a second year bird, with a yellow eye...or....a first year bird (soon to be second year at Jan 1st) already molted out of its juvenile plumage into is basic!! If you get a really close look, the second year birds usually, have yellow eyes, that are starting to turn orange from the outside of the eye to the iris. Just a little something to keep us banders...Sharp :)

 

 

Re(2): Sharp-shinned Hawk - age?
Posted on December 8, 2005 at 09:06:26 AM by Barbara Taylor

Thanks Eleanor. That's what I had thought, but this bird is just "off the chart" I guess. No hint of orange/red yet but definite adult plumage.

 

 

Re(1): Sharp-shinned Hawk - age?
Posted on December 8, 2005 at 07:57:34 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

HI Barb,

From what the banders at Hawk Cliff have told me first year has yellow eyes, second year has orange eyes and third year has red eyes. I have pictures of all three stages taken in the fall.

 

 

Sharp-shinned Hawk - age?
Posted on December 7, 2005 at 08:16:53 PM by Barbara Taylor

Does anyone know at what age a Sharpie's eye colour changes from yellow to the adult's red colour? Today we had what I believe was a female Sharp-shinned Hawk visit our yard. (Only got a brief look so might have been a small male Cooper's Hawk.) The bird had a rusty barred breast and light gray back (adult plumage), but had yellow eyes like a juvenile.

Also today we had our first Pine Siskins visit the feeders. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(2): Bohemians in Bracebridge
Posted on December 10, 2005 at 12:00:59 PM by Doug Smith

There was a smaller flock back there this morning, so expect they will keep at it until all the fruit is gone.

 

 

Re(1): Bohemians in Bracebridge
Posted on December 7, 2005 at 06:43:44 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

I tried for some photographs of the Bohemians this morning. They arrived about 8:15 am and were gone again after about 15 minutes. I checked back a couple of times during the day and missed them if they returned.

 

 

Bohemians in Bracebridge
Posted on December 6, 2005 at 11:41:54 AM by Doug Smith

This morning there were approx. 20 Bohemian Waxwings feeding on the crabapple (?) tree in the park beside the movie theatre in downtown Bracebridge. The tree is right in front of the bandstand.

 

 

Re(2): Pine Grosbeaks
Posted on December 10, 2005 at 12:22:23 PM by Barbara Taylor for Don Bailey

This morning Don Bailey saw Pine Grosbeaks eating sand/grit on Glendale Rd. between Kevin Cres. and Daleman Dr., Bracebridge.

 

 

Re(3): and a Northern Goshawk, Pine Grosbeaks
Posted on December 7, 2005 at 01:31:01 PM by Al Johnston

Ted, I understand that they're back to be called Rock Pigeons now (just when I was getting used to calling them doves --- sheeesh!!! Al

 

 

Re(2): and a Northern Goshawk, Pine Grosbeaks
Posted on December 5, 2005 at 03:48:02 PM by Ted Gardner

Probably the same hawk that has taken a couple of Rock Doves "aka Pigeon and other less flattering names" in our yard a wee bit back. (120 meadow hieghts, meadow hieghts and Brian rd)

 

 

Re(1): and a Northern Goshawk, Pine Grosbeaks
Posted on December 5, 2005 at 03:06:58 PM by Barbara Taylor

Just before 3 p.m a Northern Goshawk flew over our yard heading north-west towards Meadow Heights Dr. (so maybe it's the one catching the doves). At the corner of Glendale Rd. and Kevin Cres. there were two Pine Grosbeaks eating grit on the road. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Juncos, Cardinals
Posted on December 5, 2005 at 02:08:16 PM by Barbara Taylor

Snowsqualls are good for something - they bring the birds to the feeders. We have six Dark-eyed Juncos today and our neighbourhood pair of Northern Cardinals have returned after a long absence. Other birds we've had today are lots of Black-capped Chickadees, Red-breasted Nuthatches, White-breasted Nuthatches, Blue Jays, Mourning Doves, Downy Woodpeckers, Hairy Woodpeckers, and a Brown Creeper. We had a predator in the area last week - Mourning Dove feathers were scattered about the yard on three separate mornings. Wonder if it's our "dove-hunting" Barred Owl from last winter? (Bracebridge)

 

 

White Throat
Posted on December 5, 2005 at 10:15:11 AM by Frank LeVay

Dec. 5th: 1 White Throat Sparrow on our ground-feeder. SW corner, Alexander & Catherine Streets, Gravenhurst.

 

 

More Bohemians
Posted on December 5, 2005 at 09:04:11 AM by Frank LeVay

About 9 a.m. on December 5th about 100 bohemian waxwings feeding on crab apples at NW corner of Catherine & Alexander Streets, Gravenhurst. Quite shy; departed when neighbour with snowblower appeared!

 

 

Re(1): Bald Eagle
Posted on December 11, 2005 at 08:59:51 PM by Kevin Mccrank

On thursday the Dec 8th I spotted a large bird soaring over head at the farm I take care of in Brackenrig Center (South East of Port Carling). I am 100% sure it was a mature or near mature bald eagle. Heading a southrly direction. Very nice to see.

 

 

Bald Eagle
Posted on December 4, 2005 at 06:57:17 PM by Mary Aldridge

Today,we seen a near mature looking Bald Eagle just south of Huntsville

 

 

East of Henry marsh - Pine Grosbeaks, Pine Siskins
Posted on December 3, 2005 at 12:19:12 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there were about 25 Pine Grosbeaks and at least 30 Pine Siskins along the Trans Canada Trail east of Henry marsh. As usual, they were on the section of trail between the east edge of the marsh and the place where the trail "dips down", about half way over to the pipeline. Four Common Redpolls flew over the trail near the pipeline. We thought we heard a Boreal Chickadee call once, but couldn't find it amongst all the Black-capped Chickadees and Red-breasted Nuthatch. This was just a short distance east of Henry marsh.

The trail is now clear of all water from the recent flooding, and is covered with only an inch or so of snow. We saw fisher tracks, rabbit tracks, and Ruffed Grouse tracks.


Directions: from traffic lights at Eccelstone Dr. and Wellington St., head west on Beaumont Dr. to Henry Rd., Bracebridge. There is a parking area at the end of Henry Rd. by the pile of woodchips at the trailhead. When you walk to the "T" in the trail, turn left (east). Birds were within 15 min. walk from the car. (Note there is a snowmobile trail to your left before you reach the "T".)

 

 

Winter finches in Algonquin Park
Posted on December 3, 2005 at 09:08:27 AM by Rick Stronks

There are small flocks of winter finches in Algonquin Park. Pine Grosbeaks seem to be the most numerous as I had 3 flocks on Hwy 60 this morning and there have been 10-15 seen regularly at the Visitor Centre feeder (km 43) the past couple of weeks.

I also had two flocks of Common Redpolls (one near Mew Lake Campground and one at the Visitor Centre driveway).

American Goldfinch and Purple Finch have also been seen at the Visitor Centre but not as regular as the Pine Grosbeaks.

For some of the northern birds (Gray Jay, Boreal Chickadee, Spruce Grouse) Opeongo Road and Spruce Bog Trail are good locations to check.

The Visitor Centre is open weekends from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at this time of the year.

Good birding...Rick

ps - the Visitor Centre feeder is also a great place to see an American Marten - two have been using the feeder almost daily the past couple of weeks!

 

 

Re(1): Redpolls now too...Bracebridge
Posted on December 7, 2005 at 12:44:02 PM by Mary Smith

We just sighted what appeared to be a Hoary Red Poll at our backyard feeder on Sadler Dr. in Bracebridge.

 

 

Redpolls now too...Bracebridge
Posted on December 2, 2005 at 02:03:28 PM by Al Sinclair

Today we had our first Common Redpolls of the season, 7 at the feeders. There is still a large flock of Siskins and a few Goldfinches but no Evening Grosbeaks for a couple of weeks.
We are located on Hwy 118E, 8km east of Bracebridge.

 

 

Pine Siskins...large flock at our feeder
Posted on December 1, 2005 at 04:34:24 PM by Al Sinclair

Seems to be a big movement of Pine Siskins into our area now. Today we had about 60 Pine Siskins at out feeders and only 2 Goldfinches. Last week the numbers were reversed. (8km east of Bracebridge on Hwy 118E)

 

 

Wild Turkeys
Posted on December 1, 2005 at 01:02:25 PM by Bob Burt

Just before noon today there were 23 Wild Turkeys behind Corbett Feeds on Barron Dr., Bracebridge. They were feeding on some cracked corn.

 

 

Re(1): Bird Board Update
Posted on December 3, 2005 at 07:05:36 AM by Ted Sykes

Had a robin at our feeder all last week? No sign, yet, of the cardinal pair that stayed all last winter and most of the summer.

 

 

Bird Board Update
Posted on December 1, 2005 at 12:45:13 PM by Barbara Taylor

Thanks to everyone for all your reports. All posts for October and November are now available in the Archived Reports.

Just a reminder to bookmark (save to your favourites list) the back-up webpage. All recently posted reports are copied and stored there. In the event of any major problems with the Bird Board hosting service, important notices will also be posted there.


New to the Bird Board?
The Muskoka Bird Board is a place to share reports of any bird sightings or other nature sightings in Muskoka and surrounding areas. You don't have to include an email address in your post. Please include a location for the sightings in your report - even the nearest town or major crossroads would be fine. See the Posting Guidelines for more information, including several tips on using the message board.

I try to monitor the Bird Board on a regular basis. If you want to bring something to my attention, just send me an email and I'll get back to you as soon as possible.

Barbara Taylor
muskoka_birder@hotmail.com

 

 

Re(2): request for info
Posted on December 5, 2005 at 11:16:53 AM by John Lobel

Thanks for the advice and directions.

Saturday was a beautiful day; it was a long day in the car but it was great fun and very enjoyable to be there.

I had Bohemian Waxwings, Pine Grosbeak, and 1 Boreal Chickadee at Henry Rd. in Bracebridge. I didn't have enough time in Algonquin Park to see many birds but it was great to look around there.

Thanks again for the help!

Kind regards,
John Lobel

 

 

Re(1): request for info
Posted on November 30, 2005 at 06:59:56 PM by Alex Mills

For the boreal species, you would probably have most luck in Algonquin Park (3 hours north of Toronto). For Bohemians, you might want to look for ornamental fruit trees in Muskoka towns like Gravenhurst, Bracebridge or Hunstville (2 hours north of Toronto). You may also wish to check the Simcoe Nature Board which covers the area 1 hour north of Toronto. You probably won't get boreal specialties there, but there are recent sightings of pine grosbeaks, bohemian waxwings, and great gray owls.

 

 

request for info
Posted on November 29, 2005 at 11:57:29 PM by John Lobel

I am a California birder working in the Toronto area for a few days and hope to have some time Saturday to go birding in your area. I'd like to get advice on best spots for Boreal Chickadee, White-winged Crossbill, Bohemian Waxwing, and any other northern specialities.
Thanks,
John Lobel
jlobel@prg.com
Sherman Oaks, CA, USA

 

 

Bohemian Waxwings
Posted on November 29, 2005 at 03:02:22 PM by dawn

There were approx. 100 Bohemian Waxwings on the Hunter's Bay Trail in Huntsville this afternoon.

 

 

Re(1): Henry marsh
Posted on November 30, 2005 at 04:43:40 PM by Barbara Taylor

We made a brief trip to Henry marsh earlier today - misty rain/sleet didn't make for ideal birding conditions. Four Common Goldeneyes circled over the now ice-free beaver pond, but didn't come in for a landing. We flushed a Merlin a short distance along the trail east of the marsh. We saw only two Pine Grosbeaks, but heard a few more calling from deeper in the woods. A large number of chickadees and nuthatch flew overhead very quickly, but they were relatively silent as they went past (perhaps not wanting to alert the Merlin). If there was a Boreal Chickadee in the group, we didn't hear or see it.

Note that due to heavy rains and snow melt there is some water across the trail at the "T" so go prepared...about 4-5 inches deep at one spot.

 

 

Boreal Chickadees east of Henry marsh
Posted on November 28, 2005 at 01:14:29 PM by Barbara Taylor

Around noon today we saw one Boreal Chickadee and heard a second one calling just a few trees away but couldn't see it. They were with a mixed flock of Red-breasted Nuthatch and Black-capped Chickadees where the Trans Canada Trail "dips down" about half way between the marsh and the pipeline. There is a recently fallen fir tree (still green) lying along the trail right where the birds were. We haven't heard or seen a Boreal Chickadee along the trail since our report of Nov. 4.  We also found 10 Pine Grosbeaks and a few Pine Siskins nearby.

 

Also made a stop at the Bracebridge Ponds. There was a muskrat standing on the ice near the south edge of cell 3. There were no gulls.


Directions: from traffic lights at Eccelstone Dr. and Wellington St., head west on Beaumont Dr. to Henry Rd., Bracebridge. When you walk to the "T" in the trail, turn left (east) for the Boreal Chickadees.
There was a muskrat standing on the ice near the south edge of cell 3 at the Bracebridge Ponds. There were no gulls at the Ponds.

 

 

Beaumaris birds
Posted on November 27, 2005 at 08:45:42 PM by mary willmott

Today at my feeder at Beaumaris I had 20 or so Evening Grosbeaks ,lots of Black-Capped chickadees , 1 Red- breasted Nuthatch, 3 or 4 White- breasted Nuthatches 30 to 40 Goldfinches,1 Grackle The usual Woodpeckers. In the Bay , there were 3 Buffleheads and 6 or 8 Common Goldeneyes

 

 

Possible Iceland Gull
Posted on November 27, 2005 at 07:42:53 PM by Bob Healey

We went for a walk at the BB Lagoons yesterday shortly after lunch. We flushed a large flock of mixed gull which included a possible adult Iceland Gull.

 

 

common grackle (AOU 511)
Posted on November 27, 2005 at 03:35:49 PM by Frank LeVay

1 Grackle has been at our feeders (ground level) since the fall migrations. It appears to have an injured wing. SW Corner of Catherine & Alexander Streets, Gravenhurst.

 

 

Re(2): Golden Eagle
Posted on November 27, 2005 at 06:57:19 PM by todd white

Barbara,it was early this morning at little madawaska lake.and quite likely an adult?

 

 

Re(1): Golden Eagle
Posted on November 27, 2005 at 03:38:13 PM by Barbara Taylor

Todd, where in Algonquin Park did you see the Golden Eagle? Was it an adult? I wonder if it might be the same one that Burke Korol reported seeing on Nov. 12.

 

 

(no subject)
Posted on November 27, 2005 at 02:46:11 PM by todd white

lots of pine grossbeaks in algonquin park,also a barred owl,and a golden eagle.

 

 

Fox Sparrow
Posted on November 27, 2005 at 02:07:31 PM by Ted Gardner

This morning peeking out the back door i noticed two birds in the Forsythia bush
one was a Junco which have been around since late summer, the other was a Fox Sparrow which i have not seen for a few weeks...seems a little late for him. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Pine Grosbeaks/Bohemian Waxwings
Posted on November 27, 2005 at 09:19:41 AM by Goodyear

This morning there was a flock of 13 Bohemian Waxwings feeding in our miniature crab tree, and a flock of approx. 15 Pine Grosbeaks has been frequenting our neighbourhood - seen late yesterday afternoon and this morning - 117 MeadowHeights Drive. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(2): Large number of Pine Grosbeaks
Posted on November 28, 2005 at 12:53:59 PM by Barbara Taylor

Around noon today we found a flock of 10 Pine Grosbeaks just west of where the trail "dips down". Some of the birds were feeding on the ground close to the trail so we had a great look at them - much better than getting "warbler neck" when they were feeding high in the firs.

No sight nor sound of any WW Crossbills, but did see eight Pine Siskins, and a Boreal Chickadee where the trail "dips down"...see my "Boreal" post above.

 

 

Re(1): Large number of Pine Grosbeaks
Posted on November 27, 2005 at 10:33:50 PM by Barbara Taylor

Bob Healey reports that they went out there this afternoon and found 8 White-winged Crossbills, but no Pine Grosbeaks.  They also saw a Merlin at the Henry marsh and a muskrat by the beaver dam. Thanks for the update Bob.

 

 

Large number of Pine Grosbeaks
Posted on November 26, 2005 at 03:31:34 PM by Barbara Taylor

This afternoon we found approx. forty Pine Grosbeaks along the Trans Canada Trail east of Henry marsh. They were calling frequently and flying around a bit, but eventually stopped to feed high in the fir trees where the trail "dips down". (about half way over to the pipeline)

Directions: from traffic lights at Eccelstone Dr. and Wellington St., head west on Beaumont Dr. to Henry Rd., Bracebridge. When you walk to the "T" in the trail, turn left (east) for the grosbeaks.

 

 

Bohemian Waxwings
Posted on November 26, 2005 at 03:13:43 PM by Dawn

I saw a flock of 23 Bohemian Waxwings eating berries on the Hunter's Bay trail in Huntsville this afternoon. Also, a robin still hanging around.

 

 

Re(1): Pine Siskins
Posted on November 27, 2005 at 08:34:09 AM by jim maguire&sylvia purdon

Pine Siskins at Sparrow Lake with the goldfinches

 

 

Re(1): Pine Siskins
Posted on November 26, 2005 at 08:42:18 AM by Nancy

We have had a flock of a dozen or so in Bent River.
Busy little birds both Pine Siskins and Goldfinches.

 

 

Pine Siskins
Posted on November 25, 2005 at 06:36:37 PM by Ted Gardner

A small flock of 15 to 20 showed up today.Blended with the Goldfinches there was about 40 birds fighting for 12 perches on my niger feeders....total mayhem!! (120 meadow hieghts)- Bracebridge.

 

 

Re(1): Eastern Cougar in Ontario...Sudbury biologist collecting data
Posted on November 27, 2005 at 02:20:21 PM by J. Gardner

This mystery of the Eastern Cougar was on the charts fifty years ago when I worked for the old Lands and Forests - and probably long before that.

 

 

Eastern Cougar in Ontario...Sudbury biologist collecting data
Posted on November 25, 2005 at 05:10:36 PM by Allan Sinclair

Heather Coupland alerted me to an article about a biologist, Dr Frank Mallory at Laurentian University, who is collecting data and doing DNA testing for cougar.

"A LAURENTIAN PROFESSOR could soon crack open an almost decade old mystery, that the endangered cougar is really roaming around northeastern Ontario. Wildlife biologist Dr. Frank Mallory is about to embark on final testing that could prove the big cats are in northeastern Ontario after disappearing more than 100 years ago."

The full article can be seen at the link below on page 12.

Warning: This is a PDF file of the whole newsletter and takes about 15 min plus to download on dialup internet.

Laurentian Alumni Magazine

 

 

Audrey Tourney article in Readers Digest
Posted on November 24, 2005 at 12:26:52 PM by Leslee Tassie

For those of you who may be interested, the December issue of Readers Digest has a wonderful article about Audrey Tourney of Aspen Wildlife Sanctuary in it.

 

 

BALD EAGLE
Posted on November 23, 2005 at 12:47:31 PM by DAVID ELDER

NOV.20th 2005 2:00 PM HY # 520 NEAR LAKE CECEBE . BALD EAGLE SITTING IN TREE BY THE LAKE , WITH CROWS ALL A ROUND

 

 

No Winter Gulls, Bracebridge
Posted on November 22, 2005 at 09:18:19 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Today, Dinny and Neil Nimmo and I took a look for winter gulls at the Bracebridge dump. We didn't find any of the hoped-for great black-backed or white-winged gulls. Lots of herring and ring-billed gulls. No ravens either. We did see one crow and a flock of approx. 50 starlings.

 

 

Re(2): Brown Creeper
Posted on November 23, 2005 at 10:22:42 AM by Virginia Pray

We had a Brown Creeper here in Port Carling on Tues. We usually have 1 or 2 every winter here.

 

 

Re(1): Brown Creeper
Posted on November 23, 2005 at 08:53:15 AM by Ted Gardner

We had a flock of 12 or more about 2 weeks ago. They were around for about 5 days, but not lately (120 Meadow hieghts) - Bracebridge.

 

 

Brown Creeper
Posted on November 22, 2005 at 03:26:42 PM by Barbara Taylor

There was a Brown Creeper at our suet feeder this morning. Still waiting for our first Evening Grosbeaks...

(Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Super Squirrel...photos
Posted on November 22, 2005 at 01:05:19 PM by Lorena

Hi Al, it has been sent to me numerous times in the past few months. He is one determined and acrobatic bear!!!!! Lorena

 

 

Super Squirrel...photos
Posted on November 21, 2005 at 09:45:37 PM by Al Sinclair

The photos below have been circulating on the internet under the subject line Super Squirrel. I don't know where they were taken. They were sent to me by Jon Grandfield.

http://www.muskoka.com/~sinclair/mammals/pic07164.jpg http://www.muskoka.com/~sinclair/mammals/pic05109.jpg

http://www.muskoka.com/~sinclair/mammals/pic07882.jpg

http://www.muskoka.com/~sinclair/mammals/pic17086.jpg

 

 

Re(2): tundra swans
Posted on November 25, 2005 at 09:11:32 PM by Dave Hawke

You are right in that swan ident is tricky at times. Tundra swans (or Whistling swans) have been noted on seasonal migrations for years. As these birds were all adult plumage, and so many of them, I beleive them to be tundra and not the re-introduced and scattered trumps. Ah, if only Mr. Audubon was here to shoot one down, then we'd know for sure.

 

 

Re(1): tundra swans
Posted on November 21, 2005 at 12:32:21 PM by Nick

i am always a sceptic when it comes to swans... sorry, just curious as to the certainty that they were not trumpeters, as trumpeters are more likely

 

 

tundra swans
Posted on November 20, 2005 at 12:09:10 PM by Dave Hawke

On Nov. 19 a flock of 14 tundra swans flew over Taboo Resort, Lake Muskoka. Heard a couple minutes before being seen. Awesome sight. Continued flying south over Gravenhurst.

 

 

Re(2): Warbler!
Posted on November 24, 2005 at 12:31:27 PM by Brenda Clark

Our little fox sparrow left with many of our juncoes on Nov.15.

 

 

Re(1): Warbler!
Posted on November 22, 2005 at 03:20:25 PM by Barbara Taylor

Amazing what can pop up. I'd guess the Blackburnian was injured in some way so it was unable to migrate earlier. Hope it made a beeline south right after you saw it. Even our last Fox Sparrow has moved on - last seen Nov. 15. Has your Fox moved on as well?

 

 

Warbler!
Posted on November 19, 2005 at 07:50:11 PM by Brenda Clark

I could not believe my eyes this morning. I was walking along Sedore Road between the pits near the dump when a small bird flitted across at road level and landed at the bottom branch of a small pine in the ditch. I thought I saw an orange tinge, so I tracked it down, and there was a Blackburnian warbler! There were also pine grosbeaks nearby.

 

 

Fisher and Pine Grosbeaks
Posted on November 19, 2005 at 01:15:22 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there was a Fisher walking along the ice at the edge of the beaver pond at Henry marsh. Four Pine Grosbeaks were feeding in the same area as a week ago, just a short distance along the Trans Canada Trail to the east of Henry marsh.

Directions: from traffic lights at Eccelstone Dr. and Wellington St., head west on Beaumont Dr. to Henry Rd., Bracebridge. When you walk to the "T" in the trail, turn left (east) for the grosbeaks or turn right (west) to the beaver pond.

 

 

Re(3): Winter Starlings
Posted on November 21, 2005 at 10:03:31 AM by Al Sinclair

In fall and early winter Starlings moult into what Sibley calls non-breeding plumage. It is browner and more spotted. I think many of Starlings we see here in the fall, at the Bracebridge dump and elsewhere, are actually migrants from farther north.

 

 

Re(2): Winter Starlings
Posted on November 20, 2005 at 08:14:31 PM by Al Johnston

Yep.

 

 

Re(1): Winter Starlings
Posted on November 20, 2005 at 07:21:30 PM by mary willmott

Is a winter starling a european starling?

 

 

Winter Starlings
Posted on November 16, 2005 at 10:02:04 AM by Virginia Pray

A flock of about 25 beautiful Winter Starlings landed briefly in our yard this am here in Port Carling.

 

 

Red-tailed Hawk
Posted on November 14, 2005 at 12:44:48 PM by Bob Burt

This morning there was a Red-tailed Hawk on a fence post along Falkenburg Rd. between Butter & Egg Rd. and Beatrice Townline Rd., near #1700.

 

 

Golden Eagle in Algonquin Park
Posted on November 13, 2005 at 07:24:11 PM by Burke Korol

On Saturday, 12 November, Amy Switzer and I saw a GOLDEN EAGLE on the Centennial Ridges Trail around 12:00 pm. It was flying low over the forest towards the west near Cloud Lake. It was a brief, side-on view, but long enough to see the gold nape. Subsequent checks from the magnificent vantage points along the trail (e.g., over Whitefish Lake) failed to relocate the bird.

We also had a PINE GROSBEAK fly over.

 

 

Re(1): Pine Grosbeaks and White-winged Crossbills
Posted on November 13, 2005 at 12:32:16 PM by Barbara Taylor

Thanks for the tip. At noon today we found 5 Pine Grosbeaks along the Trans Canada Trail just a short distance into the woods to the east of Henry Marsh. They were drinking from a small puddle on the trail.

Just a bit further east there were two White-winged Crossbills.


Directions: from traffic lights at Eccelstone Dr. and Wellington St., head west on Beaumont Dr. to Henry Rd., Bracebridge. When you walk to the "T" in the trail, turn left (east).

 

 

Pine Grosbeaks
Posted on November 12, 2005 at 05:29:33 PM by Goodyear

This afternoon we encountered a flock of 6 Pine Grosbeaks (5 females, 1 first year male? - this bird was more orange-red around the head and had some faint orange-red feathering on the upper breast) along the Trans Canada Trail at Henry Marsh.

 

 

Re(1): Snow Geese and Northern Shrike
Posted on November 13, 2005 at 10:47:03 PM by Ann Hansen

My husband and I saw the snow geese this morning, flying over the top of Lankin Ave. They were flying with some Canada Geese, and appeared to have left one of the ponds at Muskoka Highlands Golf Course, behind the houses at the top of our street.

 

 

Re(2): Snow Geese - now at the ponds
Posted on November 13, 2005 at 05:46:33 PM by Al Sinclair

Doug Smith saw the 3 Amigos over at cell 3 in the Bracebridge Ponds this afternoon. New species for the Ponds birding area. The Ponds can be accessed from Lagoon Lane or Kerr Park, south end of Bracebridge.

 

 

Re(1): Snow Geese - still there
Posted on November 13, 2005 at 12:33:11 PM by Barbara Taylor

The 3 Snow Geese were still at Annie Williams Park around noon today.

 

 

Snow Geese and Northern Shrike
Posted on November 12, 2005 at 03:56:26 PM by David Britton

This morning at 11:00 there were 3 white phase Snow Geese amongst the 200 or so Canada Geese on the lawn by the Muskoka River at Annie Williams Park in Bracebridge. Apparently these birds have been in this location since at least yesterday.

Also today I had my first Northern Shrike of the fall, in a treetop along Windermere Road near the intersection with Rostrevor Rd. just outside of the village of Windermere

 

 

Common Goldeneyes
Posted on November 12, 2005 at 01:13:54 PM by Barbara Taylor

Around noon today there were about 45 Common Goldeneyes and 50 Bufflehead at the foot of Stephens Bay on Lake Muskoka. (seen from driveway at #1160 Stephens Bay Rd., Bracebridge)

At the mouth of the Hoc Roc River near Taboo, there were about 15 Goldeneyes and a dozen Bufflehead...possibly more since they were diving a lot. (seen from Muskoka Beach Rd., Gravenhurst)

 

 

Re(2): Unusual Mallard Behaviour
Posted on November 17, 2005 at 09:02:26 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Brian, Thanks for that! I guess they eat minnows when they have the opportunity. At Kempenfelt Bay at Barrie millions of Emerald Shiners come in in the fall, therefore, thousands of gulls, loons, grebes and other fish eaters.

 

 

Re(1): Unusual Mallard Behaviour
Posted on November 17, 2005 at 05:08:58 AM by Brian Zwiebel

Hi Eleanor, A couple of years ago I photod Mallards eating Shad on the Detroit River in Windsor. Crazy Ducks!
Brian

 

 

Mallard eating fish - photo
Posted on November 13, 2005 at 01:28:04 PM by Barbara Taylor for Eleanor Kee Wellman

Here is a great photo Eleanor took yesterday of a Mallard eating some fish.

 

 

Unusual Mallard Behaviour
Posted on November 12, 2005 at 09:09:05 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Late yesterday afternoon I visited the Tiffin St. Boat ramp in Barrie to photograph Bonaparte's gulls. I watched a flock of mallards for about 1 1/2 hours.

They started at the shoreline, moved together out to a line where schools of shiners were swimming. They appeared to herd the shiners into a larger school them started deep diving. They came up with shiners in their beaks and proceeded to eat them. They then turned and flew and scooted quickly back to shore where they preened for awhile and then started out again.

The photographs I have don't show the shiners well and I am going back today to try again.

 

 

Re(1): Fox Sparrows
Posted on November 11, 2005 at 07:52:27 PM by Brenda Clark

Yes, we've had one lone one for a couple of weeks now, mixing with our juncoes. I did not see the juncoes today as we were doing a lot of disturbing yard work, but Fox came by. (just south of Gravenhurst)

 

 

Fox Sparrows
Posted on November 10, 2005 at 10:14:21 AM by Barbara Taylor

We have enjoyed watching a small flock of Fox Sparrows in our yard since October 15 when the first three arrived. There were 10 of them still here on Nov. 7th, then only 5 on Nov. 8, and only 1 yesterday. So the instinct to move south has finally won out over easy food at the feeders...except for the one bird which is still here this morning. (Bracebridge)  Does anyone else still have some Fox Sparrows?

 

 

Snow Geese & Snow Buntings
Posted on November 10, 2005 at 08:43:23 AM by Virginia Pray

On Tues Nov.7 the 3 Snow Geese were on the Kirrie Glen Golf course along with a huge flock of Ca. Geese. Wed Nov 8 we drove W. on Hwy 4 to Walkerton and a large flock of Snow Buntings flew up ahead of us on the road near Hanover. First we've see this year.

 

 

Re(1): Evening Grosbeak
Posted on November 14, 2005 at 10:38:48 AM by Debbie Adams

We haven't seen Grosbeaks in our neighbourhood for several years but on Saturday 12th we had 3 males and 3 females at our feeder at Walker's Bay on Walker's Point.

 

 

Re(1): Evening Grosbeak
Posted on November 10, 2005 at 09:09:35 AM by Al Sinclair

Here east of Bracebridge we had 14 Evening Grosbeaks checking out the feeder this morning but they didn't come in, likely because of a Red Squirrel on the feeder. Yesterday we had 40 Goldfinches and 1 Pine Siskin.

 

 

Re(1): Evening Grosbeak
Posted on November 10, 2005 at 08:38:52 AM by Virginia Pray

We have had a dozen Evening Grosbeaks at our feeders and the neighbours also for the past week. Bailey St Port Carling

 

 

Re(1): Evening Grosbeak
Posted on November 10, 2005 at 05:51:37 AM by Brian Shulist

Hi,
On the east side of Algonquin, in the Wilno/Barry's Bay area along Highway 60, I also have had a few pine siskins with my goldfinches and a flock of 22 evening grosbeaks. Whether they will stick around is the big question. Also, had a Northern Shrike show up last week. It looked rather comical as it chased my unusually low number of Blue Jays.

 

 

Re(3): Evening Grosbeak - photo
Posted on November 12, 2005 at 10:31:02 AM by challis-carlyle

Hadn't heard of 'greedies' before, but we refer to them as the goon squad. None at our feeders yet, but they do hang around downtown Washago.

 

 

Re(2): Evening Grosbeak - photo
Posted on November 9, 2005 at 10:34:03 AM by J. Gardner

After several years of no grosbeaks, we have a substantial number coming almost daily to our feeders in Hurdville, bottom end of Lake Manitowabing. Whoever coined the name "greedies" had it right.

 

 

Re(1): Evening Grosbeak - photo
Posted on November 9, 2005 at 08:58:15 AM by Barbara Taylor

Mary sent me this photo of some of the Evening Grosbeaks. Nice to see them since we haven't had any in our yard for a few years. Bob Bowles thinks there might be more around this winter. Apparently there were a few outbreaks of spruce budworm which the grosbeaks feed to their young...so more breeding success and better chance for us to see the birds. 

 

 

Evening Grosbeak
Posted on November 9, 2005 at 07:02:50 AM by mary willmott

3 male and 2 females Evening Grosbeaks at my feeder at Beaumaris Also several Pine Siskins in the flock of Goldfinches.

 

 

Departing Muskoka
Posted on November 8, 2005 at 10:44:50 PM by challis-carlyle

Gayle and I will no longer be offering news from Rocksborough Road in Bracebridge. We have moved to the village of Washago, to be a little closer to work. It's been a little too hectic to do much scouting for birds, but there is a small flock of evening grosbeaks that makes a tour of duty through the village through the day. We have an 8.5 acre property, about half of which is wetland, so we are eagerly looking forward to sightings ... when the boxes are unpacked. Hope someone else can keep tabs of our warblers, bobolinks, barred owls, and others on Rocksborough Road.

 

 

Re(1): Cardinals in Muskoka?
Posted on November 19, 2005 at 01:46:49 PM by Burke Korol

I saw a Northern Cardinal in Huntsville two winters ago on the CBC. They were also on territory in Huntsville in the summer of 2005 and were recorded for the Breeding Bird Atlas.

 

 

Re(4): Cardinals - range expansion
Posted on November 11, 2005 at 02:01:17 PM by Barbara Taylor

There is some interesting information about the range expansion of the Northern Cardinal on the Ontario Breeding Bird Atlas webpage at: http://www.birdsontario.org/atlas/atlasbook.jsp?pg=430

Map for the Northern Cardinal from the Ontario Breeding Bird Atlas (1981-1985): http://www.birdsontario.org/atlas/atlasbook.jsp?pg=431


Draft maps from the Ontario Breeding Bird Atlas 2001-2005 (select species name "Northern Cardinal"): http://www.birdsontario.org/atlas/map.jsp


Information about the status of the 2001-2005 Ontario Breeding Bird Atlas can be found at: http://www.birdsontario.org/atlas/atlasmain.html

 

 

Re(3): Cardinals in Muskoka?
Posted on November 11, 2005 at 12:41:47 PM by Lorena

I had no idea that Cardinals were this rare anywhere!! I'm sorry! I am on the south shore of Lake Simcoe(Willow Beach near Sutton) been here 12 years and have always had mating Cardinals. Their babies stick around with them for months and months. They then bring all their babies. No shortage of Cardinals here. On average there are 5 or 6 here at a time. I feed them Black oil sunflower seeds, mixed seed and Safflower, all in different feeders and areas of my property. Lorena

 

 

Re(2): Cardinals in Muskoka?
Posted on November 10, 2005 at 09:36:46 PM by bob burton for Joan Paget

Joan has a pair of Cardinals at her yard at 47 Aubery st. now and for several years (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(2): Cardinals in Muskoka?
Posted on November 10, 2005 at 02:17:29 PM by David Britton

There have been cardinals around my mother in law's house at the corner of Dill and Victoria streets in Bracebridge since at least 2002. I most often detect them by song during spring and summer, but have also seen singles and pairs on a couple of occasions.

Other Muskoka sightings I've had include one in Annie Williams Park in July 2003 and one at my parents farm outside of Windermere in November 2001.

 

 

Re(1): Cardinals in Muskoka?
Posted on November 7, 2005 at 08:48:38 PM by Al Sinclair

Dave and Pat Wright had a pair all summer on King Street in Bracebridge (near Woodchester Villa). There has been Cardinals in this neighbourhood for several years and they have been counted on The Christmas Bird Count a few times.

 

 

Re(1): Cardinals in Muskoka?
Posted on November 7, 2005 at 08:16:50 PM by Lori

There have been cardinals visiting our bird feeder from time to time this fall. We live on Ann Street in Bracebridge.

 

 

Re(1): Cardinals in Muskoka?
Posted on November 7, 2005 at 08:12:29 PM by Bruce

Although I am not in Muskoka, I had a female cardinal at my feeder this week here in Coldwater. It is the first one I have seen since last spring.

 

 

Re(1): Cardinals in Muskoka?
Posted on November 7, 2005 at 03:33:32 PM by Leslee Tassie

We had a pair over the summer. They seem to have left after raising their brood of 4. This was the famous male cardinal I was posting messages about this summer who was hitting his reflection on our windows 100-200 times a day, every day.
(Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Cardinals in Muskoka?
Posted on November 7, 2005 at 12:02:55 PM by Barbara Taylor for Debbie Adams

Debbie Adams reports "I saw a female Cardinal, all day, at our feeder Wednesday November 2nd. Our property is in Walker's Bay on Walker's Point. We haven't had one in our neighbourhood before this week."

 

 

Cardinals in Muskoka?
Posted on November 7, 2005 at 12:02:11 PM by Barbara Taylor

Are Northern Cardinals becoming more common in Muskoka? Let's find out. Please post a reply to this message if you've seen a Cardinal and include the approximate location or town where you saw the bird so we can get an idea of the distribution.

We have a pair of Cardinals in our neighbourhood by Glendale Rd./Kevin Cres. in Bracebridge and they visit our feeder on a regular basis. They had two broods this past summer so there should be five young Cardinals out there somewhere. Hope they pop up for the Christmas Bird Count in December!

 

 

Black-belliled Plover and Rough-legged Hawk at Magnetawan
Posted on November 6, 2005 at 07:12:16 PM by Alex Mills

On saturday at mid-morning, a calling Black-bellied Plover flew over Ahmic Lake near Magnetawan, heading south.

On sunday at noon hour, a light phase rough-legged hawk was hovering over a field east of Magnetawan.

Magnetawan is in central Parry Sound District.

 

 

brown thrasher
Posted on November 4, 2005 at 10:00:15 AM by marlene lannan

on Oct 25 &26 there was a brown thrasher in my yard for several hours,off & on.just outside of Kearney.

 

 

Re(1):Boreal Chickadee and Northern Saw-whet Owl
Posted on November 4, 2005 at 04:41:37 PM by Barbara Taylor

This afternoon we again found the Boreal Chickadee with a large flock of Black-capped Chickadees and Red-breasted Nuthatch along the Trans Canada Trail. Suddenly the birds became very agitated and very vocal. By watching where they were concentrating, we were able to zero in on a little Saw-whet Owl. The location was about half way between the Henry Rd. marsh and the pipeline right-of-way. The owl was in a fir tree near the spot where the trail dips down slightly, with several dead trees at the north side of the trail and an open area to the south.

 

 

Boreal Chickadee
Posted on November 3, 2005 at 03:12:49 PM by Barbara Taylor

This afternoon around 2:30 p.m. we first heard and then saw a Boreal Chickadee moving along with a large flock of Black-capped Chickadees and Red-breasted Nuthatch. The flock was at the intersection of the Trans Canada trail and the pipeline right-of-way just west of cell 4 at the Bracebridge Ponds.

 

P.S. - Our copy of the 2nd edition National Geographic Field Guide shows the wrong picture for Boreal Chickadee, but they got it right in the 3rd edition.  For anyone who only has the 2nd edition, I found some good photos at: http://www.jnphoto.net/borealchickadee.html

 

 

Re(1): Gray Catbird in Huntsville
Posted on November 4, 2005 at 01:21:51 PM by Ron Stager

I am also interested in late dates. It would be good to know a resource for fall migration times. Let me know if you come up with one.

We had a common snipe in our backyard (Merkley Rd east of Barkway) on Wednesday morning. Same questions went through my mind: what is the late date? will it stay for the Bird Count?

While I hope the snipe, for its sake, was just passing through, we have red-winged blackbirds, grackles, white-throated sparrows and a couple of fox sparrows that have been hanging around for the last week or two. Maybe they will stay for the bird count.

We also have a flock of 25 or so evening grosbeaks for the last week or two. They seem to have arrived earlier than usual.

Anybody seen butterflies the last few days? I saw several clouded and orange sulphurs in York Region yesterday.

See ya

 

 

Gray Catbird in Huntsville
Posted on November 3, 2005 at 10:36:22 AM by Burke Korol

This morning (3 November) around 9 a.m. I saw a Gray Catbird at the entrance to the health clinic/pharmacy on the Huntsville Hospital Grounds.
Is this a late date for Muskoka?
Is it too early to hope it hangs around for the Christmas Bird Count?

 

 

Barred Owl watching our feeder...photo
Posted on November 2, 2005 at 07:14:35 PM by Al Sinclair

A Barred Owl was watching our feeder this morning until about 9:30am. There was one sitting on the same branch in late March this year, maybe the same bird. I took this photo through my scope. 

 

 

Re(1): Winter Finches...Pine Grosbeak near Bracebridge
Posted on November 2, 2005 at 07:02:16 PM by Al Sinclair

We had a single Pine Grosbeak fly over the house here this afternoon. We are 8km east of Bracebridge on Hwy 118E

 

 

Winter Finches: East Side of Algonquin Park
Posted on November 1, 2005 at 11:53:42 AM by Ron Tozer (on ONTBIRDS)

*This report originated on ONTBIRDS (November 1, 2005) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.


Ontbirders:

Michael Runtz reported the following birds during three days
(October 29, 30 and 31) of birding along the Barron Canyon
Road (formerly called Sand Lake Road) on the East Side of
Algonquin Provincial Park:

-Bohemian Waxwing: at three locations, including a flock
of 28 at Grand Lake.

-Pine Grosbeak: one at the Hydro Line (km 50), October 29.

-Red Crossbill: many. Lots of a small-billed type that
were feeding on Tamarack cones, and some of the resident
type, with medium-sized bills, that were seen on White Pine.

-White-winged Crossbill: several, but lower numbers than
Red Crossbill.

-Common Redpolls: many on all days, feeding on Speckled
Alder seeds.

-Pine Siskin: several, but not high numbers.

These species have not been reported to date from the
Highway 60 Corridor of Algonquin Park, except for two
sightings of Pine Grosbeak.

Directions:
Access to the Barron Canyon Road in Algonquin Park is
via the Sand Lake Gate, which is reached as follows:
turn south off the Highway 17 bypass onto County Road
26, at a point 3.5 km west of the Forest Lea Road (about
9 km west of Pembroke); travel 300 metres, then turn right
at the Barron Canyon Road and drive 26 km to the Sand Lake
Gate. Grand Lake is accessible from the Achray Road, a left
turn off Barron Canyon Road at km 37.8. There are kilometre
markers along the Barron Canyon Road (e.g., Sand Lake Gate
is at km 18). The Barron Canyon Road is open to public access
all the way to Lake Travers (at km 70.5).

Ron Tozer
Dwight, Ontario
______________________________________________
*ONTBIRDS is presented by the Ontario Field Ornithologists - the provincial birding organization.
For instructions to join or leave ONTBIRDS visit http://www.ofo.ca/ontbirdshow.htm

 

 

Bird Board Update
Posted on November 1, 2005 at 09:31:58 AM by Barbara Taylor

Thanks to everyone for all your reports. All posts for October are now available in the Archived Reports.

Just a reminder to bookmark the back-up webpage. Important notices will be posted there in the event of any major problems with the Bird Board hosting service.

Need help posting photos? Find out how to post your digital photos and give it a test run on the Ontario Nature Photos board.

New to the Bird Board?
The Muskoka Bird Board is a place to share reports of any bird sightings or other nature sightings in Muskoka and surrounding areas. You don't have to include an email address in your post. See the Posting Guidelines for more information, including several tips on using the message board.

I try to monitor the Bird Board on a regular basis. If you want to bring something to my attention, just send me an email and I'll get back to you as soon as possible.

Barbara Taylor
muskoka_birder@hotmail.com

 

 

Re(2): Spotted Towhee in Algonquin Park
Posted on November 3, 2005 at 05:32:46 PM by Nick Bartok

I was about to age this bird for all;but was beat to the punch. adding to the age, first basic plumage, meaning the body plumage has molted from juvenile plumage (from nest) to basic plumage (the colours of warbles in spring are what we bird banders call alternate plumage). you can see in the picture that the outer flight feathers are brown (still juvenile) the tertials (inner secondaries) have been replaced, hense the darker black contrasting. Also, the eye colour, light brown is definate hatch year bird, adults are red/scarlet. This is also a male, by the black head colour.

 

 

Re(1): Spotted Towhee in Algonquin Park
Posted on November 2, 2005 at 07:39:19 AM by Ron Tozer

This Spotted Towhee is a new species for the Algonquin Park list. Congratulations, Ted! After viewing the photos, Ron Pittaway advises that the bird's brownish wings and buffy white markings on the scapulars and tertials indicate first basic plumage. In the unlikely event that there are any subsequent sightings of this bird, I will post the information here. The area will be checked today (November 2).

 

 

Re(1): Spotted Towhee in Algonquin...photo
Posted on November 2, 2005 at 07:52:51 AM by Al Sinclair for Ted Smith

Spotted Towhee photo taken in Algonquin Park on Oct 30, 2005.

 

 

Spotted Towhee in Algonquin Park
Posted on October 31, 2005 at 11:04:45 PM by Theodore Smith

Hello folks,
On the evening of Sunday, October 30th I had the fortune of hearing, then seeing a lone male spotted towhee in Algonquin Park. I could hear it scratching at the leaf litter. Upon investigating I noticed the bird pulling back the leaves searching for supper. It appeared that its beak was a tad blunted. It was quite late in the evening, however I was able to manage a few adequate photos at high ISO that clearly identify the bird. Unfortunately I'm not certain how to post the image on the bird board. The bird was spotted north of Hwy 60 in the area of the Sanitary Station at approximately the 37 km mark.

Take care,
Ted

 

 

Birds On Lake Simcoe
Posted on October 31, 2005 at 08:44:36 AM by Bob Bowles

 

Jaeger flying through flock of Bonaparte's and Little Gulls at Barrie is probably a Parasitic but may be a Pomerine Jaeger.  Jaeger photo

It is a little early for the large rafts of northern ducks on Lake Simcoe that we get every December but a great time to view large numbers of Common Loons, Red-necked Grebes, Horned Grebes and gulls. I am leading a trip for the Muskoka Field Naturalists this Saturday, November 5th so this will give you an idea what is expected with what I saw yesterday. There were two adult Franklin's Gulls in a small flock of Bonaparte's Gulls, 15 Great Black-backed Gulls and several loons and grebes in Orillia. More loons, grebes, and gulls on the way to Barrie but then in Kempenfelt Bay schools of minnows jumping from the surface being fed on by Yellow Perch and Small-mouthed Bass. Several fishing boats in the harbour catching lots of fish and large flocks of Bonaparte's Gull feeding on the minnows. In the flock were 5 Little Gulls while Great Black-backed, Iceland, Herring, and Ring-billed Gulls floated on the bay. Then a jaeger made a quick pass through the gulls far from shore then landed for a few minutes on the water. It then circled over Spirit Park and made its way down the bay out of sight. I think it was a Parasitic from the brief view that I had but may be a Pomarine. I was able to get a quick, distance photo. I did not see the immature Franklin's Gull that was reported the day before at this location. There were also a few ducks and geese on the bay but the jaeger was the bird of the day.
Little Gull and immature Bonaparte's Gull photo

 

 

Re(1): Pied raven
Posted on November 10, 2005 at 02:19:19 PM by David Britton

Last year I saw a Common Raven in the parking lot of the Pentacostal Church on Wellington St. that had distinct patch of white feathers on the back of its head. Interestingly this location is less than a kilometre from the Canadian Tire.

 

 

Re(1): Pied raven
Posted on October 30, 2005 at 10:48:21 AM by Alex Mills

Several times about two years ago, I saw a raven at Magnetawan with a white primary. I don't remember which wing it was, but it certainly made it a distinctive individual. I only ever saw it flying, so I never saw its head well enough to see white there. It did not have a matching white primary on the other side. That's about 70 kilometers north of Bracebridge.

 

 

Pied raven
Posted on October 29, 2005 at 12:30:25 PM by Doug Smith

There is a raven at the Canadian Tire parking lot in Bracebridge that has one white primary on its left wing, (and maybe a matching white primary on the right wing) and some white on its head. I have seen it on 2 different occasions.

 

 

Speaker on Healthy Watersheds - Nov. 7
Posted on October 29, 2005 at 12:26:33 PM by Barbara Taylor

Bob Bowles has asked me to post the following notice...contact Bob for more info.

HEALTHY LAKES THROUGH HEALTHY HEADWATERS AND WETLANDS
TWIN LAKES CONSERVATION CLUB is continuing their Environmental Education Awareness Speaker Series

On Monday, November 7, 2005 at 7:00 p.m.
At the Orillia Campus of Georgian College, Room 1206
Jack Imhof, National Biologist, Trout Unlimited Canada will be Guest Speaker

Professor Imhof Adjunct Professor of School of Environmental Design and Rural Planning University of Guelph and Department of Biology University of Waterloo is considered the leading expert on aquatic ecosystem rehabilitation, fish habitat management, and watershed development management.

Professor Imhof will be speaking on WATERSHEDS AND COLDWATER STREAMS – THE THREATS AND THE SOLUTIONS

Twin Lakes Conservation would like to invite the public to attend this free lecture series and to learn more about the club and the wonderful value we have in our local lakes mainly Lake Simcoe and Lake Couchiching.

For more information about the club or this environmental educational lecture series please contact club director Bob Bowles at 705-325-3149.

 

 

Fox Sparrows...Snow Buntings at Gravenhurst
Posted on October 28, 2005 at 05:44:16 PM by Al Sinclair

This morning while waiting for some new tires to be installed I checked out Pratt's Pit and found 5 Fox Sparrows, many Tree Sparrows, and about 50 Snow Buntings.
Pratt's pit is an abandoned gravel pit on Industrial Drive off Bethune Drive north of Gravenhurst. About half of the pit is full of weeds making it a good feeding area for migrants.

 

 

Re(1): Northern Goshawk
Posted on October 29, 2005 at 03:03:47 PM by Al Johnston

Ted, Last February an immature goshawk was feeding on a mallard it had killed just outside our living room window. When I went to dispose of the carcass of the unfortunate fowl, which had been feeding on spillage from the finch feeders, I noticed it had a band on one leg. I phoned the number of the U.S. Geological Survey and they mailed me a Certificate of Appreciation indicating that the mallard was banded just outside Winnipeg in Aug. 2000. It travelled quite a distance to meet it's destiny. I framed the certificate with a pic of the hawk I took just before it flew away. Al

 

 

Northern Goshawk
Posted on October 28, 2005 at 04:19:26 PM by Ted Gardner

Had a Northern Goshawk pay 2 visits to our yard yesterday, once first thing in the morning and again in the afternoon.
On Both occasions he was a flash and 2 puffs of feathers as 2 of the local pigeon air force disappeared. They do serve a purpose besides eating expensive wild bird seed.
(120 Meadow Hieghts BB)

 

 

Northern Shrike
Posted on October 27, 2005 at 12:53:55 PM by Barbara Taylor

A Northern Shrike tried to catch a Blue Jay for lunch at Kerr Park today. It missed and then perched for a while in the tall dead tree on the hill near the viewing stand. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Bluebirds
Posted on October 26, 2005 at 12:44:04 PM by Bob Burt

Shortly before noon today there were four Bluebirds along Beaumont Dr. where the road turns through the large fields by Beaumont Farm Rd., Bracebridge.

 

 

Evening Grosbeaks, Bala
Posted on October 25, 2005 at 03:52:31 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Evening grosbeaks at my feeder again. Not the same group though. Two adult males, one adult female and one juvenile.

Other than juncos and usual feeder bird there are a couple of purple finches, one goldfinch and one tree sparrow.

 

 

Re(1): Cougar !!!
Posted on October 30, 2005 at 01:25:05 PM by todd white

This past month an article in the orillia packet and times news paper,reported that they had re introduced the cougar to there area? someone in the orillia area has reported to me sightings as well!im an unsure if the this is true? or not

 

 

Re(1): Cougar !!!
Posted on October 27, 2005 at 11:35:34 AM by Gayle Carlyle

Michelle;
Where on the Fraserburg road are you? We live on Rocksborough Rd., about 4 km in from the highway.
We will keep our eyes and ears open and watch our two dogs more closely.
I hope the poor cougar is all right. Sounds like it was a "pet" that either escaped or was released after its owners bored of it.

 

 

Re(2): Cougar !!!
Posted on October 26, 2005 at 06:13:22 AM by Kenn Pray

On Thursday Oct 20 I was towing a boat & trailer on Faulkengurg Rd. a few km in from Brackenburg Rd where there is a waterfall on the E side of the road. and saw a very dark animal standing in some water close to the road. As we were going quite fast we couldn't get stopped to back up. But it appeared to be the same animal you are speaking about. It was wet and sleek, not at all like a bear, wolf or dog. I questioned my sighting and am glad to hear someone else saw a similar animal.

 

 

Re(1): Cougar !!!
Posted on October 25, 2005 at 03:15:03 PM by Al Johnston

Very exciting sighting, Michelle. There was an informative thread on the Simcoe Nature Board (http://www.b2g4.com/boards/board.cgi?user=SimcoeNatureBoard) from Oct.14th through 21st. under the heading "more on Cougars" I wish you'd got a picture.
Al

 

 

Cougar !!!
Posted on October 25, 2005 at 01:26:43 PM by Michelle Jessen

On friday Oct21 at 7.30 pm our neighbour spotted a "huge cat"~4 feet with a long tail of~2-3 feet crossing Fraserburg Road just of our property line. He suspected it being a cougar.
At 12.30am that night a comotion prompted me to check our lower deck to find a large fully grown cougar on our deck. The animal, seen in dim lamp light from the above living room lamp was tawny, uniformly coloured, no spots or speckels like Lynx or Bobcat,about 3 feet long,with a tail an additional 2.5 feet. and darker on its tip .It was however quite thin, almost emaciated.
Unfortunately when I ran to wake my husband and get a camera it jumped of the deck into the bushes. We have not seen it since, but found out that such a large cat had been seen around Baysville the week before.

 

 

Re(1): Brant at Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on October 24, 2005 at 10:38:44 AM by Alex Mills

In my experience, Brant show up in the fall in a many-or-none manner, at least in Simcoe County just south of Muskoka. I am sure there are exceptions to this, but commonly, if one or a few are seen, others will also be found. In other years, they are absolutely absent. So, watch for others!

 

 

Re(2): Brant at Bracebridge Ponds...photo
Posted on October 23, 2005 at 10:39:32 PM by Al Sinclair

Wilf Yusek sent this photo of the Brant seen today.

 

 

Re(1): Brant at Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on October 23, 2005 at 02:48:01 PM by Barbara Taylor

Thanks Wilf and Al for the Brant alert. It was still there as of 2 p.m. feeding right at the shoreline about mid-way along the north side of cell 3. Also in cell 3, a female Northern Shoveler, a female Goldeneye keeping company with a group of Buffleheads, an American Coot, Ring-necked Duck, Green-winged Teal, American Black Ducks, and Mallards. Scaup in cell 2. At least a dozen Snow Buntings were feeding at the edges of the small dumping ponds.  Bracebridge Ponds - map

 

 

Brant at Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on October 23, 2005 at 12:21:53 PM by Al Sinclair for Wilf Yusek

Wilf just called at 12:20 pm today to report a Brant in Cell 3 at the Bracebridge Ponds. The ponds are south of town and can be accessed off Muskoka 4 from Lagoon Lane or from Kerr Park off Beaumont Drive.

 

 

Cardinals
Posted on October 22, 2005 at 06:07:24 PM by Goodyear

We had a family of four Cardinals (adult pair, 2 young males) visit our feeders this afternoon about 5:30 p.m.
(Bracebridge)

 

 

Northern Shovelers - Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on October 20, 2005 at 11:32:33 AM by Barbara Taylor

Four Northern Shovelers in cell 3 at the Bracebridge Ponds at 11 a.m. this morning. Two males and a female swimming together and another female off by herself.
Bracebridge Ponds - map`

 

 

Evening Grosbeaks, Bala
Posted on October 20, 2005 at 08:28:21 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

I have 3, only, evening grosbeaks at my feeder at Bala. One adult male and two juveniles.

 

 

Re(1): The 3 Snow Geese...
Posted on October 20, 2005 at 04:40:19 PM by Barbara Taylor

This afternoon there were three adult Snow Geese near the mouth of the Muskoka River. They were standing on a bit of high ground amidst the reeds by Caisses Island on the Alport Bay side. Also many Canada Geese, Mallards, and Wood Ducks.

 

 

The 3 Snow Geese...todays location...South Monk Dr
Posted on October 19, 2005 at 11:07:49 AM by Al Sinclair

Wilf Yusek reports that the 3 Snow Geese were on the Muskoka Highlands Driving range on South Monk Drive at 10:30 this morning. Just west of Bracebridge off Hwy 118w.

 

 

Fox Sparrows
Posted on October 18, 2005 at 07:21:10 PM by Goodyear

We also had an influx of Fox Sparrows in our yard today. We counted six feeding on mixed seed we have spread on the ground.  (Bracebridge)

 

 

Turkey Tail fungi
Posted on October 18, 2005 at 11:49:59 AM by Barbara Taylor

We found these pretty fungi yesterday on the remains of an old tree stump on Browning Island. It appears to be Turkey Tail (Trametes versicolor). photo1  photo2  photo3

 

 

Sparrows and Juncos
Posted on October 18, 2005 at 11:21:11 AM by Barbara Taylor

Just as I thought the fall migration was winding down, we had a new influx of birds into our yard this morning. Five Fox Sparrows, two White-throated Sparrows, and at least thirty Dark-eyed Juncos. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Lagoons/Henry Marsh
Posted on October 17, 2005 at 04:09:56 PM by Goodyear

Numbers of ducks down from last week, but a good variety: Wood Duck, American Wigeon, Black Duck, Mallard, 1 female Shoveler, Green-winged Teal, Ring-necked Duck, Lesser Scaup??, Bufflehead, Common Goldeneye, and the lone Ruddy Duck.
A single Greater Yellowlegs called as it flew over cell 4. Two Coots still present. Two Hooded Mergansers, a lingering Great Blue Heron, and a Northern Shrike at Henry Marsh.     (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Snow Geese
Posted on October 17, 2005 at 10:40:25 AM by Virginia Pray

We saw them in a field on Hwy 118 last Fri on the S side of the road just around the big bend, where the long laneways are, coming N from Bracebridge, also with a huge flock of Can Geese.

 

 

Re(1): Snow Geese...still there today
Posted on October 17, 2005 at 04:32:23 PM by Al Sinclair

We saw the snow geese today on the Bangor Lodge Golf Course at about 3pm, barely visible from the road, at the back of the course. We drove into the lodge past the club house and up the hill where we had a good view through a scope. Also had a female merlin sitting in plain view in one of the small white pines out on the course.

 

 

Snow Geese
Posted on October 17, 2005 at 08:52:53 AM by Goodyear

Late yesterday afternoon at 5:30 we saw 3 Snow Geese with a flock of 100+ Canada Geese on the Bangor Lodge Golf Course. They were visible from Golden Beach Road.

 

 

Ivory-billed Woodpecker story on TV tonight Oct 16
Posted on October 16, 2005 at 10:05:00 AM by Al Sinclair

For those who have cable or satellite TV, the television program "60 Minutes" is doing a story on the rediscovery of the Ivory-billed Woodpecker tonight. The following message was sent out by the American Birding Association.

Search for ivory-billed woodpecker featured Sunday on'60 Minutes'

ITHACA, N.Y. - Last spring's news of the rediscovery of the ivory-billed woodpecker - unseen for six decades - stunned birders,scientists, conservationists and everyday people around the world. Now the news of the rediscovery effort, led by the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology, will be featured on CBS News' "60 Minutes" this Sunday, Oct. 16, at 7 p.m. EDT.

The segment was videotaped on location in the Arkansas bayou (where the ivory-bill has been sighted) and in the Acoustic Analysis Lab at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in Ithaca. The Cornell Lab of Ornithology, the leading scientific and research organization in the search for the ivory-billed woodpecker, has partnered with The Nature Conservancy, the nation's leading land-conservation group, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in the Big Woods Conservation Partnership to conserve the habitat for this magnificent bird and other wildlife in the region.

 

 

Re(1): Forecast Update - Red-breasted Nuthatch
Posted on October 18, 2005 at 02:31:50 PM by Barbara Taylor

An update to the forecast can be read at:
http://mailman.hwcn.org/pipermail/ontbirds/Week-of-Mon-20051017/011200.html

 

 

Winter Finch Forecast
Posted on October 16, 2005 at 09:52:33 AM by Barbara Taylor

Ron Pittaway has posted a winter finch forecast on ONTBIRDS - you can read the report at: http://mailman.hwcn.org/pipermail/ontbirds/Week-of-Mon-20051010/011182.html

There is a discussion of 9 species of "winter finches" as well as Blue Jays, Red-breasted Nuthatch, and Bohemian Waxwings.

-------------------------------------
ONTBIRDS is presented by the Ontario Field Ornithologists - the provincial
birding organization. For instructions to join or leave ONTBIRDS visit
http://www.ofo.ca/ontbirdshow.htm

 

 

Ruffed Grouse
Posted on October 15, 2005 at 01:31:26 PM by Dan Burton

An unusual sighting today was a Ruffed Grouse that wandered into my yard, which is in a residential neighbourhood. It ate a few Mountain Ash berries off the ground. (Gravenhurst)

 

 

Re(7): Hummingbird - migration tidbits
Posted on October 16, 2005 at 02:12:14 PM by Barbara Taylor

There is an interesting article showing historic daily counts of hummingbirds at Holiday Beach (Ontario) during fall migration - http://www.amazilia.net/MIHummerNet/22years.htm


Data on spring first arrival dates in Algonquin Park has shown that some migrant species are returning earlier with the recent trend to milder spring weather. Perhaps the milder fall weather in recent years has also delayed the departure of some migrants such as the Yellow-bellied Sapsucker. This could explain why some hummingbirds (probably juveniles) stay late into the fall if they are able to continue drinking the tree sap provided by sapsucker holes and temperatures stay "relatively" mild. I have no scientific evidence of this...but makes for an interesting theory. : )

Here's a good article about Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers and how they mine the sap from trees all summer long: http://nationalzoo.si.edu/ConservationAndScience/MigratoryBirds/Featured_Birds/default.cfm?bird=Yellow-bellied Sapsucker



Here's a reprint of a Bird Board post which describes the relationship between sapsuckers and hummingbirds:
Re(1): hummingbird - arrival dates
Posted on April 15, 2005 at 01:39:06 PM by Barbara Taylor
I asked Rick Stronks if he could provide some information about arrival dates for Ruby-throated Hummingbirds in Alqonquin Park. (Thanks Rick.) Here is his reply:

Hi Barbara,
The average spring arrival date for Ruby-throated Hummingbird in
Algonquin is May 12, while the earliest record is May 3. As you know,
the return of hummers is closely tied to the activity of Yellow-bellied
Sapsuckers. For the first month or two, Ruby-throated Hummingbirds rely
on the tree sap from the holes left by sapsuckers. Their average return
date is April 14 and this year we have only had one confirmed.

So, although it is always possible to get a very early date, it seems
unlikely. While other birds do make early forays to check out the
habitat (i.e., loons looking for open water), hummingbirds do not have
the fat reserves to be able to afford such investigative journeys.

Hope this helps,
Rick

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Rick Stronks
Chief Park Naturalist
Algonquin Visitor Centre

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

 

Re(7): Hummingbird & Junco
Posted on October 16, 2005 at 08:16:35 AM by T.

Thanks Alex
i have seen situations where there is nothing left in the way of natural food sources and Hummers still coming to a feeder very late into the fall. One hard frost and he is not going south.
"experts from florida? or not!"

 

 

Re(6): Hummingbird & Junco
Posted on October 15, 2005 at 09:46:02 PM by Alex Mills

The migration timetables of most migratory birds are influenced by day length; that influences hormonal levels that help regulate migration timing instincts. However, that timing is modified by many things including reproductive success the previous summer, health, state of moult, weather, and food. It is plausible that hummingbird feeders delay departure in the order of a few days. That may help by providing them with fuel, or it may hinder by keeping them beyond a safe period. Migration timetables are instinctive, but they have changed in historical periods due to feeders and other food (e.g. American Goldfinches and Common Crows) and more recently due to climate change.

 

 

Re(5): Hummingbird & Junco
Posted on October 15, 2005 at 11:30:15 AM by Brian Zwiebel

A recent article in Birder's World adressed this issue. Hummingbird migration is triggered by day length and is not determined by food availability.
Good Birding!
BZ

 

 

Re(4): Hummingbird & Junco
Posted on October 15, 2005 at 10:15:52 AM by Virginia Pray

The feeder was empty so the bird did not hang around.We attended a Naturalists meeting in Destin Fl. last spring. The Speaker Fred Bassett who works with Bob Sargent banding hummers all over the U. S. was asked that question. He says leave those feeders up as long as possible, even in our part of the world. The birds need all the food they can get and will leave on their own instinct. So who is the expert here.

 

 

Re(3): Hummingbird & Junco
Posted on October 15, 2005 at 08:11:08 AM by T

Here! Here! take down those feeders and send the wee one south for the winter!

 

 

Re(2): Hummingbird & Junco
Posted on October 14, 2005 at 09:42:47 AM by J. Gardner

Leaving your feeder out this late in the year encourages not-too-bright hummers to stay too late at the party too. I take my feeders in by mid-September to encourage the birds on their way.

 

 

Re(1): Hummingbird & Junco
Posted on October 13, 2005 at 11:02:03 PM by Al Sinclair

Hummingbirds seen late in the fall are sometimes unusual or rare species that have migrated in the wrong direction, like Rufous, Broad-tailed etc. If it stays around they should check to make sure which species it is.

 

 

Hummingbird & Junco
Posted on October 13, 2005 at 05:08:20 PM by Virginia Pray

On October 6, a Hummingbird was spotted at a feeder of a friend on Falkenburg Rd near Port Carling. Not sure if M or F. We have had a number of Juncos here in Port Carling since Tuesday Oct 11. Also White Throated and Song Sparrows.

 

 

Fox Sparrow
Posted on October 13, 2005 at 09:26:25 AM by Goodyear

Our feeders here on Meadow Heights have been invaded by a flock of 60+ sparrows the last couple of mornings. The mixed flock includes 1 Fox Sparrow,1 Chipping Sparrow, 1 Song, White-throated, White-crowned, and Juncos.  (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Ruddy Duck, Bracebridge Lagoons
Posted on October 15, 2005 at 12:00:21 PM by Barbara Taylor

We couldn't find the Ruddy Duck this morning, but still a good variety of ducks. In cell 2 there were a few Ring-necked Ducks and Scaup. In cell 3 there were American Wigeon, Ring-necked Duck, American Coot, Green-winged Teal, Blue-winged Teal, Wood Ducks, American Black Duck, and Mallards.

Lots of sparrows and juncos in the weedy patches along the roadways. A few Tree Sparrows along with many Song Sparrows and White-crowned Sparrows.

 

 

Ruddy Duck, Bracebridge Lagoons
Posted on October 12, 2005 at 04:13:18 PM by Wilf Yusek

This afternoon at approx. 3.15 there was a winter plumage male Ruddy Duck in cell 3 in the middle near the west end in the green mossy stuff.

 

 

Beaumaris Birds
Posted on October 9, 2005 at 06:35:10 PM by mary willmott

Over the week, many white crowned sparrows and song sparrows Red Tailed Hawk about one week ago on the Butter and Egg RD. Today several American Pipets on the Beaumaris Golf Course.

 

 

Re(3): Fall fungi on Browning Island - photos
Posted on October 25, 2005 at 08:54:11 AM by nancy ironside

Not a Northern Toothed -what it really is is harder to say , there are so many something like that.

 

 

Re(2): Fall fungi on Browning Island - photos
Posted on October 13, 2005 at 11:10:30 AM by Barbara Taylor

Thanks for the suggestion Nancy. There were no spines that I could see, but I think the high up fungi has already dried out. Here are some cropped close-ups of the fresh fungi on the fallen part of the beech. The bottom one shows "folds" sort of like a sponge, but no spines.  photo1  photo2  photo3

 

 

Re(1): Fall fungi on Browning Island - photos
Posted on October 7, 2005 at 09:49:46 AM by Nancy Ironside

Photos are notoriously difficult, of course. The high fungus could be a Climacadon septentrionale,(Northern Tooth) usually white, but maybe this is older, and dry. You would have to use your binoculars to see if it had spines, to be sure.

 

 

Fall fungi on Browning Island - photos
Posted on October 6, 2005 at 12:51:02 PM by Barbara Taylor

This small mushroom was growing all by itself. From the top there was only a hint of purple at the edges, but what a surprise when I turned it over. Looks like a Blewit (Lepista nuda). photo

 

The top of a dead beech tree snapped off recently and has some very interesting fungi. I'm still trying to figure out what it might be. The standing dead tree is covered in light brown fungi, but it's so high up I had to use digital zoom to get a shot. photo 1   photo 2   photo 3

 

 

Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers, Bala
Posted on October 5, 2005 at 05:12:29 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Last year at the end of September I had a male and female sapsucker coming into my peanut feeder. This year I started seeing a juvenile male in the trees around my house. Today I saw him on the peanut feeder. This must be much more common that I thought to have two sets of juveniles coming in. I have yet to see any adults around.

 

 

Algonquin-Oct. 3/4
Posted on October 5, 2005 at 09:33:33 AM by Dave Milsom [on ONTBIRDS]

*This report originated on ONTBIRDS (October 4, 2005) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.


A productive one and a half days at Algonquin: Oct. 3rd 2 Boreal Chickadees near Wolf Howl Pond off Arrowhon Rd. 2 Ruffed Grouse on Opeongo Road. A Peregrine and a Merlin near Arrowhon Rd. Today 7 Spruce Grouse at the Spruce Bog, Black-backed Woodpecker (male) at km. post 53; 2 Pileated Woodpeckers at the Visitor Centre. 2 Pine Grosbeaks flew across the old airfield at Mew Lake.

Also, several Ravens, 15 Gray Jays, many White -crowned, + White-throated, Swamp and Song sparrows, Juncos, a Turkey Vulture, Kestrel, 4 flocks of Pipits, Palm & Yellow-rumped warblers, Great Blue Herons, Wood Ducks, Black Ducks, Mallards, 8 Common Loons, Brown Creeper, Winter Wren, Hermit Thrush, flocks of Golden-crowned Kinglets, Common Grackles, Mourning Dove, Canada Goose, 2 Flickers, Hairy woodpeckers, etc.

Mammals included a Black Bear seen from the Visitor Centre, 6 Moose, 4 Beavers, and a Wolf. Butterflies, dragonflies, frogs and Garter snakes made it difficult to appreciate the gorgeous Fall colours !

Dave Milsom

_______________________________________________
*ONTBIRDS is presented by the Ontario Field Ornithologists - the provincial birding organization. For instructions to join or leave ONTBIRDS visit http://www.ofo.ca/ontbirdshow.htm

 

 

Muskoka Field Naturalists - next meeting October 6
Posted on October 3, 2005 at 01:13:47 PM by Barbara Taylor

 

OCTOBER 6 THURSDAY MEETING 7:30 PM
Claire Mitchell, of Ducks Unlimited Canada, will have a presentation about wetlands and their many functions for waterfowl, wildlife and people. Claire will also talk about opportunities for private landowners to be involved in wetland conservation. Meeting to be held at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, 705 Cedar Lane, Bracebridge (south-east corner of Cedar Lane and Taylor Rd.). Visitors welcome to attend the meeting.
Membership Information & Program Updates: MFN website

 

 

PLEASE READ - problems accessing the Bird Board...
Posted on October 3, 2005 at 09:12:09 AM by Barbara Taylor

If you've had problems accessing the Bird Board, please let me know if the trouble persists. There was recently an issue with Sympatico's dial-up service sometimes giving an "Internal Server Error" message. That problem should now be resolved.

There may be times that you won't be able to reach the Bird Board because the server is down, however, this does not happen very often. If you routinely have trouble accessing the board, then something else is occurring. I've added a "server status" link on the back-up webpage so you can now check if the server is temporarily offline.


Server Status:
If it says "b3.boards2go.com is down", then you won't be able to access the board until the Boards2Go hosting service fixes the problem. In the meantime you can browse a copy of all recently posted reports on the back-up webpage. If there is a major problem with the server, I will post updated notices there too.

If it says "b3.boards2go.com is up", then you should be able to access the Bird Board. Try clearing your browser's cache (temporary internet files), cookies, and history, and then try again. If you still can't access the board, and this is a recurring problem, please contact me. In your email please include the date and time you couldn't access the board, and also include the text of any error message you may have seen.


Barbara Taylor
muskoka_birder@hotmail.com

 

 

still some Monarchs
Posted on October 2, 2005 at 00:05:29 AM by Leslee Tassie

I thought our Monarchs had all left, but the sun and the warmer weather today brought several to our butterfly bush. Hopefully they'll be farther south when we get our first frost!

 

 

Re(2): Beavers, Bala... a question
Posted on October 5, 2005 at 07:59:13 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

There have been two families on my 26 acre lake. If there are two now I haven't found the second lodge being used.

If what the town says is true you could see small lakes with lodges around the whole lake. I have never seen anything like that. Time to call the MNR.

 

 

Re(1): Beavers, Bala... a question
Posted on October 2, 2005 at 09:36:59 AM by Al Sinclair

Since they are territorial animals, I'm wondering how many families do you have on the lake at any one time? This relates to what the town of Bracebridge is doing at Henry Marsh to "control the beaver population". They believe that the beaver population will continue to grow and expand the pond unless they annually cull them.

 

 

Beavers, Bala
Posted on October 1, 2005 at 09:36:01 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

While out on a short kayak around my little lake I discovered that one of the families of beavers has moved back into the lodge they were using when I first bought this place in 1998.

I wasn't aware that they reused lodges. There are six on this lake that have been abandoned over the years. It will be even more interesting to see if others are reused too.

 

 

Wood Ducks, Mallards, Pie-billed Grebe, Black Duck, Bala
Posted on October 1, 2005 at 09:32:41 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

This evening on Leech Lake, Bala, there were 4 dozen mallards, 1 pr + 5 male wood ducks, 1 black duck and a pie-billed grebe.

The last 2 species are new for my yard list.

 

 

Bird Board update
Posted on October 1, 2005 at 09:36:03 AM by Barbara Taylor

Thanks to everyone for all your reports. All posts for July-September are now available in the Archived Reports.

Just a reminder to bookmark (save to your favourites list) the back-up webpage. All recently posted reports are copied and stored there. In the event of any major problems with the Bird Board hosting service, important notices will also be posted there.


New to the Bird Board?
The Muskoka Bird Board is a place to share reports of any bird sightings or other nature sightings in Muskoka and surrounding areas. You don't have to include an email address in your post. See the Posting Guidelines for more information, including several tips on using the message board.

I try to monitor the Bird Board on a regular basis. If you want to bring something to my attention, just send me an email and I'll get back to you as soon as possible.

Barbara Taylor
muskoka_birder@hotmail.com