Muskoka Bird Board - Archived Reports from April - June 2005
 
Return to the Index of Archived Reports
 
Go to the Muskoka Bird Board
 
 
 
 

Clay-colored Sparrow (re: post from May 16)
Posted on June 30, 2005 at 03:25:55 PM by Barbara Taylor

I haven't heard or seen the sparrow since the big thunderstorms June 14th. Until then, he could be heard singing every day, but not once since. Either he has moved on, or is too busy tending nestlings (Wilf Yusek had seen 2 Clay-colored Sparrows in the same spruce tree at #86 Glendale Rd., Bracebridge, on May 18).

 

 

Re(1): Purple Martins in Bracebridge
Posted on July 1, 2005 at 12:45:09 PM by Al Johnston

Doug, it's too early for them to be this year's young so they're probably last year's hatchling's looking for a suitable nesting site. I'd be indebted if you'd send them down to Whitchurch-Stouffville where I've got 54 unoccupied compartments just waiting for tenants. Thanks, Al

 

 

Purple Martins in Bracebridge
Posted on June 30, 2005 at 12:12:14 PM by Doug Smith

Three purple martins were circling and calling over Memorial Park near the movie theatre in Bracebridge at approx. 9 am this morning. They seemed to be all immatures.

 

 

Merlins
Posted on June 29, 2005 at 10:35:11 AM by Gayle Carlyle

There is a at least one Merlin hanging out, and calling loudly, behind the District buildings on Pine St. Bracebridge. I had heard this bird back in April but didn't know what it was. It may be nesting in the pine forest on the cliff.
Also, last week, John and I were walking around the Bracebridge lagoons and spotted a Merlin finishing off a bird. It was on the gravel road between the cells. It flew away after it saw us so we checked out the remaining feathers but were unable to determine the prey speices. The feathers were black and a few smaller ones had edges of white.

 

 

Bonaparte's Gulls, Sparrow Lake
Posted on June 28, 2005 at 04:10:58 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Today, while out in my kayak at Long Island, Sparrow Lake, I saw two Bonaparte's gulls at the shoreline of the ring-billed gull colony. They appear to be first year birds. I have several pictures so that their age could be identified.

Also seen were two Caspian terns.

At the common terns colony there are about 15 chicks at this time. They are from one week to a couple of days old.

 

 

Re(1): Eastern Phoebe second nesting
Posted on June 29, 2005 at 10:39:26 AM by Gayle Carlyle

We've had phoebes nesting around our house and garden for the past six years or so. Several times they have used the same nest for their second brood.
Last year, and this year too, a nest was built in the rafters of our garden gazebo but then were abandoned with eggs in them. Don't really know why.
And then last weekend, the male was singing almost non-stop starting at about 5 am until we spotted the pair checking out an old robin nest on a downspout at the back of our house. The female seems to like it so I hope they don't abandon this one too. About four years ago, phoebes built a nest on the same spot and successfully fledged four babies.    (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Eastern Phoebe second nesting
Posted on June 28, 2005 at 01:46:09 PM by Barbara Taylor

We used to have a pair of phoebes that would reuse the old nest for a second brood. They would build from scratch the next year though. This went on for several years, until either racoons or red squirrels began finding the nest - now the phoebes have moved to a different site which we haven't discovered yet. (Bracebridge)


quote from The Birder's Handbook by
Ehrlich, Dobkin, and Wheye, p. 378, Eastern Phoebe:

"Oft renovate old nests (occ those of Barn Swallow); second clutches oft in same nest as first, esp if first was successful. Energetic cost of building a new adherent nest translates into a reduced clutch size."

 

 

Re(1): Eastern Phoebe second nesting
Posted on June 28, 2005 at 01:36:43 PM by Al Johnston

Good question, Mark. I Googled this and learned that it's quite common. They even keep the same mate. Check out ---http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Sayornis_phoebe.html ---- Al

 

 

Eastern Phoebe second nesting
Posted on June 28, 2005 at 06:36:30 AM by Mark McAnally

Here in Huntsville, we had an Eastern Phoebe pair successfully raise a brood which fledged probably two weeks ago. The female is now sitting on the same nest again, I guess to have a second brood. Is this normal behaviour, using the same nest to have a second brood?

 

 

Re(1): cardinal a few bricks short of a load
Posted on June 30, 2005 at 01:03:59 PM by Barbara Taylor

Usually the bird will give up after a week or so. You must have a VERY aggressive male cardinal in your yard! Here is a website with a couple ideas: http://volusia.org/birding/rehab.htm

And be glad it isn't a Pileated...http://web.syr.edu/~bpburtt/Birds/Jun12-05.htm

 

 

cardinal a few bricks short of a load
Posted on June 27, 2005 at 01:24:08 PM by Leslee Tassie

Steve and I are quite aware that sometimes a bird will see itself reflected in a window and attack it's own reflection. However, I really have to report what I think is obsessive behavior for a male cardinal.
For about a month and a half now, the male has been attacking our windows. We have at least 5 different windows/sliding doors that get attacked multiple times per day. Each time he comes he hits it 5 to 10 times and then goes to another window and does the same. It doesn't help to put up sillouetes, he hits them too. He also perches on the rear view mirrors of vehicles parked in our driveway and hits our vehicle windows over and over. He's even bent down and looked at himself in the rear view mirrow. He probably hits various windows around our house 100-200 times a day easily. Mrs. Cardinal is usually not far away, but I have to wonder since they are almost always together if they have managed to raise a successful brood together - could this be related to his obsessive behavior? He's very active in our yard every day, all day. He starts singing about quarter to 4 every morning too. Has anyone ever experienced this behavior to this extent??? ( or is this one very dumb bird?)

 

 

Re(1): URGENT
Posted on June 25, 2005 at 09:33:42 PM by Barbara Taylor

You could try calling Janice Enright at A Wing and a Prayer (705)385-1488

 

 

URGENT
Posted on June 25, 2005 at 09:13:03 PM by bruce

Looking for bird sanctuary/rehab.
I have a small kestrel that has been abandoned for about 24 hours.
I thought there was a rehab in Muskoka area. Can anybody direct me to a name and address.

 

 

Sphinx Moth
Posted on June 25, 2005 at 05:27:36 PM by Barbara Taylor

This afternoon I found a large moth on the underside of a hosta leaf under a birch tree. It appears to be a Blinded Sphinx Moth (Paonias excaecatus, #7824).  photo1  photo2  (update: received email from Al Sinclair, confirming ID - thanks Al) (location: Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Pied-billed Grebe, etc.
Posted on June 25, 2005 at 09:31:58 PM by Barbara Taylor

Thanks Wilf, the grebe was still there when we went to the Ponds this evening. There were six baby Wood Ducks in cell 4 and another eight in cell 2. Three Green Herons, two at the north side of cell 4, and one flying over cell 3. Two male Blue-winged Teal were in the marshy area to the west of cell 4. Other birds seen included Cedar Waxwings, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Common Yellowthroat, Yellow Warblers, American Redstart, Red-eyed Vireo, and Gray Catbird (at NW corner of cell 4). An Eastern Meadowlark was singing from the fenceline at the west edge of Kerr Park.

A doe and her fawn were on the hill to the south-west of cell 4. Painted Turtles were on the move - a large one was crossing the roadway at the west side of cell 3.

 

 

Pied-billed Grebe
Posted on June 25, 2005 at 03:53:20 PM by Wilf Yusek

Saw 1 in cell 3 at noon today, it was on the west side of the cell.
Bracebridge Ponds - map

 

 

Re(3): Never seen this bird before..
Posted on June 26, 2005 at 10:29:36 AM by Al Johnston

It was probably feeding on ants. The northern flicker is not considered rare. Good birding, Jess. Al

 

 

Re(2): Never seen this bird before..
Posted on June 26, 2005 at 09:03:35 AM by Jess

Yes it was feeding on the ground, hopping around near the edge of the bush line.
I just checked out a picture of the Northern Flicker, and I can visibly confirm that that is what I saw, a male one.
Is it rare for them to be around here?

 

 

Re(1): Never seen this bird before..
Posted on June 25, 2005 at 12:33:33 PM by Al Johnston

Jess, you've come very close to describing a Northern Flicker. Was it feeding on the ground by any chance. Al

 

 

Never seen this bird before..
Posted on June 25, 2005 at 12:19:44 PM by Jess

Hello,
I am having trouble identifying a bird I saw this morning, at Highway 169 in Glen Orchard. I don't bird watch very often, but this bird is one that definatly stood out.
It was hanging out with at least 15 grackles (both males and females).
It was about the same size as the grackles, the beak looked thicker then the grackles'.
It's dominent colour was a dark gray or black, with lighter grey/white on it's head and belly. On the belly there were thick black vertical stripes (I think 2). On the back of it's neck there was a horizontal red stripe.
When it flew away it's under part of it's wings were a yellow/tan colour...
So if anybody could help identify that bird, that would be great. I would love to find out what kind of bird this was!

 

 

Re(1): White-eyed Vireo at Arrowhead PP (Huntsville)
Posted on June 29, 2005 at 10:58:51 PM by Burke Korol

Hi All,
I only recently heard about Blake's find, and today (29 June) I went to a couple of places where I thought the bird had been, but the directions are a bit vague.

Regardless, I didn't find it, but I did hear a cuckoo sp., which was a first for me in Arrowhead. I also found a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker nest, so the trip was worthwhile.

 

 

White-eyed Vireo at Arrowhead PP (Huntsville)
Posted on June 24, 2005 at 06:46:07 PM by Blake A. Mann

*This report originated on ONTBIRDS (June 24, 2005) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.


Hi All,
This late note is for those in the area that want to pursue this bird. I was birding (trying to get away from everything here!) in the Algonquin area all week, hence the late note.
On Monday afternoon (June 20) while birding in Arrowhead Provincial Park, I was surprised to hear a WHITE-EYED VIREO on Beaver Meadow Trail. It sang for about ten minutes before I even saw it. This species is hard enough to find in Rondeau, let alone in northern Muskoka district!
Lots of other resident warblers and other birds were around, including Olive-sided Flycatcher, Broad-winged Hawk.

Location: Arrowhead PP is located just north of Huntsville off Hwy 11. Go into park and turn left just past the gatehouse. Follow narrow road until you see the sign for Beaver Meadow Trail. Park there and walk in to trail. This trail is quite long (over 9km) as I found out! The location of the vireo was at the almost halfway point where there is a boardwalk that crosses a stream. This was the first boardwalk as I recall. Perhaps check for map at gatehouse and you will see where trail first crosses a stream.
Hoping the bird is still there...

Blake A. Mann
Wallaceburg, Ontario

------------------------------------------------
*ONTBIRDS is presented by the Ontario Field Ornithologists - the provincial birding organization.
For instructions to join or leave ONTBIRDS visit http://www.ofo.ca/ontbirdshow.htm
ONTBIRDS Guidelines may be viewed at http://www.ofo.ca/ontbirdsguide.htm

 

 

Muskoka Field Naturalists - next meeting July 7
Posted on June 24, 2005 at 08:51:52 AM by Barbara Taylor

 

JULY 7 THURSDAY MEETING 7:30 PM - at Bala Community Centre
"Porter Lake Loons" is the story of a pair of loons and their chick through the eyes and lens of wildlife photographer Eleanor Kee Wellman. The presentation of the daily life of this northern nature icon will be brought to you in surprising detail! The photo essay follows a loon pair in their daily routine of tending, feeding and protecting their single chick while it grows. Eleanor spent much of last summer following the pair, taking care not to disturb them while photographing them. It was time consuming and challenging work but worth the effort to obtain this intimate portrait of the loon family.

There will be no charge for the talk, but a donation jar will be set up at the door to cover the hall rental. Visitors are welcome to attend the meeting. For more information call MFN president Pauline Goodfellow at 687-3526.

Membership Information & Program Updates:
MFN website

 

 

Re(1): Nesting Loon
Posted on June 26, 2005 at 11:06:16 PM by Bruce

Thanks Virginia for the location.
I have posted a couple of pictures on my website, have a look if you like.
http://www.amtelecom.net/~bbm

 

 

Nesting Loon
Posted on June 23, 2005 at 11:10:05 AM by Virginia Pray

Yesterday June 22, we spotted a loon nesting on Little Go Home Bay just off Hwy 400. Directions: Best to go #38 from Bala to Hwy 400. Turn S. There are 2 bridges at the swampy area on the Lake. At the 1st bridge going S there is ample room to pull onto the shoulder of the raod. Look to your right and near the far shore (about 100 yards) you will see the nest.Exit off l62 returning N. Good picture taking opp. We have no idea of course how long it has been nesting. E-mail me if you need more info on directions.

 

 

Todays birds- N. Waterthrush, Sedge Wren, Yellow Throated Vireos
Posted on June 22, 2005 at 09:33:06 PM by Dan Burton

On Penninsula Rd:
3 Yellow Throated Vireos (2 were paired)
2 N. Waterthrush (pair)
2 Ovenbirds carrying food
1 Sedge Wren still singing on Muldrew Lake Rd

 

 

Re(1): Sandhill Cranes
Posted on June 23, 2005 at 04:01:51 PM by Jim Gardner

We have a pair of sandhill cranes making daily visits to a boggy area in our beaver pond.  (at Hurdville, the bottom end of Lake Manitowabing)

 

 

Re(1): Sandhill Cranes
Posted on June 23, 2005 at 06:40:03 AM by Mark McAnally

On Saturday, June 18, we watched two Sandhill Cranes in a low lying field north of the French River near a town called St. Charles.

 

 

Sandhill Cranes
Posted on June 22, 2005 at 03:47:25 PM by Adam Bryk

Three Sandhill Cranes in a field at Nobel just north of Parry Sound last Saturday - first time seeing those in many years in the area. Don't know if this is odd or not?

 

 

Great Cresteds
Posted on June 22, 2005 at 09:24:03 AM by Carol Quemby

We hve a pair of GCF nesting in a birdhouse in our backyard (Hiram Street, Bracebridge)This is the 3rd or 4th year they have been here. This year a pair of wrens were building a nest in it when the flycatchers arrived. A territorial war broke out and the GCF won!It appears that there is now a family to feed as the parents are busy getting food and warding off any squirrel, bird or such that comes near.

 

 

Bracebridge Ponds - butterflies and dragonflies
Posted on June 20, 2005 at 07:27:56 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning at the Bracebridge Ponds there were several White Admirals, Red Admiral, Common Ringlets, Little Wood Satyr, Monarch, Viceroy, Hobomok Skippers, Canadian Tiger Swallowtails, and a small blue butterfly, possibly a late Spring Azure. Also many dragonflies and damselflies including Twelve-spotted Skimmer, Common Whitetail, Chalk-fronted Skimmer, Common Green Darner, and a zillion Bluets. There was a very vocal Gray Catbird near the north-west corner of cell 4.  (note: the trail heading west towards Henry marsh is flooded at the pipeline/snowmobile trail)   Bracebridge Ponds - map

 

 

Todays new birds- Snipe, Raven
Posted on June 19, 2005 at 04:56:34 PM by Dan Burton

Today I found Snipe in 3 different locations: 169, Loon Lake Rd, and Turtle Lake. A group of 3 Ravens turned up on 169 while I was watching Bobolink. A 2nd Bobolink location turned up on Loon Lake Rd. A Black Throated Blue, and a Yellow-throated Vireo carrying food were out Sniders Bay Rd. Two other locations were found for YTVI as well as Magnolia Warblers out Loon Lake Rd. YTVI have now been found in 7 locations in this square, making them much more common than previously believed.

 

 

Bala Butterfly Count and Butterflies last week
Posted on June 18, 2005 at 08:56:21 PM by Ron Stager

Some of the butterflies around our house east of Barkway last week included:

Canadian Tiger Swallowtail
Bronze Copper
Silver-bordered Fritillary
Harris's Checkerspot
Tawny Crescent
Northern Crescent
Common Ringlet
Little Wood Satyr
Monarch
duskywing species
Arctic Skipper
Hobomok Skipper

These species and several others are likely be around on June 25th for the Bala Butterfly Count. The count is part of a North American butterfly count and the organizing association requests a $4 donation from official counters to defray publication of results. No charge for observers.

Meet at 9:30 am at Ragged Rapids Hydro Parking Lot. Take Hwy 38 from Bala (past Jaspen Park) roughly 3 KM to Ragged Rapids Road (make right turn), follow Ragged Rapids Road to the Hydro parking lot, keeping left all the way. Bring lunch. Spare nets will be available.

If it is raining heavily, or the wind is strong, postponement to Sunday is a distinct possibility.

If interested or for more information, contact Al Sinclair ( 645-2848, sinclair@muskoka.com) or Ron Stager (ronstager@sympatico.ca , 684-9194).

Good butterflying to all.

Ron Stager

 

 

Re(1): Todays new birds: Philadelphia Vireo, Magnolia Warbler
Posted on June 30, 2005 at 03:50:27 PM by Alex Mills

I am wondering what the habitat was that the Philadelphia Vireo was frequenting.

 

 

Todays new birds: Philadelphia Vireo, Magnolia Warbler
Posted on June 18, 2005 at 07:40:27 PM by Dan Burton

Today I was out Muldrew Lake Rd and Penninsula Rd. I was astonished to see a Philadelphia Vireo singing in a bush in the swamp. Not far away was a Yellow Throated Vireo, a Warbling Vireo, and a Red-eyed Vireo. I still need a Blue-headed for this square. Sedge Wren is still singing away. I found suitable habitat for Magnolia Warbler and was pleased to find at least one pair, perhaps more. Fledglings seen:
20 Canada Geese
1 Chestnut-sided
1 Yellow-rumped

 

 

Henry marsh birds
Posted on June 18, 2005 at 02:40:11 PM by Barbara Taylor

Good news! The recent flood has subsided and you can now get to the Henry Rd. marsh again. The beaver dam was washed out by the heavy rains and the water had overflowed the entire dike/walking trail.

There was lots of activity at the marsh around noon today. Most of the songbirds were at the east side of the open area near the edge of the woods.


Green Heron (2 adults)
Great Crested Flycatcher (4, with young)
Alder Flycatcher
Northern Parula
Golden-winged Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Black-and-white Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Ovenbird
Baltimore Oriole
Scarlet Tanager
Eastern Kingbird
Song Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow

Belted Kingfisher
Turkey Vulture
Double-crested Cormorant
American Robin
Tree Swallow
Red-winged Blackbird
Hairy Woodpecker
American Goldfinch
Blue Jay
Black-capped Chickadee

(directions to Henry marsh: from traffic lights at Eccelstone Dr. and Wellington St., go west on Beaumont Dr. to Henry Rd., Bracebridge)

 

 

Moths flying last week (wk23 June 5-12)
Posted on June 17, 2005 at 03:52:32 PM by Al Sinclair

Moths flying last week (wk23 June 5-12)
The following, except where noted, were recorded at a mercury vapour light on my verandah at 1852 Hwy 118E, 8km east of Bracebridge. The light is controlled by a timer to come on on alternate nights 3 times a week.
Total species this week - 54
First Giant Silkmoth, 1 Luna Moth, June 10

HODGES,GENUS,SPECIES,CNAME
1014,Antaeotricha,leucillana,
3625,Argyrotaenia,mariana,Gray-banded Leafroller
3672,Syndemis,afflictana,Dead-leaf Leafroller
4759,Parapoynx,maculalis,
4897,Evergestis,pallidata,Purple-backed Cabbageworm Moth
5226,Palpita,magniferalis,
6235,Habrosyne,scripta,Lettered Habrosyne
6251,Drepana,arcuata,Arched Hooktip
6342,Semiothisa,bisignata,Red-headed Inchworm
6449,Glena,cribrataria,Dotted Gray
6588,Iridopsis,larvaria,Bent-line Gray
6597,Ectropis,crepuscularia,The Small Engrailed
6621,Melanolophia,signataria,Signate Melanolophia
6638,Eufidonia,notataria,Powder Moth
6668,Lomographa,glomeraria,Gray Spring Moth
6677,Cabera,erythemaria,Yellow-dusted Cream Moth
6726,Euchlaena,obtusaria,Obtuse Euchlaena
6796,Campaea,perlata,Pale Beauty
6819,Metanema,inatomaria,Pale Metanema
6835,Cepphis,armataria,Scallop Moth
6837,Probole,alienaria,Alien Probole
6864,Caripeta,piniata,Northern Pine Looper
6894,Lambdina,fervidaria,Curve-lined Looper
6966,Eutrapela,clemataria,Curve-toothed Geometer
7047,Nemoria,rubrifrontaria,Red-fronted Emerald
7048,Nemoria,mimosaria,
7058,Synchlora,aerata,Wavey-lined Emerald
7071,Chlorochlamys,chloroleucaria,Blackberry Looper Moth
7213,Ecliptopera,silaceata,The Small Phoenix
7235,Hydriomena,divisaria,Black-dashed Hydriomena
7640,Lobophora,nivigerata,Powdered Bigwing
7715,Dryocampa,rubicunda,Rosy Maple Moth
7758,Actias,luna,Luna Moth
7787,Ceratomia,undulosa,Waved Sphinx
7809,Sphinx,kalmiae,Laurel Sphinx
7822,Smerinthus,cerisyi,One-eyed Sphinx
7828,Pachysphinx,modesta,Big Poplar Sphinx
7895,Clostera,albosigma,Sigmoid Prominent
7898,Clostera,strigosa,
7901,Clostera,apicalis,
7931,Gluphisia,septentrionis,Common Gluphisia
7994,Heterocampa,guttivitta,Maple Prominent
7995,Heterocampa,biundata,Wavy-lined Heterocampa
8007,Schizura,unicornis,Unicorn Caterpillar Moth
8137,Spilosoma,virginica,Virginian Tiger Moth
8158,Phragmatobia,assimilans,Large Ruby Tiger Moth
8717,Zale,horrida,Horrid Zale
9053,Pseudeustrotia,carneola,Pink-barred Lithacodia
9193,Raphia,frater,The Brother
9556,Chytonix,palliatricula,Cloaked Marvel
10200,Cucullia,asteroides,The Asteroid
10291,Polia,latex,Fluid Arches
10431,Faronta,diffusa,Wheat Head Armyworm Moth
10999,Aplectoides,condita,

LUNA MOTH photo

 

 

Re(1): big moths
Posted on June 17, 2005 at 03:59:39 PM by Al Sinclair

Columbia Silk Moths are not seen very often. I have had them here only a couple of times in the last 8 years. Can you send me the date, location, and circumstances (ie at a merc vapour light)? I could submit the sighting under your name to the Toronto Entomologists Society for their yearly summary.
I had one Luna on the 10th and heard of another at Home Depot in Bracebridge this week, but no other silk moths.

 

 

big moths
Posted on June 16, 2005 at 07:15:12 PM by Dave Hawke

At Taboo Resort (Gravenhurst) I've noticed the big silk moths are emerging. A few cecropias, a couple lunas, and a Columbia silk moth (the last one is new to me... looks similar to a cecropia). Also a dobson fly. All attracted to night security lights.

 

 

Whooping Cranes lost in Ontario...update...all back in the USA
Posted on June 15, 2005 at 07:29:59 PM by Al Sinclair

The 3 Whooping Cranes that wandered off course into Ontario during the spring migration are now all back in the USA. They are part of the eastern introduced flock that is being trained by flying with ultralights to winter in Florida and summer in Wisconsin. The lost birds, hatched in 2003, were number 301, 309, and 318. The last update on Journey North reports 301 and 318 in Missawkee Co. lower Michigan. 309 was in eastern Ontario in early May but moved south into Vermont. If it stays put for a while they plan to recapture it and take it back to Wisconsin. Another website to watch for updates is Operation Migration

 

 

Re(1): Red-headed Woodpecker...also Sedge Wren and Yellow-throated Vireo
Posted on June 14, 2005 at 07:26:06 AM by Al Sinclair

Although not as exciting as a pair of Red-headed Woodpeckers but still good birds for this area, we also located a Sedge Wren that Dan found in a wetland on North Muldrew Lake Rd at Peninsula Rd. It was at an opening in the alders near the east end of the marsh and north side of the road. And a Yellow-throated Vireo was singing in the woods at the corner of Peninsula Rd. and N. Muldrew.
N. Muldrew Lake Rd is just west of Gravenhurst off Hwy 169.

 

 

Red-headed Woodpecker...pair at Pine Lake near Gravenhurst
Posted on June 13, 2005 at 09:31:53 PM by Al Sinclair

Dan Burton reported finding a Red-headed Woodpecker yesterday on a private road off Snider's Bay Rd west of Gravenhurst at Pine Lake. Today Dan, Allan Aubin and myself returned to the site and found a pair. This raises their breeding status for the breeding bird atlas to Probable. This could be the only breeding pair in the Muskoka region. I took this photo through a scope for confirmation.

 

 

Re(1): Stick-mimic caterpillar
Posted on June 14, 2005 at 07:06:21 AM by Al Sinclair

It looks like a Crocus Geometer or False Crocus Geometer caterpillar. Both are common in this area. These are the large yellow moths with brown spots that can be found flying in the daytime. My references are two guides published by the USDA Forest Service. You can order them by email and they will be mailed free of charge even to Canada.

They are Caterpillars of Eastern Forests (FHTET-96-34) and Geometroid
Caterpillars of Northeastern and Appalachian Forests (FHTET-2001-10).
Contact Richard Reardon in Morgantown, WV, phone 304-285-1566, e-mail
rreardon@fs.fed.us.

FHTET-96-34 is on the web at:
http://www.npwrc.usgs.gov/resource/2000/cateast/cateast.htm
It does not have the Crocus Geometer however. It is shown in FHTET-2001-10.

 

 

Stick-mimic caterpillar
Posted on June 13, 2005 at 08:11:55 PM by Barbara Taylor

Some kind of stick-mimic caterpillar was doing its best, but his bright green colour didn't exactly hide him very well in this Purpleleaf Sandcherry. (photographed today in Bracebridge - click thumbnail for larger image)

As found, hanging upside down from branch, with its head at the left side. photo1

By turning the branch, the caterpillar's back is revealed. photo2  photo3

Near the top of the next photo, you can see some of the silken thread which suspends the head end of the caterpillar from the branch. That's how it can stretch out straight - even though at first it appears to have only its hind end anchored to the branch. (The shot was taken looking up from underneath the caterpillar as I tilted the branch back a bit, so the angle looks funny.)  photo4

 

 

Nuthatches, Bala
Posted on June 13, 2005 at 08:11:10 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

There are nuthatch fledglings bopping around in the trees this morning. I haven't seen any other fledglings yet but the woodpeckers should be along any day.

 

 

cuckoo, hognose, frogsong and more
Posted on June 12, 2005 at 11:00:38 PM by Challis & Carlyle

A black-billed cuckoo was calling behind our house on Rocksborough Road Saturday. Haven't heard it today.
A young juvenile hognose appeared in our front yard today -- first we've seen this season. And for the last few nights, a very odd call has been coming from a cluster of grey tree frogs. Almost as though a tree frog had been listening too closely to the spring peepers. It's a loud, questioning Peep? Peep? Peep? in about the same key as a treefrog, but without the trill.
Also watched a juvenile crow begging for food on River Road on Friday in Bracebridge. The chimney swifts are back downtown, and a lone nighthawk was feeding, flying and calling while we dined on the Inn at the Falls patio Sunday evening.

 

 

Re(1): Harvester Butterfly photographed in Bracebridge
Posted on June 12, 2005 at 09:16:11 PM by Rick Snider

I've been searching for woolly aphids on alders in our area for 2 years with no luck until this year. Alders that had none previously, have them this year. Harvesters are apparently subject to population irruptions (Glassberg). It will be interesting to find if there are Harvesters on these "new" woolly aphid populations.

 

 

Harvester Butterfly photographed in Bracebridge
Posted on June 12, 2005 at 05:45:26 PM by Al Sinclair

Wilf Yusek took this photo on June 11 along the path behind the houses on Beaumont Drive in Bracebridge. The path goes west from the parking lot at the end of Henry Rd. The butterfly was just before the bridge.
Although quite worn this appears to be a Harvester butterfly, a good find as they quite local in their distribution around Muskoka. Their larvae eat woolley aphids that are found on alders. This is the only butterfly in our area with a carnivorus caterpillar.

 

 

Todays birds- Red Headed Woodpecker, Yellow Throated Vireos
Posted on June 12, 2005 at 03:06:21 PM by Dan Burton

Today I ventured out 169 to Sniders Bay Road and followed it past Muriel Cresent to Unit Rd.
Red-Headed Woodpecker (1)
Yellow-Throated Vireos (2)
Eastern Towhees (3)
Winter Wren (1)
Blackburnian Warbler
Rose Breasted Grosbeak
many Black and Whites and Chestnut-Sideds
On 169 at least 10 Bobolink and 2 Meadowlarks

 

 

Chickadee fledglings
Posted on June 11, 2005 at 12:44:20 PM by Barbara Taylor

For the third year in a row, a pair of Black-capped Chickadees has nested successfully in the street light by the end of our driveway. I've been hearing baby bird begging sounds for several days, and this morning there were at least two fledglings in the nearby trees. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Moths flying last week (wk22 May 29-Jun 5)
Posted on June 11, 2005 at 10:19:14 AM by Al Sinclair

Moths flying last week (wk22 May 29-Jun 5)
The following, except where noted, were recorded at a mercury vapour light on my verandah at 1852 Hwy 118E, 8km east of Bracebridge. The light is controlled by a timer to come on on alternate nights 3 times a week.
(Data from 2 nights only this week)

HODGES,GENUS,SPECIES,CNAME
6251,Drepana,arcuata,Arched Hooktip
6597,Ectropis,crepuscularia,The Small Engrailed
6804,Petrophora,subaequaria,Northern Petrophora
6822,Metarranthis,duaria,Ruddy Metarranthis
6966,Eutrapela,clemataria,Curve-toothed Geometer
7425,Venusia,cambrica,The Welsh Wave
7637,Cladara,limitaria,Mottled Gray Carpet
7931,Gluphisia,septentrionis,Common Gluphisia
7994,Heterocampa,guttivitta,Maple Prominent
8137,Spilosoma,virginica,Virginian Tiger Moth
8158,Phragmatobia,assimilans,Large Ruby Tiger Moth
8338,Phalaenophana,pyramusalis,Dark-banded Owlet

The Small Engrailed - photo

 

 

Windermere area - Brewster's Warbler
Posted on June 11, 2005 at 09:17:49 AM by David Britton

I spent a pleasant hour this morning birding along the 1.5 km stretch of Rostrevor Rd immediately north of Windermere Rd. (about 2 km outside the village of Windermere).

The excellent variety of habitats (hayfields, old field, wet and dry thickets, river and mixed coniferous-deciduous forest) along this relatively short stretch of road make this one of my favourite bird walks in Muskoka.

This morning didn't disappoint, with 50 species seen or heard including American Bittern, Hooded Merganser, Alder Flycatcher, Bank Swallow, Common Raven, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Winter Wren, Brown Thrasher, Eastern Bluebird, Golden-winged, Brewster's (see below), Blackburnian and Mourning warblers, Bobolink, Indigo Bunting and Purple Finch.

The Brewster's Warbler was seen well in an alder/willow thicket on the east side of the road about 1.5km north of Windermere Rd. just before the road makes a left turn and goes up a hill. It was singing a very wheezy version of the Blue-winged song (beeez-buzzz). Further south, in the thick alders on the north side of the Dee River a male Golden-winged was seen and heard singing the typical Golden-winged song.

To my knowledge, this is the most reliable spot in Muskoka for Golden-winged Warbler (I've heard or seen it virtually every visit to this spot from May to July over the last 6 or 7 years). This is also the third time in that period that I've had a Brewster's Warbler on Rostrevor.

 

 

Re(3): Moth ID? - another...
Posted on June 11, 2005 at 10:26:47 PM by Al Sinclair

Pale Beauty is correct. The greenish tint is present on most fresh specimens. Since most photos are of dead mounted specimens the colors are often faded and subtle tints missing. Living specimens are much more attractive.

 

 

Re(2): Moth ID? - another...
Posted on June 11, 2005 at 05:26:34 PM by Barbara Taylor

Thanks Al. I found another moth today which I think I have identified (6796, Campaea perlata, Pale Beauty), but perhaps you can confirm it for me...

It looked much whiter with the naked eye, so possibly my camera's white-balance was off or the dark colour of the wood underneath is making it look greenish toned in the close-up.  (in Bracebridge)  photo

 

 

Re(1): Moth ID? Northern Pine Looper Moth
Posted on June 11, 2005 at 10:14:34 AM by Al Sinclair

6864,Caripeta divisata,Northern Pine Looper Moth
Since you have lots of pines in your neighbourhood it makes sense that you have this species. Out here near Uffington I have not seen it before. Thanks for posting it, I can now add it to the Muskoka Moth list.

 

 

Moth ID?
Posted on June 10, 2005 at 04:45:05 PM by Barbara Taylor

I found this moth today on the ground under a spirea bush. The pattern is so distinctive I thought it would be easy to identify, but I can't find it anywhere. Does anyone recognize the species?  (in Bracebridge)
photo1   photo2   photo3

 

Loon House-Hunting Behaviour, Bala
Posted on June 10, 2005 at 12:28:50 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

This morning a pair of loons was on my lake after there being no loons since early May. I assume that they had a nest failure elsewhere, and are going to try again.

One adult would approach a potential nest site and the other bird would come in and swim around the location and then move off a bit. The first bird would sit and stare at the site for at least 10 minutes and then swim off to another location. This went on for more than two hours and each site was checked at least twice.

Twice the second bird swam over to a take-off area and started taking off only to abort and swim back to a nest site that the other bird was checking out.

I don't know which was which because neither one did any vocalizing but there was lots of bill dipping and bill splashing.

The drill must be that both have to be finished the inspections before the other one can leave.

Easy to anthropomorphize this situation. It was quite amusing to watch!

 

 

Re(2): indigo bunting
Posted on June 12, 2005 at 10:53:23 PM by Challis

So THAT'S where they went. The ones who have returned here are singing enthusiastically.

 

 

Re(1): indigo bunting
Posted on June 10, 2005 at 08:56:57 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

John, I have found indigo buntings at practically every place I have been listening and photographing birds. They are everywhere and have been for almost 2 weeks over on this side of Muskoka. More this year than I have ever encountered. (Bala area)

 

 

indigo bunting
Posted on June 9, 2005 at 12:23:01 PM by John Challis

I heard two indigo buntings calling (and saw one) on Rocksborough Road, Bracebridge this morning, for the first time this season. The Simcoe County bird board had reports of indigo buntings in abundance a week or two ago ... we were worrying they wouldn't show up this year.

 

 

Frogs in Parry Sound
Posted on June 9, 2005 at 07:58:09 AM by Peter Mills

While at Magnetawan I took the time to look for some Reptiles and Amphibians. The frogs chorus was in full swing with Green, Bull and Mink Frogs along with Spring Peepers and Gray Treefrogs.

 

 

Henry marsh
Posted on June 8, 2005 at 10:21:20 AM by Barbara Taylor

Yesterday afternoon it was fairly quiet at the Henry Rd. marsh, but a few good birds were seen - two American Bittern, a Green Heron, Belted Kingfisher, Chestnut-sided Warbler, several singing Common Yellowthroats, and five Cedar Waxwings. 

The strong winds kept all the biting bugs away! Great time to watch the many dragonflies and damselflies in the sheltered area by the little bridge. Many Common Whitetail, Chalk-fronted Skimmers, a Common Green Darner, and Bluets.

(directions to Henry marsh: from traffic lights at Eccelstone Dr. and Wellington St., go west on Beaumont Dr. to Henry Rd., Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): Migrating Monarchs Are On The Way!
Posted on June 9, 2005 at 09:36:09 PM by dawn

First Monarch of the year at Hunter's Bay in Huntsville approx. 4:30 pm.

 

 

Re(1): Migrating Monarchs Are On The Way!
Posted on June 9, 2005 at 02:47:54 PM by Wilf Yusek

I saw 3 Monarchs yesterday at the Bracebridge Lagoons and one today same place, all in cell 4 area,north and east sides.

 

 

Re(1): Migrating Monarchs Are On The Way!
Posted on June 9, 2005 at 01:28:43 PM by Barbara Taylor

One arrived at our lilac bush at noon today. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Migrating Monarchs Are On The Way!
Posted on June 7, 2005 at 10:36:50 PM by Don Davis

The annual northbound migration by monarch butterflies is late this year, but over the past 4 days, there have been many reports along the north shores of Lakes Erie and Ontario. The northern most reports I have come from Carden Alvar and Bruce Peninsula.

I would appeciate hearing from anyone who spots a migrating monarch. They have lots of lilac shrubs in the south to feed on. There is much concern that the population rebound this year from an all-time low overwintering number.

Please send date of sighting, name of observer, location (i.e. closest town or city) and details of sighting to donald_davis@yahoo.com.

Thank you

 

 

Re(1): Damselfly - River Jewelwing?
Posted on June 6, 2005 at 06:19:08 PM by Al Sinclair

Both the River and Ebony Jewelwing can be found in our area. This one looks like a male River Jewelwing because of the two color shades on the wings, Ebony wings are solid black. Female Jewelwings have a white spot at the tip of the wing.

 

 

Damselfly - River Jewelwing?
Posted on June 6, 2005 at 05:03:48 PM by Barbara Taylor

This afternoon I managed to get this photo of a damselfly on a hemlock branch - it wouldn't sit still for a better shot. (Bracebridge)   Is it a River Jewelwing?

 

 

Todays new birds: Sedge Wrens, Mourning Warbler
Posted on June 5, 2005 at 12:38:39 PM by Dan Burton

At Muldrew Lake Rd, SEDGE Wrens are singing. Also in the area:
Chestnut sided warblers (many)
American Redstarts (many)
Black throated Greens
Yellows
Common Yellowthroats
Nashvilles (many)
Black and White Warblers
Alder Flycatchers
Eastern Wood Pewees
Gt Crested
Least Flycatchers
EASTERN TOWHEE
FIELD SPARROW
Catbird
Wild Turkey

On Penninsula Rd:
Yellow Rumped
MOURNING Warbler
Indigo Buntings (many)

 

 

Common Terns
Posted on June 5, 2005 at 09:06:48 AM by jim maguire&sylvia purdon

Est. 12-15 Common Terns sitting on nests on Long Island, Sparrow Lake, Saturday June 4, 2005.

Fluffy young Herring Gull and RBGull.

Non - nesting DCCormorants; 17 adult birds, no breeding evidence.

American Crow: 2

Spotted Sandpiper: 1

Note: Herring Gull nest and RBGull nest in same area as the Common Tern nesting area at the northern tip of the island. Remainder of hundreds of RBGulls and est 25 Herring Gulls on the main island nesting areas.

 

 

Chimney Swifts
Posted on June 5, 2005 at 09:02:03 AM by sylvia purdon

Chimney Swifts flying over the burned out building on the main street of Gravenhurst, last week.

 

 

Cuckoo, Nighthawks
Posted on June 4, 2005 at 04:15:42 PM by Dan Burton

First Nighthawk I have had here was June 1st. Nighthawks are in Bracebridge as well since I heard one last night.
Todays new bird was a Black Billed Cuckoo calling from the cemetery bewtween Wagner and Lorne Streets (Gravenhurst)

 

 

Wild Turkey
Posted on June 2, 2005 at 11:29:22 PM by Pitter

Last Saturday, May 28, 2005 on Rt 35 just south of Dorset we saw a hen and tom Wild Turkey cross the road in front of our car. The hen was leading with the tom not far behind.

 

 

Migration officially over...Wood-Pewee back
Posted on June 2, 2005 at 08:45:47 AM by Al Sinclair

I consider the migration over when an Eastern Wood-Pewee returns to our woods. He was back this morning, heard singing at 7:30 am. There may be a few stragglers and shorebirds yet, but most of our resident birds are now back.

 

 

Bird Board update
Posted on June 1, 2005 at 09:22:33 AM by Barbara Taylor

Thanks to everyone for all your reports. All posts for April-May are now available in the Archived Reports.

Just a reminder to bookmark (add to your favourites list) the back-up webpage. All recently posted reports are copied and stored there. In the event of any major problems with the Bird Board hosting service, important notices will also be posted there.

Need help posting photos? Find out how to post your digital photos and give it a try on the Ontario Nature Photos board.



New to the Bird Board?
The Muskoka Bird Board is a place to share reports of any bird sightings or other nature sightings in Muskoka and surrounding areas. You don't have to include an email address in your post. See the Posting Guidelines for more information, including several tips on using the message board.

I try to monitor the Bird Board on a regular basis. If you want to bring something to my attention, just send me an email and I'll get back to you as soon as possible.

Barbara Taylor
muskoka_birder@hotmail.com

 

 

Warbling Vireo (Vireo gilvus)
Posted on May 31, 2005 at 09:27:08 PM by Terry Whittam / Marion Whittam

This Warbling vireo was singing its heart out at the cottage near Coopers Falls.
Warbling Vireo (Vireo gilvus) photo

 

 

Columbine (Aguilegia canadensis L.)
Posted on May 31, 2005 at 09:05:13 PM by Terry Whittam / Marion Whittam

Beautiful Columbine are out all over the Coopers Falls Road area east of Washago. This picture was snapped early Sunday morning... 5/29/05.   Columbine photo

 

 

Muskoka Field Naturalists - next meeting June 2
Posted on May 30, 2005 at 09:21:20 PM by Barbara Taylor

JUNE 2 THURSDAY MEETING 7:30 PM

Lorne Jewitt's "Rivers" audio/visual digital show will intrigue you with the twists and turns that the Muskoka rivers take to get to their Georgian Bay destination! This meeting will also focus on Seniors for Nature and their nature programs. 7:30 p.m. at Calvary Baptist Church, corner of First and Brock Street, Gravenhurst. Visitors welcome to attend the meeting.

Membership Information & Program Updates:
MFN website

 

 

Canada Geese - moving north
Posted on May 30, 2005 at 08:19:02 PM by Barbara Taylor

This evening there have been large vees of Canada Goose moving north over Bracebridge. Right on schedule - here's a post from the Bird Board archives:


Re(1): Geese
Posted on May 31, 2004 at 07:21:33 PM by Barbara Taylor

There were about 200 Canada Geese on Lake Muskoka near Eleanor Island Sunday morning. We have often seen a second big migration of geese around this time of year. The Bird Board archives have reports of large flocks heading north between May 27 and June 4 in previous years.

Excerpt from Canadian Hinterland:
"In addition to the annual migration from breeding to wintering grounds, Canada Geese sometimes undertake a special voyage called a moult migration. Every year, geese must replace their worn-out flight feathers. The feathers are replaced all at once, so the geese cannot fly during the four- to five-week moulting period. The best places for the geese during this time are those with lots of open water where the birds can seek refuge if threatened and where they may find a good supply of the protein-rich food needed for growing new feathers. Most of the geese that don’t breed during the season undertake this migration, which usually involves travelling north, often well beyond the normal breeding range, between late May and early June. Successful breeders moult later in the season, remaining with their young goslings, which have not begun to fly."

 

 

whip-poor-wills
Posted on May 30, 2005 at 01:51:03 PM by Carlyle/Challis

Sat. May 28 about 9:25.
So thrilled to hear not one, but two whip-poor-wills calling back and forth down at the end of Rocksborough Rd. Haven't had any around our house in a few years but they seem to like the bush at the end of our road. Great to hear them again.

 

 

Yellow-throated Vireo
Posted on May 30, 2005 at 09:23:39 AM by Doug Smith

A male yellow-throated Vireo was seen singing from the top of a dead tree near the pond at Balfour Lake Rd, which is approx. 20 km south of Torrance, on the Southwood Rd. This was Saturday morning, when I was on my Breeding Bird Survey.

 

 

Re(1): Loons & Blackflies
Posted on June 5, 2005 at 08:47:02 AM by Al Johnston

The Joseph River loons are incubating more regularly now with the male having accepted his shift. Recently, I observed the female on the nest from close range through 10X binoculars and her head was crawling with black flies. Fortunately this didn't appear to be disturbing her too much.
Al

 

 

Loons & Blackflies
Posted on May 29, 2005 at 11:00:14 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

For those who monitor loons there has been a report of adults not brooding that we think is related to a swarm of blackflies. About 5 years ago the adults stayed off the eggs and the nesting platform I had put out because they were swarmed by their own special species of blackfly. The swarm was so large they could be heard buzzing from 25 ft away. That clutch was lost.

If this happens on your lake they could nest again.

 

 

Moths flying last week (wk21 May 22-28)
Posted on May 29, 2005 at 09:56:51 PM by Al Sinclair

Moths flying last week (wk21 May 22-28)
The following, except where noted, were recorded at a mercury vapour light on my verandah at 1852 Hwy 118E, 8km east of Bracebridge. The light is controlled by a timer to come on on alternate nights 3 times a week.

HODGES,GENUS,SPECIES,CNAME
6251,Drepana,arcuata,Arched Hooktip
6430,Orthofidonia,flavivenata,
6621,Melanolophia,signataria,Signate Melanolophia
6668,Lomographa,glomeraria,Gray Spring Moth
6817,Selenia,alciphearia,Northern Selenia
6842,Plagodis,phlogosaria,Straight-lined Plagodis
6844,Plagodis,alcoolaria,Hollow-spotted Plagodis
6966,Eutrapela,clemataria,Curve-toothed Geometer
7329,Anticlea,vasiliata,Variable Carpet
7369,Xanthorhoe,packardata,
7390,Xanthorhoe,lacustrata,Toothed Brown Carpet
7428,Venusia,comptaria,Brown-shaded Carpet
7635,Acasis,viridata,Olive-and-black Carpet
7639,Cladara,atroliturata,The Scribbler
7687,Phyllodesma,americana,Lappet Moth
7931,Gluphisia,septentrionis,Common Gluphisia
8137,Spilosoma,virginica,Virginian Tiger Moth
8158,Phragmatobia,assimilans,Large Ruby Tiger Moth
9193,Raphia,frater,The Brother
9888,Lithophane,innominata,Nameless Pinion
10008,Feralia,comstocki,Comstock's Sallow
10520,Morrisonia,evicta,Bicolored Woodgrain

OLIVE-AND-BLACK CARPET photo

 

 

A great day in Muskoka square 17PK26!
Posted on May 29, 2005 at 08:41:10 PM by Terry Whittam / Marion Whittam

Saturday, May 28, 2005, 5am, Marion and I left our Muskoka square 17PK36 for a day to visit our adjacent square 17PK26 monitored by Sylvia Purden and Jim Maguire. What a day! What a fascinating experience to monitor the many similar species between the adjacent squares and also see many species we would never get just 10km away! The day started with bird 1 being a Sora Rail crossing the road in front of us just before picking Sylvia up. The day ended 84 species later with a Whip-poor-will! Highlights included observing the tern colony at Sparrow lake, Sora rails and a tight grouping of territorial(4) Golden Wing warblers on Beiers Rd north of Kilworthy. Confirmed breeding species were Raven and Kildeer both observed feeding young in 17PK26! Other observations included Painted Trilliums, deer and a noisy 50+ MG car rally on Canning Rd! Thanks Sylvia for a great day!

 

 

MFN Baillie Birdathon...results
Posted on May 29, 2005 at 03:11:04 PM by Al Sinclair

The Muskoka Field Naturalists held their Baillie Birdathon on Saturday May 28 and recorded a total of 90 species in and around Bracebridge. The weather was warm, breezy and partly cloudy. A team of 8 started at 7am at the Bracebridge Ponds and later birded several other locations in the Bracebridge area: Henry Rd Marsh, Glendale Rd, Falkenburg Rd, Hudson Rd, Roxborough Rd, Muskoka Airport, Silver Lk Rd, Doe lake. We finished at 4pm with our team down to 3. The spring migration appeared to be almost over so we missed most of the species that just pass through. Except for the 2 Blackpoll Warblers we had at the Bracebridge Ponds, the rest were likely local breeding birds. The list of species found and an overview of the Baillie Birdathon is pasted below.

Some of the good birds were:
Clay-colored Sparrow on Gendale Rd.
Brewer's Blackbird on Falkenburg Rd
Vesper Sparrow south end of Muskoka Airport
Northern Parula, Golden winged Warbler, Sharp-shinned Hawk at Henry Marsh
Blackpoll Warbler Bracebridge Ponds
Wilson's Snipe, Roxborough Rd
Pied-billed Grebe, Silver lake Rd.

SPECIES SEEN
5/28/2005 ~ in Muskoka ~ 90 seen
Pied-billed Grebe
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
American Bittern
Canada Goose
Wood Duck
Mallard
American Black Duck
Blue-winged Teal
Hooded Merganser
Turkey Vulture
Northern Harrier
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Broad-winged Hawk
Ruffed Grouse
Virginia Rail
Sora
Killdeer
Wilson's Snipe
Spotted Sandpiper
Ring-billed Gull
Herring Gull
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Chimney Swift
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Hairy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
Alder Flycatcher
Least Flycatcher
Eastern Phoebe
Great Crested Flycatcher
Eastern Kingbird
Tree Swallow
Bank Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Barn Swallow
House Wren
Gray Catbird
Brown Thrasher
Eastern Bluebird
Veery
Wood Thrush
American Robin
Black-capped Chickadee
Red-breasted Nuthatch
Blue Jay
American Crow
Common Raven
European Starling
Warbling Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
Golden-winged Warbler
Nashville Warbler
Northern Parula
Yellow Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Magnolia Warbler
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
Pine Warbler
Blackpoll Warbler
Black-and-white Warbler
American Redstart
Ovenbird
Northern Waterthrush
Common Yellowthroat
Chipping Sparrow
Clay-colored Sparrow
Vesper Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Northern Cardinal
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Indigo Bunting
Bobolink
Red-winged Blackbird
Eastern Meadowlark
Brewer's Blackbird
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
Baltimore Oriole
Purple Finch
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow
////---- STATISTICS ----/////
Species seen - 90

Participants:
Lou Spence, Greg and Deb Dufton, Moira Payne, Janice House, Ingrid Schulz, Neil Nimmo, Al Sinclair

From the Bird Studies Canada Website:
BAILLIE BIRDATHON: AN OVERVIEW
Canada’s Baillie Birdathon is the oldest sponsored bird count in North America. It was established in 1976 as a national fundraiser to support the research and conservation of wild birds. Funds raised by participants benefit not only the work of Bird Studies Canada, but also designated bird observatories in the Canadian Migration Monitoring Network, the James L. Baillie Memorial Fund, which provides research grants to amateurs across Canada, and participating conservation and naturalist clubs. All contributions to Birdathon are tax-creditable (Canadian Registered Charity No. 119024313RR0001).

BIRDATHON is a registered trademark of Bird Studies Canada/Études d’Oiseaux Canada

 

 

first crickets ... and veeries
Posted on May 26, 2005 at 09:06:39 PM by John Challis

On a slow bike ride down Fraserburg Road tonight, I heard my first crickets of the season. And, in the space of about 5 km, seven veeries singing. An Eastern wood peewee, and hermit thrushes and white throated sparrows also in strong numbers. The air in places was heavy with wild cherry blossoms. A fine evening, as long as you're moving faster than the mosquitoes.

 

 

Sparrow Lke-Terns,Cormorants,Loons
Posted on May 26, 2005 at 08:50:51 PM by jim maguire&sylvia purdon

On the water by boat: Long Island, Margaret Island and nearby spits:
Thursday May 26, 2005.

Long Island: 24 Common Terns: some sitting on nests; 30 Cormorants, no evidence of nesting;
"Margaret Island Spits and Marker: 10 Caspian Terns, 1 Common Tern;
Goose Rock: Common Loon, 100yed away, no vegetation on Goose Rock except one small tree
"Evans Bay" off PunGishEMoo Point; Common Loon pr in vicinity of last year's successful nest.

Note: Common Terns are nesting at the northern tip of Long Island as in the past few years, but RBGull nests are immediately adjacent to these nests.

RBGulls: Herring Gulls: Maybe 300-400 gulls nesting on Long Island

 

 

Eagle
Posted on May 26, 2005 at 04:50:25 PM by Dave Wright

I saw a adult bald eagle Wednesday morning about 9:30 am. It flew right over the house.

 

 

Wildflowers
Posted on May 25, 2005 at 09:53:47 PM by Barbara Taylor

Found some wildflowers in bloom today on Browning Island, Lake Muskoka. Very few trilliums - they seem to be a favourite of the large deer population on the island.  (click on the thumbnail to see larger picture)
Wild Columbine    Starflower    Jack-in-the-Pulpit

 

 

Northern Goshawk, Philadelphia Vireo, 3 Wren Species - SE Parry Sound
Posted on May 24, 2005 at 04:00:36 PM by Kip Daynard

Highlights of two days atlassing...

This morning I found three wren species singing on the west side of Pickerel Lake about 12kms NE of Burk's Falls. Winter Wren, House Wren and Sedge Wren, the latter making an appearance during a 5-minute point count.

On Monday off the Rain Lake forest access road near the western edge of Algonquin I found a singing Philadephia Vireo, a low flying Goshawk, a male Ring-necked Duck, plus four Scarlet Tanagers on the same branch at once! (2m,2f)

GPS locations available if interested.

Kip Daynard
Emsdale

 

 

Wilson's Phalarope...Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on May 24, 2005 at 01:01:49 PM by Al Sinclair

Wilf Yusek just called to report a Wilson's Phalarope seen at 12:30 on the shore of the dike between cell 1 and 2. Was on the cell 1 side but flew into cell 2.

 

 

Birds in Your Woodlot Workshop
Posted on May 24, 2005 at 09:20:14 AM by Barbara Taylor

I thought some of you might be interested in this workshop. There is still time to register - contact Mike Walsh before 5pm Thursday.


BIRDS IN YOUR WOODLOT WORKSHOP - presented by Parry Sound-Muskoka Stewardship Network
Friday, May 27, Kinark Outdoor Centre, Carnarvon.
Agenda includes:

"Lets go Birding" An outdoor field trip to identify woodlot birds by sight & song. Al Sinclair, Muskoka Field Naturalists

"Woodland Bird Habitat-From the Canopy to the Forest Floor". Ron Tozer, Naturalist & Friends of Algonquin Park member.

"Migration patterns & population trends" Audrey Heagy, Bird Studies Canada, Partner In Flight Plan Writer

"Introduction to Stick Nests, Forest Raptors & Cavity Tree Dwellers" Dr. Brian Naylor, Forest Habitat Biologist, MNR.

Cost for the day is $20, including lunch. Anyone interested in attending should contact Mike Walsh, Stewardship Coordinator Parry Sound-Muskoka Stewardship Network, Ministry of Natural Resources R.R. #2, 1350 High Falls Rd.& Hwy 11, Bracebridge, Ont. P1L 1W9
Phone: (705) 646-5530 Fax: (705) 645-8372 email: mike.walsh@mnr.gov.on.ca

 

 

Moths flying last week (wk20 May 15-21)
Posted on May 23, 2005 at 06:36:13 PM by Al Sinclair

Moths flying last week (wk20 May 15-21)
The following, except where noted, were recorded at a mercury vapour light on my verandah at 1852 Hwy 118E, 8km east of Bracebridge. The light is controlled by a timer to come on on alternate nights 3 times a week.
There were very few flying this week because of the cool weather.

HODGES,GENUS,SPECIES,CNAME,LOCATION
6621,Melanolophia,signataria,Signate Melanolophia
6667,Lomographa,vestaliata,White Spring Moth,Bracebridge Ponds
6668,Lomographa,glomeraria,Gray Spring Moth
6836,Anagoga,occiduaria,American Barred Umber
6842,Plagodis,phlogosaria,Straight-lined Plagodis
6966,Eutrapela,clemataria,Curve-toothed Geometer
7637,Cladara,limitaria,Mottled Gray Carpet
7931,Gluphisia,septentrionis,Common Gluphisia

 

STRAIGHT-LINED PLAGODIS - photo

 

 

Re(2): Whip-Poor-Will
Posted on May 29, 2005 at 10:49:05 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Janet (? last name), Audrey Tournay's neice, told me today that they used to hear whip-poor-wills all the time at Aspen Valley Wildlife Sanctuary when they visited as kids. She heard one there a few years ago but none since.

 

 

Re(1): Whip-Poor-Will
Posted on May 29, 2005 at 10:45:46 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Late posting but a whip-poor-will was heard here, Bala, on Saturday night the 21st and has been here several nights since including at 9:30 pm tonight. That seems to be its prefered time.

 

 

Whip-Poor-Will
Posted on May 23, 2005 at 05:54:32 PM by sylvia purdon

Near 1357 Beiers Rd. Kilworthy, 2 Whip-Poor-Wills calling at 2250hr Sunday evening, May 22.

 

 

Bracebridge Ponds May 23...41species...Alder Flycatchers
Posted on May 23, 2005 at 01:41:36 PM by Al Sinclair

It was cool and windy today at the ponds. All the Yellowlegs and other shorebirds (except resident Spotted) were gone. I had 2 new species for my Ponds list this spring:
Alder Flycatcher, 4 or more west of cell 4 along the pipeline
Great-crested Flycatcher, 1 south of cell 4
Also found a Spotted Sandpiper nest with eggs just off the road about a meter, south side of cell 4, bush side. Marked the spot with a scratch on the road. Don't aproach the nest any closer than you have to, the resident fox might follow your scent when he does his patrol.
There was 2 House Wrens singing at the Lagoon Lane gate and another at the Kerr Park Chalet.
At Henry Rd had the Golden-winged Warbler and Green Heron, Hairy Woodpecker nest at the parking lot south-west corner in a poplar tree, young begging calls heard.

SPECIES SEEN
From 5/23/2005 to 5/23/2005 ~ in Bracebridge S.L. ~ 41 seen
Canada Goose
Wood Duck
Green-winged Teal
Mallard
American Black Duck
Blue-winged Teal
Spotted Sandpiper
Ring-billed Gull
Northern Flicker
Alder Flycatcher
Great Crested Flycatcher
Tree Swallow
Bank Swallow
Barn Swallow
House Wren
Gray Catbird
Veery
Wood Thrush
American Robin
Blue Jay
European Starling
Warbling Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
Nashville Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Magnolia Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
American Redstart
Ovenbird
Northern Waterthrush
Common Yellowthroat
Chipping Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
Bobolink
Red-winged Blackbird
Baltimore Oriole
Purple Finch
American Goldfinch
////---- STATISTICS ----/////
Species seen - 41

 

 

Re(2): Olive-sided? Flycatcher
Posted on May 23, 2005 at 08:45:02 PM by Terry Whittam / Marion Whittam

Hi Dan. I listened hard for the "quick three beers" but all I hear was the "free beer" or "three beer" call. I was so busy taking pictures of the Golden wing I neglected the fly-catcher. Now you have me thinking! I'll go back next weekend for a picture. If your in the area please verify it for me. Exact co-ordinates 629525 easting - 4961948 northing... right on Canning road at the small bridge about .5 K before Wenona Rd.
Thanks Terry

 

 

Re(1): Olive-sided? Flycatcher
Posted on May 23, 2005 at 01:47:31 PM by Dan Burton

If your Flycatcher sang "quick three beers" then it is much more interesting! This is the song of Olive-sided Flycatcher, a much rarer bird.

 

 

Golden Winged Warbler on Canning Road
Posted on May 23, 2005 at 12:37:52 PM by Terry Whittam / Marion Whittam

 

Golden Winged warbler singing this morning on Canning Road at the "little" bridge half way from Baseline road to Wenona road. Also Alder Flycatcher (calling for "three beers") and Chestnut sided at the same location. Attached picture is downsized and a little grainy from magnification. But it confirms it as a Golden Winged!  photo

 

 

Re(1): Dreamy Duskywing butterfly
Posted on May 23, 2005 at 01:24:22 PM by Al Sinclair

Around Bracebridge it could be either, but I find Juvenal's Duskywing more common than Dreamy Duskywing. Juvenal's look similar but are larger, has some white spots on the forewing, fly at the same time.

 

 

Dreamy Duskywing butterfly
Posted on May 23, 2005 at 09:39:16 AM by Barbara Taylor

Yesterday there was a dark butterfly on the ground at the edge of the Henry Rd. trail just as you leave the woods and step out into the open area. (Bracebridge)

It appeared to be a Dreamy Duskywing. Is there a similar looking species that might be out now?

 

 

Vesper Sparrows - photo
Posted on May 22, 2005 at 09:28:55 PM by Barbara Taylor

Wilf Yusek found a few Vesper Sparrows near the entrance to the Beaver Creek Institution in Gravenhurst yesterday. Here are a couple of his photos. Thanks Wilf.  photo1  photo2

 

 

Hooded Mergansers
Posted on May 22, 2005 at 04:47:07 PM by Wilf Yusek

In cell 4 at the Bracebridge Lagoons this a.m. I saw a male and female Hooded Merganser

 

 

Golden Winged Warbler in town
Posted on May 22, 2005 at 12:53:41 PM by Dan Burton

This morning I heard and saw a Golden Winged Warbler on Wagner Street. This is the first ever that I have had right in town (Gravenhurst)

 

 

Bracebridge Ponds - MFN birding
Posted on May 21, 2005 at 01:17:27 PM by Barbara Taylor

The Muskoka Field Naturalists held a birding walk around the Ponds this morning, led by Don Bailey. It was relatively quiet at the Ponds today, with many of the warblers already moved on, or perhaps just not in the singing mood. Nevertheless, there were still a number of colourful sightings, including a beautiful male Scarlet Tanager. Also to our surprise, a fawn was seen in the woods to the west of cell 3. Virginia Rails were heard and even glimpsed by some in the marshy area to the east of cell 4. A Sora was calling from the west of cell 4. Just as the walk was ending, there was a special treat - a Semipalmated Plover in cell 2 on the large floating mat of vegetation near the north end. Many thanks to Wilf Yusek for lending us his scope so we could have a good look at the bird. Here is the list for this morning's outing - 44 species:

Semipalmated Plover
Virginia Rail
Sora
Osprey
Turkey Vulture
Red-eyed Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Ovenbird
American Redstart
Yellow Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Black-and-white Warbler
Tree Swallow
Scarlet Tanager
Rose-breasted Grosbeak (M & F)
Baltimore Oriole
American Goldfinch
Gray Catbird
Hairy Woodpecker
Black-capped Chickadee
Red-breasted Nuthatch
Blue Jay
American Robin
American Crow
Common Raven
Ring-billed Gull
European Starling
Red-winged Blackbird
Savannah Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Chipping Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Canada Goose
Double-crested Cormorant
Green-winged Teal
Blue-winged Teal
Mallard
Lesser Scaup
Wood Duck
Spotted Sandpiper
Killdeer
Ruffed Grouse (heard drumming)

 

Bracebridge Ponds - map

 

 

 

Re(1): Other Warblers
Posted on May 21, 2005 at 08:47:02 PM by Dan Burton

In addition to the Tennessee, some other warblers around Gravenhurst today:
Nashvilles, Yellows, Chestnut-sideds, Black-Throated Greens, Black-Throated Blues, Blackburnian, Yellow-rumpeds, Pines,Blackpoll, Black&Whites, American Redstarts, Ovenbirds, Common Yellowthroats.

 

 

Tennessee
Posted on May 21, 2005 at 01:07:07 PM by Dan Burton

Tennessee Warbler singing here in my yard today (Gravenhurst)

 

 

Swainsons Thrush, Baltimore Oriole, Bala
Posted on May 20, 2005 at 05:14:15 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Swainsons thrush Wednesday and Baltimore oriole today add another two species for my home list. Dinny Nimmo identified the thrush and the oriole is coming to half an orange hung up with a coat hanger.

Muskoka RD 38, Bala

 

 

Catbird
Posted on May 20, 2005 at 04:34:49 PM by Dan Burton

Yesterday- 1st Catbird (my yard in Gravenhurst)

 

 

Re(1): Painted Trilliums blooming...photo
Posted on May 20, 2005 at 10:37:04 AM by Terry Whittam / Marion Whittam

Nice photo Al. Just beautiful..... I'll keep my eyes open this weekend. Terry

 

 

Painted Trilliums blooming...photo
Posted on May 19, 2005 at 07:12:07 PM by Al Sinclair

This photo was taken today in our woods east of Bracebridge. They are fairly common in Muskoka and are usually found near Eastern Hemlock trees. I have seen them beside the Wilson's Falls trail in Bracebridge in the low section on the east side of the river.

 

 

Bracebridge Ponds May 19...Osprey, Blackpoll Warbler, House Wren, 45 species
Posted on May 19, 2005 at 02:55:02 PM by Al Sinclair

At the Ponds today 11am to 1pm:
Osprey, flying over, circled, flew north
Blackpoll Warbler, in the poplars at the Lagoon Lane gate, singing
House Wren, singing behind the trees east of the Lagoon Lane gate.
Green Heron, south of the septic dumping cells.
Red-eyed Vireo, singing on the hill west of the pipeline (3 or 4 were singing at home this morning, first this year)
Cedar Waxings, 4 corner of cell 3 and 4.

SPECIES SEEN
From 5/19/2005 to 5/19/2005 45 seen
Green Heron
Canada Goose
Wood Duck
Green-winged Teal
Mallard
Blue-winged Teal
Lesser Scaup
Bufflehead
Turkey Vulture
Osprey
Sora
Lesser Yellowlegs
Solitary Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Cedar Waxwing
House Wren
Wood Thrush
American Robin
Black-capped Chickadee
White-breasted Nuthatch
Blue Jay
American Crow
Warbling Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
Yellow Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Magnolia Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Blackpoll Warbler
Black-and-white Warbler
American Redstart
Ovenbird
Northern Waterthrush
Common Yellowthroat
Savannah Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Bobolink
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
Baltimore Oriole
American Goldfinch
////---- STATISTICS ----/////
Species seen - 45

 

 

Tiger Swallowtail butterfly
Posted on May 19, 2005 at 12:42:16 PM by Barbara Taylor

A Tiger Swallowtail butterfly just flew through our yard. Seems early for them - usually we don't see any here until the lilacs are in bloom. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Magnolia Warbler - photo
Posted on May 19, 2005 at 08:19:09 AM by Barbara Taylor

Wilf Yusek captured this nice photo of a Magnolia Warbler yesterday at the Bracebridge Ponds. Thanks Wilf.

 

 

Clay-colored Sparrow - photo
Posted on May 19, 2005 at 08:16:03 AM by Barbara Taylor

Wilf Yusek found two Clay-colored Sparrows yesterday by #86 Glendale Rd., Bracebridge. Here are a couple of his photos (cropped for faster download). Thanks Wilf.  photo1  photo2

 

 

wood thrush
Posted on May 18, 2005 at 10:15:23 PM by Challis

A wood thrush has been singing on Rocksborough Road this week (Tuesday and Wednesday). It made me late for work. Also heard our first common yellowthroat warbler on Tuesday.

 

 

Bobolinks at Lagoons
Posted on May 18, 2005 at 07:43:48 PM by Brenda Clark

At about 2 pm today I saw several bobolinks on the dike between lagoons one and three according to the map on the previous entry at Bracebridge.

 

 

Warblers - Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on May 18, 2005 at 10:58:10 AM by Barbara Taylor

Lots of warblers at the Ponds this morning, especially in the thickets and tamaracks to the west of cell 4.

Cape May (1)
Palm
Magnolia
American Redstart
Chestnut-sided
Black-and-white
Yellow
Nashville
Yellow-rumped
Common Yellowthroat
Northern Waterthrush
Ovenbird
Warbling Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo

A Solitary Sandpiper, Greater Yellowlegs, and Spotted Sandpipers at the south edge of cell 3. Heard a Sora calling from west of cell 4.  Several Eastern Kingbirds to north of cell 4.

Bracebridge Ponds - map

 

 

Golden-winged Warblers
Posted on May 17, 2005 at 04:06:26 PM by Bob Burt

This afternoon at the Henry Rd. marsh a female Golden-winged Warbler was with the male.

 

 

Moths flying last week (wk19 May 8-14)
Posted on May 16, 2005 at 07:45:38 PM by Al Sinclair

Moths flying last week (wk19 May 8-14)
The following were seen at the MV light on my verandah that I leave on 3 nights a week.

HODGES GENUS SPECIES CNAME
6621 Melanolophia signataria, Signate Melanolophia
6668 Lomographa glomeraria, Gray Spring Moth
6842 Plagodis phlogosaria, Straight-lined Plagodis
6966 Eutrapela clemataria, Curve-toothed Geometer
7329 Anticlea vasiliata, Variable Carpet
7637 Cladara limitaria, Mottled Gray Carpet
8137 Spilosoma virginica, Virginian Tiger Moth
8713 Zale lunifera, Bold-based Zale
9936 Eupsilia morrisoni, Morrison's Sallow
10008 Feralia comstocki, Comstock's Sallow
10520 Morrisonia evicta, Bicolored Woodgrain
10994 Cerastis tenebrifera, Reddish Speckled Dart
10996 Metalepsis salicarum

CURVE-TOOTHED GEOMETER photo

 

 

 

Brewer's Blackbirds, Northern Parula
Posted on May 16, 2005 at 04:49:38 PM by Barbara Taylor

There are at least four Brewer's Blackbirds back at the peat farm on Beatrice Townline at junction with Falkenburg Rd.

This afternoon we saw a female Northern Harrier and then a Broad-winged Hawk hunting low over a swampy area along South Monck Dr. A Northern Parula and Green Heron were heard calling from the west side of the road, but they were in too far to be seen. A Gray Catbird was seen on the east side. Chestnut-sided and Nashville Warblers were singing nearby. Take Hwy 118 W. to South Monck Dr. The road dips down and passes through a large swampy area with lots of thickets just north of Crawford Lane. (Bracebridge)


directions to Brewer's Blackbirds:
From Bracebridge go west on Hwy. 118W and turn right onto Butter & Egg Rd. At Falkenburg Rd. turn left to Beatrice Townline Rd. The birds are often foraging on the piles of black earth on the right side of the road.

 

 

Re(1): Clay-colored Sparrow
Posted on June 30, 2005 at 03:25:55 PM by Barbara Taylor

I haven't heard or seen the sparrow since the big thunderstorms June 14th. Until then, he could be heard singing every day, but not once since. Either he has moved on, or is too busy tending nestlings (Wilf Yusek had seen 2 Clay-colored Sparrows in the same spruce tree at #86 Glendale Rd., Bracebridge, on May 18).

 

 

Re(2): Clay-colored Sparrow - still there
Posted on May 21, 2005 at 07:26:25 PM by Terry Whittam / Marion Whittam

A "lifer" for both of us. The Clay-colored sparrow was still there today when we arrived at about 10am. Literally heard it before we even stopped the car! Took some great pictures!

 

 

Re(1): Clay-colored Sparrow - still there
Posted on May 18, 2005 at 06:43:46 AM by Barbara Taylor

The sparrow is still there this morning singing his four buzz notes.

 

 

Re(1): Clay-colored Sparrow ... last Muskoka sighting was in 2003
Posted on May 17, 2005 at 09:43:17 AM by Al Sinclair

The last sighting of the species in Muskoka was in spring 2003. I copied the text below from the Bird Board Archives. Note the date is almost the same.

"At 4pm yesterday May 17, when the bird board was down , I had a close look at a Clay-colored Sparrow at the Bracebridge Ponds. It was in the grass and shrubs along the ditch side of the north wall of cell 4(the one near the pipeline). When last seen it was at the west end near the pile of wood chips, earlier it was about 100 ft east. This is the first one I've seen in Muskoka in about 20 years although they do occur regularly just south in Simcoe and Victoria Co."

 

 

Re(1): Clay-colored Sparrow - Bracebridge...seen at noon today
Posted on May 16, 2005 at 04:32:30 PM by Al Sinclair

We saw it at around noon today with no problem. It was defending the spruce trees in front of #86. As soon as we stopped it came flying over from the cedar hedge left of the vacant lot and scolded us at close range for about 10 minutes, also sang a couple of times. Part of the time it was across the street.

 

 

Clay-colored Sparrow - Bracebridge
Posted on May 16, 2005 at 10:51:16 AM by Barbara Taylor

There is a Clay-colored Sparrow perched atop a spruce tree beside the driveway of #86 Glendale Rd. It has been singing its four flat buzz notes off and on all morning. I have heard the sounds coming from the same general area for about a week but couldn't find the bird until this morning. Most frequently heard between 8-10 a.m. Confirmed by Don Bailey at about 10:30 a.m.


directions: from Ball's Dr. (behind the A&P plaza) turn north on Tamarack Trail and turn left onto Glendale Rd. #86 is up on the top of the hill, on your right.

 

 

Ontario Trillium "Trillium grandiflorum"
Posted on May 15, 2005 at 08:28:07 PM by Terry Whittam / Marion Whittam

Hundreds of White Trilliums on the trail at Henry Marsh Bracebridge
Ontario Trilliums at Henry Marsh

 

 

Golden Winged Warblers "heard"
Posted on May 15, 2005 at 08:15:46 PM by Terry Whittam / Marion Whittam

Multiple Golden-Winged Warblers heard today at a number of sights east of Washago on Coopers Falls Road. No pictures yet! Hoping our Blue Winged has returned at the 8km mark east of Washago.

 

 

Henry Marsh "Bethroot" Purple Trillium
Posted on May 15, 2005 at 08:04:44 PM by Terry Whittam / Marion Whittam

A great morning this morning at Henry Marsh. Greeted immediately by a Nashville singing as we parked the car.... Chestnut sided, Yellow warbler, WhiteThroat sparrow, Swamp sparrow, a very loud roughed grouse, Veery, Ovenbird, and a winter wren singing endlessly. No bitterns heard this week.
Lots of White trilliums including a few beautiful Purple Trillums on the trail!

Bethroot "Purple Trillium"

 

 

brown thrasher
Posted on May 15, 2005 at 07:51:11 PM by Leslee Tassie

Our first brown thrasher was hopping around the ground today, earlier than we usually see them.

 

 

Re(2): Green Heron & RTHummingbird
Posted on May 16, 2005 at 08:23:40 AM by jim maguire&sylvia purdon

Brian: Thank you for the response. The birds must fan out in a large migration which i think must have happened last Thursday and Friday nights.

 

 

Re(1): Green Heron & RTHummingbird
Posted on May 16, 2005 at 05:13:27 AM by Brian Shulist

Hi:
Although I'm located a distance from Muskoka (Barry's Bay area), I'm still amazed at the similarity in the timing of species' arrivals in both our areas. I saw my first ruby-throat on May 15th and first Green Heron on May 13th. The Green Heron is rare in the Madawaska Highlands.
Brian

 

 

Green Heron & RTHummingbird
Posted on May 15, 2005 at 07:56:00 AM by jim maguire&sylvia purdon

Sparrow Lake, Saturday May 14 :Ruby Throated Hummingbird arrived at the nectar feeder within 20 minutes of putting it up; Green Heron on the Wenona Marsh, Wenona Lodge Road, on Friday May 13 just before dusk

 

 

Bird, Ragged Rapids Road
Posted on May 14, 2005 at 07:04:20 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Ragged Rapids RD and Medora Lake Rd. combined to give me more American Redstarts in one day than I usually see all summer. I had 5 in total.

RRRD, Palm, black & white, lots of yellow-rumped, redstarts, chestnut sided, warbling vireo, hermit thrush.

 

 

Golden-winged Warbler - Henry Rd. Marsh
Posted on May 14, 2005 at 03:12:48 PM by Barbara Taylor

Wilf Yusek saw the Golden-winged Warbler this morning on the west side of the trail as you come out into the open area. So we decided to have a quick look this afternoon, and found the bird at the far east side right next to the trail that heads into the woods towards the Bracebridge Ponds. A Sora was calling from the west side of the marsh.
  The blackflies were "thick" as the sun came out so we didn't stay very long - I think I donated a couple of pints...


(directions to Henry marsh: from traffic lights at Eccelstone Dr. and Wellington St., go west on Beaumont Dr. to Henry Rd., Bracebridge)

 

 

Bracebridge Ponds May 14 AM...59 species
Posted on May 14, 2005 at 02:11:13 PM by Al Sinclair

Wilf Yusek, Don Bailey, Barbara Taylor, Bob Burt & Al Sinclair birded the Ponds this morning. Quite a few new birds have arrived, good variety of species were seen but numbers were low. Of special interest were:
Orange-crowned Warbler, west side of cell 4 half way down. (two in one day for me, a record - they're not hard to get this year)
Northern Parula, 1 possibly 2, north side of cell 4.
Solitary Sandpipers, 3 in cells 2 and 3
Virginia Rail & Sora west side of cell 4

SPECIES SEEN
From 5/14/2005 to 5/14/2005 ~ in Bracebridge S.L. ~ 59 seen
Great Blue Heron
Canada Goose
Wood Duck
Mallard
Blue-winged Teal
Lesser Scaup
Bufflehead
Turkey Vulture
Virginia Rail
Sora
Greater Yellowlegs
Lesser Yellowlegs
Solitary Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
Ring-billed Gull
Chimney Swift
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Least Flycatcher
Eastern Kingbird
Tree Swallow
Bank Swallow
Barn Swallow
Gray Catbird
Brown Thrasher
Wood Thrush
American Robin
Black-capped Chickadee
Brown Creeper
Blue Jay
American Crow
European Starling
Warbling Vireo
Orange-crowned Warbler
Nashville Warbler
Northern Parula
Yellow Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Magnolia Warbler
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
Black-and-white Warbler
American Redstart
Ovenbird
Northern Waterthrush
Common Yellowthroat
Savannah Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Bobolink
Red-winged Blackbird
Eastern Meadowlark
Rusty Blackbird
Baltimore Oriole
Purple Finch
American Goldfinch
////---- STATISTICS ----/////
Species seen - 59

 

 

sharp shinned hawks
Posted on May 14, 2005 at 11:28:16 AM by Leslee Tassie

For the past 5 or 6 days there's been a pair of sharp shinned hawks around our place. I'm sure they must be nesting nearby because everytime I step outside I see and/or hear them. I have a lot of bird-feeders going at the moment and we have a lot of activity going on at them. I'm reasonably sure (it happened so fast) I witnessed a bird get snatched in mid-air today by the sharp-shinned hawk.
As well, on Thursday, there was a red-tailed hawk soaring over our house.

 

 

Orange-crowned Warbler...Bracebridge
Posted on May 14, 2005 at 08:36:59 AM by Al Sinclair

It might be a good day to go warbler hunting, a change in weather often brings in new migrants. When I went down for the paper this morning at 8 there was an Orange-crowned Warbler singing in the wet woods across the road. I followed it through thick undergrowth for about 15 minutes and had a few brief looks. It stayed low and hidden most of the time but sang continuously. From my experience this is a hard species to get in Muskoka. We are 8km east of Bracebridge on Hwy 118E at #1852.

 

 

Osprey - Bay Lake
Posted on May 13, 2005 at 01:57:06 PM by Kip Daynard

Yesterday morning watched an Osprey flying over Bay Lake. This is only the second I've seen on Bay Lake in the 3 & 1/2 years I've been living here. (Also saw one near Clear Lake back in mid April).

Bay Lake is 25kms NE of Huntsville via Hwy 11, 592, Bay Lake Rd.

 

 

Scarlet Tanager
Posted on May 13, 2005 at 01:01:11 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there was a Scarlet Tanager along the Henry Rd. trail between the parking area and the open marsh.

And a quick check for warblers at the Bracebridge Ponds in the sheltered woods south of cell 3 - Yellow, Nashville, Chestnut-sided, Black-and-white, Yellow-rumped, and Black-throated Blue Warblers, Ovenbirds, and Warbling Vireos. Several Baltimore Orioles were singing. Many Yellowlegs and Spotted Sandpipers along south edge of cell 3.

 

Bracebridge Ponds - map

(directions to Henry marsh: from traffic lights at Eccelstone Dr. and Wellington St., go west on Beaumont Dr. to Henry Rd., Bracebridge)    

 

 

OSPREY nest - more info on SIMCOE BOARD
Posted on May 16, 2005 at 08:57:32 AM by jd


there are several posting on the SIMCOE NATURE BOARD about this nest.
3 years running -- maintenance crew takes it down each year.
no successful offspring recorded yet.
suggestions about a web cam are being proposed ( informally ... possibly formally )
jd

 

 

osprey nest, Hwy 11
Posted on May 13, 2005 at 12:09:04 PM by John Challis

If you have occasion to drive to Barrie, watch for the cell-phone tower just by the ramp where Highway 400 joins Highway 11 (about 2 km past Penetanguishene Road 93). There's a large stick nest at the top, looking out over the world. On Tuesday I noticed a pair of large birds at the nest -- possibly osprey but I didn't have much time to get a good look; drivesr are crazy at that intersection. I haven't seen any large birds there since, and a starling seems quite interested in the thing. So perhaps they've abandoned it. I hope not.

 

 

Golden-winged Warbler at Huntsville
Posted on May 13, 2005 at 09:26:27 AM by Burke Korol

On Tuesday, 10 May around 7 p.m. I heard a bird giving a Blue-winged Warbler song on the Fairy Vista Trail, about 300 m east of the water treatment plant. I eventually tracked it down and saw that it was a Golden-winged Warbler.

An adult male Eastern Bluebird was also seen in this general area.

 

 

Warblers, Bala
Posted on May 13, 2005 at 08:02:38 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Yesterday a small flock of warblers fed along the shoreline of my lake where lots of small flies were flying. Several yellow-rumped, pine, blackburnian, magnolia and black-throated green.

It was a different experience trying to identify them from the water side.

 

 

Golden-winged Warbler
Posted on May 12, 2005 at 04:20:30 PM by Barbara Taylor

This afternoon we heard the song of a Golden-winged Warbler at Henry marsh but couldn't see the bird. It was just east (left) of the Henry Rd. trail as you walk out of the woods into the open area. Other birds at the marsh included Nashville and Black-throated Green Warblers,
 Common Yellowthroat, American Goldfinch, Eastern Kingbird, Barn Swallow, Belted Kingfisher, and Broad-winged Hawk.


(directions: from traffic lights at Eccelstone Dr. and Wellington St., go west on Beaumont Dr. to Henry Rd. - Bracebridge)

 

 

Killdeer
Posted on May 12, 2005 at 03:01:48 PM by Gayle Carlyle

Wed. May 11 3:00
I saw, and heard, a pair of killdeer down in the wet area at the end of Rocksborough Rd.
We haven't had killdeer around here for about 6 years. I hope they decide to nest in the area.
I also saw a few shorebirds in the morning, maybe sandpipers, but I didn't get a close enough look at them to see what kind.

 

 

black-throated blue
Posted on May 12, 2005 at 12:53:47 PM by Challis & Carlyle

It may have been cold, but the first black-throated blue warbler in our neighbourhood (Rocksborough Rd., Bracebridge) was singing this morning, ca. 7:10 a.m.
There seem to be a great many Nashville warblers down the road this year, too. Has anyone else experienced large numbers of Nashvilles? Or is it just that I'm now able to pick their call out from others?

 

 

Photo of Whooping Cranes on the Bruce
Posted on May 12, 2005 at 09:51:10 AM by Al Sinclair

Click on the link below, scroll down to the whooping crane photo link.
Checkout the transmitters on their legs, antenna wire pointing down.
http://www.ofo.ca/photos

 

 

Bracebridge Ponds May 11 AM...58 species
Posted on May 11, 2005 at 01:12:48 PM by Al Sinclair

It was cold and damp at the Ponds this morning but the change in weather brought in quite a few new birds including:
Least Sandpiper 24 - cell 1
Semiplamated Plover 1 - cell 1
Baltimore Oriole
Green Heron 1 - in the woods north of cell 4 close to cell 3.
Common Yellowthroat
Eastern Kingbird
Bobolink 5
Wood Thrush
Magnolia Warbler - TC Trail west side of the pipeline.

The first progeny of the year were swimming with their parents in cell 3, two broods of Canada Geese totalling 9 goslings.

Complete list for this morning:
SPECIES SEEN
From 5/11/2005 58 seen
Double-crested Cormorant
Green Heron
Canada Goose
Wood Duck
Gadwall
Green-winged Teal
Mallard
Blue-winged Teal
Lesser Scaup
Bufflehead
Ruffed Grouse
Sora
Semipalmated Plover
Killdeer
Greater Yellowlegs
Lesser Yellowlegs
Spotted Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
Ring-billed Gull
Chimney Swift
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Least Flycatcher
Eastern Kingbird
Tree Swallow
Bank Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Barn Swallow
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Brown Thrasher
Wood Thrush
American Robin
Black-capped Chickadee
Blue Jay
American Crow
Warbling Vireo
Nashville Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Magnolia Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Palm Warbler
Ovenbird
Northern Waterthrush
Common Yellowthroat
Chipping Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Bobolink
Red-winged Blackbird
Eastern Meadowlark
Baltimore Oriole
American Goldfinch
////---- STATISTICS ----/////
Species seen - 58

 

 

Re(2): Whooping Crane photo from Quebec
Posted on May 11, 2005 at 10:13:33 PM by Al Sinclair

They appear to have revised the site today with all new photos. I see Barbara has found it on another site.

 

 

Re(2): Whooping Crane photo - new link
Posted on May 11, 2005 at 10:08:57 PM by Barbara Taylor

Looks like they've updated the website with more recent sightings, but I've found another link to the photo. The photo was taken by Pierre Bannon and you can find it at http://www.pbase.com/pbannon/image/42922373

I found the link on a Montreal sightings website at http://www.cam.org/~postigny/ObsMtl/index.php If my French translation is right, there have only been 5 previous sightings in Quebec in the past - scroll down to the Mai 3 sighting of a GRUE BLANCHE D'AMERIQUE.

 

 

Re(1): Whooping Crane photo from Quebec
Posted on May 11, 2005 at 07:43:01 PM by Mark McAnally

Al
I can't seem to find the Whooping Crane photo on the site you gave. I am the only one to report this to you?

 

 

Whooping Crane photo from Quebec
Posted on May 10, 2005 at 07:54:16 PM by Al Sinclair

A photo of the Whooping Crane seen in Quebec on May 3 is posted on the web site below (scroll down past the Grebe).

http://www.oiseauxrares.qc.ca

It is likely one of the 3 cranes that were lost in Ontario. The other 2 crossed over to the Michigan Upper Peninsula and are on track to get back to Wisconsin.

 

 

Bobolinks and more
Posted on May 10, 2005 at 11:46:06 AM by Carlyle/Challis

Tuesday, May 10 about 9:30
The bobolinks have returned to Rocksborough Rd. as have the noisy ravens to their nest in the Hydro tower.
Had our first hummingbird show up May 9 at about 9:30 am. This is about 3 days later than usual.

 

 

bike around Muskoka
Posted on May 10, 2005 at 08:03:55 AM by gerald willmott

Hello All,

First of all, I have 14 white crowned sparrows running, literally running, around under my feeder at 103 Ball's Dr. in BB. Also around are a pair of purple finches, 5 or so chipping sparrow, and three Savannah Sparrows.

But on a nice bike around Muskoka last night were the following:

-Beaver on Muskoka Rd #4 just west of the railway crossing just west of Falkenburg Rd.
-At Bardsville was a Meadow Lark singing
-At Brookland farms on the Butter & Egg road was a dead Crow, which may be of interest in itself, but it was being eaten by a Northern Harrier and watching the show was a TV.
-At Ziska Road on 118 a Broad Winged Hawk was sitting on the hydro wires, and a gopher was running across the field.

A nice ride. Can you trace the route?

 

 

whip-poor-will
Posted on May 9, 2005 at 09:57:37 PM by ron stager

Tonight a whip-poor-will was calling on Merkley Rd east of Barkway. They are about a week later than usual.

I saw a dragonfly, many butterflies and lots of sparrows today. Evening grosbeaks at the feeder yesterday and a rose breasted a couple of days ago. There is a group of 30 or more purple finches for the last week or so.

 

 

RB Grosbeak, Gadwall
Posted on May 9, 2005 at 09:26:53 PM by Dan Burton

A male Rose Breasted Grosbeak was singing at BB lagoons today. Nearby were Winter Wren, Nashville Warbler. A Sora called persistently and sang several times.
1 Gadwall in cell 1.

 

 

Whooping Cranes...more info on current locations
Posted on May 10, 2005 at 08:21:51 AM by Al Sinclair

A post last night on Ontbirds has given more info on the latest locations of the 3 Whooping Cranes. The text below was clipped from this webpage:
http://www.operationmigration.org/Field_Journal.html

"The three Michigan birds (AKA South Carolina birds AKA Ontario birds) appear to have split up. Two (301 and 318) were reported at the very tip of the Bruce Peninsula which is a spit of land that divides Georgian Bay from the rest of Lake Huron. Now it appears they have made the jump over open water and are in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. This is very god news and if they keep going west they could eventually make it home. On the other hand we just received a unconfirmed report that the last member of this notorious group has been sighted south west of Montreal in the Province of Quebec. This report comes with a fairly convincing picture of what appears to be a Whooping crane in flight but no bands are visible."

 

 

Re(1): Whooping Crane? Could be one of the 3 lost in Ontario
Posted on May 10, 2005 at 03:38:17 PM by todd white

al, im am not 100% sure.i have seen sand hills many times,this bird.had a very long neck in flight.and was oddley soaring for quite a while.appeared light in color

 

 

Whooping Crane? Could be one of the 3 lost in Ontario
Posted on May 10, 2005 at 08:05:43 AM by Al Sinclair

How sure are you about the crane? Sandhill Cranes are getting fairly common and are all grey when seen flying. Whooping Cranes are pure white with distinctive black wing tips. One of the 3 lost Whooping Cranes that flew into the park 3 weeks ago was separated from the other two and hasn't been seen since. It does not have a transmitter. I think the biologists tracking them would be very interested in knowing the details of your sighting.

 

 

bald eagle
Posted on May 9, 2005 at 07:55:37 PM by todd white

six king fisher,two wood ducks,two northen flicker,a bittern,five loons,common meragnser,pileated woodpecker,four beaver,eight moose,two deer,two otters,and by gods grace a whooping crane in flight ,i think? and a mature bald eagle. (Algonquin Park)

 

 

Re(1): Flycatchers and other new arrivals
Posted on May 10, 2005 at 01:42:49 PM by Barbara Taylor

A Great Crested Flycatcher was "wheeep - wheeping" in our yard this morning. Yesterday we had a second wave of White-throated Sparrows at the feeders but they have already moved on. Still awaiting our first hummingbird. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Flycatchers and other new arrivals
Posted on May 9, 2005 at 05:13:25 PM by Kip Daynard

Firsts of season for us on Bay Lake today:

Great-Crested Flycatcher
Least Flycatcher
Blue-headed Vireos (several)
Black-and-White Warbler (several)
Black-throated Blue Warbler

1380 Bay Lake Rd.
25kms NE of Huntsville via Hwy 11, 592 N

 

 

flycatcher, warblers, white-crowned sp
Posted on May 9, 2005 at 04:54:32 PM by Challis & Carlyle

Gayle reports our first hummingbird this morning. We had a white crowned sparrow singing and a pair of Nashville warblers feeding on the birch catkins in our backyard, Rocksborough Rd., Bracebridge, and Gayle's first blackfly bite on Sunday. Also, today's morning dog-walk bird call survey yielded 23 species, including our first least flycatcher, black-and-white warbler and yellow warbler. Enjoyed a wonderful quintet by the adjacent farm field of song sparrow, hermit thrush, meadowlark, winter wren and ovenbird, all at once.

 

 

Ruby-throated hummingbird
Posted on May 9, 2005 at 12:15:20 PM by Doug Smith

Put up my hummer feeder on Mother's Day, as usual, though thought it might be a little early, and had a male there this morning.  (Uffington)

 

 

Re(1): Red-bellied woodpecker?
Posted on May 9, 2005 at 05:07:56 PM by Kip Daynard

I'd say its possible. Red-Bellied woodpeckers have been seen in SE Parry Sound District (Clear Lake / Bay Lake) in two of the past 4 years. However, both these sightings were in late fall (Nov/Dec).

 

 

Re(1): Red-bellied woodpecker?
Posted on May 9, 2005 at 01:30:28 PM by Al Sinclair

Red-bellied Woodpeckers are expanding their range and, although still rare, are now being seen as far north as North Bay and Sudbury. There have been two or three sightings per year in Muskoka recently.

 

 

Red-bellied woodpecker?
Posted on May 9, 2005 at 11:58:08 AM by dawn

I think I may have seen a pair of Red-bellied woodpeckers yesterday (Blackstone Lake, just south of Parry Sound). Is this possible? In the book that I have, their range wasn't that far north. If not, any guess what they could have been?

 

 

Bracebridge Ponds PM...Gadwall, Rusty Blackbird, Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Posted on May 9, 2005 at 01:58:45 PM by Al Sinclair

As usually the PM is quieter, I missed most of the warblers and Merlin. However, did find a Gadwall in cell 1, Rusty Blackbird on the ground in the wet area at corner of cell 3 & 4, 2 Rose-breasted Grosbeaks. The complete list is below, 32 species.

SPECIES SEEN
From 5/9/2005 to 5/9/2005
Canada Goose
Wood Duck
Gadwall
Green-winged Teal
Mallard
Blue-winged Teal
Lesser Scaup
Bufflehead
Turkey Vulture
Ruffed Grouse
Sora
Killdeer
Greater Yellowlegs
Lesser Yellowlegs
Spotted Sandpiper
Ring-billed Gull
Brown Thrasher
American Robin
Black-capped Chickadee
American Crow
Warbling Vireo
Nashville Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Ovenbird
Northern Waterthrush
Savannah Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Red-winged Blackbird
Rusty Blackbird
American Goldfinch
////---- STATISTICS ----/////
Species seen - 32

 

 

White-crowned Sparrows, Sora - Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on May 9, 2005 at 11:20:04 AM by Barbara Taylor

The two Sora were calling again this morning just west of cell 4 near the south end. A Merlin was swooping down on Spotted Sandpipers in cell 2, but kept missing. White-crowned Sparrows were near the Lagoon Lane gate. Many Black-throated Green, Yellow-rumped, and Black-and-white Warblers, and a few Yellow Warblers and Ovenbirds. A Brown Thrasher was singing from a dead tree near the viewing stand in Kerr Park. The blackflies are out in small numbers now. Very few Ducks. A couple of Ring-necked Ducks in cell 4. Some Lesser Scaup, Wood Ducks, Mallards, and a couple of Blue-winged Teal in cell 2. Small numbers of Bufflehead in all cells, but mostly females now.  Bracebridge Ponds - map

 

 

Black Morels
Posted on May 8, 2005 at 06:34:09 PM by Barbara Taylor

On Browning Island (Lake Muskoka) today there were some Black Morels starting to come up in their usual spot. A few new arrivals - Black-throated Green Warblers, Black-and-white Warblers, Blue-headed Vireo, and Chipping Sparrows. We were happy to hear the Winter Wren is sticking around.

(note: morel webpage is part of George Barron's Website on Fungi)

 

 

Moths flying last week..May 1-7
Posted on May 8, 2005 at 02:49:42 PM by Al Sinclair

Moths flying last week (wk18 May 1-7)
The following were seen at the MV light on my verandah that I leave on 3 nights a week.

checklist#,genus,species,common name
10996,Metalepsis,salicarum,
7637,Cladara,limitaria,Mottled Gray Carpet
9935,Eupsilia,tristigmata,
8713,Zale,lunifera,Bold-based Zale
7390,Xanthorhoe,lacustrata,Toothed Brown Carpet
6812,Homochlodes,fritillaria,Pale Homochlodes

 

Most common:Mottled Gray Carpet, 5 on May 6 photo

 

 

 

Butterflies
Posted on May 8, 2005 at 02:13:12 PM by Al Sinclair

Warmer weather has brought out some butterflies. We had our first Mustard White here today, first Spring Azure yesterday. We are 8 km east of Bracebridge on Hwy 118E.

 

 

Mystery Bird
Posted on May 7, 2005 at 07:33:22 PM by Brenda Clark

I have not been able to nail this one down that we heard early this morning near a beaver pond south of the end of Hewitt St in Gravenhurst. It had a two part call. The first was a distinctive "whoop" as my husband called it, like a cardinal's "what", almost a whistle tone, followed after a brief pause by a weak tinkle of a trill. I could not place just where it came from, as we faced a hillside. Any ideas as to what it might be?

 

 

Re(1): hummers
Posted on May 7, 2005 at 02:49:21 PM by Barbara Taylor

No hummers here yet, but a few have started popping up in Ontario. Calmer winds and warmer temperatures should encourage them to get moving now. Ruby-throated Hummingbird Migration Map

Here's some information from Rick Stronks about hummingbird arrival dates in Algonquin Park.

 

 

Ovenbird
Posted on May 7, 2005 at 02:12:27 PM by Challis/Carlyle

Sat. May 7 1 pm
John heard our first ovenbird behind our house on Rocksborough Rd.
No hummingbird as yet.

 

 

Bala Lily-pad Sitters, Bala
Posted on May 7, 2005 at 01:40:54 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

This morning while out in my kayak on my lake I notice hundreds of blackflies sitting on large lilypads in the marsh. Not a good sign. They are discussing their strategy for making our lives miserable for the next few weeks!

 

 

Sora
Posted on May 7, 2005 at 11:55:05 AM by Barbara Taylor

This morning at the Bracebridge Ponds there were two Sora calling from the west of cell 4 along the pipeline right-of-way. Wilf Yusek heard a Virginia Rail calling there yesterday, but no luck this morning.

A very healthy looking fox was trotting up the hill to the south-west of cell 4, carrying a large rabbit in its mouth. Several Palm Warblers to the north and west of cell 4.

Bracebridge Ponds - map

 

 

Re(1): Eastern Towhee, Ovenbird, Wood Thrush, Bala
Posted on May 8, 2005 at 11:05:34 AM by bob burton

An Eastern Towhee has been scratching around the backyard at 47 Aubrey st.sat. also 2 White Crowned sparrows today  (Bracebridge)

 

 

Eastern Towhee, Ovenbird, Wood Thrush, Bala
Posted on May 7, 2005 at 09:44:45 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

I heard a towhee calling at my place in Bala this morning. Never heard one here before. Ovenbird calling and saw a wood thrush. Both towhee and wood thrush are new for my home list.

The white-throated sparrows and yellow-rumped warblers are calling too.

 

 

Bracebridge Ponds - PM
Posted on May 6, 2005 at 04:20:29 PM by Al Sinclair

Very quiet this afternoon. Added Black-and-white Warbler and Brown Creeper to Barbara's list, at the corner of cell 3 & 4. Stephanie Lehman reported hearing a Sora on May 2, between cell 4 and the pipeline.

 

 

Bracebridge Ponds - 35 species
Posted on May 6, 2005 at 12:09:32 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there were very few ducks on the Ponds, but lots of bird song in the air. At 11 a.m. there were two Meadowlarks near the fenceline between Kerr Park and the TransCanada Pipeline property. The one that was singing flew to an unmowed area to the left (east) of the path that leads up the hill to the viewing stand. A Brown Thrasher was singing from a treetop near the Kerr Park parking lot. Here's my list of 35 species for this morning:

Eastern Meadowlark
Brown Thrasher
Northern Waterthrush
Yellow Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Pine Warbler
Tree Swallow
Song Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
Chipping Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Canada Goose
Wood Duck
Mallard
Blue-winged Teal
Lesser Scaup
Bufflehead
Greater Yellowlegs
Lesser Yellowlegs
Spotted Sandpiper
Killdeer
Ring-billed Gull
Black-capped Chickadee
Red-breasted Nuthatch
White-breasted Nuthatch
Blue Jay
Downy Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Northern Flicker
Ruffed Grouse
American Crow
Common Raven
Red-winged Blackbird
American Goldfinch
American Robin

 

 

Re(1): Black-throated Green near Bracebridge
Posted on May 6, 2005 at 08:49:24 AM by Kip Daynard

Likewise we had our first Black-throated Green yesterday (May 5). 1380 Bay Lake Rd. 25kms NE of Huntsville.

 

 

Black-throated Green near Bracebridge
Posted on May 5, 2005 at 01:39:32 PM by Al Sinclair

We had our first Black-throated Green Warbler of the year here this morning. 1852 Hwy 118E, 8km east of Bracebridge

 

 

Warblers, Bala
Posted on May 5, 2005 at 09:05:06 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

It is 9:05 am and I have seen black & white and Nashville warblers so far this morning. A delight when it was -3 at 6 am.

 

 

Loons & Canada Geese, Bala
Posted on May 5, 2005 at 05:30:46 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

On April 28th I observed a pair of loons on a possible nest site mating. This is at least 3 weeks earlier than I have seen over the last 13 years in Muskoka. They are acting very territorially (sp) and checking out any activity by other water birds on the lake.

A pair of Canada geese have been nesting for at least 2 weeks on an abandoned beaver lodge. One, I presume the male, attacked, multiple times, another pair that came into the lake on April 28th.

 

 

Re(1): Bracebridge Ponds - cormorant diving
Posted on May 4, 2005 at 09:57:20 PM by Barbara Taylor

Perhaps the Cormorant was hunting for frogs?

I could only find a reference about the Great Cormorant diet, but maybe it's the same for Double-crested...here's an excerpt from http://www.amonline.net.au/factsheets/great_cormorant.htm
"Like other cormorants, the Great Cormorant feeds predominantly on fish, supplemented in freshwater by crustaceans, various aquatic insects and frogs."

 

 

Bracebridge Ponds May 4 AM...Palm Warbler, 30 species
Posted on May 4, 2005 at 08:10:05 PM by Al Sinclair

This morning at the ponds there were 2 pairs of Northern Shovelers in cell 1 and 2. A Palm Warbler was near the chip pile on the north side of cell 4. A few Yellow-rumped Warblers were in the woods on the hill along the east side of cell 4. A Double-crested Cormorant was diving in cell 1, why?

Total species for the morning was 30. I missed the Meadowlark in Kerr Park and the Ring-necked Ducks. Below is the printout of species seen from Avisys birding software. I can tick the species of on my Palm PDA and download to Avisys when I get home. This software works well in my opinion.

SPECIES SEEN
5/4/2005
Double-crested Cormorant
Canada Goose
Wood Duck
Green-winged Teal
Mallard
American Black Duck
Blue-winged Teal
Northern Shoveler
Lesser Scaup
Bufflehead
Turkey Vulture
Greater Yellowlegs
Lesser Yellowlegs
Spotted Sandpiper
Ring-billed Gull
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Black-capped Chickadee
Red-breasted Nuthatch
Blue Jay
American Crow
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Palm Warbler
Chipping Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Red-winged Blackbird
Purple Finch
American Goldfinch

 

 

Re(1): now 14 Yellowlegs, warblers
Posted on May 5, 2005 at 01:29:10 PM by Barbara Taylor

At 1 p.m. today there were 14 Yellowlegs (Greater & Lesser) and 4 Killdeer on a small mud flat at the north-west corner of cell 1.

A Common Loon flew overhead, and Ruffed Grouse were drumming in the woods west of cell 4. In the shrubs and woods to the west and north of cell 4 there was a Warbling Vireo, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Palm Warbler, Pine Warbler, and I heard what sounded like a Magnolia Warbler.

 

 

Eastern Meadowlark, Yellowlegs
Posted on May 4, 2005 at 05:01:10 PM by Barbara Taylor

This afternoon an Eastern Meadowlark was singing from the fenceline between Kerr Park and the TransCanada Pipeline property, Bracebridge.

At the Bracebridge Ponds there are still some Lesser Scaup (cells 1 and 2), Ring-necked Ducks and Blue-winged Teal (cell 4), and several Wood Ducks, Bufflehead and Mallards. One pair of Green-winged Teal in cell 4. Four Greater Yellowlegs were scattered along the north shoreline of cell 4. Cell 4 was drained recently but is now refilling quickly. No sign nor sound of any warblers or vireos when we were there, but since the wind was quite brisk they may have been back in the woods where it's more sheltered.

 

 

Re(1): loons & Harrier
Posted on May 4, 2005 at 07:56:22 PM by Al Sinclair

It is nameless on all the maps I have. Maybe ask a local what they call it?

 

 

loons & Harrier
Posted on May 4, 2005 at 12:54:50 PM by Gerald WIllmott

There is a pair of Loons calling and floating on a lake behind Ziska Road. Also a female marsh hawk was hunting over the edge of this small lake.


I would like to know the name of this lake. It if you were to stand at the corner formed by the intersection of Baldwin? and Ziska Road, the lake would be north and west, but not visible. It would still be back about 1km.

 

 

Re(1): Blue-headed vireo, too
Posted on May 4, 2005 at 07:50:29 PM by Al Sinclair

Our first Blue-headed Vireo was here on Hwy 118E today also. Last years arrival was April 26. He is a week late.

 

 

Blue-headed vireo, too
Posted on May 4, 2005 at 02:44:26 PM by John Challis

... in addition to my wife's discovery this morning, I heard our first blue-headed (solitary) vireo on Rocksborough Road.

 

 

Sandhill cranes
Posted on May 4, 2005 at 11:23:27 AM by Gayle Carlyle

Wednesday, May 4 at 10 am.
I heard and then spotted two pairs of sandhill cranes flying over the Rocksborough Rd. from southeast to northwest. They were fairly high up so I don't think they were looking for a nesting spot (but you never know). I never would have seen then if it hadn't been for their noisy call during flight.
I'll keep my eyes and ears open for them again.   (Bracebridge)

 

 

Chimney Swifts
Posted on May 3, 2005 at 07:24:02 PM by Dan Burton

Yesterday at noon, 2 Swifts were flying high over the playing field at BMLSS

 

 

Re(1): Broad Wing, Virginia Rail, Hoodie
Posted on May 3, 2005 at 12:26:30 PM by Al Johnston

Gerald, maybe there was a hen hoodie in the area. They are very furtive. We have a hoodie incubating in a nest box and she won't return to her nest, after a little fishing, if we are on the deck.
Al

 

 

Broad Wing, Virginia Rail, Hoodie
Posted on May 3, 2005 at 08:02:43 AM by Gerald Willmott

There has been a Broad Winged Hawk at the intersection of Graves Rd and Muskoka # 4 (out past KFC) on two separate occasions. The first time I watched this bird it was sitting on a wire over a small bit of wetland. As I watched another Broad Wing came flew down and the two birds mated?very cool. They both flew away shortly afterwards. However I was there again last night and the female, I suppose, was back on location. While I was there she flew around area and sat on some trees on the other side of the road.

Also of note was a Woodcock along Graves road, and down the skidoo trail were some other birds. If you walk down the trail, which is easy to find, you will come across a causway that has been constructed for the Skidooers. Walk a little past and there is a pond on the left hand side of the trail. At the beginning of the pond was a Virginia Rail calling and at the far end of the pond where the Beaver Lodge is, is a male Hooded Merganzer.

Question: The male Hoodie was swimming up to get a better look at me, as I was partially hidden from view. As he did, he displayed his crest, any thoughts?

 

 

Re(6): Algonquin birds
Posted on May 3, 2005 at 01:36:55 PM by Brian Shulist

All good observations Al. I, too, found that there was poor response on what seemed identical nights to good Owling ones. Now that you bring these points up and after re-checking my notes I noticed some possibly interesting effects. I ran 2 owling sessions in my home square: one on Mar 21/22 (-7C, high pressure, clear moonlit, perfect conditions) getting only 3 Barred and 1 Saw-whet in 11 stops. A week later, on Mar 30, just before the big snow storm, I got 7 Barred and 3 Saw-whets in only 8 stops. In another square, on March 23/24 (when I noted conditions of -8C, no wind and a halo around the moon indicating a possibly approaching front) the Owls were going nuts. From 1:15 to 4:00 am I got an amazing 9 Barred on only 6 stops! Two were duets. On my last outing on April 25, with sleet falling intermittently I got 3 Barred in 3 stops. So if I were to make a tentative conclusion, I would say that a drop in barometric pressure would result in increased activity in owl response. Red Herring? This is probably too simplistic an explanation but it would be a start for further research. Whoo's up for it? Perhaps it's already been done.

 

 

Re(5): Algonquin birds
Posted on May 3, 2005 at 10:06:19 AM by Al Sinclair

You mentioned other factors: barometric pressure, clarity of the atmosphere to sound transmission.
Have you made any conclusions on these i.e. rising/falling high/low pressure, or sound transmission good/poor. I have noticed a few times that poor sound transmission was better than good but need more data to be sure. I attributed this to a temperature inversion, warm air over cold being the best, the result giving the appearance of poor transmission because of upward bending sound waves. Or perhaps it was high humidity because of an incoming warm front. Anyhow I have found some nights produce no owls no matter how hard you try, while others for some reason produce owls on every stop. It would nice to be able to predict (wishful thinking).

 

 

Re(4): Algonquin birds
Posted on May 3, 2005 at 08:50:22 AM by Brian Shulist

Good question. I definitely prefer it as I can orient myself to the sky and throw away the compass when determining from which direction the owls are calling. As for the Owls, I do think that most wildlife loves a moonlit night; a case in point being the woodcocks who sing all night when the moon is full. I was having better response rates from the owls when the moon was in the gibbous to full moon phase. But a lot of variables are involved: wind, barometric pressure, clarity of the atmosphere to sound transmission etc, etc. Oh yes, and one final note: At one station, I played the broadcast as usual with no response. As I was packing up and about to start my vehicle, I saw a moonlit-cast shadow on the ground. With the moon setting in the west, that's where a Barred owl came from, perched above me in the hardwoods and didn't call until 5 minutes after the final broadcast. When owling, the moon is beneficial, by sound and sight!

Brian

 

 

Re(3): Algonquin birds
Posted on May 3, 2005 at 07:19:59 AM by Alex Mills

Are the moonlit conditions you speak of preferred by you for owling, or are they preferred by the owls for calling?

 

 

Re(2): Algonquin birds
Posted on May 2, 2005 at 09:16:59 PM by Brian Shulist

Hi Todd. No Saw-whets on this night/morning. But I had good success during the moonlit skies of late March and late April. I detected Northern Saw-whets in 12 squares in SE Region 27 where there is a strong coniferous component. Overall, I was getting roughly 6 Barred Owls and 1 Northern Saw-whet Owl per 10 stops using the Boreal/Barred Owl protocol. The number of responding wolves were a complete and awe-inspiring surprise!

 

 

Re(1): Algonquin birds
Posted on May 2, 2005 at 06:48:03 PM by todd white

Brian, did you find any saw whet owls?

 

 

Algonquin birds
Posted on May 2, 2005 at 06:02:17 PM by Brian Shulist

Hi all:

I was up early to finish some owl/woodcock surveying for the Ontario Breeding Bird Atlas in Region 27 just east of the Park. A highlight here was a pair of wolves <50 m howling in response to my Saw-whet Owl calls.

 
Later in the morning (7 a.m), walked the Spruce Bog Boardwalk where 2 male Spruce Grouse were in fine form, strutting like their was no tomorrow. Both were performing between posts 1 and 2. Ruby-crowned Kinglets were in fine singing form also.

 
Walked the Hemlock Bluff trail. At least 200 juncoes were seen moving slowly north in a continous wave near post 3 which seemed to spark a wave of song from a Brown Creeper, Golden-crowned Kinglets, Purple Finches, a yellow-rumped warbler, and the ubiquitous Winter Wrens. Pileated and yellow-bellied sapsuckers were drumming near Jack Lake. Ruffed Grouse too, but not many.

 
Only a cow moose with last years' calf was seen along Hwy 60 near the East Beach Theatre.

Regards,

Brian Shulist

 

 

Weasel - photo
Posted on May 2, 2005 at 09:39:56 AM by John Challis

The weasel poking around our outside stairwell Sunday was midway through his/her colour change, and actually looked very smart, with its back and only the far end of its tail all brown. photo (Rocksborough Rd., Bracebridge)

 

 

Bird Board Update
Posted on May 2, 2005 at 09:21:22 AM by Barbara Taylor

Thanks to everyone for all your reports. All posts for April are now available in the Archived Reports.

Just a reminder to bookmark (add to your favourites list) the back-up webpage. All recently posted reports are copied and stored there. In the event of any major problems with the Bird Board hosting service, important notices will also be posted there.



New to the Bird Board?
The Muskoka Bird Board is a place to share reports of any bird sightings or other nature sightings in Muskoka and surrounding areas. You don't have to include an email address in your post. See the Posting Guidelines for more information, including several tips on using the message board.

I try to monitor the Bird Board on a regular basis. If you want to bring something to my attention, just send me an email and I'll get back to you as soon as possible.

Barbara Taylor
muskoka_birder@hotmail.com

 

 

Muskoka Field Naturalists - next meeting May 5
Posted on May 2, 2005 at 09:12:33 AM by Barbara Taylor

 

MAY 5 THURSDAY MEETING 7:30 PM
"Being Caribou" Movie Night. John Challis and Gayle Carlyle are helping to bring this outstanding film, a National Film Board production, which follows a herd of 120,000 caribou across 1,500 km of rugged Arctic tundra. Dramatic footage and video diaries provide an intimate perspective of an epic expedition. At stake is the herd's delicate habitat which could be devastated if proposed oil and gas development goes ahead on their calving grounds in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. 7:30 p.m. at Calvary Baptist Church, corner of First and Brock Street, Gravenhurst. Visitors welcome to attend the meeting.

 

Membership Information & Program Updates:
MFN website

 

 

Vireos Sunday
Posted on May 2, 2005 at 00:18:04 AM by Dan Burton

In addition to the Audubon's Warbler, there was 1 Blue Headed Vireo, at least 1 Warbling Vireo, 1 GC Kinglet, 2 Brown Creepers and many Yellow Rumped Warblers. GW Teal was the only interesting Duck, but 2 Greater and 1 Lesser Yellowlegs in cell 4 and about 20 Tree Swallows flying high overhead. Also one Harrier over the pipeline
(Bracebridge Ponds)

 

 

Re(1): How about a friendly birding competition? Most species seen in a day at the Ponds
Posted on May 1, 2005 at 06:20:26 PM by Goodyear

Sounds fun! We're already plotting our route.

The Goodyears

 

 

How about a friendly birding competition? Most species seen in a day at the Ponds
Posted on May 1, 2005 at 12:12:56 PM by Al Sinclair

Many of us bird the Bracebridge Ponds regularly. How about a bit of friendly birding competition? Who can see the most species at the Bracebridge Ponds in one day in each month April to October.

This would help us track the migration peaks spring and fall as well as show how many species breed there in the summer. It would also be valuable evidence to support keeping the ponds by showing how many birds and birders use this area yearly.

The area involved would be anywhere around the ponds including Kerr Park, the pipeline right-of-way, adjacent woods and fields and the south gate area. We would follow American Birding Association Big Day rules, see http://www.americanbirding.org/bigday/. Basically identify as many species as possible on one calendar day. The birds can be seen or heard, if a team, all members must identify at least 95% of the species and must be in direct voice contact, no outside help allowed.

OK April is passed already, we can do it next year. I did get a measly 20 species on April 29/05 including 400 ducks, can anybody beat that? Perhaps there isn't enough competitive birders here to make a good contest. Any comments?

BTW The big day record for Muskoka is 125 species set by Ron & Doug Tozer et al about 10 years ago.

 

 

Northern Waterthrush...arrives same day last 3 years
Posted on May 1, 2005 at 11:22:42 AM by Al Sinclair

We heard the Northern Waterthrush singing at our place this morning for the first time this year. I checked my records and found that it has returned on May 1st for the last 3 years!
You can hear him in the wet woods on the north side of Hwy 118E opposite driveway #1852.

 

 

Re(1): Found again today...3:30pm
Posted on May 1, 2005 at 08:04:00 PM by Bob Healey

Found the Audubon's Yellow-rumped Warbler at 6:30 this afternoon associating with an Oranged-crowned Warbler.

 

 

Found again today...3:30pm
Posted on May 1, 2005 at 06:35:41 PM by Al Sinclair

David Goodyear, Dan Burton and I found the male Audubon's Yellow-rumped Warbler again today at 3:30pm and had a good look at it for about 5 minutes before it moved back into the woods. It was along the edge of the woods on the west side of cell 2 and 3, about half way down at the dike between the cells.
This is likely the first Muskoka record for this western subspecies of Yellow-rumped that is rare in Eastern North America.

 

 

"Audubon's" Yellow-rumped Warbler
Posted on April 30, 2005 at 05:38:35 PM by Goodyear

At 3:00 this afternoon, at the north-east corner of Cell 4 - 1 male (bright yellow throat and yellow on head; heavy black breast markings; yellow patches on side of upper breast; yellow rump) with a small flock of male and female "Myrtle" Yellow-rumped Warblers      (Bracebridge Ponds)

 

 

yellow rumped warbler
Posted on April 30, 2005 at 11:20:06 AM by Challis & Carlyle

Our first yellow-rumped warbler has been singing on Rocksborough Road since about Wednesday last week. The number of winter wrens on the street is up significantly from previous years.   (Bracebridge)

 

 

Trailing Arbutus, Bala
Posted on April 30, 2005 at 08:39:53 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Yesterday, on a three hour hike, I found the trailing arbutus in full bloom. I have never hit it at just the right time before. Hundreds and hundreds of highly scented blooms.  Muskoka RD. 38, Bala.

 

 

Re(1): bittern
Posted on April 30, 2005 at 03:40:07 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning we heard what sounded like a Least Bittern calling from a large marshy area east of Stephens Bay Rd., between the walking trail at Strawberry Bay Rd. and the road into the Royal Muskoka property, Bracebridge.

Also saw our first Broad-winged Hawk of the season flying overhead. A few patches of Spring Beauty were in bloom, and many White Trilliums and Trout Lilies were already showing colour in their flower buds.

 

 

bittern
Posted on April 29, 2005 at 07:38:07 PM by todd white

i have just seen a lesser bittern at hwy 60 and hidden valley rd.

 

 

Whooping Crane lost in Ontario...April 29 update
Posted on April 29, 2005 at 06:53:30 PM by Al Sinclair

The regular Friday updates from Journey North are posted at:
http://www.learner.org/jnorth/crane/spring2005/News.html

301 & 318 are still together, 309 is missing and has not been seen with the others since April 14. 301 and 318 flew south from Algonquin on the April 17 almost to Lake Ontario and then looped north again where they were seen in a corn field near Owen Sound from April 22 to 25. On April 27 they were seen in a small marsh near Tobermory at the tip of the Bruce Peninsula.

 

 

Re(1): Great Horned Owl again (question)
Posted on May 1, 2005 at 01:24:47 PM by Barbara Taylor

I'm not familiar with all the owl's sounds, so I can only offer this excerpt from The Owl Pages (http://www.owlpages.com/species/bubo/virginianus/Default.htm):

Voice: Great Horned Owls have a large repertoire of sounds, ranging from deep booming hoots to shrill shrieks. The male's resonant territorial call "hoo-hoo hoooooo hoo-hoo" can be heard over several miles during a still night. Both sexes hoot, but males have a lower-pitched voice than females. They give a growling "krrooo-oo" or screaming note when attacking intruders. Other sounds include a "whaaa whaaaaaa-a-a-aarrk" from disturbed birds, a catlike "MEEE-OWww", barks, hair-raising shrieks, coos, and beak snapping.

 

 

Great Horned Owl again (question)
Posted on April 29, 2005 at 05:33:31 PM by Leslee Tassie

3 nights this week we've heard the Great Horned Owl, hooting about 2-4 times a minute around the 10:30 to 11:30 p.m. times (Mon, Wed, Thurs). We live on Santa's Village Road in Bracebridge close to the small bridge at the pipeline. Last night Steve went outside to try and locate it and found it in a tree right along the edge of the road very close to the bridge that goes over Beaver Creek. (He didn't see it, he heard it directly above him and knows exactly which tree it was in). Now my question. Last night it was giving it's usual familiar call over and over, but then,after a while, it gave a different call several times in a row. There was a bunch of short hoos in place of the first "note" and then the rest followed. Then, I heard some shreiks/squaks several times that I do not think was the owl and then total silence. My perception of what may have transpired is that it caught it's late evening dinner, but I wondered if anyone knows if the Great Horned Owl gives a typical call as I described when it spots it's prey or is excited about something. I've not heard it make this call before.
Leslee

 

 

Horned Grebe - Lake Muskoka
Posted on April 29, 2005 at 04:40:37 PM by Barbara Taylor

A lone Horned Grebe was near the south end of Browning Island this afternoon. New arrivals on the island included a singing Winter Wren, and a Northern Flicker.

 

 

Re(1): Red-eyed Vireo, Bala
Posted on April 29, 2005 at 07:28:59 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

Al Sinclair has made me realize that the bird I heard is not likely to have been a red-eyed vireo but a blue-headed.  Sorry for getting anyone's hope up but a blue-headed isn't bad either.

 

 

Red-eyed Vireo, Bala
Posted on April 28, 2005 at 09:44:06 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

I had a red-eyed vireo singing from several trees at my place yesterday. Not today though - it was probably frozen!

Unusually early but I saw the pair of loons on my lake mating! I thought that mating took place just before the eggs were laid to fertilize the eggs as they passed through. I guess not!

 

 

Re(1): Ivory-billed Woodpecker rediscovery...link to Science Magazine article
Posted on April 28, 2005 at 05:53:56 PM by Al Sinclair

Below is a link to the Science Magazine article published today. Has more info on the discovery and stills from the video that confirms the identification. It is a pdf file that requires Acrobat Reader, takes a few minutes to download on dialup. http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/rapidpdf/1114103v1.pdf

 

 

Info about the Ivory-billed Woodpecker rediscovery
Posted on April 28, 2005 at 11:57:29 AM by Barbara Taylor

Today's Press Release:
http://www.ivorybill.org/release.html

Video news release:
http://www.ivorybill.org/video.html
(includes poor quality video of the bird)

More details:
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/ivory/
http://www.nature.org/ivorybill/

 

 

Bracebridge Ponds April 27...Yellowlegs, warblers
Posted on April 27, 2005 at 08:49:25 PM by Al Sinclair

I managed a quick trip around the ponds this afternoon between the showers. There were 2 Yellowlegs, 1 Greater, 1 Lesser on the dike between cell 1&2. I couldn't find the Shovelers. A flock of about 20 Yellow-rumped Warblers were in the woods on the west side of cell 2. A single Pine Warbler was travelling with them.

 

 

Northern Shovelers - Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on April 26, 2005 at 08:21:02 PM by Barbara Taylor

A pair of Northern Shovelers in cell 2, tonight at 7:30 p.m.

Counted 282 ducks in cell 4 alone - Wood Ducks, Ring-necked Ducks, Blue-winged Teal, Green-winged Teal, Bufflehead, and Mallards. Also by cell 4 a beaver smacking its tail, a muskrat, 3 deer, a Belted Kingfisher and a Northern Harrier. Many Lesser Scaup in cells 1 and 2.  Map of the Ponds

 

 

Bluebird, Red-shouldered Hawk
Posted on April 26, 2005 at 11:38:43 AM by Barbara Taylor

This morning a Red-shouldered Hawk was hunting low over the fields by Brooklands Farm on Butter & Egg Rd. (access from Hwy. 118 west of Bracebridge).

A female Eastern Bluebird was perched on a wire along Beatrice Town Line near the intersection with Falkenburg Rd. An American Kestrel was sitting only one pole away from the bluebird. No Brewer's Blackbirds in the area yet.

 

 

Great Horned Owl
Posted on April 25, 2005 at 10:52:17 PM by Leslee Tassie

Approx. 10:30 p.m. today, April 25th, I heard the Great Horned Owl once again outside my bathroom window. It was loud enough that I first heard it with the window closed. (Santa's Village Road near the pipeline, Bracebridge).

 

 

Finches moving...many at our feeders today
Posted on April 24, 2005 at 06:21:01 PM by Al Sinclair

We had about 30 Purple Finches, 12 Evening Grosbeaks, and 6 Pine Siskins today. Lots of activity and colour!

 

 

Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on April 24, 2005 at 04:22:29 PM by Barbara Taylor

Lots of bird activity at the Bracebridge Ponds this afternoon when the rain stopped. A few crows were cawing loudly from the hill to the south-west of cell 4. We looked their way just in time to see a Wild Turkey flying in for a landing, pursued by one of the crows. I know crows will bother hawks and foxes, both predators, but a turkey?! A porcupine was sitting high in a poplar to the north-west of cell 4.

Tree Swallow   (at least 100 - by cell 4)
Barn Swallow   (at least 2 - by cell 4)
Green-winged Teal   (3 - cell 3)
Blue-winged Teal   (10 - most in cell 3)
Ring-necked Duck   (35 - cell 4)
Lesser Scaup   (40 - most in cell 2)
Common Merganser   (pair in cell 4)
Wood Ducks   (4 in cell 1)
Bufflehead   (many in all cells)
Mallards
Song Sparrows
Savannah Sparrows
Red-winged Blackbirds
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Wild Turkey

Note that rubber boots are now needed to walk along the trail heading west from cell 4 - a small lake has formed across the pipeline/snowmobile trail thanks to all the rain and a bit of help from a beaver.  Map of the Ponds

 

 

Herping @ Magnetawan
Posted on April 24, 2005 at 12:06:17 PM by Peter Mills

I spent the weekend near Magnetawan at my cottage and despite the bad weather we saw a lot of awesome stuff. We went to a beaver pond at night in hopes of seeing some breeding amphibians and after 2 1/2 hours we had 130 Yellow-spotted Salamnders, (yes, it's true) 19 Blue-spotted Salamanders, 5 Red-backed Salamanders and 5 Red-spotted newts. Also heard many Peepers calling and a Wood Frog egg mass. It was quite the night!

 

 

OFO Algonquin Park Field Trip (April 23)
Posted on April 24, 2005 at 08:54:22 AM by Ron Tozer

*This report originated on ONTBIRDS (April 24, 2005) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.


Ontbirders:
Twenty-one enthusiastic OFO members and friends enjoyed an early spring day
in Algonquin Park on Saturday (April 23). Luckily, we did not experience any
significant rainfall until 3 p.m., allowing ample time to search for the
northern birds that were our primary objective.

A male Spruce Grouse in the black spruce bog along Opeongo Road (km 46.3 on
Highway 60) allowed close approach for all to see. It was a life bird for
some. Gray Jays along Opeongo Road took food from people's hands. A few
participants heard Boreal Chickadee along the old railway near Wolf Howl
Pond (accessible from Arowhon Road at km 15.4). Unfortunately, as has been
the case for many birding in Algonquin recently, Black-backed Woodpecker
eluded us. The Great Gray Owl observed near Wolf Howl Pond on April 22 had
apparently moved on.

The Visitor Centre (km 43) feeders attracted several sparrow species,
including Chipping, Savannah, Fox and White-throated (the latter two in
song). Finch sightings for the day were limited to Purple Finch and the
much-appreciated five Evening Grosbeaks at the Visitor Centre feeder.

Directions:
Algonquin Park is three hours north of Toronto, via Highways 400, 11 and 60.
Follow the signs, which start in Toronto on Highway 400. From Ottawa, take
Highway 17 to Renfrew, then follow Highway 60 to the park. Kilometre markers
on Highway 60 in the park go from the West Gate (km 0) to the East Gate (km
56). Permits and information are available daily at both gates. The Visitor
Centre (km 43) is open daily, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Ron Tozer
Dwight, Ontario

_______________________________________________
*ONTBIRDS is presented by the Ontario Field Ornithologists - the provincial birding organization.
For instructions to join or leave ONTBIRDS visit http://www.ofo.ca/ontbirdshow.htm
ONTBIRDS Guidelines may be viewed at http://www.ofo.ca/ontbirdsguide.htm

 

 

Tree Swallows at Henry Marsh
Posted on April 23, 2005 at 05:54:37 PM by Terry Whittam / Marion Whittam

Close to a hundred tree swallows enjoying the cold rain and strong wind at Henry Marsh this morning! No one else was in such a good mood!  Tree Swallow perch

 

 

Muskrats and Coopers Hawks
Posted on April 23, 2005 at 11:36:10 AM by Bob Burt

Today, around 10:00 there were two muskrats at the Bracebridge ponds, one in cell three and one in cell four, swimming close to the shorelines. As well, we observed two Coopers Hawks flying over cell four in a very strong NE wind.  There are still plenty of Buffleheads and a few Lesser Scaup.

 

 

Optics Expo
Posted on April 22, 2005 at 06:37:10 PM by Barbara Taylor

This upcoming Optics Expo may be of interest to anyone thinking of new binoculars or scopes. Admission is free. Here are the details provided by Michael Malone of Pelee Wings Nature Store:


9th ANNUAL SPORTS OPTICS EXPO 2005

SATURDAY MAY 7 & SUNDAY MAY 8, 2005 10AM - 5PM

Scope & Binocular manufacturers set-up outdoors at Pelee Wings to let you
field test 100's of sports optics. Attending this year are 9 companies:

* Swarovski * Pentax * Leica * Bushnell * Kowa * Swift
* Celestron * Leupold * Zeiss

Each company has been asked to provide a "Show Special": some have spiffy
give-away items or accessories with a purchase, while some will offer 5%
off selected, or all products. This is a great opportunity to test and compare
scopes and binoculars outdoors with the experts while enjoying the fabulous
birding at Point Pelee National Park.

Pelee Wings and the Optics Companies will donate $1,000. to a
conservation/wildlife cause after this event.

Pelee Wings - Discount Binoculars & Scopes - is located at
636 Point Pelee Drive, Leamington Ontario, 2 km from Point Pelee
National Park. www.peleewings.ca (519) 326-5193

Admission to the Expo is free.

 

 

Bird Board update - New Edit Feature
Posted on April 22, 2005 at 02:50:52 PM by Barbara Taylor

I've added an option which will let you edit your own posts. Please only change minor details of your report using the edit function. If you need to correct an ID please post a reply to your original message stating the change. That way nobody will miss an important correction.

How to Edit
When you are filling out the posting form, just enter a simple password where it says "Password to Edit Post". You will then be able to re-open your message to correct spelling or perhaps to add a location or directions. When you are reading your posted message, near the top you will see "Edit Post". Click there and you will be prompted to enter your password. Make your changes, then click "Edit". If you didn't enter a password when you posted your message, you will not be able to make changes to that particular message. However, you can still send me an email and I can make changes for you.

 

 

Re(1): Whooping Crane update
Posted on April 29, 2005 at 10:26:22 AM by klaus bonnekamp

Last fall I saw 3 cranes at the Hamlet Swing Bridge(trent severn waterway689-6161)which I operate. These birds were landing in grass lake nearby.I saw them clearly with binoculars in the air and I called the wye marsh. They said no way, but I am sure. Have other sitings been reported?

 

 

Whooping Crane update
Posted on April 22, 2005 at 12:10:32 PM by Al Sinclair

The latest update on the Journey North website says that the Cranes have been found in southern Ontario but don't say where. I expect if/when they are located and stop moving, the location won't be released on purpose so the birds aren't spooked by a flock of birders chasing after them. I do know they have doubled back from Algonquin and are in Southern Ontario somewhere. What to do next is a bit controversial, catch them or leave them. The experts say they need to be near the main flock in Wisconsin to have a better chance of finding a mate and breeding. However they did leave these three in Michigan all last year. You can read about it at the following link: http://www.learner.org/jnorth/crane/spring2005/Lost301_309_318.html

 

 

Common Snipe
Posted on April 21, 2005 at 11:01:46 PM by Terry Whittam / Marion Whittam

Lots of common snipe along Coopers Falls Road east of Washago!
Take a look at this beauty! Common Snipe

 

 

Golden Eagle
Posted on April 21, 2005 at 09:17:25 PM by Steve Tassie

While travelling along Foreman Road headed towards Port Carling (at 10 a.m.), nearing Mirror Lake road, I spotted a Golden Eagle a couple of hundred feet above the ridge to the west. It was working it's way along the ridge. Being unsure, I conferred with our birding guide when I got home. I feel that the wingspan was too great to be anything else and it fit the description in the bird guide.

 

 

Moths at Home Depot
Posted on April 21, 2005 at 06:09:04 PM by Al Sinclair

I checked out the MV lights on the back and east wall of Home Depot in Bracebridge this morning. There were approx. 40 moths of 5 species but most were high up and binoculars were required to ID them. Quite a few for a cool night early in spring. I was told that these lights attract hundreds of moths in the summer. This probably has a negative effect on their population and the birds that depend on them and their larva for food. But it is a good place to study moths!

The species were:
6658 Phigalia titea, The Half-wing
9935 Eupsilia tristigmata
10007 Feralia major, Major Sallow
10021 Copivaleria grotei, Grote's Sallow
10520 Morrisonia evicta, Bicolored Woodgrain
(the number is the the one used in Hodge's "Checklist of the Lepidoptera of North America North of Mexico")

 

 

Osprey & Browning Island birds
Posted on April 21, 2005 at 05:01:09 PM by Barbara Taylor

A quick trip to Henry Rd. marsh today - an Osprey put on a great show, but other than that only one pair of Buffleheads, a couple of Mallards and a few Tree Swallows. The Spring Peepers at the west edge of the marsh were almost deafening. The bit of rain we had, combined with the beavers' work (the overflow pipes are plugged up again), has caused the water level to rise too high now. The water is starting to flow across the trail at the west end of the marsh, although still passable for now.

A lot more bird song at Browning Island on Lake Muskoka today:
Eastern Phoebe
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Pine Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
American Robin
Dark-eyed Junco
Song Sparrow
Tree Swallow
Red-breasted Nuthatch
White-breasted Nuthatch
Hairy Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Blue Jay
Black-capped Chickadee
American Crow
Common Raven
Common Merganser

 

 

Ovenbird
Posted on April 21, 2005 at 01:34:08 PM by Dan Burton

1 individual calling near Lorne Street in Gravenhurst

 

 

Nashville Warbler, Bala
Posted on April 21, 2005 at 12:22:15 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

This morning at 7 am there was a Nashville calling on Porter Lake, Bala.

 

 

Where to report Whooping Crane sightings
Posted on April 20, 2005 at 08:45:41 PM by Al Sinclair

If the cranes are spotted report it to
Bob Russell with the US Fish & Wildlife Service in Minnesota
email:Robert_Russell@fws.gov

 

 

Lost Whooping Cranes...map
Posted on April 20, 2005 at 08:22:29 PM by Al Sinclair

The 3 Whooping Cranes lost in Ontario (see previous post) likely flew over Huntsville late last week. A map of the latest satellite tracking information puts them in an isolated area in the west side of Algonquin Park on April 16. If they stay there they may be hard to find.  http://www.muskoka.com/~sinclair/birds/whoopermap.jpg

 

 

Bracebridge western bypass - Update
Posted on April 20, 2005 at 09:56:40 AM by Barbara Taylor

Here's the text of an email I received today regarding the Bracebridge Western Bypass. Also, here's a link to the map that was included in the email: PreferredAlternativePlanningSolution(Alternative2).pdf



This e-mail is being sent to all individuals who have expressed an interest in the Bracebridge West Transportation Corridor Class Environmental Assessment Study. This e-mail is in regard to the Environmental Study Report, which will be available for public and agency review beginning on Wednesday April 20, 2005.

At the request of the Town of Bracebridge, The District Municipality of Muskoka (Muskoka) has completed a Class Environmental Assessment Study to confirm the location of a proposed transportation corridor to connect Muskoka Road (MR) 118 near Highway 11 with MR 118 west of Wellington Street. The purpose of the Study was to confirm the preferred location for the corridor so that the necessary property can be protected, the Town's Official Plan can be updated and transportation infrastructure can be constructed within the corridor in stages, as required. The product of the study is a recommended alignment for the corridor. The Preferred Alternative Planning Solution has been identified as Alternative 2 (see attached map).

As described in the attached Notice, Muskoka has planned this project under Schedule C of the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment (the Class EA). An Environmental Study Report (ESR) documenting the planning and preliminary design components of the Class EA process for this project has been completed and is being placed in the public record.

The ESR will be filed with the Clerks Offices of Muskoka and the Town of Bracebridge for a review period of 60 days. A copy of the ESR will also be on display at the Bracebridge public library and on the project web site at http://www.bracebridgewestroute.on.ca. The Ontario Environmental Assessment Act requires that the ESR be subject to public review, following which, subject to comments received and the receipt of necessary approvals, Muskoka intends to proceed as set out in the ESR. In addition, it is anticipated that the Town of Bracebridge will update its Official Plan to show the preferred route for the corridor.

You are invited and encouraged to review the ESR and to participate in the public/agency review process. Please provide written comments to the District Clerk (Attn: Ms. Christine Lees) within 60 calendar days. If concerns regarding this project cannot be resolved in discussion with Muskoka, any individual may request that the Minister of the Environment make an order for the project to comply with Part II of the Environmental Assessment Act (referred to as a Part II order). Requests must be received by the Minister at the address indicated on the attached Notice by June 20, 2005. A copy of the request must also be sent to the District Clerk (Attn: Ms. Christine Lees) at the address also given on the Notice. If no requests for a Part II order are received by June 20, 2005, the Town and Muskoka will proceed as noted above.

Yours very truly,
Doug I. Allingham, P.Eng.
President, TSH

 

 

Sandhill Cranes, Evening Grosbeaks and Wood Ducks
Posted on April 19, 2005 at 09:55:02 PM by Ted Smith

Hi folks,
Over the past few days I've been photographing ducks (primarily wood ducks) in a marshy area near Rocky Narrows on the south branch of the Muskoka River. Yesterday morning I heard (ie. not seen) the unmistakable sound of at least two sandhill cranes flying near the river.
When I arrived home I observed a small upset flock of evening grosbeaks staring at my empty feeders!

 

 

Yellow-rumped, Barn Swallow, Herons
Posted on April 19, 2005 at 08:35:51 PM by Dan Burton

Saw my first Yellow-rumped Warbler of the year on 169 north of Gravenhurst. Also in the same area- Wood Ducks, Blue Winged Teal, 2 Gt Blue Herons, several Wild Turkeys, one deer.
At Gravenhurst Bay were Barn Swallows over the water.

 

 

Pine Warbler - Browning Island
Posted on April 19, 2005 at 05:36:07 PM by Barbara Taylor

This afternoon the woods were fairly quiet at Browning Island except for a Pine Warbler and a Blue Jay. At least 40 Double-crested Cormorants were already on Eleanor Island. There had been a large area of Lake Muskoka open for some time near the mouth of the Muskoka River so the cormorants have had no trouble finding food. A few Tree Swallows were flying about near St. Elmo. Several Bufflehead and Ring-necked Ducks were still at Alport Lake.

Overnight most of the ice went out of Lake Muskoka, although there are a few large sections floating around. The strong west wind is keeping some areas iced in such as near Taboo (Muskoka Sands).

 

 

First Red Admiral butterfly
Posted on April 19, 2005 at 05:34:08 PM by Al Sinclair

We saw our first Red Admiral, Vanessa atalanta, of the year here today April 19. It was in fresh condition and must have just blown in from the south. They are migratory in our area. There is a migration monitoring project for them and their relatives on the net at http://www.public.iastate.edu/~mariposa/homepage.html.

 

 

Whooping Cranes lost in Ontario...no kidding
Posted on April 19, 2005 at 05:17:51 PM by Al Sinclair

We were alerted to the presence of 3 Whooping Cranes in Ontario by messages posted to Ontbirds. The 3 lost cranes were last seen near Holland Centre south of Owen Sound on the 13th, but were tracked (by a satellite transmitter on one of the birds) to somewhere east of Georgian Bay on April 16. They are part of the introduced eastern flock that should be going to Wisconsin.
The following is from the Journey North Website:
"Numbers #301, #309 and #318 were reported in New York State late last week, but they have now been confirmed in Ontario, Canada! Their location would mean they’d somehow have to get around two large water obstacles to make it home. The Great Lakes are confusing them, and they are lost. Joe Duff adds, The Tracking Team have their hands full for now, but once things settle and we get an accurate fix on these errant birds, they may be moved back to Wisconsin in an effort to reorient them."
An update will be posted every Friday on Journey North at http://www.learner.org/jnorth/crane/spring2005/News.html
Keep your eyes open, they might be in a wet field in Muskoka! Let us know if you see them.

 

 

Barred Owl
Posted on April 19, 2005 at 04:08:55 PM by Terry Whittam / Marion Whittam

2 Barred Owls put on quite a display for us near Big Chute on the Severn River while doing the standardized Owl survey. While Bob Whittam aimed the flashlight I caught this picture with a 300mm telephoto lense.
Barred Owl

 

 

wood frogs
Posted on April 17, 2005 at 11:18:18 PM by challis & carlyle

Our first wood frogs began calling tonight, in our neighbour's pond. A lone spring peeper was giving it his all, waiting for the rest of the gang to come out of hiding.

 

 

Prepare for warblers
Posted on April 17, 2005 at 08:47:18 PM by Brenda Clark

At Severn Bridge this morning there were several Pine Warblers singing. Also, there were a lot of bluebirds, tree swallows, and a barn swallow along the road that runs from Severn Bridge, parallel to highway 11, then swinging westward to Southwood Rd, and on up Southwood as well.

 

 

Birds, frogs, and leeks
Posted on April 17, 2005 at 07:18:51 PM by Barbara Taylor

The trail between Henry Rd. marsh and Stephens Bay Rd. was teeming with birds this afternoon - several Hermit Thrush, Winter Wrens, Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers, Golden-crowned Kinglets, Brown Creepers, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Ruffed Grouse, Red-shouldered Hawk, Belted Kingfisher. Only one pair of Bufflehead and Mallards in the Henry marsh.

Wood Frogs and Spring Peepers could be heard calling from a marshy area down below the trail, a short distance east of Stephens Bay Rd. Chorus Frogs were calling briefly at the east side of Henry marsh. There were a few patches of Wild Leeks along the trail.

directions:
Take Beaumont Dr. to Henry Rd., or continue on to Stephens Bay Rd. and park at Strawberry Bay Rd.

 

Beaumont Dr. goes west from the stop lights at the junction of Wellington St. and Eccelstone Dr. (Bracebridge)

 

 

Barkway birds and bugs
Posted on April 17, 2005 at 07:16:08 PM by Ron Stager

Spring Beauty, wood frogs and gray comma and spring azure butterflies today at our place on Merkley Rd east of Barkway.

A broad-winged hawk at 6:30 p.m on telephone wire near Doe Lake and Barkway Rd.

Back in our woods, a red-shouldered hawk and a barred owl were scolding us from the same group of trees at about 1:30.

 

 

Prothonotary Warbler at Tiny Marsh
Posted on April 17, 2005 at 11:31:52 AM by Barbara Taylor

For anyone who does not subscribe to ONTBIRDS, you might be interested to know there was a Prothonotary Warbler seen yesterday and again this morning at Tiny Marsh. Last time this species was recorded in Simcoe County was waaay back in 1974.

Here's a link to the latest sighting info: http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/ONTB.html#1113750818

 

 

A struggle to live
Posted on April 17, 2005 at 11:16:15 AM by bob burton

During a visit to the cottage at Skeleton Bay, Lake Rosseau on April 16, we witnessed the struggle of a lifetime. Half the bay was open with pans of ice floating. The west end of the bay had black ice. Here we watched as three deer, one a yearling, tried to cross. They were half way across, were breaking through the ice then momentarily recoving on top, then crashing through again, forelegs thrashing. In half an hour they had moved about 200 metres, two falling behind with 100 metres separating them and the leader within 100 feet of open water and the shore. The leader turned back to the others. They found a solid spot, stood for an hour, two facing the shore they had come from, the other the near shore; strength returned. Then in unison they struck out for shore. All three were in the water breaking the ice as they went; two reached open water and swam to shore within about twenty minutes and the third followed about fifteen minutes later. We cheered them on.

Also seen was a loon swimming, circling the open fringe; and two flickers were heard calling and tapping.

 

 

(no subject)
Posted on April 17, 2005 at 09:40:22 AM by todd white

along hwy 60, a pair of lesser yellowlegs. six male wood ducks, kingfischer,heron,hooded merganser,northern harrier.

 

 

Kingfishers, Medora Lake Rd.
Posted on April 17, 2005 at 07:38:16 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

I have been driving Medora Lake Rd. this past week in anticipation of seeing kingfishers where there is water at a sand pit. Yesterday afternoon I was rewarded with 3 apparently vying for territory. I haven't seen where they could have been nesting there but it is possible.

One flicker too.
One pair and 5 bachelor wood ducks on my lake at Bala.

 

 

Loon, Cormorant
Posted on April 16, 2005 at 09:32:29 PM by Barbara Taylor

This evening there was a Common Loon and a Double-crested Cormorant at Alport Lake, by the Allport Marina on Beaumont Dr. Also a pair of Wood Ducks, Common Mergansers, and many Ring-necked Ducks. Lots of Spring Peepers calling.

All of Alport Lake is now open water but Lake Muskoka still has ice. The ice looks very black so it should be gone fairly soon, if not overnight.  (Bracebridge)

 

 

Wood Ducks
Posted on April 16, 2005 at 08:41:39 PM by Bob Healey

Forgot to mention in my earlier post that there were at least a dozen Wood Ducks in the N.W. cell (don't know the number) at the Bracebridge Lagoons.

 

 

Hermit Thrush
Posted on April 16, 2005 at 08:35:26 PM by Bob Healey

I heard a Hermit Thrush singing this evening at the Poker Lakes. Follow Hwy. 118 east to approximately 1 km. past the Haliburton District sign.

 

 

Re(1): Tree Swallows
Posted on April 16, 2005 at 10:17:20 PM by Terry Whittam / Marion Whittam

Hi Sylvia! We saw tree swallows today on Canning road and in Washago. Also quite a few along the Coopers falls road towards Clearwater Lake. Just 2 weeks ago we finished preparing and cleaning out the 55 tree swallow boxes we have ringing the lake. Last year we had 3 pairs.....hopefully more this year! Tonight I had a report from another cottager who reports seeing 9 tree swallows flying together around the lake. No nesting activity yet.

 

 

Tree Swallows
Posted on April 16, 2005 at 08:16:29 PM by sylvia purdon

Two Tree Swallows flew out from The Point on Sparrow Lake today around noon.

 

 

GGO!!
Posted on April 16, 2005 at 09:18:00 AM by todd white

great grey, west of algonquin park. along hwy 60,near oxtounge river.raven was attacking it.

 

 

Henry Rd. marsh
Posted on April 16, 2005 at 07:22:28 AM by Gerald Willmott

Yesterday I watched an Osprey circle and hover..sort of..over Henry Rd. Marsh. He would spy a fish, hover for a bit, and stretch out his talons to get ready for the plunge. He never plunged. But he did settle down on a dead tree on the far side of the pond for a leisurely view. Wished I had a camera!

Otherwise there was a pair of Hooded Mergansers
Mallards, up to 10
Canada Geese
And a tree swallow!

Gerald

 

 

Boreal Owl #2
Posted on April 15, 2005 at 09:34:57 PM by Dan Burton

At 8:50pm I heard a Boreal Owl calling at the Gammage driveway on Fraserburg Rd just before Roxborough Road. John Challis you should listen for this one!  (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(1): lots of critters/coyotes/development
Posted on April 16, 2005 at 10:24:32 AM by Al Sinclair

Wilf Yusek and I hung out at Henry Marsh one night on lawn chairs listening for owls. We didn't get any but we heard coyotes howling in 3 different directions.
There are lots of critters in this area south of Beaumont drive. Too bad the whole are is designated for development in the town plan that is now under review. With its wetlands and rocky hills the area is much better suited for wildlife than housing developments and golf courses.

 

 

Lagoons tonight - lots of critters
Posted on April 15, 2005 at 08:56:52 PM by Leslee Tassie

Yes, tonight was not just a night for the birds at the lagoons, but the critters too. First, we did hear the great horned owl between 7:30 and 8:00 p.m. back in the corner of cell (4???). This would be the corner that is by the hill going up the pipeline.
As well, our son Logan ran up to the top of the pipeline hill and saw about 10 deer. Steve and I then looked down the pipeline clearing (to the north) and saw either a fox or a coyote. I'd say it looked more like a coyote but in the fading light and the distance, I can't be sure. It's legs looked kind of rusty coloured though from the distance with the binocs. However, we think it was too big to be a fox. In the cell beside us we saw one beaver and a few minutes later, one curious snorting otter. There were lots of redwings, buffleheads, blue winged teal, song sparrows, geese, mallards, and one miserable noisy ATV'r.    (Bracebridge Ponds)
Leslee

 

 

Feeder activity Bracebridge
Posted on April 15, 2005 at 01:39:57 PM by Goodyear

Sparrow invasion continues at our feeders here in Bracebridge this a.m. (MeadowHeights Dr.)
White-throated - 1
Song - 3
Fox - 3
Chipping - 1
Tree - 10+
Juncos galore
Goldfinches, chickadees, Mourning Doves, both nuthatches, crows, jays, Hairy and Downy, too. Unfortunately, work called and we had to leave the flurry of activity. I wonder what we miss during the day!!??

 

 

Bald Eagle & Various, Bala
Posted on April 15, 2005 at 00:14:28 AM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

I added two species to my yard list. A 2nd year bald eagle flew over my place about noon today. There was a ring-necked duck on Porter Lake this evening along with 5 wood ducks. The ring-neck came in and slept 15 ft from my camera lens for 1/2 hr on the other side of a row of leather leaf. I got him though.

The ice went out on Porter Lake, except for the wetland areas, last night and a loon was in this morning.
I have a photograph of a loon on the ice-free lake last year on April 14th.
Lots of juncos around still.

 

 

hermit thrush
Posted on April 14, 2005 at 09:53:23 PM by Carlyle&Challis

Gayle heard a hermit thrush 7:20 a.m. today on Rocksborough Rd., and we have had a pair of eastern meadowlarks for the last two days singing in the flats at the end of the road. Bob Burton may have heard them last night while tending to bluebird boxes on the road, too -- did you Bob?   (Bracebridge)

 

 

Re(2): Teal
Posted on April 15, 2005 at 08:50:45 PM by Barbara Taylor

There were three Blue-winged Teal in cell 1 earlier today. An otter was swimming around in cell 4 and a beaver was in the wet woods north of cell 4.

 

 

Re(1): Great Horned Owl calling tonight - Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on April 14, 2005 at 10:32:48 PM by Gerald Willmott

This a.m. (7:30) at the lagoons:

many buffleheads
song sparrows
rw blackbirds
blue-winged teal
wood duck
ringneck ducks
kingfisher
canada geese

 

 

Great Horned Owl calling tonight - Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on April 14, 2005 at 08:27:34 PM by Barbara Taylor

A Great Horned Owl was calling from the woods to the west of cell 3 and north of cell 4. It only gave a few tentative whoos around 7:20 p.m. but began calling steadily by 7:50 p.m. Possibly the same owl that Leslee Tassie reported hearing near the pipeline at Santa's Village Rd. since the Ponds are not too far from there.

By cell 4 we saw a muskrat, a Belted Kingfisher, a Northern Harrier, an Osprey, 3 Great Blue Herons, and several Wood Ducks coming in for the night. No sign of the Wigeons. Many male Red-winged Blackbirds have arrived and were noisily staking out their territory.

 

 

Sandhill Crane at Muskoka Store
Posted on April 14, 2005 at 07:55:48 PM by Brenda Clark

Yesterday, one was heading north. I have never seen such a leisurely migration. A few squawks to get my attention, then sitting motionless on the wind for the whole time, soaring in a straight line up beside highway 11, with only 1 flap for a flight correction. His head "craned" back and forth as if taking in the sights along the way!

 

 

Re(1): humming bird - arrival dates
Posted on April 15, 2005 at 01:39:06 PM by Barbara Taylor

I asked Rick Stronks if he could provide some information about arrival dates for Ruby-throated Hummingbirds in Alqonquin Park. (Thanks Rick.) Here is his reply:

Hi Barbara,

The average spring arrival date for Ruby-throated Hummingbird in
Algonquin is May 12, while the earliest record is May 3. As you know,
the return of hummers is closely tied to the activity of Yellow-bellied
Sapsuckers. For the first month or two, Ruby-throated Hummingbirds rely
on the tree sap from the holes left by sapsuckers. Their average return
date is April 14 and this year we have only had one confirmed.

So, although it is always possible to get a very early date, it seems
unlikely. While other birds do make early forays to check out the
habitat (i.e., loons looking for open water), hummingbirds do not have
the fat reserves to be able to afford such investigative journeys.

Hope this helps,

Rick

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Rick Stronks
Chief Park Naturalist
Algonquin Visitor Centre

Algonquin Provincial Park
Box 219
Whitney, ON, K0J 2M0

Ph: 613.637.2828
Fx: 613.637.2138
Email: rick.stronks@mnr.gov.on.ca
Web: www.algonquinpark.on.ca
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

 

Re(1): humming bird
Posted on April 14, 2005 at 03:49:20 PM by Al Johnston

Steven, the ruby-throated hummingbird 2005 migration map shows them on the south shore of Lake Erie on April 10th and 11th so It's unlikely you saw one in Algonquin Park on the 9th IMHO. Could you possibly have seen a Sphinx moth, with which they've been mistaken?

 

 

humming bird
Posted on April 14, 2005 at 12:32:37 PM by steven rose

Did I see a humming bird on Burnt Island lake in Algonquin Park on the 9 April 2005 !!!

 

 

Common Loon
Posted on April 14, 2005 at 08:13:21 AM by jim maguire&sylvia purdon

Single Common Loon calling Tuesday April 12 at 8:30 p.m. on Sparrow Lake.

 

 

Re(1): MFN Owl Survey...unexpected results
Posted on April 14, 2005 at 08:11:51 AM by stylvia purdon

Pair of Barred Owls calling on Tuesday April 12 around 9:00 p.m.  The owls were calling from the pine forest in the Rockwood cottage subdivision at Wenona Lodge Road, Sparrow Lake.

 

 

Long-eared Owl...migrant or breeding
Posted on April 14, 2005 at 07:08:33 PM by Al Sinclair

If you heard one calling in April in Muskoka, I think it should be added to the species list for that square as a possible breeder.

The Atlas owl survey manual say the following about Long-eared Owl:

Acceptable dates for breeding evidence:
Central Region: Apr 1 - Jul 15
Appears as though Ontario birds are migratory, although a few may remain on their territory year-around.
Probably not safe to consider it a possible breeder until April, unless it is calling.
Egg Laying: Mid-March until the end of June, mostly mid-April to the first week of May.
Fledgling: mid-May until the end of August, mostly mid June to early July.

 

 

Re(1): MFN Owl Survey...unexpected results
Posted on April 14, 2005 at 03:24:38 PM by David Britton

About a year ago, in mid-April 2004 I heard a Long-eared Owl calling not far from your site at my parents farm along the Dee River just outside of Windermere.

Its the only one I've ever heard in Muskoka. I assumed it was a migrant (this is the time of year they're usually found migrating through the Ottawa area).

 

 

MFN Owl Survey...unexpected results
Posted on April 13, 2005 at 06:33:34 PM by Al Sinclair

We found only 2 owls but they were two of the rarest in the region, Long-eared and Boreal. We have been doing owl outings for over 20 years and have never recorded these species before. We did not get any of the common owls we expected to find.

This was a Standardized Owl Survey for the Breeding Bird Atlas that we did in the Raymond square north-west of Bracebridge on Tuesday night, April 12. Starting at 1/2 hour after sunset, we played recorded calls of Boreal and Barred Owls at 7 of 10 random computer generated locations on the road grid. (The other 3 stops will have to be done soon to complete the survey.)

At the first stop at Echo Beach on the north side of Three Mile Lake, we had just played the Boreal call when we heard a Long-eared calling on a ridge with large white pines to the north. It was making the single WHOO calls separated by a couple of seconds. A couple of minutes later if flew over our heads and disappeared into the woods on the other side and went silent. We saw the typical Long-eared wing-shape and erratic flight with some vertical wing flaps.

At the second stop on Three Mile Lake Rd 1, south and behind the Raymond store, we had just played the Boreal call and the first Barred call when we heard one reply from a Boreal Owl. It appeared to be coming from trees behind a house near the store. This bird is likely an owl that spent the winter here and has not returned north yet. It was not in suitable habitat so will likely be not included in the atlas data as a breeding bird.

We continued on and did 5 more stops before quitting for the night at around midnight. We had no owls at any of these stops. It seems that despite our early success it was not a good night for getting owls to respond. On the way back I stopped in Bracebridge to see if the Great-horned on Santa's Village Rd was calling. It wasn't.

Weather:
Temperature +6 to -1C
Humidity 30% to 61%
Wind 4 to 6 km/hr
Pressure 101.8 kPa steady
Moon phase 24%
Sounds travelling well

 

 

...and a Shrike
Posted on April 13, 2005 at 06:11:08 PM by Barbara Taylor

Forgot to mention the Northern Shrike near the Lagoon Lane gate. Its plumage was tinged with a bit of brown so it might be the same one that was seen earlier this year just a few wing flaps away at Robert Dollar Dr.

 

 

American Wigeons, Osprey - Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on April 13, 2005 at 04:19:44 PM by Barbara Taylor

This afternoon at the Bracebridge Ponds:

Cell 2 - Lesser Scaup (2)
Cell 4 - American Wigeon (pair), Ring-necked Ducks (5), Common Goldeneye (1), Wood Duck (pair)

A few Bufflehead and Mallards were in all the cells. A Belted Kingfisher was in the marshy area east of cell 4. An Osprey and Red-tailed Hawk were seen flying overhead.



Important Note: if the Lagoon Lane gate is open, DO NOT drive through or you might find yourself trapped inside when the gate automatically closes. There is a built-in time delay on the gate for the sewage trucks.

Directions:
The Bracebridge Ponds can be accessed from Kerr Park, off Beaumont Dr. or from Lagoon Lane, off Eccelstone Dr. (turn at the Seasons garden centre). Cell 1 is in front of the aeration pond by the treatment plant. Cell 2 is in front of the viewing stand located up on the hill at Kerr Park. Cell 3 is the pond nearest the Lagoon Lane gate. Cell 4 is further west near the snowmobile trail/pipeline right-of-way.

 

 

Pine Siskin - Bay Lake
Posted on April 13, 2005 at 11:16:00 AM by Kip Daynard

This morning the first Pine Siskin I've seen this year made an appearance at our tube feeder.
Has anyone else been seeing them around this year?

 

 

Great Gray Owls in/near Algonquin Park
Posted on April 13, 2005 at 10:08:53 AM by Rick Stronks

*This report originated on ONTBIRDS (April 13, 2005) and is provided here with the kind permission of the Ontario Field Ornithologists.


This morning I had a Great Gray Owl just west of the village of Oxtongue
Lake (outside the West boundary of Algonquin Park) and another Great Gray
just west of the Minnesing Trail (km 23) in the Park.

Unlike areas to the south of us, we have not had many GGOW records in
Algonquin this winter.

Algonquin Park is located on Hwy 60, east from Huntsville or west from
Whitney. Oxtongue Lake is on Hwy 60 between Dwight and the west boundary of
the Park. Minnesing Trail is on Hwy 60, 23 kilometres from the West Gate.

Rick
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Rick Stronks
Chief Park Naturalist
Algonquin Visitor Centre

Algonquin Provincial Park
Box 219
Whitney, ON, K0J 2M0

Ph: 613.637.2828
Fx: 613.637.2138
Email: rick.stronks@mnr.gov.on.ca
Web: www.algonquinpark.on.ca
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
_________________________________________________________
*ONTBIRDS is presented by the Ontario Field Ornithologists - the provincial
birding organization.
For instructions to join or leave ONTBIRDS visit http://www.ofo.ca/ontbirdshow.htm
ONTBIRDS Guidelines may be viewed at http://www.ofo.ca/ontbirdsguide.htm

 

 

Savannah, Chipping Sparrows
Posted on April 12, 2005 at 06:24:27 PM by Dan Burton

At Bracebridge lagoons:
Savannah Sparrows, one Chipping Sparrow, and one Tree Sparrow were among a crowd of Song Sparows.

Ducks:
Bufflehead, Ring-Necked, Mallard, Wood

 

 

Great Horned Owl and Northern Lights
Posted on April 12, 2005 at 10:13:42 AM by Leslee Tassie

We last heard the Great Horned Owl about 11:30 p.m. this past Sunday night (April 10). (Santa's Village Road near the pipeline).
As well as we were coming home from a concert in Orillia last night about 10:30 or so, the Northern Lights were the most spectacular that I've ever seen them. We were coming north on the highway just north of Orillia, and even with the glare of headlights and highway signs and lamps they were shooting up in arcs of blue and green. We only saw them for 15 minutes or so and then they seemed to dull and by the time we got home we could barely see a glow. Watch tonight and hopefully they'll present themselves again!

 

 

Re(1): Fishing Spider - id help?
Posted on April 13, 2005 at 09:25:58 AM by Bob Bowles

Hi Barbara;
It is Six-spotted Fishing Spider, Dolomedes triton and one of the four species in that Genus found in Muskoka. They are fairly common around docks and swimming rafts and in England this family is called raft spiders.

 

 

Fishing Spider - id help?
Posted on April 12, 2005 at 08:04:21 AM by Barbara Taylor

Fishing Spider - Dolomedes triton?
Yesterday at the Henry Rd. marsh we saw a large spider moving across the surface of the pond and then up onto the ice. It looked very much like the photo below (from bugguide.net). Does anyone know if Dolemedes triton is found in Muskoka? And how do they overwinter? (http://bugguide.net/node/view/2063/bgimage)

 

 

First(?) Loon
Posted on April 11, 2005 at 05:34:13 PM by jim griffin

As I post this there is a common loon on the widened part of the N Muskoka river just south of the road 10 bridge in Port Sydney. From what I've seen of lake ice it would be wise to stay a while.

 

 

Bracebridge Ponds
Posted on April 11, 2005 at 04:09:07 PM by Barbara Taylor

There is now lots of open water at the Bracebridge Ponds (sewage lagoons). This afternoon in cell 3 there was a small number of Bufflehead, Mallards, and Ring-necked Ducks. In the woods near the Lagoon Lane entrance there was a Fox Sparrow, American Tree Sparrows, Song Sparrows, and an Eastern Phoebe.

The Henry Rd. marsh has some open water now, but only a pair of Hooded Mergansers, Mallards, and a Great Blue Heron. The beavers have begun rebuilding their dam.

directions:
The Bracebridge Ponds can be accessed from Kerr Park, off Beaumont Dr. or from Lagoon Lane, off Eccelstone Dr. (turn at the Seasons garden centre). Cell 1 is in front of the aeration pond by the treatment plant. Cell 2 is in front of the viewing stand located up on the hill at Kerr Park. Cell 3 is the pond nearest the Lagoon Lane gate. Cell 4 is further west near the snowmobile trail/pipeline right-of-way.

Henry Rd. marsh can be accessed from Beaumont Dr., Bracebridge.

 

 

Re(1): MFN Owl Survey...now Tuesday night
Posted on April 12, 2005 at 07:32:59 AM by Brian Shulist

If it's clear on the 12th while owling, be alert to possible auroral activity. Last night, April 11th, a subtle but beautiful auroral arc formed while I was out re-locating Saw-whets. I've had Saw-whet's calling in 5 squares in the Wilno area, on the other side of Algonquin. Woodcocks are singing in earnest too.

 

 

MFN Owl Survey...now Tuesday night
Posted on April 11, 2005 at 02:48:53 PM by Al Sinclair

If the weather cooperates, the Muskoka Field Naturalists will be doing a Breeding Bird Atlas owl survey in the Raymond square on Tuesday April 12, not Monday as mentioned last week. Details of the time and place are in the MFN newsletter or on the internet at Muskoka Field Naturalists Website.

 

 

Ever played chicken with a Woodcock?
Posted on April 11, 2005 at 01:28:47 PM by Kip Daynard

This morning saw some new arrivals to our neck of the woods:

Northern Flicker calling, Yellow-bellied Sapsucker drumming, Winter Wren tinkling....
Two Mallards in the partially open reed-bed at our end of the lake.

More Juncos have stopped over and are vying for attention with the numerous Evening Grosbeaks and a single Golden-Crowned Kinglet.

At 10AM this morning On Bay Lake Rd. near Clear Lake I played chicken with a woodcock who was sitting in the middle of road. The woodcock won! I was forced to stop the car and walk within about 8 feet of him before he'd get out of harm's way.

 

 

Confirmed Breeding-RSHawk
Posted on April 11, 2005 at 12:53:32 PM by sylvia purdon

Sunday April 10, m and f RSHawk mating on a tree overlooking the marsh on Wenona Rd, near Sparrow Lake.

 

 

swallows, mergansers, osprey
Posted on April 11, 2005 at 12:52:47 PM by Challis & Carlyle

Sorry for the late entries, but last Friday we saw our first two tree swallows on the farm flats on Rocksborough Road, Bracebridge. Very early for them, but more were seen on a Simcoe county trail on Sunday, where Gayle also heard the first spring peepers of the season (very exciting for Gayle). Saturday morning a pair of hooded mergansers were swimming in Sharpe's Creek. This morning, I saw an osprey flying over the Severn River.

 

 

Re(2): BSC OWL survey 4/9/05
Posted on April 11, 2005 at 07:54:40 PM by Terry Whittam / Marion Whittam

Yes, the stars were amazing Saturday night...... and one planet Jupiter was very noticable in the SE. This was our first owl survey but my brother Bob Whittam said they usually get a Barred response at 3-4 of the 10 stops along Upper Big Chute road. . At stop 5 about 2 km before Big Chute we got a very "diving" response with 2 Barred owls literally swooping in above our heads. Thats were I took a number of pictures. Quite a night! Nice to hear from you.

 

 

Re(1): BSC OWL survey 4/9/05
Posted on April 11, 2005 at 05:23:51 PM by Gerald Willmott

Hi,
My dad, Ian Willmott, and I completed our owl route on Saturday night. Only heard one barred Owl at the first stop. Our route is the southwood road which runs through the Torrance Barrens. No owls, but the stars were amazing.

 

 

BSC OWL survey 4/9/05
Posted on April 10, 2005 at 11:15:36 PM by Terry Whittam / Marion Whittam

Dan Whittam, Bob and Judy Whittam, Marion and Terry Whittam completed the annual Owl survey along big chute road on Saturday April 9, 2005. Starting in Muskoka we finished in Simcoe county!. A great night for Barred Owls. We heard 7 Barred owls over the 10 stop route set up by Becky Blaney (Whittam) of Bird Studies Canada some 6 yeaqrs ago! At stop 5 just before Big Chute we got quite a reaction with 2 Barred Owls literally coming within a few meters of our location. Clearly we were right in their territory! Got some great pictures which are attached! Quite a night! This was our first "Owl survey" but Bob and Judy Whittam & Dan Whittam have been completeing this route for over 5 years. Terry    Barred Owl on big chute road

 

 

(no subject)
Posted on April 10, 2005 at 10:30:25 PM by Alex Mills

While watching a Barred Owl and a displaying Woodcock in the evening twilight on Saturday night (April 9) at Magnetawan in central Parry Sound District, we heard our first spring peepers. Two were calling from the woods beside a still frozen beaver pond.

 

 

Red-shouldered Hawk near Huntsville
Posted on April 10, 2005 at 09:20:08 PM by Kip Daynard

On Saturday morning at about 10AM I saw a Red-shouldered Hawk flying over Hwy 11 between Huntsville and Port Sydney.

 

 

Re(1): Rainbow ridge & Henry Road Marsh
Posted on April 10, 2005 at 07:12:22 PM by Gerald Willmott

I forgot to add that there was a shrike at Henry Road Marsh and there has been a woodcock calling in Beaumaris.

 

 

Rainbow ridge & Henry Road Marsh
Posted on April 10, 2005 at 07:08:17 PM by Gerald Willmott

Saturday a.m., Rainbow Ridge

Walked the trails behind Rainbow Ridge, beginning behind Sleep Inn, Bracebridge. Accessed Rainbow Ridge via the Pipeline. Walked through to Rainbow Pond and back.

Birds Seen
Red Tailed Hawk
Red shouldered hawk
Winter Wren
Barred Owl
YB Sap Suckers, two males drumming with in a short distance of each other
Numerous golden-crowned kinglets, song sparrows,
Ruffed Grouse

Sunday a.m., Henry Road Marsh

Birds seen
Phoebe
RW black birds
Kingfisher, male
Unidentified Buteo
Red Tailed Hawk
7 Canada Geese
3 Blue Jays
Mallards (saw 50 or so 700m +- with black duck west of the road the camp ground is on...Stephens Bay Rd.)
Three deer
A lovely morning!

 

 

Butterflies and Sandhill Cranes
Posted on April 10, 2005 at 03:09:12 PM by Ron Stager

Compton Tortoiseshells at our house (Merkley Rd east of Barkway) on Friday and Saturday and a Mourning Cloak this morning.

Sandhill cranes circling and calling this morning as well.

 

 

Wild Turkey in Uffington
Posted on April 10, 2005 at 02:20:08 PM by Doug Smith

This morning we were awakened to the gobbling of a Tom Turkey in our front yard. He was by himself. This is the first time we've seen wild turkeys at our house.

 

 

Wilson's Snipe
Posted on April 10, 2005 at 12:45:05 PM by Bob Burt

This morning there were seven Wilson's Snipe in the wet fields at the end of Rocksborough Rd., off Fraserburg Rd., Bracebridge. Most were near the road on the same side as the "Century Farm".

[note: Wilson’s Snipe (Gallinago delicata) was re-split from Common Snipe (Gallinago gallinago) in the 43rd Supplement to the American Ornithologists’ Union (AOU) official Checklist of Birds for North America in 2002. Some older fieldguides will refer to the bird as Common Snipe.]

 

 

GGOW 1094 Golden Beach Rd, Bracebridge
Posted on April 9, 2005 at 07:16:24 PM by Richard Doucette

Seen Saturday April 9 @ 7:05pm. The GGOW was perched next to the ditch about 8' up in a pine. What a view with the golden light of the setting sun! I couldn't have asked for a better last sighting during this eruption year.

 

 

Trumpeter Swan and other migrants
Posted on April 9, 2005 at 06:42:15 PM by David Britton

I spent the day birding around my parent's farm just outside of Windermere.

Highlight of the day was a wing-tagged Trumpeter Swan (#733) which spent about an hour in the morning on the Dee River just east of the bridge on Rostrevor Road. It flew off and I haven't seen it since, but it may still be in the area. The Dee River can also be viewed at the bridge on Dee Bank Road, so this may be worth checking. There were numbers of Canada Goose, Mallard, American Black Duck, Wood Duck, Bufflehead, Hooded Merganser and Pied-billed Grebe in the same area.

The weather was amazing and birding was great all day with lots of returning migrants including Eastern Meadowlark, Eastern Bluebird, American Woodcock, Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, Tree Swallow, Fox Sparrow, Belted Kingfisher, Golden-crowned Kinglet, Brown Creeper, and Cooper's Hawk. There were still good numbers of American Tree Sparrows around and a Northern Shrike was seen.

 

 

Re(2): first bluebird
Posted on April 10, 2005 at 01:59:39 PM by Carol Wagg

This morning at 10, I commented that seeing a bluebird would make it a perfect birthday. Within one minute, (literally!)there was a pair of them on the telephone wire over the garden. They have been around all day, inspecting boxes.


(Doe Lake, Gravenhurst)

 

 

Re(1): first bluebird
Posted on April 10, 2005 at 12:41:00 PM by Barbara Taylor

We missed the bluebird, but just before noon today there were two beavers lazily stretching/slumbering on the bank of the creek near #1267 Fraserburg Rd., Bracebridge.

 

 

first bluebird
Posted on April 9, 2005 at 04:09:57 PM by bob burton

This afternoon,a female bluebird sat on the Peterson box on the Helde's fenceline on Fraserburg rd.Below runs Sharpes creek where Hooded Mergansers and a female Bufflehead swam.7 beaver lay on the banks soaking up the warm spring sun.  (Bracebridge)

 

 

Shrike, etc. - Gravenhurst
Posted on April 9, 2005 at 12:02:05 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning a Northern Shrike was on the west side of Muskoka Beach Rd. near the entrance to the Gravenhurst sewage treatment plant.

At the mouth of the Hoc Roc River (by Taboo, Muskoka Beach Rd.) there were still several Common Mergansers, Common Goldeneyes, Buffleheads, Mallards, and Canada Geese. Two Turkey Vultures soared overhead, and an Eastern Phoebe and Song Sparrow were both singing.

 

There was a male Northern Harrier and a few Tree Swallows at a field on Muskoka Beach Rd. near Stage Coach Rd.

 

 

Sapsucker
Posted on April 9, 2005 at 11:02:37 AM by Stew Boyd

April 9
Today Cathy and I saw our first spring yellow-bellied sapsucker on what we call our "sapsucker" tree. They return to the same eating spot every year.
We continue to have about 50 common redpolls regularly at our feeders. They should be leaving soon I think.
Hope everyone has plenty of good sightings this Spring.  (Bracebridge)

 

 

Sandhill Cranes near Washago
Posted on April 8, 2005 at 06:59:23 PM by The Gibsons

I apologize for the lateness of this posting. We saw two sandhill cranes in a field at the northwest corner of Hwy 169 and Simcoe Cty Rd 46 (north of Udney-Conc 11, Lot 11) on Tuesday April 5th around 5 pm. Not sure if they are still around but it maybe worth a look. Best of luck!

 

 

Archiearis infans, The Infant, Moth, Bala
Posted on April 8, 2005 at 03:30:34 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

The last couple of days I have seen a brightly coloured moth flying. I thought it was a butterfly until I went through every book I have and decided to check Al Sinclair's very helpful information on his website, Muskoka Nature News. His schedules of flight times led me to The Infant, a moth, the size of a small skipper.

It is quite a treat to see.

 

 

Henry Rd. Marsh
Posted on April 8, 2005 at 01:42:26 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there was a Red-shouldered Hawk and a Turkey Vulture at the Henry Rd. marsh. A Great Blue Heron was fishing in a bit of open water at the west edge of the marsh, but the pond is still iced in. Lots of Song Sparrows but no Red-winged Blackbirds yet.

Also, there was a male Northern Harrier hunting in the field along Beaumont Farm Rd. A couple Mallards and an American Black Duck were in a large puddle in the field.

Only a very small patch of open water in cell 1 and cell 2 at the Bracebridge Ponds (aka sewage lagoons) so no ducks. Many Song Sparrows and Golden-crowned Kinglets in the woods at the Lagoon Lane gate.


directions and trail conditions:
Henry Marsh can be accessed from Henry Rd. off Beaumont Dr., Bracebridge. The roadway along the marsh has been washed out near the newly constructed bridge, but the built-up walking path is still in excellent condition. The first part of the path from Henry Rd. parking area is still hard-packed snow. There is a bit of water overflowing the road as you come to the "tee" in the trail, but you can still jump across okay.  The Trans Canada Trail east and west from Henry marsh is still snow covered.

 

 

Re(1): Winter Wren
Posted on April 8, 2005 at 07:37:24 PM by Barbara Taylor

Common Redpoll, Pine Siskin or American Goldfinch? I've heard all three give a few notes with an "upswing" at the end, and they could all be in your area now.

And for a long-shot, how about a Brown-headed Cowbird? Very distinctive "upswing" though, so you'd probably have recognized that one.

 

 

Winter Wren
Posted on April 8, 2005 at 12:37:26 PM by Mark McAnally

I heard my first Winter Wren this morning in my back woods where they usually are found(Huntsville). I also heard a bird I could not identify. It made a two or three note call, with an upswing at the end. It was in a wooded area. I have checked the calls of Brown Creeper and any other early migrant I could think of. Any ideas?

 

 

Wild Turkey Behaviour, Bala
Posted on April 8, 2005 at 12:34:46 PM by Eleanor Kee Wellman

As most of the area around my newly constructed house is tile bed, it is all sand and not landscaped up to now. Yesterday I noticed that there was a patch next to the foundation on the south side of the house that looked disturbed and nad no vegetation on it and the sand looked loosened.

I discovered it is because one of the female turkeys is using it as a dust bath and sits there in the sun. She has found a nice warm spot out of the wind.

Clever lady!

Several fox sparrows around with the dozens of juncos and about 6 purple finches this morning.

 

 

Woodcocks
Posted on April 8, 2005 at 08:18:33 AM by Brenda Clark

Last night 3 woodcocks put on a good show in the meadows between highway 11 and Beaver Ridge Road in the meadows south of the Muskoka Store. Next showtime is scheduled for about 8:25 tonight.

 

 

The Owl Foundation
Posted on April 8, 2005 at 08:04:08 AM by Barbara Taylor

The following letter has been issued by The Owl Foundation:

THE OWL FOUNDATION in Vineland Ontario has been overwhelmed by the number of Great Gray Owls it has admitted this year due to the very heavy incursion of Great Gray Owls this winter. Dr. Katherine (Kay) McKeever, founder and president of The Owl Foundation feels the numbers of Great Gray Owls road killed as a result of this extreme southerly flow could number in the hundreds, possibly thousands. The Owl Foundation needs your help.

For birders in southern Ontario, the opportunity to see a wild Great Gray Owl is a cherished event.

The Great Gray Owls that aren't so lucky need your help. The Owl Foundation has received over 40 Great Gray Owls this winter, a staggering increase over the usually sporadic Great Gray admission numbers. The birds arrive in varying medical conditions. Some require immediate surgery, some are so badly injured they are humanely euthanized. Others just need a safe place to recover from their injuries while being assessed for their potential early or ultimate release.

The Owl Foundation relies almost exclusively on private funding. To help The Owl Foundation support these magnificent Great Gray Owls, please send your tax deductible contribution to:

The Owl Foundation
RR1
Vineland Station
Ontario L0R 2E0

Visit our website for more information: http://www.theowlfoundation.ca

You are welcome to post this appeal on other listservs or websites.

Catherine B. Foxcroft
Business Administrator
The Owl Foundation
www.theowlfoundation.ca

 

 

White Throated Sparrow
Posted on April 7, 2005 at 06:31:34 PM by Dan Burton

On Lorne Street in Gravenhurst-
White Throated Sparrow
Fox Sparrow (singing)
chorus of Juncos
Kingfisher
Cowbirds
G C Kinglet

At Muskoka Sands yesterday:
Com Mergansers
Hooded Mergansers
Buffleheads
Mallards
Com Goldeneyes
Can Geese

 

 

Northern Harrier and more
Posted on April 7, 2005 at 05:46:35 PM by jim maguire&sylvia purdon

Northern Harrier along Canning Rd at the rlwy tracks over the farm fields; like others we had a small invasion of Phoebes on Tuesday April 5; GGO on South Sparrow Lake Rd, reported to Bob Bowles; and the following: Common Merganser in a bit of water alongside the ice still on the lake; Wood Duck pair in the flooded marshland along the roadway at The Point.

 

 

migrants near Huntsville
Posted on April 7, 2005 at 11:23:15 AM by Kip Daynard

Yesterday saw the first Juncos and the first Tree Sparrow of the year at our place on Bay Lake Rd. NE of Huntsville. While Golden-Crowned Kinglets have been in the area all winter, an appearance of one outside my window was the first I've seen around the house this year and seems to indicate they are on the move.

On Saturday I saw a Northern Harrier flying low southbound near the Huntsville Walmart parking lot.

Late last week 10 Hooded Mergansers were congregating in the Little East River at the exit of Fish Lake near Novar (Hwy 11 exit ramp).

Still no sign of the Winter Wren or YB-Sapsuckers around our place, but I expect them any day now!

 

 

first spring arrivals
Posted on April 6, 2005 at 09:42:03 PM by Challis & Carlyle

This morning was a great one for new arrivals, on Rocksborough Rd. First phoebe in a tree beside our house, 7 a.m. (enthusiastic applause from Gayle, who loves her phoebes). Also the first winter wren set up song in the marshy woods down the road, while a brown creeper accompanied. A kingfisher was flying overhead across Sharpe's Creek on Fraserburg Road, on my way to work.
Fox sparrow has been visiting the crabapple since the weekend.
And tonight a northern shrike was hunting on the farm flats at the end of the road.

 

 

ducks
Posted on April 6, 2005 at 09:28:25 PM by dawn

3 pairs of Common Mergansers, 1 pair of Hooded Mergansers, and 7 Ring-necked Ducks (5 males, 2 females) on the river, west of the Centre Street bridge, Hunter's Bay Trail, Huntsville.

 

 

Killdeer
Posted on April 6, 2005 at 05:23:46 PM by Mark McAnally

Killdeer heard flying over Huntsville town at two different locations today.

 

 

Kingfisher, Phoebe, Kestrels, etc.
Posted on April 6, 2005 at 01:33:58 PM by Barbara Taylor

This morning we saw the following birds as we toured around parts of Bracebridge:
 

American Kestrel and several Mallards in field on west side of Stephens Bay Rd. just south of Beaumont Dr.

Hooded Merganser and Bufflehead on Muskoka River at the big bend near Santa's Village, a Great Blue Heron in the marshy area on other side of Beaumont Dr., and two Turkey Vultures flying overhead.

Belted Kingfisher near junction of Beaumont Dr. and Beaumont Farm Rd.

Common Mergansers, Hooded Mergansers and Bufflehead in very small area of open water at Kirby's Beach, off Beaumont Dr.

Eastern Phoebe at corner of Golden Beach Rd. and Cedar Beach Rd., and a Great Blue Heron in a pond near #1175 Golden Beach Rd.

American Kestrel on South Monck Dr. near golf course driving range, a Red-tailed Hawk further along on east side of road near #1134, and many robins and starlings in field on west side.

Many Song Sparrows were heard along route.

 

 

Red Tail, Kinglet
Posted on April 5, 2005 at 07:59:15 PM by Brenda Clark

A Red tailed hawk was circling northward over the Muskoka Store, Highway 11, Gravenhurst today. Also nearby was a golden-crowned kinglet.

 

 

Great Blue Heron
Posted on April 5, 2005 at 07:13:56 PM by Mark McAnally

Great Blue Heron over my house on Britannia Road, Huntsville.

 

 

Breeding Bird Atlas meeting Saturday
Posted on April 5, 2005 at 05:03:55 PM by Al Sinclair

All atlasers and prospective atlasers are invited to this event.

From the Breeding Bird Atlas Office:
This Saturday (April 9th) is our last year kick-off event at the Kortright Centre for Conservation. We have a great day planned, and I hope you'll be able to join us.

The day starts at 11 am and will wrap-up around 4:45 pm.
A full agenda for the day is included below.

When you arrive at Kortright, tell the gate people that you are there for the Atlas event. There will be no fee for admission or parking.

Directions

Agenda for the day
11:00 am ­ 12:00 pm: Welcome and Project Update!
-Introduction and welcome to the day
-Project highlights and achievements to date
-An analysis of the point counts and what it means for you in 2005
-The latest news on the progress and development of the Atlas publication

12:00 pm ­ 1:00 pm: Lunch*, displays, and presentations
Atlassers are invited to browse displays, mingle, chat with RCs, and/or attend any of the following optional sessions:
12:00 - 12:20- The ins and outs of basic atlassing
12:20 - 12:40- An update on the Ontario Nest Records Scheme
12:40 - 1:00- A photo journey to the remote northern Pen Islands**
* Lunch can be purchased at the Kortright Centre snack bar, or you can bring your own along with you.
** You won’t want to miss this one!

1:00 pm ­ 2:30 pm: Where to go from here?
-An overview of goals, progress to date, and what’s left to do in the final year! We’ll discuss unassigned squares across the province, and work out plans to ensure that all squares and tasks are assigned.

2:30 pm ­ 3:00 pm: Snack break and displays

3:00 pm ­ 4: 00 pm: Afternoon sessions
-Species at Risk and the Atlas
-How to find those elusive species! Tips for owling, rail surveys, and crepuscular species surveys.
-Maximizing your atlassing efforts in 2005

4:00 pm - 4:30 pm: The application of Atlas data in bird conservation planning in Ontario
-Featured speaker: Dr. Peter Blancher (Bird Studies Canada/Canadian Wildlife Service)

4:30 pm ­ 4:45 pm: Wrap up

 

 

Sparrows
Posted on April 4, 2005 at 10:56:24 PM by Doug Smith

There was a Fox sparrow underneath our feeder on Saturday, and a Song sparrow today, which was also heard calling later in the afternoon. We are near Uffington.

 

 

MFN Owl Survey postponed until next week
Posted on April 4, 2005 at 12:07:51 PM by Al Sinclair

The Muskoka Field Naturalists owl survey planned for tonight has been postponed because of the weather, too much snow on the back roads. We will try again next Monday same time and location.

 

 

Re(1): Common Redpoll
Posted on April 4, 2005 at 12:23:01 PM by Mark McAnally

A neighbour of mine who lives on Brunel Road in Huntsville just north of South Portage Road reports about 150 Redpolls on Saturday and Sunday.

 

 

Common Redpoll"s
Posted on April 3, 2005 at 03:01:05 PM by George & Mary

We have over the last week or two had Redpoll's gathering up and feeding , numbers up to aprox. 200.On the Williamsport Rd Huntsville

 

 

Hooded Merganser
Posted on April 3, 2005 at 10:43:26 AM by Mark McAnally

Two pair of Hooded Mergansers in Muskoka River below Huntsville Locks.

 

 

Cooper's Hawk, Northern Harrier, Pied-billed Grebe seen today
Posted on April 2, 2005 at 08:00:11 PM by Al Sinclair

Today in the snow and rain I was scouting out the locations for an owl survey the Muskoka Field Naturalists are doing next week in the Raymond area north-west of Bracebridge. Despite the weather I had some new birds for the year. A Northern Harrier was flying over a field beside Luckey Rd. just off Hwy 141. A Cooper's Hawk was sitting in a tree beside Three Mile Lake Rd 2 near Echo Bay. It scolded me a few times suggesting that it may be planning on nesting in the area. On the way home I checked the Muskoka River from Santa's Village Rd and found a Pied-billed Grebe about halfway along near number 331.

 

 

More of the same
Posted on April 2, 2005 at 04:59:14 PM by Brenda Clark

A phoebe was working its way north along Sedore Road east, Gravenhurst, and 3 meadowlarks were in the open area just south of the Muskoka Store on highway 11.

 

 

TV and Snow Drops
Posted on April 2, 2005 at 01:37:14 PM by Peter Mills

On the weekend I saw my first Turkey Vulture of the year at the Future Shop parkinglot on Bayfield (Barrie) and the first of our Snow Drops are up now too.

 

 

Muskoka Field Naturalists - next meeting April 7
Posted on April 2, 2005 at 11:35:33 AM by Barbara Taylor

 

APRIL 7 THURSDAY MEETING 7:30 PM
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING: Election of Officers

GUEST SPEAKER: Paul Summerskill will give us "A Look Inside The Owl Foundation" in Vineland, Ontario, which has worked with 14 of the 16 species in Canada, Paul will speak about breeding, fostering and release programs, about sponsorship and a unique opportunity to visit the Centre, which is not open to the public. 7:30 p.m. at Calvary Baptist Church, corner of First and Brock Street, Gravenhurst. Visitors welcome to attend the meeting.

Membership Information & Program Updates:
MFN website

 

 

Shrike, Red-tailed Hawk
Posted on April 2, 2005 at 11:18:56 AM by Barbara Taylor

This morning there was a Northern Shrike hunting in the fields at Brooklands Farm on Butter & Egg Rd. (off Hwy. 118 west of Bracebridge). Also many American Robins and a couple Red-winged Blackbirds. Nearby, a Ruffed Grouse sat at the side of the road.

Near the junction of Beatrice Town Line and Falkenburg Rd. there was a Red-tailed Hawk. Also a huge mixed flock of robins and starlings, and a few American Tree Sparrows. (note that Beatrice Town Line is now flooded and impassable near Falkenburg Rd.)

 

 

E. Phoebe
Posted on April 2, 2005 at 10:40:59 AM by Dan Burton

My 1st Phoebe arrived in the yard this morning.   (Gravenhurst)

 

 

looking for new spring birds
Posted on April 1, 2005 at 05:39:08 PM by bob burton

This afternoon, Joan and I looked for our first bluebird.On driving out Cedarlane north,in a field just before the rt-angle bend, a meadowlark fed with a dozen robins.Flying from it's perches to pick something off the ground was a northern shrike.Then sitting in a row on horse corral fence were 40 + snowbirds resting from feeding on the seeds of the hay or straw.     (Bracebridge)

 

 

American Kestrel
Posted on April 1, 2005 at 04:22:48 PM by jim maguire&sylvia purdon

Viewed hunting off the wires on Canning Road east of Wenona Rd. Wednesday, Thursday and Friday April 1.

 

 

Wooly Bear Caterpillar, Song Sparrows and Grackles
Posted on April 1, 2005 at 04:20:39 PM by jim maguire&sylvia purdon

This warm Friday afternoon the first Wooly Bear caterpillar was seen on Wenona Road, plus two Song Sparrows and a gaggle of Common Grackles.
(Sparrow Lake, off Canning Road).

 

 

bird movement
Posted on April 1, 2005 at 01:53:06 PM by Challis

Yesterday and today has been busy at the feeder here on Rocksborough Road. Purple finch, a few redpolls, slate-colored juncos (3) and goldfinches by the barrel-load.  (Bracebridge)

 

 

Bird Board Update
Posted on April 1, 2005 at 09:17:55 AM by Barbara Taylor

Thanks to everyone for all your reports. All posts for January thru March are now available in the Archived Reports.

A wee request...
Please include a general location of the sightings in your report - even the nearest town or major crossroads would be of interest. This will help give a better understanding of the distribution of birds and wildlife in our area.



New to the Bird Board?
The Muskoka Bird Board is a place to share reports of any bird sightings or other nature sightings in Muskoka and surrounding areas. You don't have to include an email address in your post. See the Posting Guidelines for more information, including several tips on using the message board.

I try to monitor the Bird Board on a regular basis. If you want to bring something to my attention, just send me an email and I'll get back to you as soon as possible.

Barbara Taylor
muskoka_birder@hotmail.com